26 results match your criteria Nasal Reconstruction Following Soft Tissue Resection

  • Page 1 of 1

Rhinoplasty: lessons from "errors" : From anatomy and experience to the concept of sequential primary rhinoplasty.

Authors:
Y Saban

HNO 2018 Jan;66(1):15-25

Cabinet du Dr Yves Saban, 31 avenue Jean Médecin, 06000, Nice, France.

Background: Reshaping the nose can be achieved following 3 main concepts: preservation and reshaping of normal anatomy, resection of nasal deformities, reconstruction of nasal framework. Time, experience and nasal anatomic knowledge are keys to understand nasal biomechanics.

Objectives: To describe how experience and morphodynamic anatomy lead to a new concept of sequential primary rhinoplasty, resulting in reducing revision rhinoplasties. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00106-017-0454-5
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00106-017-0454-5DOI Listing
January 2018
9 Reads

Levator alae nasi muscle V-Y island flap for nasal tip reconstruction.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2017 Mar 21;45(3):432-435. Epub 2016 Dec 21.

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, A.O.U. Federico II, 80131 Naples, Italy.

Nasal tip reconstruction can be very challenging. It requires close attention to skin texture, colour and thickness matching, with the respect of the nasal aesthetic units and symmetry. Flaps are usually preferred to skin grafts where possible. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2016.12.019DOI Listing
March 2017
4 Reads

Bilayered, non-cross-linked collagen matrix for regeneration of facial defects after skin cancer removal: a new perspective for biomaterial-based tissue reconstruction.

J Cell Commun Signal 2016 Mar 9;10(1):3-15. Epub 2015 Dec 9.

Frankfurt Orofacial Regenerative Medicine (FORM) Lab, Department for Oral, Cranio-Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Medical Center of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Classically skin defects are covered by split thickness skin grafts or by means of local or regional skin flaps. In the presented case series for the first time a bilayered, non-crossed-linked collagen matrix has been used in an off-label fashion in order to reconstruct facial skin defects following different types of skin cancer resection. The material is of porcine origin and consists of a spongy and a compact layer. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12079-015-0313-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4850141PMC
March 2016
17 Reads

[Submental island pedicled flap combination with bio-membrane for reconstructing the piercing palate defects].

Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi 2015 May;50(5):392-6

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School of Stomatology, Beijing 100081, Email:

Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of submental island pedicled flap (SIPF) combination with bio-membrane in reconstructing palate defects after maxillofacial or palatal neoplasm resection.

Methods: There were 12 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and one patient with adenoid cystic carcinoma. The clinical stages of tumours were II in two patients, III in four patients, IV in six patients (UICC 2002), and one patient with adenoid cystic carcinoma no staged. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2015
7 Reads

Efficacy of dexamethasone with controlled hypotension on intraoperative bleeding, postoperative oedema and ecchymosis in rhinoplasty.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2013 Mar 12;41(2):124-8. Epub 2012 Jul 12.

Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, 60100 Tokat, Turkey.

Purpose: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of dexamethasone with controlled hypotension on intraoperative bleeding and postoperative morbidity in rhinoplasty.

Materials And Methods: Sixty rhinoplasty patients required hump resection and lateral osteotomy were included in this study. The patients were randomized into four groups. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S10105182120014
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2012.06.003DOI Listing
March 2013
6 Reads

Craniofacial neurofibromatosis and tissue expansion: long-term results.

J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 2012 Jul 3;65(7):956-9. Epub 2011 Dec 3.

Chang Gung Craniofacial Center, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5, Fu-Hsin Street, Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC.

The role of tissue expansion for coverage of soft-tissue defects of the face following neurofibroma resection has been briefly described previously with good results but limited follow-up. Recent scientific evidence has arisen that neurofibromas adversely affect the rheological properties of normal surrounding skin resulting in hyper-extensibility of dermal elements. In this context, we believe that long-term outcomes of tissue expansion for treatment of soft-tissue defects in patients with craniofacial neurofibromatosis would demonstrate suboptimal results because of loss of contour. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjps.2011.11.034DOI Listing
July 2012
11 Reads

Evaluation of postoperative function in patients undergoing reconstruction following resection of superior and lateral oropharyngeal cancer: long-term outcomes of reconstruction with the Gehanno method.

Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2012 Jan 6;41(1):9-16. Epub 2011 Nov 6.

Department of Otolaryngology, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, Japan.

Resection of the superior or lateral wall of the cancer-affected oropharynx can often lead to disturbed nasal breathing, dysphagia, and dysarthria. The authors used the Gehanno method to reconstruct these surgical defects and achieved favourable functional recovery soon after surgery. The present study was undertaken to analyze the long-term outcome and usefulness of this method. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijom.2011.10.003DOI Listing
January 2012
33 Reads

Latissimus dorsi free flap reconstruction of anterior skull base defects.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2012 Feb 9;40(2):177-9. Epub 2011 Mar 9.

Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery Unit, Institut Curie, 26 rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France.

Introduction: Surgery of extensive skull base tumour results of a defect of soft and hard tissue and dura. Free flap reconstruction provides tissue to restore the defect and separate the intracranial content from the bacterial flora of the nasal fossae. Vertical and transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flap are usually used. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2011.01.023DOI Listing
February 2012
3 Reads

A facial inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour in a 6-year-old girl: plastic surgery lessons from a rare case.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2011 Mar 30;39(2):141-4. Epub 2010 Dec 30.

Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery Unit, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14, Switzerland.

Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours (IMT) are rare, challenging lesions with respect to differential diagnosis, biological behaviour and treatment. We reviewed the literature and report a unique case of a large (9 × 8 × 8 cm) IMT in the nasal region of a 6-year-old girl responsible for important facial deformation. Following surgical resection, without any craniofacial reconstruction, the dysmorphism regressed spontaneously with a good result at 2 years of follow-up. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2010.11.015DOI Listing
March 2011
3 Reads

Obturator prostheses following palatal resection: clinical cases.

Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital 2010 Feb;30(1):33-9

ENT Clinic, Head and Neck Department, Hospital of Cattinara, University of Trieste, via Bellosguardo 34, Trieste, Italy.

Malignant tumours of the upper gum and hard palate account for 1-5% of malignant neoplasms of the oral cavity; two thirds of the lesions which involve these areas are squamous cell carcinomas. Most of these carcinomas are diagnosed late, when they invade the underlying bone. The procedures of choice for removal are: alveolectomy, palatectomy, maxillectomy, which may be total or partial. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2881608PMC
February 2010
2 Reads

Double bilobed radial forearm free flap for anterior tongue and floor-of-mouth reconstruction.

Ear Nose Throat J 2010 Apr;89(4):177-9

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Case Western Reserve University, 11100 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.

We describe what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first use of a double bilobed radial forearm free flap in reconstructive surgery of the tongue and floor of the mouth following bilateral tumor resection. Our patient was a 78-year-old man who had experienced tumor recurrence in the anterior floor of the mouth after previous resection and radiotherapy. Eleven weeks postoperatively, the patient could extend his tongue to his hard palate and past his mandibular alveolus anteriorly. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2010
3 Reads

Oropharyngeal reconstruction using a myomucosal uvular transposition flap following transoral resection of oropharyngeal carcinoma.

Ear Nose Throat J 2009 Nov;88(11):E5-8

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen, U.K.

Defects in the structure of the oropharynx can result in significant functional deficit and lead to nasal regurgitation and rhinolalia aperta. Many techniques have been described to reconstruct surgical oropharyngeal defects that are created during resection of squamous cell carcinoma, including the use of local advancement flaps and free-tissue transfers. We describe our experience with using a myomucosal uvular transposition flap for oropharyngeal reconstruction in a series of 11 patients. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2009
1 Read

Nasal base reduction: a treatment algorithm including alar release with medialization.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2009 Feb;123(2):716-25

Division of Plastic, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.

