58 results match your criteria Nano Today [Journal]


Colloidal aggregation: from screening nuisance to formulation nuance.

Nano Today 2018 Apr 10;19:188-200. Epub 2018 Mar 10.

Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, ON,Canada.

It is well known that small molecule colloidal aggregation is a leading cause of false positives in early drug discovery. Colloid-formers are diverse and well represented among corporate and academic screening decks, and even among approved drugs. Less appreciated is how colloid formation by drug-like compounds fits into the wider understanding of colloid physical chemistry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2018.02.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6150470PMC
April 2018
1 Read

Complement activation turnover on surfaces of nanoparticles.

Nano Today 2017 Aug 12;15:8-10. Epub 2017 Apr 12.

Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, 12850 East Montview Blvd., Aurora, CO, 80045, USA.

The complement system is an important component of the innate immune system, which contributes to non-specific host defence. Particulate matters, such as invading pathogens and nanomedicines, in the blood may activate the complement system through classical, lectin and alternative pathways. Complement activation can aid recognition and clearance of particulate matters by immune cells, but uncontrolled complement activation can inflict damage and be life threatening. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2017.03.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5794016PMC
August 2017
4 Reads

Evolution and Clinical Translation of Drug Delivery Nanomaterials.

Nano Today 2017 Aug 2;15:91-106. Epub 2017 Aug 2.

Biomaterials Innovation Research Center, Division of Engineering in Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.

With the advent of technology, the role of nanomaterials in medicine has grown exponentially in the last few decades. The main advantage of such materials has been exploited in drug delivery applications, due to their effective targeting that in turn reduces systemic toxicity compared to the conventional routes of drug administration. Even though these materials offer broad flexibility based on targeting tissue, disease, and drug payload, the demand for more effective yet highly biocompatible nanomaterial-based drugs is increasing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2017.06.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5720147PMC
August 2017
18 Reads
5 Citations
15.000 Impact Factor

Nanobiotechnology: Cell Membrane-Based Delivery Systems.

Nano Today 2017 Apr 12;13:7-9. Epub 2016 Nov 12.

Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

The increasingly rapid pace of research in the field of bioinspired drug delivery systems is revealing the promise of cell membrane-based nanovesicles for biomedical applications. Those cell membrane-based nanoparticles combine the natural functionalities of cell plasma membranes and the bioengineering flexibility of synthetic nanomaterials, and such versatility provides a means of designing exciting new drug formulations for personalized treatment in future nanomedicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2016.10.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5396544PMC
April 2017
21 Reads

Microfluidic Hydrodynamic Focusing for Synthesis of Nanomaterials.

Nano Today 2016 Dec 12;11(6):778-792. Epub 2016 Nov 12.

Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802, USA.

Microfluidics expands the synthetic space such as heat transfer, mass transport, and reagent consumption to conditions not easily achievable in conventional batch processes. Hydrodynamic focusing in particular enables the generation and study of complex engineered nanostructures and new materials systems. In this review, we present an overview of recent progress in the synthesis of nanostructures and microfibers using microfluidic hydrodynamic focusing techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2016.10.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6191180PMC
December 2016
1 Read

Fluorescent nanoprobes for sensing and imaging of metal ions: recent advances and future perspectives.

Nano Today 2016 Jun 11;11(3):309-329. Epub 2016 Jun 11.

Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.

Recent advances in nanoscale science and technology have generated nanomaterials with unique optical properties. Over the past decade, numerous fluorescent nanoprobes have been developed for highly sensitive and selective sensing and imaging of metal ions, both and . In this review, we provide an overview of the recent development of the design and optical properties of the different classes of fluorescent nanoprobes based on noble metal nanomaterials, upconversion nanoparticles, semiconductor quantum dots, and carbon-based nanomaterials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2016.05.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5089816PMC
June 2016
8 Reads

3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

Nano Today 2016 Jun 29;11(3):330-350. Epub 2016 Apr 29.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA.

