111 results match your criteria Muehrcke Lines of the Fingernails


Muehrcke Lines in an Infant.

J Pediatr 2017 10 5;189:234. Epub 2017 Jun 5.

Division of Pediatrics Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research Chandigarh, India.

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October 2017
5 Reads
3.790 Impact Factor

Muehrcke lines associated to active rheumatoid arthritis.

J Clin Rheumatol 2013 Jan;19(1):30-1

Department of Rheumatology, Centenario Hospital Miguel Hidalgo, Aguascalientes, México.

Careful examination of the fingernails and toenails can help to detect underlying systemic diseases. Physicians should look for shape, growth, or color changes in the nails; the transverse nail discolorations include different diagnostic possibilities such as Muehrcke lines and Mees lines. Leukonychia striata or Muehrcke lines are transverse nail bands of discoloration that are unspecific, and there are around 70 different causes that include cancer treatment and less commonly rheumatic diseases. Read More

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January 2013
23 Reads

Muehrcke lines.

CMAJ 2013 Mar 27;185(5):E239. Epub 2012 Aug 27.

Department of Medicine, University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi, India.

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Evaluation of nail abnormalities.

Am Fam Physician 2012 Apr;85(8):779-87

Cleveland Clinic, Stongsville, OH, USA.

Knowledge of the anatomy and function of the nail apparatus is essential when performing the physical examination. Inspection may reveal localized nail abnormalities that should be treated, or may provide clues to an underlying systemic disease that requires further workup. Excessive keratinaceous material under the nail bed in a distal and lateral distribution should prompt an evaluation for onychomycosis. Read More

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April 2012
18 Reads

Invited commentary.

Authors:
Derek Muehrcke

Ann Thorac Surg 2010 Apr;89(4):1185-6

Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgical Associates, 300 Health Park Blvd, Ste 5000, St. Augustine, FL 32086, USA.

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Calcium phosphate cements improve bone density when used in osteoporotic sternums.

Ann Thorac Surg 2009 Nov;88(5):1658-61

Department of Cardiac Surgery, Flagler Hospital, St. Augustine, Florida, USA.

Purpose: Calcium phosphate cements control bleeding and are safe to use in osteoporotic sternums during open heart surgery. We looked at the clinical and radiographic effects of this agent on bone healing.

Description: Since March 2006, 18 patients had calcium phosphate cement inserted in their sternal tables at heart surgery. Read More

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November 2009

In patients undergoing surgical repair of post-infarction ventricular septal defect, does concomitant revascularization improve prognosis?

Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 2009 Nov 19;9(5):879-87. Epub 2009 Aug 19.

Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.

A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'In patients undergoing surgical repair of post-infarction ventricular septal defect (VSD), does concomitant revascularization improve prognosis?'. The scientific literature was reviewed by searching Medline, using Ovid interface, from 1950 to April 2009. Read More

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November 2009
4 Reads

Leiomyosarcoma of the left ventricle.

Ann Thorac Surg 2008 Aug;86(2):666

Department of Cardiac Surgery, Flagler Hospital, St Augustine, Florida 32086, USA.

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Calcium phosphate cements to control bleeding in osteoporotic sternums.

Ann Thorac Surg 2007 Jul;84(1):259-61

Department of Cardiac Surgery, Flagler Hospital, St. Augustine, Florida, USA.

Purpose: A new method to control bleeding from fragile, severely osteoporotic sternums in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

Description: From January 2006 and January 2007, we used orthopedic calcium phosphate cement in 11 patients to control sternal table bleeding. Each patient had greater than 35% of their sternal table surface missing and had associated bleeding after open heart surgery. Read More

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Invited commentary.

Authors:
Derek D Muehrcke

Ann Thorac Surg 2006 Jun;81(6):2095-6

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June 2006
2 Reads

Transverse leukonychia: a case report.

West Afr J Med 2005 Apr-Jun;24(2):181-2

Catholic University and Armed Forces Hospital, Brasilia-DF.

A case of transverse leukonychia following chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease in a 17-year-old white male is reported. The patient presented with multiple white bands across the fingernails, which appeared three weeks after the end of chemotherapy. The changes were almost homogeneously spread across the breadth of the fingernail plates, showing smooth borders with a rounded distal edge. Read More

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October 2005
5 Reads

Invited commentary.

