2,130 results match your criteria Nature Reviews Neuroscience [Journal]


The neural mechanisms and consequences of paternal caregiving.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.

In recent decades, human sociocultural changes have increased the numbers of fathers that are involved in direct caregiving in Western societies. This trend has led to a resurgence of interest in understanding the mechanisms and effects of paternal care. Across the animal kingdom, paternal caregiving has been found to be a highly malleable phenomenon, presenting with great variability among and within species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0124-6DOI Listing
February 2019

Author Correction: Inflammasome signalling in brain function and neurodegenerative disease.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Bonn, Germany.

In the originally published version of this article, the competing interests statement indicated that the authors had no competing interests; however, this statement was incorrect. The statement should have read as follows: 'M.H. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0137-1DOI Listing
February 2019

Sat nav for the spinal cord.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0135-3DOI Listing
February 2019

Oxidative stress, dysfunctional glucose metabolism and Alzheimer disease.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb 8. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Department of Biochemistry and Centre for Ageing and Neurobiology, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

Alzheimer disease (AD) is a major cause of age-related dementia. We do not fully understand AD aetiology and pathogenesis, but oxidative damage is a key component. The brain mostly uses glucose for energy, but in AD and amnestic mild cognitive impairment glucose metabolism is dramatically decreased, probably owing, at least in part, to oxidative damage to enzymes involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and ATP biosynthesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0132-6DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Revealing a receptor for secreted APP.

Authors:
Darran Yates

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0136-2DOI Listing
February 2019

Environmental enrichment, new neurons and the neurobiology of individuality.

Authors:
Gerd Kempermann

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Dresden, Germany.

'Enriched environments' are a key experimental paradigm to decipher how interactions between genes and environment change the structure and function of the brain across the lifespan of an animal. The regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by environmental enrichment is a prime example of this complex interaction. As each animal in an enriched environment will have a slightly different set of experiences that results in downstream differences between individuals, enrichment can be considered not only as an external source of rich stimuli but also to provide the room for individual behaviour that shapes individual patterns of brain plasticity and thus function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0120-xDOI Listing
February 2019

Affective valence in the brain: modules or modes?

Authors:
Kent C Berridge

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

How do brain systems evaluate the affective valence of a stimulus - that is, its quality of being good or bad? One possibility is that a neural subsystem, or 'module' (such as a subregion of the brain, a projection pathway, a neuronal population or an individual neuron), is permanently dedicated to mediate only one affective function, or at least only one specific valence - an idea that is termed here the 'affective modules' hypothesis. An alternative possibility is that a given neural module can exist in multiple neurobiological states that give it different affective functions - an idea termed here the 'affective modes' hypothesis. This suggests that the affective function or valence mediated by a neural module need not remain permanently stable but rather can change dynamically across different situations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0122-8DOI Listing
February 2019

Lost in ruptures.

Authors:
Natasha Bray

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0134-4DOI Listing
January 2019

Balancing competing drives.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0127-3DOI Listing
January 2019

How the epigenome integrates information and reshapes the synapse.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, Center for Addiction Neuroscience, Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.

In the past few decades, the field of neuroepigenetics has investigated how the brain encodes information to form long-lasting memories that lead to stable changes in behaviour. Activity-dependent molecular mechanisms, including, but not limited to, histone modification, DNA methylation and nucleosome remodelling, dynamically regulate the gene expression required for memory formation. Recently, the field has begun to examine how a learning experience is integrated at the level of both chromatin structure and synaptic physiology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0121-9DOI Listing
January 2019

Repair in 3D.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0130-8DOI Listing
January 2019

Switching fates.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0131-7DOI Listing
January 2019

Depression of forgetting.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0128-2DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Planting seeds.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0129-1DOI Listing
January 2019

Collicular cortex watches movies.

Authors:
Natasha Bray

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-019-0123-7DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The control of release probability at nerve terminals.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan 15. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Department of Biochemistry, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.

Exocytosis is a fundamental membrane fusion process by which the soluble or membrane-associated cargoes of a secretory vesicle are delivered to the extracellular milieu or the cell surface. While essential for all organs, the brain relies on a specialized form of exocytosis to mediate information flow throughout its vast circuitry. Neurotransmitter-laden synaptic vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane on cue with astonishing speed in a probabilistic process that is both tightly regulated and capable of a fascinating array of plasticities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0111-3DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Beyond the neuron-cellular interactions early in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb;20(2):94-108

The University of Edinburgh Centre for Discovery Brain Sciences, UK Dementia Research Institute, Edinburgh, UK.