The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2016.04.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5016035PMC
June 2016
9 Reads

Using the Power of Organic Synthesis for Engineering the Interactions of Nanoparticles with Biological Systems.

Nano Today 2016 Feb;11(1):31-40

Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA.

The surface properties of nanoparticles (NPs) dictate their interaction with the outside world. The use of precisely designed molecular ligands to control NP surface properties provides an important toolkit for modulating their interaction with biological systems, facilitating their use in biomedicine. In this review we will discuss the application of the atom-by-atom control provided by organic synthesis to the generation of engineered nanoparticles, with emphasis on how the functionalization of NPs with these "small" organic molecules (Mw < 1,000) can be used to engineer NPs for a wide range of applications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2015.11.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4847953PMC
February 2016
8 Reads

Self-assembled peptide-based nanostructures: Smart nanomaterials toward targeted drug delivery.

Nano Today 2016 Feb;11(1):41-60

Division of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Renal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02139 (USA).

Self-assembly of peptides can yield an array of well-defined nanostructures that are highly attractive nanomaterials for many biomedical applications such as drug delivery. Some of the advantages of self-assembled peptide nanostructures over other delivery platforms include their chemical diversity, biocompatibility, high loading capacity for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs, and their ability to target molecular recognition sites. Furthermore, these self-assembled nanostructures could be designed with novel peptide motifs, making them stimuli-responsive and achieving triggered drug delivery at disease sites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2016.02.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4834907PMC
February 2016
28 Reads

Building Nanostructures with Drugs.

Nano Today 2016 Feb;11(1):13-30

Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 1 Jianshe Eastern Road, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052, China; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA; Institute for NanoBioTechnology, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA; Department of Oncology and Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA; Center for Nanomedicine, The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 400 North Broadway, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA.

The convergence of nanoscience and drug delivery has prompted the formation of the field of nanomedicine, one that exploits the novel physicochemical and biological properties of nanostructures for improved medical treatments and reduced side effects. Until recently, this nanostructure-mediated strategy considered the drug to be solely a biologically active compound to be delivered, and its potential as a molecular building unit remained largely unexplored. A growing trend within nanomedicine has been the use of drug molecules to build well-defined nanostructures of various sizes and shapes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2015.11.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4821422PMC
February 2016
26 Reads
1 Citation
15.000 Impact Factor

Nanomedicines for Endothelial Disorders.

Nano Today 2015 Dec;10(6):759-776

David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The endothelium lines the internal surfaces of blood and lymphatic vessels and has a critical role in maintaining homeostasis. Endothelial dysfunction is involved in the pathology of many diseases and conditions, including disorders such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Given this common etiology in a range of diseases, medicines targeting an impaired endothelium can strengthen the arsenal of therapeutics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2015.11.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4778260PMC
December 2015
17 Reads

Nanoscale Assemblies of Small Molecules Control the Fate of Cells.

Authors:
Junfeng Shi Bing Xu

Nano Today 2015 Oct 20;10(5):615-630. Epub 2015 Oct 20.

Department of Chemistry, Brandeis University, 415 South St. MS 015, Waltham, MA 02454.

Being driven by non-covalent interactions, the formation of functional assemblies (or aggregates) of small molecules at nanoscale is a more common process in water than one would think. While most efforts on self-assembly in cellular environment concentrate on the assemblies of proteins (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2015.09.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4758372PMC
October 2015
14 Reads

RNA as a stable polymer to build controllable and defined nanostructures for material and biomedical applications.

Nano Today 2015 Oct;10(5):631-655

Nanobiotechnology Center, Markey Cancer Center, and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA.

The value of polymers is manifested in their vital use as building blocks in material and life sciences. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is a polynucleic acid, but its polymeric nature in materials and technological applications is often overlooked due to an impression that RNA is seemingly unstable. Recent findings that certain modifications can make RNA resistant to RNase degradation while retaining its authentic folding property and biological function, and the discovery of ultra-thermostable RNA motifs have adequately addressed the concerns of RNA unstability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2015.09.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4707685PMC
October 2015
13 Reads

Photoresponsive nanoparticles for drug delivery.

