18 results match your criteria Myofascial Pain in Athletes

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Immediate effects of self-myofascial release on latent trigger point sensitivity: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

Biol Sport 2018 Dec 31;35(4):349-354. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Department of Sports Medicine, Frankfurt am Main.

Latent myofascial trigger points (MTrP) have been linked to several impairments of muscle function. The present study was conducted in order to examine whether a single bout of self-myofascial release using a foam roller is effective in reducing MTrP sensitivity. Fifty healthy, pain-free subjects (26. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/biolsport.2018.78055DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6358529PMC
December 2018

The effects of dry needling and radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy on latent trigger point sensitivity in the quadriceps: A randomised control pilot study.

J Bodyw Mov Ther 2019 Jan 11;23(1):82-88. Epub 2018 Feb 11.

United Physiotherapy, Castletroy, Limerick, Ireland.

Objectives: Latent myofascial trigger points (TrP) can alter joint kinematics, reduce strength and alter activation patterns, affecting athletic performance. TrP sensitivity can be measured with the pressure pain threshold (PPT). Dry needling (DN) has been used to treat latent TrPs, but may cause post-needling soreness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.02.010DOI Listing
January 2019
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Interventions used for Rehabilitation and Prevention of Patellar Tendinopathy in athletes: a survey of Brazilian Sports Physical Therapists.

Braz J Phys Ther 2018 Dec 19. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Physical Therapy Department, Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar), São Carlos, SP, Brazil; Postgraduate Program of Physical Therapy, Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar), São Carlos, SP, Brazil.

Objectives: (1) To identify the type and frequency of interventions used by Brazilian physical therapists to treat and prevent the occurrence of patellar tendinopathy in athletes and the criteria used to return to sport; (2) to compare the interventions used to the grade of recommendation of current evidence.

Methods: Design: cross-sectional study.

Setting: online survey throughout sports physical therapy association. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S14133555183022
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjpt.2018.12.001DOI Listing
December 2018
8 Reads

Changes in Muscle Stiffness of the Trapezius Muscle After Application of Ischemic Compression into Myofascial Trigger Points in Professional Basketball Players.

J Hum Kinet 2018 Sep 15;64:35-45. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

Department of Sport Science, University School of Physical Education in Wroclaw; Wrocław, Poland.

The study aimed to assess the effects of compression trigger point therapy on the stiffness of the trapezius muscle in professional basketball players (Part A), and the reliability of the MyotonPRO device in clinical evaluation of athletes (Part B). Twelve professional basketball players participated in Part A of the study (mean age: 19.8 ± 2. Read More

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http://content.sciendo.com/view/journals/hukin/64/1/article-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/hukin-2018-0043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6231330PMC
September 2018
13 Reads

Examination of Self-Myofascial Release vs. Instrument-Assisted Soft-Tissue Mobilization Techniques on Vertical and Horizontal Power in Recreational Athletes.

J Strength Cond Res 2018 May 8. Epub 2018 May 8.

Psychology Department, Gannon University, Erie, Pennsylvania.

Stroiney, DA, Mokris, RL, Hanna, GR, and Ranney, JD. Examination of self-myofascial release vs. instrument-assisted soft-tissue mobilization techniques on vertical and horizontal power in recreational athletes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000002628DOI Listing
May 2018
2 Reads

Roller Massage: A Descriptive Survey of Allied Health Professionals.

Authors:
Scott W Cheatham

J Sport Rehabil 2018 Oct 28:1-10. Epub 2018 Oct 28.

Background: In sports medicine, the interprofessional care of athletes has become a frequent practice. This type of care often involves different interventions used among professionals. One common intervention prescribed is roller massage (RM) or self-myofascial release. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jsr.2017-0366DOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads

The Effects of Myofascial Trigger Point Release on the Power and Force Production in the Lower Limb Kinetic Chain.

J Strength Cond Res 2018 Feb 22. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

Department of Science and Health, Institute of Technology Carlow, Carlow, Ireland.

The purpose of this study was to firstly investigate the effects of treating latent myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in the lower limb kinetic chain with respect to performance during sporting actions, as opposed to the traditional goal of pain management with active MTrPs. The second aim was to investigate the effects of dry needling (DN) on performance parameters over time to establish treatment timeframe guidelines prior to performance. Forty male athletes were assigned to four groups; rectus femoris DN (group 1), medial gastrocnemius DN (group 2), rectus femoris and medial gastrocnemius DN (group 3) and no DN (group 4). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000002520DOI Listing
February 2018
8 Reads

Comparison of Upper Trapezius and Infraspinatus Myofascial Trigger Point Therapy by Dry Needling in Overhead Athletes With Unilateral Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

J Sport Rehabil 2018 Nov 30:1-7. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

Context: Chronic musculoskeletal disorders in the shoulder joint are often associated with myofascial trigger points (MTrPs), particularly in the upper trapezius (UT) muscle. Dry needling (DN) is a treatment of choice for myofascial pain syndrome. However, local lesions and severe postneedle soreness sometimes hamper the direct application of DN in the UT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jsr.2017-0207DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Effects of self-myofascial release: A systematic review.

J Bodyw Mov Ther 2015 Oct 28;19(4):747-58. Epub 2015 Aug 28.

Department of Biology of Physical Activity, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.

Background: Self-myofascial release (SMFR) is a type of myofascial release performed by the individual themselves rather than by a clinician, typically using a tool.

Objectives: To review the literature regarding studies exploring acute and chronic clinical effects of SMFR.