Authors:
Derek D Muehrcke

Ann Thorac Surg 2005 Jun;79(6):1989-90

Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgical Associates, PA, 300 Health Park Blvd, Suite 5000, St. Augustine, FL 32086, USA.

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Transmyocardial laser therapy: a strategic approach.

Heart Surg Forum 2004 ;7(3):E218-29

Lankenau Hospital, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania 19096, USA.

Background: Coronary artery bypass and percutaneous intervention have become the established methods of coronary revascularization in treating angina pectoris. Subsets of angina patients, however, are not amenable to either of these procedures. Transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR) has been developed as a potential treatment to address such patients, and clinical research to date illustrates the success of TMR for this patient group. Read More

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December 2006
3 Reads

The early introduction of percutaneous renal biopsy in Italy.

Kidney Int 1999 Nov;56(5):1951-61

Divisione di Nefrologia e Dialisi, Ospedale Maggiore, IRCCS, Milano, Italy.

Background: Percutaneous renal biopsy, based on the use of an aspiration needle and the patient in the sitting position, was first described by Iversen and Brun in 1951. In 1954, Kark and Muehrcke described the use of the cutting Vim-Silverman needle on patients in the prone position, with a substantial improvement in the rate of success. The 1961 CIBA Foundation Symposium on renal biopsy marked the coming of age of this technique. Read More

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November 1999

Is there an advantage to repairing infected mitral valves?

Ann Thorac Surg 1997 Jun;63(6):1718-24

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio, USA.

Background: The therapy for native mitral valve endocarditis is in evolution. Antibiotics have significantly improved survival rates, but patients with complications of endocarditis may require surgical treatment.

Methods: Between January 1985 and December 1995, 146 patients underwent surgical therapy (repair or replacement) for native mitral valve endocarditis. Read More

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Reoperation for failure of mitral valve repair.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1997 Mar;113(3):467-73; discussion 473-5

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH 44195, USA.

Background And Objective: Mitral valve repair is the procedure of choice to correct mitral regurgitation of all types. Up to 10% of patients who undergo mitral valvuloplasty require late reoperation for recurrent mitral valve dysfunction. To determine the causes of failed mitral valve repair, we examined the surgical pathology of patients who underwent reoperation for failed mitral valve repair. Read More

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March 1997
3 Reads

Oral disease burden in patients undergoing prosthetic heart valve implantation.

Ann Thorac Surg 1997 Feb;63(2):402-4

Department of Dentistry, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH 44195, USA.

Background: Valvular heart disease predisposing to endocarditis and requiring prosthetic valve implantation is common among the elderly. Spontaneous bacteremias associated with acute or chronic oral/odontogenic infections may represent a far greater cumulative risk for the development of endocarditis than do occasional health care procedures administered in a professional setting.

Methods: To determine the oral disease burden in patients undergoing mechanical or bioprosthetic heart valve implantation, we performed a comprehensive clinical and radiographic regional examination on 156 consecutive patients, with emphasis on identifying acute and chronic oral/odontogenic infections and conditions. Read More

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February 1997

Biocompatibility of heparin-coated extracorporeal bypass circuits: a randomized, masked clinical trial.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1996 Aug;112(2):472-83

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio 44195, USA.

Cardiopulmonary bypass circuits cause morbidity during cardiac operations. Plasma proteins and cellular components are stimulated by contact with the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit and can cause bleeding and postperfusion syndrome. This is especially true in patients undergoing reoperative cardiac procedures, which carries a higher risk of postoperative bleeding and prolonged ventilation compared with primary cardiac surgical procedures. Read More

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Recurrent cerebral vascular accidents are an indication for ascending aortic endarterectomy.

Ann Thorac Surg 1996 May;61(5):1516-8

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH 44195, USA.

We present a patient with severe pedunculated ascending atherosclerosis associated with recurrent cerebral vascular accidents. We recommend that endarterectomy be considered for patients with recurrent cerebral vascular accidents associated with severe atherosclerosis of the ascending aorta when no other cause is found to explain the symptoms. Read More

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Echocardiography to assist mitral valve repair in patients with coronary artery disease.

Coron Artery Dis 1996 Mar;7(3):211-6

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH 44195-5066, USA.