Nano Today 2015 Aug 15;10(4):451-467. Epub 2015 Jul 15.

Laboratory for Biomaterials and Drug Delivery, Department of Anesthesiology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA ; David H. Koch Institutes for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.

Externally triggerable drug delivery systems provide a strategy for the delivery of therapeutic agents preferentially to a target site, presenting the ability to enhance therapeutic efficacy while reducing side effects. Light is a versatile and easily tuned external stimulus that can provide spatiotemporal control. Here we will review the use of nanoparticles in which light triggers drug release or induces particle binding to tissues (phototargeting). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2015.06.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4669578PMC
August 2015
24 Reads
25 Citations
15.000 Impact Factor

Engineered Materials for Cancer Immunotherapy.

Nano Today 2015 Aug;10(4):511-531

School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138.

Immunotherapy is a promising treatment modality for cancer as it can promote specific and durable anti-cancer responses. However, limitations to current approaches remain. Therapeutics administered as soluble injections often require high doses and frequent re-dosing, which can result in systemic toxicities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2015.06.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4665104PMC
August 2015
31 Reads

Nanoparticle Uptake: The Phagocyte Problem.

Nano Today 2015 Aug 5;10(4):487-510. Epub 2015 Sep 5.

University of Utah, Department of Bioengineering, 36 S. Wasatch Dr, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 USA ; University of Utah, Utah Center for Nanomedicine, Nano Institute of Utah, 36 S. Wasatch Dr., Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 USA ; University of Utah, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 30 South 2000 East, Rm 301, Salt Lake City, UT USA 84112.

Phagocytes are key cellular participants determining important aspects of host exposure to nanomaterials, initiating clearance, biodistribution and the tenuous balance between host tolerance and adverse nanotoxicity. Macrophages in particular are believed to be among the first and primary cell types that process nanoparticles, mediating host inflammatory and immunological biological responses. These processes occur ubiquitously throughout tissues where nanomaterials are present, including the host mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) residents in dedicated host filtration organs (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2015.06.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4666556PMC
August 2015
38 Reads

Cell-derived vesicles for drug therapy and diagnostics: opportunities and challenges.

Nano Today 2015 Jun;10(3):397-409

Department of Materials, Department of Bioengineering, and Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, SW7 2AZ London, United Kingdom.

Extracellular vesicles are small lipid-based membrane-bound entities shed by cells under both physiological and pathological conditions. Their discovery as intercellular communicators through transfer of nucleic acid- and protein-based cargos between cells locally and at distance in a highly specific manner has created recent excitement. The information they transport and their composition may vary depending on the cell of origin as well as the eliciting stimulus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2015.04.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5409525PMC
June 2015
13 Reads

Core-Crosslinked Polymeric Micelles: Principles, Preparation, Biomedical Applications and Clinical Translation.

Nano Today 2015 Feb;10(1):93-117

Department of Pharmaceutics, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Polymeric micelles (PM) are extensively used to improve the delivery of hydrophobic drugs. Many different PM have been designed and evaluated over the years, and some of them have steadily progressed through clinical trials. Increasing evidence suggests, however, that for prolonged circulation times and for efficient EPR-mediated drug targeting to tumors and to sites of inflammation, PM need to be stabilized, to prevent premature disintegration. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S17480132150000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2015.01.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4398985PMC
February 2015
7 Reads

Nanotopographical Surfaces for Stem Cell Fate Control: Engineering Mechanobiology from the Bottom.

Nano Today 2014 Dec;9(6):759-784

Integrated Biosystems and Biomechanics Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA ; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA ; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

During embryogenesis and tissue maintenance and repair in an adult organism, a myriad of stem cells are regulated by their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) enriched with tissue/organ-specific nanoscale topographical cues to adopt different fates and functions. Attributed to their capability of self-renewal and differentiation into most types of somatic cells, stem cells also hold tremendous promise for regenerative medicine and drug screening. However, a major challenge remains as to achieve fate control of stem cells with high specificity and yield. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2014.12.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4394389PMC
December 2014
11 Reads

A Multilayered Cell Culture Model for Transport Study in Solid Tumors: Evaluation of Tissue Penetration of Polyethyleneimine Based Cationic Micelles.

