2,223 results match your criteria Nature Reviews Microbiology [Journal]


E. coli rolls the dice.

Authors:
Ursula Hofer

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr 16. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0202-9DOI Listing

Type IV pili: dynamics, biophysics and functional consequences.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Institute for Biological Physics, University of Cologne, Köln, Germany.

The surfaces of many bacteria are decorated with long, exquisitely thin appendages called type IV pili (T4P), dynamic filaments that are rapidly polymerized and depolymerized from a pool of pilin subunits. Cycles of pilus extension, binding and retraction enable T4P to perform a phenomenally diverse array of functions, including twitching motility, DNA uptake and microcolony formation. On the basis of recent developments, a comprehensive understanding is emerging of the molecular architecture of the T4P machinery and the filament it builds, providing mechanistic insights into the assembly and retraction processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0195-4DOI Listing

Microbiota supports air attack.

Authors:
Yvonne Bordon

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Senior Editor, Nature Reviews Immunology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0200-yDOI Listing

Definitions and guidelines for research on antibiotic persistence.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Division of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Increasing concerns about the rising rates of antibiotic therapy failure and advances in single-cell analyses have inspired a surge of research into antibiotic persistence. Bacterial persister cells represent a subpopulation of cells that can survive intensive antibiotic treatment without being resistant. Several approaches have emerged to define and measure persistence, and it is now time to agree on the basic definition of persistence and its relation to the other mechanisms by which bacteria survive exposure to bactericidal antibiotic treatments, such as antibiotic resistance, heteroresistance or tolerance. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41579-019-0196-3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0196-3DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Origins and evolutionary consequences of ancient endogenous retroviruses.

Authors:
Welkin E Johnson

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Biology Department, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, USA.

Retroviruses infect a broad range of vertebrate hosts that includes amphibians, reptiles, fish, birds and mammals. In addition, a typical vertebrate genome contains thousands of loci composed of ancient retroviral sequences known as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). ERVs are molecular remnants of ancient retroviruses and proof that the ongoing relationship between retroviruses and their vertebrate hosts began hundreds of millions of years ago. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0189-2DOI Listing

Pushing the eject button.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr 4. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0198-1DOI Listing

Bacterial quorum sensing in complex and dynamically changing environments.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr 3. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Princeton University, Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton, NJ, USA.

Quorum sensing is a process of bacterial cell-to-cell chemical communication that relies on the production, detection and response to extracellular signalling molecules called autoinducers. Quorum sensing allows groups of bacteria to synchronously alter behaviour in response to changes in the population density and species composition of the vicinal community. Quorum-sensing-mediated communication is now understood to be the norm in the bacterial world. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41579-019-0186-5
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0186-5DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

New filovirus disease classification and nomenclature.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):261-263

World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa, Brazzaville, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0187-4DOI Listing
May 2019
4 Reads
23.574 Impact Factor

The role of microbial motility and chemotaxis in symbiosis.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):284-294

Climate Change Cluster (C3), University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Many symbiotic relationships rely on the acquisition of microbial partners from the environment. However, the mechanisms by which microbial symbionts find and colonize their hosts are often unknown. We propose that the acquisition of environmental symbionts often necessitates active migration and colonization by the symbionts through motility and chemotaxis. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41579-019-0182-9
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0182-9DOI Listing
May 2019
3 Reads

Modulating host metabolism.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar 27. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0194-5DOI Listing

TRIM5α controls HIV-1 infection in humans.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar 27. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0192-7DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Reducing the second messenger.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar 27. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0193-6DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Unlocking new potentials.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar 25. Epub 2019 Mar 25.

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0190-9DOI Listing

Malassezia restricta plays CARDs in the gut.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):266-267

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0188-3DOI Listing

Blocking pathogen transmission.

Authors:
Andrea du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):267

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0184-7DOI Listing

Fungi in aquatic ecosystems.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar 12. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Escuela de Biologia, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro, San Jose, Costa Rica.

Fungi are phylogenetically and functionally diverse ubiquitous components of almost all ecosystems on Earth, including aquatic environments stretching from high montane lakes down to the deep ocean. Aquatic ecosystems, however, remain frequently overlooked as fungal habitats, although fungi potentially hold important roles for organic matter cycling and food web dynamics. Recent methodological improvements have facilitated a greater appreciation of the importance of fungi in many aquatic systems, yet a conceptual framework is still missing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0175-8DOI Listing

Defence and counter defence.

Authors:
Andrea du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):267

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0185-6DOI Listing

Take your coat off.

Authors:
Andrea du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):267

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0183-8DOI Listing

The microbiomes of deep-sea hydrothermal vents: distributed globally, shaped locally.

Authors:
Gregory J Dick

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):271-283

Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

The discovery of chemosynthetic ecosystems at deep-sea hydrothermal vents in 1977 changed our view of biology. Chemosynthetic bacteria and archaea form the foundation of vent ecosystems by exploiting the chemical disequilibrium between reducing hydrothermal fluids and oxidizing seawater, harnessing this energy to fix inorganic carbon into biomass. Recent research has uncovered fundamental aspects of these microbial communities, including their relationships with underlying geology and hydrothermal geochemistry, interactions with animals via symbiosis and distribution both locally in various habitats within vent fields and globally across hydrothermal systems in diverse settings. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41579-019-0160-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0160-2DOI Listing
May 2019
4 Reads

Electroactive microorganisms in bioelectrochemical systems.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):307-319

Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering Division, Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia.