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Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock.

Ann Thorac Surg 1996 Feb;61(2):684-91

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH 44195, USA.

Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuits have recently been introduced for extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in adult patients in cardiogenic shock and have been shown to provide excellent oxygenation and hemodynamic support. Heparin coating of the extracorporeal circuit provides a more biocompatible surface, which has been shown to minimize early surface-induced complement activation and platelet dysfunction and hence may improve patient survival. This report reviews our experience with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to treat postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock using minimal to no systemic heparinization in 23 patients. Read More

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February 1996
16 Reads

Surgical treatment of prosthetic valve endocarditis.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1996 Jan;111(1):198-207; discussion 207-10

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH 44195, USA.

From 1975 through 1992, we reoperated on 146 patients for the treatment of prosthetic valve endocarditis. Prosthetic valve endocarditis was considered to be early (< 1 year after operation) in 46 cases and active in 103 cases. The extent of the infection was prosthesis only in 66 patients, anulus in 46, and cardiac invasion in 34. Read More

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January 1996

Surgical and long-term antifungal therapy for fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis.

Ann Thorac Surg 1995 Sep;60(3):538-43

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio 44195, USA.

Background: Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis is an uncommon but serious disease. We have developed a strategy of treatment that includes perioperative amphotericin B, radical debridement of infected tissue, reconstruction using biologic tissue when possible, and prolonged oral suppressive antifungal therapy.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 12 patients reoperated on for fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis involving the aortic valve (10 patients: six porcine valves, two mechanical valves, two homografts) and the mitral valve (2 patients, both porcine valves). Read More

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September 1995
2 Reads

Complications of extracorporeal life support systems using heparin-bound surfaces. The risk of intracardiac clot formation.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1995 Sep;110(3):843-51

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH 44195, USA.

Extracorporeal life support with heparin-coated extracorporeal membrane oxygenation circuits are being used with increased frequency in patients who have cardiogenic shock. We report our experience in 30 patients with cardiogenic shock, looking specifically at the complications associated with this form of life support. Thirty patients with a mean age of 46. Read More

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September 1995

Flow characteristics of aortic cannulae.

J Card Surg 1995 Jul;10(4 Suppl):514-9

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio 44194, USA.

Atheroembolism from the ascending aorta is an emerging cause of noncardiac complications after open heart surgery. We designed a new arterial cannula specifically to reduce the exit force and velocity of blood flow, thereby reducing the "sandblasting" effect of the exiting blood jet. The cannula has a closed tip and an internal cone that diffuses blood flow such that it enters the aorta via multiple side holes. Read More

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July 1995
6 Reads

Another use for the laryngeal mask airway--as a blocker during tracheoplasty.

Anesth Analg 1995 Mar;80(3):622-4

Department of Anesthesia, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

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Current surgical approach to acute ventricular septal rupture.

Adv Card Surg 1995 ;6:69-90

Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston.

The recent advances in the management of postinfarct ventricular septal rupture have helped to decrease the operative mortality rate to 10% in one series. The addition of coronary artery bypass grafting seems to improve long-term survival despite having little effect on hospital mortality. Recent technical improvements have helped to decrease postoperative bleeding and may preserve ventricular function. Read More

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Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis.

Authors:
D D Muehrcke

Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1995 Jan;7(1):20-4

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH 44195.

Fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis is an unusual cause of endocarditis, yet very important because of its historical poor prognosis. This article will review the incidence, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment results of fungal prosthetic valve endocarditis. In addition, 11 patients at The Cleveland Clinic over the last 16 years were treated with a strategy consisting of aggressive perioperative amphotericin B therapy, radical surgical debridement of all infected tissue and prosthetic valve replacement with biological tissue when possible, as well as the chronic use of oral azole antifungal agents for suppression. Read More

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January 1995
1 Read

Reconstructive airway operation after irradiation.