Nano Today 2014 Dec;9(6):695-704

Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, University of Utah, 30 S 2000 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, United States.

Limited drug distribution is partially responsible for the efficacy gap between preclinical and clinical studies of nano-sized drug carriers for cancer therapy. In this study, we examined the transport behavior of cationic micelles formed from a triblock copolymer of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)--branched polyethyleneimine--poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) using a unique tumor model composed of a multilayered cell culture (MCC) and an Ussing chamber system. The Cy3-labeled cationic micelles showed remarkable Cy3 distribution in the MCC whereas charge-shielded micelles with a poly(ethylene glycol) surface accumulated on the surface of the MCC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2014.10.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4387546PMC
December 2014
10 Reads

Surgical Materials: Current Challenges and Nano-enabled Solutions.

Nano Today 2014 Oct;9(5):574-589

Center for Biomaterials Innovation, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA ; Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA ; Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA ; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA ; Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Republic of Korea ; Department of Physics, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21569, Saudi Arabia.

Surgical adhesive biomaterials have emerged as substitutes to sutures and staples in many clinical applications. Nano-enabled materials containing nanoparticles or having a distinct nanotopography have been utilized for generation of a new class of surgical materials with enhanced functionality. In this review, the state of the art in the development of conventional surgical adhesive biomaterials is critically reviewed and their shortcomings are outlined. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2014.09.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4266934PMC
October 2014
5 Reads

Nano-imaging enabled via self-assembly.

Nano Today 2014 Oct;9(5):560-573

Imaging object details with length scales below approximately 200 nm has been historically difficult for conventional microscope objective lenses because of their inability to resolve features smaller than one-half the optical wavelength. Here we review some of the recent approaches to surpass this limit by harnessing self-assembly as a fabrication mechanism. Self-assembly can be used to form individual nano- and micro-lenses, as well as to form extended arrays of such lenses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2014.08.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4261225PMC
October 2014
5 Reads

Nanoparticles for cancer imaging: The good, the bad, and the promise.

Nano Today 2013 Oct;8(5):454-460

Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, United States.

Recent advances in molecular imaging and nanotechnology are providing new opportunities for biomedical imaging with great promise for the development of novel imaging agents. The unique optical, magnetic, and chemical properties of materials at the scale of nanometers allow the creation of imaging probes with better contrast enhancement, increased sensitivity, controlled biodistribution, better spatial and temporal information, multi-functionality and multi-modal imaging across MRI, PET, SPECT, and ultrasound. These features could ultimately translate to clinical advantages such as earlier detection, real time assessment of disease progression and personalized medicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2013.06.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4240321PMC
October 2013
14 Reads

Nanotoxoid Vaccines.

Nano Today 2014 Aug;9(4):401-404

Department of NanoEngineering and Moores Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, United States.

To improve innate defense against diseases, vaccine formulations are routinely administered to mount immune responses against disease-causing organisms or their associated toxins. These formulations are typically prepared with weakened forms of microbes, their surface proteins, or their virulence factors, which can train the immune system to recognize and neutralize similar infectious threats in later exposures. Owing to many unique properties of nanoparticles in enhancing vaccine potency, nanoscale carriers are drawing increasing interest as a platform for developing safer and more effective vaccine formulations. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S17480132140008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2014.06.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4180402PMC
August 2014
19 Reads

Nanomedicine in the Management of Microbial Infection - Overview and Perspectives.

Nano Today 2014 Aug;9(4):478-498

Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA ; Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences & Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.

For more than 2 billion years, microbes have reigned on our planet, evolving or outlasting many obstacles they have encountered. In the 20 century, this trend took a dramatic turn with the introduction of antibiotics and vaccines. Nevertheless, since then, microbes have progressively eroded the effectiveness of previously successful antibiotics by developing resistance, and many infections have eluded conventional vaccine design approaches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2014.06.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4175422PMC
August 2014
7 Reads

Drug-induced amplification of nanoparticle targeting to tumors.