A vast array of microorganisms from all three domains of life can produce electrical current and transfer electrons to the anodes of different types of bioelectrochemical systems. These exoelectrogens are typically iron-reducing bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens, that produce high power densities at moderate temperatures. With the right media and growth conditions, many other microorganisms ranging from common yeasts to extremophiles such as hyperthermophilic archaea can also generate high current densities. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41579-019-0173-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0173-xDOI Listing
May 2019
3 Reads

"On the bat's back I do fly".

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):265

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0177-6DOI Listing

New targets for leukocidins.

Authors:
Andrea du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):266

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0181-xDOI Listing

Casting the net wide on malaria.

Authors:
Andrea du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):266

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0180-yDOI Listing

Rewiring the host.

Authors:
Andrea du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):266

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0179-4DOI Listing

Interplay between β-lactamases and new β-lactamase inhibitors.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):295-306

Antimicrobial Development Specialists, LLC, Nyack, NY, USA.

Resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in Gram-negative bacteria is commonly associated with production of β-lactamases, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases belonging to different molecular classes: those with a catalytically active serine and those with at least one active-site Zn to facilitate hydrolysis. To counteract the hydrolytic activity of these enzymes, combinations of a β-lactam with a β-lactamase inhibitor (BLI) have been clinically successful. However, some β-lactam-BLI combinations have lost their effectiveness against prevalent Gram-negative pathogens that produce ESBLs, carbapenemases or multiple β-lactamases in the same organism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0159-8DOI Listing
May 2019
23.574 Impact Factor

Life in the slow lane.

Authors:
Ursula Hofer

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):266-267

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0176-7DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Gut phages at the centre.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):195

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0174-9DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Evolutionary stasis of viruses?

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):329

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0168-7DOI Listing
May 2019
6 Reads

Reply to 'Evolutionary stasis of viruses?'

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):329-330

Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0169-6DOI Listing
May 2019
7 Reads

Tracking antibiotic mechanisms.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):201

Gene Machines Group, Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0167-8DOI Listing

At the flick of a switch.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):197

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0172-yDOI Listing

Cut the fat.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):197

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0171-zDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

A ghost from the past.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):197

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0170-0DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Signalling to leave.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):196-197

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0166-9DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Towards a quantitative view of the global ubiquity of biofilms.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):199-200

Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0162-0DOI Listing

Listeria pioneers.

Authors:
Ursula Hofer

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):196-197

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0161-1DOI Listing

Moving together.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):196

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0165-xDOI Listing

Measuring the HIV-1 reservoir.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):196

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0164-yDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Bacteria and archaea on Earth and their abundance in biofilms.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):247-260

Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering (SCELSE), Singapore, Singapore.

Biofilms are a form of collective life with emergent properties that confer many advantages on their inhabitants, and they represent a much higher level of organization than single cells do. However, to date, no global analysis on biofilm abundance exists. We offer a critical discussion of the definition of biofilms and compile current estimates of global cell numbers in major microbial habitats, mindful of the associated uncertainty. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0158-9DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

The gut microbiome and mental health.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):196

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0163-zDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Tracing outbreaks with machine learning.

Authors:
Nicole E Wheeler

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 May;17(5):269

Centre for Genomic Pathogen Surveillance, Wellcome Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0153-1DOI Listing

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an overview of basic and clinical research.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):203-218

Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most successful modern pathogens. The same organism that lives as a commensal and is transmitted in both health-care and community settings is also a leading cause of bacteraemia, endocarditis, skin and soft tissue infections, bone and joint infections and hospital-acquired infections. Genetically diverse, the epidemiology of MRSA is primarily characterized by the serial emergence of epidemic strains. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0147-4DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Respiratory syncytial virus entry and how to block it.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Apr;17(4):233-245

Department of Molecular Biosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract disease in young children and elderly people. Although the virus was isolated in 1955, an effective RSV vaccine has not been developed, and the only licensed intervention is passive immunoprophylaxis of high-risk infants with a humanized monoclonal antibody. During the past 5 years, however, there has been substantial progress in our understanding of the structure and function of the RSV glycoproteins and their interactions with host cell factors that mediate entry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0149-xDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

The effector repertoire of Legionella.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):126

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0155-zDOI Listing

Promoting persistence.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):126

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0156-yDOI Listing

Expanding diversity of the human microbiome.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):126

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0154-0DOI Listing

FMT in the clinic.

Authors:
Ashley York

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):127

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0157-xDOI Listing

The next step towards anticancer microbiota therapeutics.

Authors:
Ursula Hofer

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):125

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0152-2DOI Listing

Drug combinations: a strategy to extend the life of antibiotics in the 21st century.

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar 25;17(3):141-155. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

M. G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research, Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Antimicrobial resistance threatens a resurgence of life-threatening bacterial infections and the potential demise of many aspects of modern medicine. Despite intensive drug discovery efforts, no new classes of antibiotics have been developed into new medicines for decades, in large part owing to the stringent chemical, biological and pharmacological requisites for effective antibiotic drugs. Combinations of antibiotics and of antibiotics with non-antibiotic activity-enhancing compounds offer a productive strategy to address the widespread emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-018-0141-xDOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Phage induction in different contexts.

Authors:
Andrea Du Toit

Nat Rev Microbiol 2019 Mar;17(3):126-127

Nature Reviews Microbiology, .

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41579-019-0150-4DOI Listing