2,189 results match your criteria Nature Reviews Microbiology [Journal]


Towards a quantitative view of the global ubiquity of biofilms.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Feb 21. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0162-0DOI Listing
February 2019

Listeria pioneers.

Authors:
Ursula Hofer

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0161-1DOI Listing
February 2019

Moving together.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0165-xDOI Listing
February 2019

Measuring the HIV-1 reservoir.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0164-yDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Bacteria and archaea on Earth and their abundance in biofilms.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering (SCELSE), Singapore, Singapore.

Biofilms are a form of collective life with emergent properties that confer many advantages on their inhabitants, and they represent a much higher level of organization than single cells do. However, to date, no global analysis on biofilm abundance exists. We offer a critical discussion of the definition of biofilms and compile current estimates of global cell numbers in major microbial habitats, mindful of the associated uncertainty. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0158-9DOI Listing
February 2019

The gut microbiome and mental health.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0163-zDOI Listing
February 2019

Tracing outbreaks with machine learning.

Authors:
Nicole E Wheeler

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Centre for Genomic Pathogen Surveillance, Wellcome Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0153-1DOI Listing
February 2019

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an overview of basic and clinical research.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Feb 8. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most successful modern pathogens. The same organism that lives as a commensal and is transmitted in both health-care and community settings is also a leading cause of bacteraemia, endocarditis, skin and soft tissue infections, bone and joint infections and hospital-acquired infections. Genetically diverse, the epidemiology of MRSA is primarily characterized by the serial emergence of epidemic strains. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0147-4DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Respiratory syncytial virus entry and how to block it.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Molecular Biosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract disease in young children and elderly people. Although the virus was isolated in 1955, an effective RSV vaccine has not been developed, and the only licensed intervention is passive immunoprophylaxis of high-risk infants with a humanized monoclonal antibody. During the past 5 years, however, there has been substantial progress in our understanding of the structure and function of the RSV glycoproteins and their interactions with host cell factors that mediate entry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0149-xDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

The effector repertoire of Legionella.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):126

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0155-zDOI Listing

Promoting persistence.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):126

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0156-yDOI Listing

Expanding diversity of the human microbiome.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):126

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0154-0DOI Listing

FMT in the clinic.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):127

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0157-xDOI Listing

The next step towards anticancer microbiota therapeutics.

Authors:
Ursula Hofer

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):125

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0152-2DOI Listing

Drug combinations: a strategy to extend the life of antibiotics in the 21st century.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar 25;17(3):141-155. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

M. G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research, Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Antimicrobial resistance threatens a resurgence of life-threatening bacterial infections and the potential demise of many aspects of modern medicine. Despite intensive drug discovery efforts, no new classes of antibiotics have been developed into new medicines for decades, in large part owing to the stringent chemical, biological and pharmacological requisites for effective antibiotic drugs. Combinations of antibiotics and of antibiotics with non-antibiotic activity-enhancing compounds offer a productive strategy to address the widespread emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0141-xDOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Phage induction in different contexts.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):126-127

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0150-4DOI Listing

Disarming to disseminate.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):126-127

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0151-3DOI Listing

An evolving view of methane metabolism in the Archaea.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Australian Centre for Ecogenomics, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia.

Methane is a key compound in the global carbon cycle that influences both nutrient cycling and the Earth's climate. A limited number of microorganisms control the flux of biologically generated methane, including methane-metabolizing archaea that either produce or consume methane. Methanogenic and methanotrophic archaea belonging to the phylum Euryarchaeota share a genetically similar, interrelated pathway for methane metabolism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0136-7DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

How elusive can a malaria vaccine be?

Authors:
Alena Pance

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):129

Wellcome Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0148-3DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

The evolution of Zika virus from Asia to the Americas.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):131-139

Department of Virology, State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.

Zika virus (ZIKV) was once considered an obscure member of the large and diverse family of mosquito-borne flaviviruses, and human infections with ZIKV were thought to be sporadic, with mild and self-limiting symptoms. The large-scale ZIKV epidemics in the Americas and the unexpected uncovering of a link to congenital birth defects escalated ZIKV infections to the status of a global public health emergency. Recent studies that combined reverse genetics with modelling in multiple systems have provided evidence that ZIKV has acquired additional amino acid substitutions at the same time as congenital Zika syndrome and other birth defects were detected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0134-9DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Divide and conquer.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):63

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0146-5DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Chemical warfare against phages.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):64

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0138-5DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Freeze! Secretion systems caught in the act.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):66

Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0145-6DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Publisher Correction: Host and viral determinants of influenza A virus species specificity.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):124

Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK.

In Figure 4, seasonal influenza virus was erroneously indicated as having "HA α2-3 SA preference" instead of "HA drift from population immunity" to represent ongoing evolution of seasonal influenza virus. This has now been corrected in all versions of the Review. The publisher apologizes to the authors and to readers for this error. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41579-018-0140-y
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0140-yDOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Reprogramming by persisters.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):65

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0143-8DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Supporting gut epithelial regeneration.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):65

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0144-7DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Living without the cell wall.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):65

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0142-9DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Fusobacterium nucleatum - symbiont, opportunist and oncobacterium.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):156-166

Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Fusobacterium nucleatum has long been found to cause opportunistic infections and has recently been implicated in colorectal cancer; however, it is a common member of the oral microbiota and can have a symbiotic relationship with its hosts. To address this dissonance, we explore the diversity and niches of fusobacteria and reconsider historic fusobacterial taxonomy in the context of current technology. We also undertake a critical reappraisal of fusobacteria with a focus on F. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0129-6DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

A rainbow of influenza virions.