Nano Today 2014 Oct 23;9(5):550-559. Epub 2014 Sep 23.

Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139.

Nanomedicines have the potential to significantly impact cancer therapy by improving drug efficacy and decreasing off-target effects, yet our ability to efficiently home nanoparticles to disease sites remains limited. One frequently overlooked constraint of current active targeting schemes is the relative dearth of targetable antigens within tumors, which restricts the amount of cargo that can be delivered in a tumor-specific manner. To address this limitation, we exploit tumor-specific responses to drugs to construct a cooperative targeting system where a small molecule therapeutic modulates the disease microenvironment to amplify nanoparticle recruitment . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2014.09.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5935498PMC
October 2014
2 Reads

Challenges associated with Penetration of Nanoparticles across Cell and Tissue Barriers: A Review of Current Status and Future Prospects.

Nano Today 2014 Apr;9(2):223-243

Center for Bioengineering, Department of Chemical Engineering University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106.

Nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as an effective modality for the treatment of various diseases including cancer, cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. Various forms of NPs including liposomes, polymer particles, micelles, dendrimers, quantum dots, gold NPs and carbon nanotubes have been synthesized and tested for therapeutic applications. One of the greatest challenges that limit the success of NPs is their ability to reach the therapeutic site at necessary doses while minimizing accumulation at undesired sites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2014.04.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4129396PMC
April 2014
82 Reads

A computational framework for identifying design guidelines to increase the penetration of targeted nanoparticles into tumors.

Nano Today 2013 Dec;8(6):566-576

Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA ; Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA ; Division of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.

Targeted nanoparticles are increasingly being engineered for the treatment of cancer. By design, they can passively accumulate in tumors, selectively bind to targets in their environment, and deliver localized treatments. However, the penetration of targeted nanoparticles deep into tissue can be hindered by their slow diffusion and a high binding affinity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2013.11.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4084751PMC
December 2013
5 Reads

Nanostructured substrates for isolation of circulating tumor cells.

Nano Today 2013 Aug;8(4):347-387

Department of Oncology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Southeast University, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210003, PR China ; Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, Adelaide, SA 5095, Australia.

Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) originate from the primary tumor mass and enter into the peripheral bloodstream. CTCs hold the key to understanding the biology of metastasis and also play a vital role in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, disease monitoring, and personalized therapy. However, CTCs are rare in blood and hard to isolate. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4059613PMC
August 2013
30 Reads

High-resolution, serial intravital microscopic imaging of nanoparticle delivery and targeting in a small animal tumor model.

Nano Today 2013 Apr;8(2)

318 Campus Drive East, E-150, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

Nanoparticles are under active investigation for the detection and treatment of cancer. Yet our understanding of nanoparticle delivery to tumors is limited by our ability to observe the uptake process on its own scale in living subjects. We chose to study single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) because they exhibit among the highest levels of tumor uptake across the wide variety of available nanoparticles. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S17480132130001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2013.02.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3836612PMC
April 2013
9 Reads

Triggered Nanoparticles as Therapeutics.

Nano Today 2013 Aug;8(4):439-447

Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 USA.

Drug delivery systems (DDSs) face several challenges including site-specific delivery, stability, and the programmed release of drugs. Engineered nanoparticle (NP) surfaces with responsive moieties can enhance the efficacy of DDSs for and systems. This triggering process can be achieved through both endogenous (biologically controlled release) and exogenous (external stimuli controlled release) activation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2013.07.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3804356PMC
August 2013
2 Reads

Nanoelectronics-biology frontier: From nanoscopic probes for action potential recording in live cells to three-dimensional cyborg tissues.

Nano Today 2013 Aug;8(4):351-373

Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China ; Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02138, USA.