Background: The broad nasal base is occasionally not correctable by excisional procedures alone because nostril distortion or stenosis may result (if resection enters the vestibule). Moreover, recurrence is a common problem when alar mobilization and suture approximation techniques are used. The authors developed an algorithm for nasal base reduction to prevent these complications. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.prs.0000345598.95343.63DOI Listing
February 2009
10 Reads

Nasal base reduction by alar release: a laboratory evaluation.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2009 Feb;123(2):709-15

Divisions of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery of Stanford University, University of California, San Francisco, Stanford, San Francisco, USA.

Background: When reducing the broad nasal base, there is a limit to the amount of soft tissue that can be resected, beyond which the anatomy distorts and the nostrils become stenotic (if resection enters the nostril). Alar mobilization by freeing soft-tissue attachments helps. This study purported to examine the nature of those attachments and the extent of medialization. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0b013e318196bc11DOI Listing
February 2009
3 Reads

Reconstruction of segmental hemi-mandibular defects using soft tissue flaps in patients with severe comorbidity and advanced head and neck cancer.

J Egypt Natl Canc Inst 2008 Dec;20(4):342-7

The Departments of Ear Nose & Throat-Head / Neck Surgery, Guy's & St Thomas'NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

Background And Purpose: The standard of care to reconstruct segmental oro-mandibular defects following head and neck oncological resection is to use osseocutaneous free-tissue transfer. Some patients however are not suitable for this type of complex reconstruction. The purpose of this paper is to study our results of soft-tissue flap reconstruction for segmental hemi-mandibular defects. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2008
1 Read

Microvascular radial forearm fasciocutaneous free flap for palatomaxillary reconstruction following malignant tumor resection.

J Egypt Natl Canc Inst 2008 Mar;20(1):90-7

The Department of Surgery, NCI, Cairo University.

Purpose: The aim of this study is to report on the patient's quality of life and outcomes after reconstruction of palatomaxillary defects by microvascular radial forearm fasciocutaneous free flap (RFFF) and dental obturator.

Material And Methods: During the period between 2005-2007, 10 patients who had palato maxillary defects were immediately reconstructed using RFFF to restore physiologic oronasal separation. All patients were treated for malignant tumors of hard palate or maxilla and all had preservation of orbital floor. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2008
8 Reads

Reconstruction of maxillectomy and midfacial defects with free tissue transfer.

J Surg Oncol 2006 Nov;94(6):522-31

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Hospital General Dr Manuel Gea Gonzalez Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, Mexico City, Mexico.

The maxillary bones are part of the midfacial skeleton and are closely related to the eyeglobe, nasal airway, and oral cavity. Together with the overlying soft tissues, the two maxillae are responsible to a large extent for facial contour. Maxillectomy defects become more complex when critical structures such as the orbit, globe, and cranial base are resected, and reconstruction with distant tissues become essential. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jso.20490
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.20490DOI Listing
November 2006
3 Reads

Functional outcomes following palatal reconstruction with a folded radial forearm free flap.

Ear Nose Throat J 2004 Jan;83(1):45-8

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.

Defects of the soft palate often occur after extirpative procedures are performed to treat oropharyngeal cancers. These defects usually result in velopharyngeal insufficiency and an alteration in speech and deglutition. Palatal prostheses have been used to circumvent this problem in the past. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2004
5 Reads

[The surgery of the tip of the nose].

Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital 2002 Jun;22(3 Suppl 70):7-29

Otorinolaringoiatria, Unità di Padova.

Surgery of the nasal tip has stimulated the creation of more surgical techniques than any other aspect of rhinoplastic surgery, to achieve an improved shape that seems natural while enhancing the balance and harmony of the face. The region described as tip of the nose is extremely varied from person to person, because of the different shape of its anatomical structures. For that reason to obtain a good result is necessary for the surgeon the perfect knowledge of the anatomy, the acquisition of surgical concepts and technical skill. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2002
9 Reads

[Reconstruction of the anterior floor of the mouth with nasolabial flaps. Report of 10 years' experience].

Schweiz Monatsschr Zahnmed 2002 ;112(5):463-6

Klinik und Poliklinik für Mund-, Kiefer- und Plastische Gesichtschirurgie der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, D-06097 Halle.