Ann Thorac Surg 1995 Jan;59(1):14-8

General Thoracic Surgical Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

After a patient died of anastomotic necrosis following a tracheal resection for the management of recurrent thyroid cancer invading the trachea, which had been treated 6 years previously by thyroid lobectomy and 4,800 cGy of radiation to control known residual disease, we explored methods to promote the healing of tissues damaged by irradiation. Between 1979 and 1992, 22 patients underwent major airway resection and reconstruction after receiving large doses of radiation. The average dose was 4,979 +/- 1,113 cGy (range, 3,150 to 6,840 cGy); the number of fractions, 20 to 38; and the average dose per fraction, 180 cGy (range, 150 to 200 cGy). Read More

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January 1995

Warm heart surgery in patients with cold autoimmune disorders.

Ann Thorac Surg 1993 Feb;55(2):532-3

Surgical Cardiovascular Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston 02114.

Continuous warm antegrade delivery of cardioplegia while maintaining systemic normothermia is a new method of performing coronary artery bypass grafting. It can be used to avoid the detrimental effects of hypothermia in patients with cold autoimmune disease. Read More

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February 1993

Survival after repair of postinfarction ventricular septal defects in patients over the age of 70.

J Card Surg 1992 Dec;7(4):290-300

Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston 02114.

Ventricular septal defect (VSD) is an infrequent but extremely serious complication of myocardial infarction. Operative mortality rates tend to be higher in the elderly population; however, long-term follow-up has not been specifically studied. It is, therefore, important to assess not only the early but also the long-term results of VSD repair in patients over 70 years of age to determine its value for the elderly patient. Read More

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December 1992

Postinfarct ventricular septal defect repair: effect of coronary artery bypass grafting.

Ann Thorac Surg 1992 Nov;54(5):876-82; discussion 882-3

Surgical Cardiovascular Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston 02114.

Between June 1968 and April 1991, 75 patients who had undergone coronary angiography underwent repair of a postinfarction ventricular septal defect. Group 1 (n = 33) includes patients who had two- or three-vessel serious (> 75% narrowing) proximal coronary artery disease and underwent complete revascularization in addition to repair of the ventricular septal defect. Group 2 (n = 19) patients also had two- or three-vessel coronary artery disease but bypass grafting was not performed; only the ventricular defect was repaired. Read More

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November 1992

Cardiac contraction affects deep myocardial vessels predominantly.

Am J Physiol 1991 Nov;261(5 Pt 2):H1417-29

Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco 94143.

To evaluate the roles of intramyocardial forces and systolic ventricular pressure in myocardial flow in the different layers separately, we measured myocardial flow in rabbit hearts during stable systolic contracture with left ventricular pressures of 60 (n = 5) and 0 mmHg (n = 5) and during stable diastolic arrest (n = 5). We also measured the number and size of the intramyocardial vessels after perfusion fixation (systolic arrest, n = 5; diastolic arrest, n = 5). In 25 rabbits, hearts were excised and perfused from the aortic root. Read More

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November 1991

Laryngotracheoesophageal cleft (type IV): management and repair of lesions beyond the carina.

J Pediatr Surg 1991 Aug;26(8):962-9; discussion 969-70

Division of Pediatric Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114.

Since the first successful repair of a complete laryngotracheoesophageal cleft (LTEC) to the carina in 1982, three newborn infants were observed with a particularly difficult variant in which the cleft extends beyond the carina into the mainstem bronchi. This type IV LTEC creates a long common tracheoesophagus, whose successful separation requires meticulous preoperative, operative, and postsurgical care. Three infants had complete surgical repair at our institution at 29, 49, and 225 days old and survived a minimum of 8 months. Read More

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Nonuniform blood flow in the canine left ventricle.

J Surg Res 1990 Nov;49(5):379-84

Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco 94143.

In order to investigate the relationship between coronary perfusion pressure and blood flow distribution in the left ventricle (LV), we measured myocardial blood flow in small regions using radioactive microspheres in six anesthetized, open-chest dogs. Mean coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) was controlled with a femoral artery to left main coronary artery shunt which included a pressurized, servo-controlled blood reservoir. In each dog, we measured flow in 192 regions of the LV free wall (mean weight per region = 206 +/- 38 mg) at different perfusion pressures. Read More

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November 1990

Nonuniform loss of regional flow reserve during myocardial ischemia in dogs.

Circ Res 1990 Aug;67(2):253-64

Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco 94143.