Semiconductor nanowires configured as the active channels of field-effect transistors (FETs) have been used as detectors for high-resolution electrical recording from single live cells, cell networks, tissues and organs. Extracellular measurements with substrate supported silicon nanowire (SiNW) FETs, which have projected active areas orders of magnitude smaller than conventional microfabricated multielectrode arrays (MEAs) and planar FETs, recorded action potential and field potential signals with high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution from cultured neurons, cultured cardiomyocytes, acute brain slices and whole animal hearts. Measurements made with modulation-doped nanoscale active channel SiNW FETs demonstrate that signals recorded from cardiomyocytes are highly localized and have improved time resolution compared to larger planar detectors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2013.05.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3781175PMC
August 2013
53 Reads

Nonporous Silica Nanoparticles for Nanomedicine Application.

Nano Today 2013 Jun;8(3):290-312

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, 61801, USA.

Nanomedicine, the use of nanotechnology for biomedical applications, has potential to change the landscape of the diagnosis and therapy of many diseases. In the past several decades, the advancement in nanotechnology and material science has resulted in a large number of organic and inorganic nanomedicine platforms. Silica nanoparticles (NPs), which exhibit many unique properties, offer a promising drug delivery platform to realize the potential of nanomedicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2013.04.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3757135PMC
June 2013
119 Reads

Materials by Design: Merging Proteins and Music.

Nano Today 2012 Dec;7(6):488-495

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

Tailored materials with tunable properties are crucial for applications as biomaterials, for drug delivery, as functional coatings, or as lightweight composites. An emerging paradigm in designing such materials is the construction of hierarchical assemblies of simple building blocks into complex architectures with superior properties. We review this approach in a case study of silk, a genetically programmable and processable biomaterial, which, in its natural role serves as a versatile protein fiber with hierarchical organization to provide structural support, prey procurement or protection of eggs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2012.09.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3752788PMC
December 2012
6 Reads

Anthracycline Nano-Delivery Systems to Overcome Multiple Drug Resistance: A Comprehensive Review.

Nano Today 2013 Jun;8(3):313-331

Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, Division of Molecular Pharmaceutics, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Anthracyclines (doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and idarubicin) are very effective chemotherapeutic drugs to treat many cancers; however, the development of multiple drug resistance (MDR) is one of the major limitations for their clinical applications. Nano-delivery systems have emerged as the novel cancer therapeutics to overcome MDR. Up until now, many anthracycline nano-delivery systems have been developed and reported to effectively circumvent MDR both and , and some of these systems have even advanced to clinical trials, such as the HPMA-doxorubicin (HPMA-DOX) conjugate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2013.04.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3718073PMC
June 2013
7 Reads

Theranostic agents for intracellular gene delivery with spatiotemporal imaging.

Nano Today 2013 Feb;8(1):21-38

Department of Chemical Engineering, C0400, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (USA).

Gene therapy is the modification of gene expression to treat a disease. However, efficient intracellular delivery and monitoring of gene therapeutic agents is an ongoing challenge. Use of theranostic agents with suitable targeted, controlled delivery and imaging modalities has the potential to greatly advance gene therapy. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S174801321200141
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2012.12.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3627379PMC
February 2013
11 Reads

Solid-State and Biological Nanopore for Real-Time Sensing of Single Chemical and Sequencing of DNA.

Nano Today 2013 Feb;8(1):56-74

Nanobiotechnology Center, Markey Cancer Center and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA.

Sensitivity and specificity are two most important factors to take into account for molecule sensing, chemical detection and disease diagnosis. A perfect sensitivity is to reach the level where a single molecule can be detected. An ideal specificity is to reach the level where the substance can be detected in the presence of many contaminants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2012.12.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3596169PMC
February 2013
5 Reads
36 Citations
15.000 Impact Factor

Toxicology and clinical potential of nanoparticles.

Nano Today 2011 Dec;6(6):585-607

Centre for Nanotechnology & Regenerative Medicine, UCL Division of Surgery & Interventional Science, University College London, London, UK.