The aim of this study was to analyse, with particular consideration to functional aspects, the results of treatment following the reconstruction of intraoral soft tissue using a pedicled nasolabial flap. Over a period of 10 years (1.1. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2002
5 Reads

Nasal reconstruction based on aesthetic subunits in Orientals.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2000 Jul;106(1):36-44; discussion 45-6

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Japan.

Reconstruction based on the aesthetic subunit principle has yielded good aesthetic outcomes in patients with moderate to severe nasal defects caused by trauma or tumor resection. However, the topographic subunits previously proposed are often unsuitable for Orientals. Compared with the nose in white patients, the nose in Orientals is low, lacks nasal muscle, and has a flat glabella; the structural features of the underlying cartilage and bone are not distinctly reflected in outward appearance. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2000
5 Reads

A classification system and algorithm for reconstruction of maxillectomy and midfacial defects.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2000 Jun;105(7):2331-46; discussion 2347-8

Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021, USA.

Maxillectomy defects become more complex when critical structures such as the orbit, globe, and cranial base are resected, and reconstruction with distant tissues becomes essential. This study reviews all maxillectomy defects reconstructed immediately using pedicled and free flaps to establish (1) a classification system and (2) an algorithm for reconstruction of these complex problems. Over a 5-year period, 60 flaps were used to reconstruct defects classified as the following: type I, limited maxillectomy (n = 7); type II, subtotal maxillectomy (n = 10); type IIIa, total maxillectomy with preservation of the orbital contents (n = 13); type IIIb, total maxillectomy with orbital exenteration (n = 18); and type IV, orbitomaxillectomy (n = 10). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2000
2 Reads

A third decade's experience with the gastric pull-up operation for hypopharyngeal carcinoma: changing patterns of use.

J Laryngol Otol 1999 Mar;113(3):241-3

Royal National Throat Nose and Ear Hospital, London, UK.

Gastric transposition has been used extensively in this department since 1965 for reconstruction following pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy (PLO). A previous report by Harrison and Thompson in 1986 detailed our experience with 101 cases dating back to 1965. Here we review our experience between 1986-1996. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 1999
3 Reads

Footplates of the medial crura.

Authors:
B Guyuron

Plast Reconstr Surg 1998 Apr;101(5):1359-63

Meridia Health System and Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

The purpose of this combined prospective and retrospective study was to review the abnormalities of the footplates of the medial crura, their surgical correction, and the dynamic changes that result from footplate alteration. Prospectively, measurements of 40 footplates were obtained during 20 consecutive primary rhinoplasties. The distance between the footplates at their most posterocaudal position was measured, along with the thickness, length, and width of the footplates. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 1998
25 Reads

Role of buttress reconstruction in zygomaticomaxillary skeletal defects.

Plast Reconstr Surg 1998 Apr;101(4):943-50

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, School of Medicine at Hokkaido University and the Clinic of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Soshundo Hospital, Sapporo, Japan.

The purpose of this study was to review eight patients undergoing midfacial skeletal reconstruction following extensive resection of tumors based on the principles of restoration of three maxillary buttresses, the nasomaxillary, zygomaticomaxillary, and pterygomaxillary. The zygomaticomaxillary skeletal defects were reconstructed with a three-dimensionally contoured piece of titanium mesh, vascularized costal cartilage, or vascularized bone flap of scapula and rib. Restoration of the zygomaticomaxillary buttress prevented the inferior deviation of the orbit and provided good zygomatic contour. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 1998
5 Reads

Reconstruction of facial soft tissues after resection of skin tumors.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 1994 Dec;22(6):342-8

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

The aim of the present study was to analyse the results of various reconstruction techniques of the facial skin with regard to general parameters such as the patients' age and health condition and to surgical parameters such as defect size, contamination of surgical fields and the type of reconstruction. 273 cases were evaluated, comprising local flaps (217), island flaps (21), free skin grafts (22) and cutaneous or myocutaneous distant flaps (13). The overall rate of major complications was 13. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1994
3 Reads
  • Page 1 of 1