Authors:
Ursula Hofer

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):64-65

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0135-8DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Dissolving immune cell membranes.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):64

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0139-4DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Buckling under stress.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):64

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0137-6DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Can we predict keystones?

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):193

KU Leuven Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Rega Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Bacteriology, Leuven, Belgium.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0132-yDOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Reply to 'Can we predict microbial keystones?'

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):194

Plant-Soil Interactions, Department of Agroecology and Environment, Agroscope, Reckenholz, Zürich, Switzerland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0133-xDOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Fungal secondary metabolism: regulation, function and drug discovery.

Authors:
Nancy P Keller

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):167-180

Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.

One of the exciting movements in microbial sciences has been a refocusing and revitalization of efforts to mine the fungal secondary metabolome. The magnitude of biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) in a single filamentous fungal genome combined with the historic number of sequenced genomes suggests that the secondary metabolite wealth of filamentous fungi is largely untapped. Mining algorithms and scalable expression platforms have greatly expanded access to the chemical repertoire of fungal-derived secondary metabolites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0121-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6381595PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Origin and evolution of pathogenic coronaviruses.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):181-192

CAS Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens and Biosafety, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei, China.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) are two highly transmissible and pathogenic viruses that emerged in humans at the beginning of the 21st century. Both viruses likely originated in bats, and genetically diverse coronaviruses that are related to SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV were discovered in bats worldwide. In this Review, we summarize the current knowledge on the origin and evolution of these two pathogenic coronaviruses and discuss their receptor usage; we also highlight the diversity and potential of spillover of bat-borne coronaviruses, as evidenced by the recent spillover of swine acute diarrhoea syndrome coronavirus (SADS-CoV) to pigs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0118-9DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

Prisoners of war - host adaptation and its constraints on virus evolution.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2018 Dec 5. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Recent discoveries of contemporary genotypes of hepatitis B virus and parvovirus B19 in ancient human remains demonstrate that little genetic change has occurred in these viruses over 4,500-6,000 years. Endogenous viral elements in host genomes provide separate evidence that viruses similar to many major contemporary groups circulated 100 million years ago or earlier. In this Opinion article, we argue that the extraordinary conservation of virus genome sequences is best explained by a niche-filling model in which fitness optimization is rapidly achieved in their specific hosts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0120-2DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Sequencing in the time of Ebola.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(1)

Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0130-0DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Viral RNA structure-based strategies to manipulate translation.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):110-123

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.

Viruses must co-opt the cellular translation machinery to produce progeny virions. Eukaryotic viruses have evolved a variety of ways to manipulate the cellular translation apparatus, in many cases using elegant RNA-centred strategies. Viral RNAs can alter or control every phase of protein synthesis and have diverse targets, mechanisms and structures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0117-xDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Changing your sugar coat.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):64-65

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0131-zDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Host and viral determinants of influenza A virus species specificity.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):67-81

Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Influenza A viruses cause pandemics when they cross between species and an antigenically novel virus acquires the ability to infect and transmit between these new hosts. The timing of pandemics is currently unpredictable but depends on ecological and virological factors. The host range of an influenza A virus is determined by species-specific interactions between virus and host cell factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0115-zDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Reduce your speed.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(1)

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0127-8DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

A villain turns good.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(1):2-3

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0126-9DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The cost of antimicrobial resistance.

Authors:
Ursula Hofer

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(1)

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0125-xDOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Author Correction: Biofilm-associated infection by enterococci.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):124

Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore.

In the section on initial attachment and in Figure 1 it was erroneously indicated that enterococcal surface protein (Esp) binds collagen and fibrinogen. The text and figure were changed to remove this binding interaction both online and in the pdf. The authors apologize for any confusion caused. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0128-7DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Growth capacity and cell size.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(1)

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0124-yDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Decomposition responses to climate.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(1)

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0123-zDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Let's get moving.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(1)

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0122-0DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Well-timed toxin export.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(1):2-3

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0119-8DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Mycobiome diversity: high-throughput sequencing and identification of fungi.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(2):95-109

Natural History Museum of Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia.

Fungi are major ecological players in both terrestrial and aquatic environments by cycling organic matter and channelling nutrients across trophic levels. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) studies of fungal communities are redrawing the map of the fungal kingdom by hinting at its enormous - and largely uncharted - taxonomic and functional diversity. However, HTS approaches come with a range of pitfalls and potential biases, cautioning against unwary application and interpretation of HTS technologies and results. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41579-018-0116-y
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0116-yDOI Listing
January 2019
76 Reads

Diverse light responses of cyanobacteria mediated by phytochrome superfamily photoreceptors.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Jan;17(1):37-50

Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA.

Cyanobacteria are an evolutionarily and ecologically important group of prokaryotes. They exist in diverse habitats, ranging from hot springs and deserts to glaciers and the open ocean. The range of environments that they inhabit can be attributed in part to their ability to sense and respond to changing environmental conditions. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41579-018-0110-4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0110-4DOI Listing
January 2019
13 Reads