In recent years, nanoparticles (NPs) have increasingly found practical applications in technology, research and medicine. The small particle size coupled to their unique chemical and physical properties is thought to underlie their exploitable biomedical activities. Here, we review current toxicity studies of NPs with clinical potential. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2011.10.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3533686PMC
December 2011
10 Reads

Odyssey of a cancer nanoparticle: from injection site to site of action.

Nano Today 2012 Dec;7(6):606-618

Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108.

No chemotherapeutic drug can be effective until it is delivered to its target site. Nano-sized drug carriers are designed to transport therapeutic or diagnostic materials from the point of administration to the drug's site of action. This task requires the nanoparticle carrying the drug to complete a journey from the injection site to the site of action. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2012.10.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3519442PMC
December 2012
6 Reads

Multifunctional nanoscale strategies for enhancing and monitoring blood vessel regeneration.

Nano Today 2012 Dec 17;7(6):514-531. Epub 2012 Nov 17.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C0800, Austin, TX 78712-0238, USA.

Nanomedicine has great potential in biomedical applications, and specifically in regenerative medicine and vascular tissue engineering. Designing nanometer-sized therapeutic and diagnostic devices for tissue engineering applications is critical because cells experience and respond to stimuli on this spatial scale. For example, nanoscaffolds, including nanoscalestructured or nanoscale surface-modified vascular scaffolds, can influence cell alignment, adhesion, and differentiation to promote better endothelization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2012.10.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5630157PMC
December 2012
8 Reads

Beyond Biomarkers: Identifying Cell State using Unbiased Nanosensor Arrays.

Nano Today 2012 Aug 3;7(4):228-230. Epub 2012 Jul 3.

Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003 USA.

Traditional cell detection based on biomarkers relies on specific lock-and-key recognition. However, many diseases either do not have obvious biomarkers or these markers are currently unknown. Unbiased sensor arrays based on nanoparticles use selective interactions to generate bioprofiles capable of identifying cell type and state. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2012.06.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3496280PMC
August 2012
2 Reads

Ultrastable synergistic tetravalent RNA nanoparticles for targeting to cancers.

Nano Today 2012 Aug;7(4):245-257

Nanobiotechnology Center, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, United States ; Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, United States.

One of the advantages of nanotechnology is the feasibility to construct therapeutic particles carrying multiple therapeutics with defined structure and stoichiometry. The field of RNA nanotechnology is emerging. However, controlled assembly of stable RNA nanoparticles with multiple functionalities which retain their original role is challenging due to refolding after fusion. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S174801321200076
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2012.06.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3458310PMC
August 2012
5 Reads

Co-delivery of siRNA and therapeutic agents using nanocarriers to overcome cancer resistance.

Nano Today 2012 Aug;7(4):367-379

Department of Chemical Engineering, C0400, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA ; Department of Biomedical Engineering, C0800, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA ; College of Pharmacy, C0400, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA.

There are two main mechanisms by which cells become multidrug resistant (MDR): by increasing drug efflux pumps on the cell membrane and by increasing anti-apoptotic pathways. The use of nanotechnology to develop nanodelivery systems has allowed researchers to overcome limitations of antineoplastic drugs by increasing the solubility of the drug and decreasing the toxicity to healthy tissues. By encapsulating drugs into nanoparticles that bypass the efflux pumps, drug efflux is reduced, hence increasing the intracellular concentration of the drug. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2012.06.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4527553PMC
August 2012
18 Reads

Guided Delivery of Polymer Therapeutics Using Plasmonic Photothermal Therapy.

Nano Today 2012 Jun 24;7(3):158-167. Epub 2012 May 24.

Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 84108, USA.

In most drug delivery systems the clinician does not have control over the location of drug delivery after the therapeutic has been administered. As the location of the tumor mass is often known in many patients, a therapy system which enables the clinician to play an active role in nanomedicine localization would provide an advantage. Here, we show a new approach wherein a laser can be used to tag tumor tissue and enhance the delivery of targeted polymer therapeutics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2012.04.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3380374PMC
June 2012
9 Reads

In Vivo Modulation of Dendritic Cells by Engineered Materials: Towards New Cancer Vaccines.

Nano Today 2011 Oct;6(5):466-477

School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138.

Therapeutic cancer vaccines are emerging as novel and potent approaches to treat cancer. These vaccines enhance the body's immune response to cancerous cells, and dendritic cells (DCs), an initiator of adaptive immunity, are a key cell type targeted by these strategies. Current DC-based cancer vaccines are based on ex vivo manipulation of the cells following their isolation from the patient, followed by reintroduction to the patient, but this approach has many limitations in practical cancer treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2011.08.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3224090PMC
October 2011
5 Reads

Advances in Resistive Pulse Sensors: Devices bridging the void between molecular and microscopic detection.

Nano Today 2011 Oct;6(5):531-545

Centre for Biomarker Research and Development, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia 4072, , Tel: 61 7 334 64173.

Since the first reported use of a biological ion channel to detect differences in single stranded genomic base pairs in 1996, a renaissance in nanoscale resistive pulse sensors has ensued. This resurgence of a technique originally outlined and commercialized over fifty years ago has largely been driven by advances in nanoscaled fabrication, and ultimately, the prospect of a rapid and inexpensive means for genomic sequencing as well as other macromolecular characterization. In this pursuit, the potential application of these devices to characterize additional properties such as the size, shape, charge, and concentration of nanoscaled materials (10 - 900 nm) has been largely overlooked. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2011.08.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3199578PMC
October 2011
4 Reads

Enhancing Cell therapies from the Outside In: Cell Surface Engineering Using Synthetic Nanomaterials.

Nano Today 2011 Jun;6(3):309-325

Department of Material Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

Therapeutic treatments based on the injection of living cells are in clinical use and preclinical development for diseases ranging from cancer to cardiovascular disease to diabetes. To enhance the function of therapeutic cells, a variety of chemical and materials science strategies are being developed that engineer the surface of therapeutic cells with new molecules, artificial receptors, and multifunctional nanomaterials, synthetically endowing donor cells with new properties and functions. These approaches offer a powerful complement to traditional genetic engineering strategies for enhancing the function of living cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2011.04.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3148657PMC
June 2011
6 Reads

Emerging links between surface nanotechnology and endocytosis: impact on nonviral gene delivery.

Nano Today 2010 Dec;5(6):553-569

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, 136 Hudson Hall, Box 90281, Durham, NC 27708, USA.

Significant effort continues to be exerted toward the improvement of transfection mediated by nonviral vectors. These endeavors are often focused on the design of particulate carriers with properties that encourage efficient accumulation at the membrane surface, particle uptake, and endosomal escape. Despite its demonstrated importance in successful nonviral transfection, relatively little investigation has been done to understand the pressures driving internalized vectors into favorable nondegradative endocytic pathways. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2010.10.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3048656PMC
December 2010
2 Reads

Microfluidic tools for cell biological research.

Nano Today 2010 Feb;5(1):28-47

Institut Curie, UMR 144 CNRS, Paris 75005, France.

Microfluidic technology is creating powerful tools for cell biologists to control the complete cellular microenvironment, leading to new questions and new discoveries. We review here the basic concepts and methodologies in designing microfluidic devices, and their diverse cell biological applications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2009.12.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2998071PMC
February 2010
3 Reads

FUNCTIONAL NANOPARTICLES FOR MOLECULAR IMAGING GUIDED GENE DELIVERY.

Nano Today 2010 Dec;5(6):524-539

Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.

Gene therapy has great potential to bring tremendous changes in treatment of various diseases and disorders. However, one of the impediments to successful gene therapy is the inefficient delivery of genes to target tissues and the inability to monitor delivery of genes and therapeutic responses at the targeted site. The emergence of molecular imaging strategies has been pivotal in optimizing gene therapy; since it can allow us to evaluate the effectiveness of gene delivery noninvasively and spatiotemporally. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S17480132100014
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nantod.2010.10.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3004232PMC
December 2010
4 Reads