Methods: PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched during February 2015 for studies containing words related to the topic of SMFR. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbmt.2015.08.007DOI Listing
October 2015
4 Reads

Effect of Therapeutic Sequence of Hot Pack and Ultrasound on Physiological Response Over Trigger Point of Upper Trapezius.

Asian J Sports Med 2015 Sep 28;6(3):e23806. Epub 2015 Sep 28.

Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Background: Musculoskeletal pain is a common problem among athletes. Apart from sport injuries, the myofascial pain syndrome is another important problem that affects performance of the athlete.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of therapeutic sequences of the hot pack in combination with ultrasound on the physiological responses over the latent myofascial trigger point (LMTrP) of upper trapezius muscle. Read More

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http://asjsm.neoscriber.org/en/articles/21604.html
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5812/asjsm.23806DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4594134PMC
September 2015
11 Reads

British athletics muscle injury classification: a new grading system.

Br J Sports Med 2014 Sep 16;48(18):1347-51. Epub 2014 Jul 16.

British Athletics Medical Team, British Athletics National Performance Centre, LoughboroughUniversity, Loughborough, UK.

The commonly used muscle injury grading systems based on three grades of injury, representing minor, moderate and complete injuries to the muscle, are lacking in diagnostic accuracy and provide limited prognostic information to the clinician. In recent years, there have been a number of proposals for alternative grading systems. While there is recent evidence regarding the prognostic features of muscle injuries, this evidence has not often been incorporated into the grading proposals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2013-093302DOI Listing
September 2014
8 Reads

Interventional spine procedures in athletes.

Curr Sports Med Rep 2012 Nov-Dec;11(6):335-40

Department of Orthopedics, University Orthopaedic Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84121, USA.

Back pain is common in athletes and a source of missed time from practice and competition. Pain generators include muscle (strain), ligament (myofascial sprain and strain), intervertebral disc (herniation and degeneration), nerve (radiculopathy), joint (facet and sacroiliac (SI) joint), and bones (pars interarticularis defect). The goal of treatment of an athlete with back pain is to relieve symptoms and facilitate safe but rapid return to play with no change in performance. Read More

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http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/acsm-csmr/2012/11000/Interventi
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http://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:land
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/JSR.0b013e3182770585DOI Listing
May 2013
6 Reads

Trigger point therapy and plantar heel pain: A case report.

Authors:
Bang M Nguyen

Foot (Edinb) 2010 Dec 27;20(4):158-62. Epub 2010 Oct 27.

Darebin Community Health Service, Victoria, Australia.

The cause of plantar heel pain and fasciitis has continued to be a diagnostic challenge even though it is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders of the foot and ankle. The subject has evoked strong emotions and sparked intense debate regarding the likely causes and effective treatment options. Myofascial trigger point as a treatment option for plantar heel pain and fasciitis has been inconspicuous. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foot.2010.09.009DOI Listing
December 2010
2 Reads

Management of shoulder injuries using dry needling in elite volleyball players.

Acupunct Med 2010 Mar;28(1):42-5

School of Medicine, University of Sheffield, UK.

These case reports describe the short-term benefits of dry needling in shoulder injuries in four international female volleyball athletes during a month-long intense competitive phase, using both replicable subjective and objective measures. Dry needling of scapulohumeral muscles was carried out. Range of movement, strength and pain were assessed before and after treatment, with a functional assessment of pain immediately after playing and overhead activity, using the short form McGill Pain Questionnaire. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/aim.2009.001560DOI Listing
March 2010
7 Reads

The 2004 Olympic Games: physiotherapy services in the Olympic Village polyclinic.

Br J Sports Med 2007 Sep 14;41(9):603-9; discussion 609. Epub 2007 May 14.

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Science, Greece.

Objective: First, to document the injuries sustained during the 2004 Olympic Games in a sample of patients visiting the physiotherapy department of the Olympic Village polyclinic. Second, to provide information and data about the physiotherapy services for planning future Olympics and other mass gatherings.

Design: Observational study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2007.035204DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2465397PMC
September 2007
5 Reads

Practical management of iliotibial band friction syndrome in runners.

Clin J Sport Med 2006 May;16(3):261-8

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA 94305-5336, USA.

This article outlines the practical management of iliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS) in running athletes. ITBFS is the most common cause of lateral knee pain in runners and is related to repetitive friction of the iliotibial band sliding over the lateral femoral epicondyle. Runners predisposed to this injury are typically in a phase of over training and often have underlying weakness of the hip abductor muscles. Read More

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http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/cjsportsmed/2006/05000/Practica
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May 2006
21 Reads

Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall in athletes.

Sports Med 2002 ;32(4):235-50

Centre for Sports Medicine, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK.

Chest pain in the athlete has a wide differential diagnosis. Pain may originate from structures within the thorax, such as the heart, lungs or oesophagus. However, musculoskeletal causes of chest pain must be considered. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.2165/00007256-200232
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2165/00007256-200232040-00003DOI Listing
May 2002
6 Reads

Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome.

Authors:
A Stager D Clement

Sports Med 1999 Jul;28(1):61-70

Allan McGavin Sports Medicine Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) is a rare cause of exercise-induced leg pain. Entrapment occurs because of an abnormal relationship between the popliteal artery and the surrounding myofascial structures in the popliteal fossa. Arterial insufficiency in the affected limb arises with entrapment of the artery, commonly giving leg symptoms with exertion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2165/00007256-199928010-00006DOI Listing
July 1999
3 Reads
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