The symptoms of Alzheimer disease reflect a loss of neural circuit integrity in the brain, but neurons do not work in isolation. Emerging evidence suggests that the intricate balance of interactions between neurons, astrocytes, microglia and vascular cells required for healthy brain function becomes perturbed during the disease, with early changes likely protecting neural circuits from damage, followed later by harmful effects when the balance cannot be restored. Moving beyond a neuronal focus to understand the complex cellular interactions in Alzheimer disease and how these change throughout the course of the disease may provide important insight into developing effective therapeutics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0113-1DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Deconstructing cortical folding: genetic, cellular and mechanical determinants.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Instituto de Neurociencias, Agencia Estatal Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas and Universidad Miguel Hernández, San Juan de Alicante, Spain.

Folding of the cerebral cortex is a fundamental milestone of mammalian brain evolution and is associated with dramatic increases in size and complexity. New animal models, genetic tools and bioengineering materials have moved the study of cortical folding from simple phenomenological observation to sophisticated experimental testing. Here, we provide an overview of how genetics, cell biology and biomechanics shape this complex and multifaceted process and affect each other. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0112-2DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

A glial contribution to 'chemobrain'.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb;20(2):67

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0115-zDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

From sleeping to waking.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb;20(2):69

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0119-8DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

All wrapped up.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb;20(2):69

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0117-xDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Seeds of change.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb;20(2):69

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41583-018-0118-9
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February 2019
2 Reads

Exploring phylogeny to find the function of sleep.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb;20(2):109-116

Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

During sleep, animals do not eat, reproduce or forage. Sleeping animals are vulnerable to predation. Yet, the persistence of sleep despite evolutionary pressures, and the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation, indicate that sleep serves a function or functions that cannot easily be bypassed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0098-9DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Too hungry to sleep.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb;20(2):69

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0116-yDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Circadian blueprint of metabolic pathways in the brain.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb;20(2):71-82

Department of Biological Chemistry, Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism, School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.

The circadian clock is an endogenous, time-tracking system that directs multiple metabolic and physiological functions required for homeostasis. The master or central clock located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus governs peripheral clocks present in all systemic tissues, contributing to their alignment and ultimately to temporal coordination of physiology. Accumulating evidence reveals the presence of additional clocks in the brain and suggests the possibility that circadian circuits may feed back to these from the periphery. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41583-018-0096-y
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February 2019
2 Reads

Portraits of communication in neuronal networks.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb;20(2):117-127

Bernstein Center Freiburg, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

The brain is organized as a network of highly specialized networks of spiking neurons. To exploit such a modular architecture for computation, the brain has to be able to regulate the flow of spiking activity between these specialized networks. In this Opinion article, we review various prominent mechanisms that may underlie communication between neuronal networks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0094-0DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Disarming the guards of change.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb;20(2):68-69

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41583-018-0114-0
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0114-0DOI Listing
February 2019
10 Reads

Author Correction: Epigenetic regulation in psychiatric disorders.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2018 Dec 13. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Psychiatry and Center for Basic Neuroscience, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA.

In part c of Figure 1 in this article, the orientation of the tail of histone 3 with respect to the core region of this molecule was incorrect, and the amino acid residue K79 should not have been depicted in the tail. The corrected figure is shown below. The authors and editors thank T. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0089-xDOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

The neurobiological basis of narcolepsy.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb;20(2):83-93

Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Narcolepsy is the most common neurological cause of chronic sleepiness. The discovery about 20 years ago that narcolepsy is caused by selective loss of the neurons producing orexins (also known as hypocretins) sparked great advances in the field. Here, we review the current understanding of how orexin neurons regulate sleep-wake behaviour and the consequences of the loss of orexin neurons. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0097-xDOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

When remembering is rewarding.

Authors:
Natasha Bray

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Feb;20(2):68-69

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41583-018-0110-4
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February 2019
5 Reads

Restoring walking.

Authors:
Darran Yates

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1)

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41583-018-0109-x
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January 2019
5 Reads

Food intake - feeling the heat.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1):2-3

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0104-2DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

To sleep, to remember.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1)

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0108-yDOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Closing the loop.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1)

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0107-zDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Patchwork subiculum.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1)

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0106-0DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Gone FISHing.