To determine whether coronary vasodilator reserve that persists during myocardial ischemia is present in all left ventricular regions, we measured regional blood flow in 192 left ventricular pieces (mean weight, 201 mg) in each of eight dogs by using radioactive microspheres while perfusing the left main coronary artery at 70, 50, 40, and 30 mm Hg. Flows were measured before and during adenosine infusion to determine flow reserve. Perfusion at 40 and 30 mm Hg produced ischemia in all dogs. Read More

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Use of pericardium to control bleeding after ascending aortic graft replacement.

Ann Thorac Surg 1989 Nov;48(5):706-8

Pacific Presbyterian Medical Center, San Francisco, California 94115.

We present the case of a patient who required replacement of an ascending aortic composite graft for endocarditis complicated by uncontrollable bleeding from the proximal anastomotic site. A new method of creating a right atrial-to-periprosthetic space fistula with autologous pericardium was used with a favorable result. Read More

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November 1989

Complications after esophagogastrectomy using stapling instruments.

Ann Thorac Surg 1989 Aug;48(2):257-62

General Surgical Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114.

We studied 195 patients undergoing esophageal resection using stapling instruments during a period of over 8.5 years. Of these, 178 (91. Read More

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Anastomotic narrowing after esophagogastrectomy with the EEA stapling device.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1989 Mar;97(3):434-8

Regional Adult Cardiothoracic Unit, Broadgreen Hospital, Liverpool, England.

We studied a series of 176 patients undergoing esophageal resection with the aid of the EEA surgical stapling device (Auto Suture U.K. Limited, Great Britain) during a period of 7 1/2 years. Read More

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Oesophagogastrectomy in patients over 70.

Thorax 1989 Feb;44(2):141-5

Regional Adult Cardiothoracic Unit, Broadgreen Hospital, Liverpool.

Although the results of oesophageal resection for benign and malignant disease are well documented, the risk of operative death and long term survival in patients over the age of 70 is not well defined. The outcome has been reviewed for 46 patients (23 male, 23 female) aged 70 years or more (mean 74 years) undergoing oesophageal resection during a period of seven years; 16 patients were 75 years or over. All resections were performed with the EEA stapler, except for one cervical anastomosis that was stitched by hand. Read More

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February 1989

Carcinoma of the bronchus with unsuspected microscopic resection-line involvement.

Cancer 1988 Sep;62(5):1014-6

Department of General Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston.

In a series of 560 pulmonary resections for bronchial carcinoma, unsuspected microscopic tumor was present at the bronchial resection margin in 26 patients (4.5%). Adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy was given in two patients. Read More

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September 1988

Oesophageal resection in the elderly.

Ann R Coll Surg Engl 1988 Jul;70(4):259-60

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Early presentation of phaeochromocytoma as acute arterial disease.

Br J Hosp Med 1988 Jun;39(6):534-5

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

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Pediatric splenic trauma: predicting the success of nonoperative therapy.

Am J Emerg Med 1987 Mar;5(2):109-12

The charts of all pediatric patients discharged from the Massachusetts General Hospital with a diagnosis of a ruptured spleen were reviewed over a six-year period to determine if any factors could be used to predict which children could be managed safely without operation. Seventy-five percent of these injuries were so managed. The patients who required surgical intervention were older (mean age, 17 years), had multiple injuries (mean ISS, 41), presented with more blood loss (mean hematocrit, 23. Read More

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Muehrcke's lines of the fingernails.

Arch Intern Med 1979 Feb;139(2):242

Paired narrow transverse fingernail lines as described by Muehrcke developed in a 64-year-old woman. This patient had lung cancer and was receiving multiple cytostatic agents. Her serum albumin level was normal when this nail finding was quite prominent. Read More

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February 1979
2 Reads

The use of IV corticosteroids in renal disease.

J Am Assoc Nephrol Nurses Tech 1978 ;5(3):129-40

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February 1979

Acute toxic nephropathies: clinical pathologic correlations.

Ann Clin Lab Sci 1976 Nov-Dec;6(6):477-513

Man's ever increasing exposure to numerous drugs and chemicals, which are the results of medical and industrial progress, produces a by-product of acute toxic nephropathies. These include acute toxic renal failure, drug-induced acute oliguric renal failure, acute hemorrhagic glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome, tubular disturbances and potassium deficiency. In depth information is provided for the previously mentioned disorders. Read More

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January 1977
2 Reads