Authors:
Sian Lewis

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1)

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0105-1DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Non-nociceptive roles of opioids in the CNS: opioids' effects on neurogenesis, learning, memory and affect.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1):5-18

Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, Shirley and Stefan Hatos Center for Neuropharmacology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Mortality due to opioid use has grown to the point where, for the first time in history, opioid-related deaths exceed those caused by car accidents in many states in the United States. Changes in the prescribing of opioids for pain and the illicit use of fentanyl (and derivatives) have contributed to the current epidemic. Less known is the impact of opioids on hippocampal neurogenesis, the functional manipulation of which may improve the deleterious effects of opioid use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0092-2DOI Listing
January 2019
15 Reads

Complements lead to insults.

Authors:
Natasha Bray

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1):2-3

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0099-8DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Merkel cells touch a nerve.

Authors:
Natasha Bray

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1)

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0100-6DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Model potential.

Authors:
Natasha Bray

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1)

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41583-018-0101-5
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January 2019
2 Reads

Imagine no fear.

Authors:
Natasha Bray

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1)

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0102-4DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Do flies like fizz?

Authors:
Natasha Bray

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1)

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0103-3DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Boosting a bad signal.

Authors:
Natasha Bray

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1)

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0095-zDOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Necroptosis and RIPK1-mediated neuroinflammation in CNS diseases.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1):19-33

Neuroscience Research, Sanofi, Framingham, MA, USA.

Apoptosis is crucial for the normal development of the nervous system, whereas neurons in the adult CNS are relatively resistant to this form of cell death. However, under pathological conditions, upregulation of death receptor family ligands, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF), can sensitize cells in the CNS to apoptosis and a form of regulated necrotic cell death known as necroptosis that is mediated by receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1), RIPK3 and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL). Necroptosis promotes further cell death and neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0093-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6342007PMC
January 2019
32 Reads

Mitochondria as central regulators of neural stem cell fate and cognitive function.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1):34-48

Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa Brain and Mind Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Emerging evidence now indicates that mitochondria are central regulators of neural stem cell (NSC) fate decisions and are crucial for both neurodevelopment and adult neurogenesis, which in turn contribute to cognitive processes in the mature brain. Inherited mutations and accumulated damage to mitochondria over the course of ageing serve as key factors underlying cognitive defects in neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases, respectively. In this Review, we explore the recent findings that implicate mitochondria as crucial regulators of NSC function and cognition. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41583-018-0091-3
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January 2019
2 Reads

Rhythms of life: circadian disruption and brain disorders across the lifespan.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2019 Jan;20(1):49-65

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Many processes in the human body - including brain function - are regulated over the 24-hour cycle, and there are strong associations between disrupted circadian rhythms (for example, sleep-wake cycles) and disorders of the CNS. Brain disorders such as autism, depression and Parkinson disease typically develop at certain stages of life, and circadian rhythms are important during each stage of life for the regulation of processes that may influence the development of these disorders. Here, we describe circadian disruptions observed in various brain disorders throughout the human lifespan and highlight emerging evidence suggesting these disruptions affect the brain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0088-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6338075PMC
January 2019
15 Reads

Nonsense-mediated RNA decay in the brain: emerging modulator of neural development and disease.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2018 Dec;19(12):715-728

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, University of California, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Steady-state RNA levels are controlled by the balance between RNA synthesis and RNA turnover. A selective RNA turnover mechanism that has received recent attention in neurons is nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD). NMD has been shown to influence neural development, neural stem cell differentiation decisions, axon guidance and synaptic plasticity. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41583-018-0079-z
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December 2018
15 Reads

Stop, don't prune me!

Authors:
Darran Yates

Nat Rev Neurosci 2018 Dec;19(12):712-713

Nature Reviews Neuroscience, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0090-4DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Author Correction: Maintenance, reserve and compensation: the cognitive neuroscience of healthy ageing.

Nat Rev Neurosci 2018 Dec;19(12):772

Departments of Psychiatry & Psychology, McGill University and Douglas Hospital Research Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

In the originally published version of article, there were two errors in the references. The reference "Nilsson, J. & Lövdén, M. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41583-018-0086-0
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December 2018
3 Reads

Versatile control of synaptic circuits by astrocytes: where, when and how?

Nat Rev Neurosci 2018 Dec;19(12):729-743

Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology, Collège de France, CNRS UMR 7241, INSERM U1050, Labex Memolife, PSL Research University, Paris, France.

Close structural and functional interactions of astrocytes with synapses play an important role in brain function. The repertoire of ways in which astrocytes can regulate synaptic transmission is complex so that they can both promote and dampen synaptic efficacy. Such contrasting effects raise questions regarding the determinants of these divergent astroglial functions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41583-018-0080-6DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads