8,222 results match your criteria Molecular ecology[Journal]


The genomic pool of standing structural variation outnumbers single nucleotide polymorphism by three-fold in the marine teleost Chrysophrys auratus.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Ltd, Nelson, New Zealand.

Recent studies have highlighted an important role of structural variation (SV) in ecological and evolutionary processes, but few have studied non-model species in the wild. As part of our long-term research programme on the non-model teleost fish Australasian snapper (Chrysophrys auratus) we aim to build one of the first catalogues of genomic variants (SNPs and indels, and deletions, duplications and inversions) in fishes, and evaluate overlap of genomic variants with regions under putative selection (Tajima's D and π), and coding sequences (genes). For this, we analysed 6 males and 6 females from three locations in New Zealand and generated a high-resolution genomic variation catalogue. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15051DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Differential responses to ocean acidification between populations of Balanophyllia elegans corals from high and low upwelling environments.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.

Ocean acidification (OA), the global decrease in surface water pH from absorption of anthropogenic CO , may put many marine taxa at risk. However, populations that experience extreme localized conditions, and are adapted to these conditions predicted in the global ocean in 2100, may be more tolerant to future OA. By identifying locally adapted populations, researchers can examine the mechanisms used to cope with decreasing pH. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15050DOI Listing
February 2019

Divergent mitochondrial lineages arose within a large, panmictic population of the Savannah sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis).

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, 32 Campus Dr. HS104, Missoula, MT, 59812.

Unusual patterns of mtDNA diversity can reveal interesting aspects of a species' biology. However, making such inferences requires discerning among the many alternative scenarios that could underlie any given mtDNA pattern. Next-generation sequencing methods provide large, multi-locus datasets with increased power to resolve unusual mtDNA patterns. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15049DOI Listing
February 2019

Deep segregation in the open ocean: Macaronesia as an evolutionary hotspot for low dispersal marine invertebrates.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Departamento de Biologia, and CESAM - Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193, Aveiro, Portugal.

Diversification and speciation of terrestrial organisms is anticipated in oceanic islands such as Macaronesia, a group of Atlantic islands that have remained unconnected to continental landmasses. Hitherto, the diversification of marine organisms in oceanic islands, especially those with low vagility, has received little direct empirical analysis using molecular markers. Here, we focus on such a case study, through applying a multi-locus molecular approach to investigate the diversity and evolution of a group that lacks a planktonic larval stage, the isopod genus Dynamene, in Macaronesia and Northeast Atlantic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15052DOI Listing
February 2019

Phototactic tails: Evolution and molecular basis of a novel sensory trait in sea snakes.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Dermal phototaxis has been reported in a few aquatic vertebrate lineages spanning fish, amphibians and reptiles. These taxa respond to light on the skin of their elongate hind-bodies and tails by withdrawing under cover to avoid detection by predators. Here, we investigated tail phototaxis in sea snakes (Hydrophiinae), the only reptiles reported to exhibit this sensory behaviour. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mec.15022
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15022DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Multiple parapatric pollinators have radiated across a continental fig tree displaying clinal genetic variation.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 12. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

CEFE, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier, EPHE, IRD, Montpellier, France.

The ways that plant-feeding insects have diversified is central to our understanding of terrestrial ecosystems. Obligate nursery pollination mutualisms provide highly relevant model systems of how plants and their insect associates have diversified and the over 800 species of fig trees (Ficus) allow comparative studies. Fig trees can have one or more pollinating fig wasp species (Agaonidae) that breed within their figs, but factors influencing their number remain to be established. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15046DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Isolation by instability: Historical climate change shapes population structure and genomic divergence of treefrogs in the Neotropical Cerrado savanna.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Integrative Biology, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0990, Austin, Texas, 78712, United States.

Although the impact of Pleistocene glacial cycles on the diversification of the tropical biota was once dismissed, increasing evidence suggests that Pleistocene climatic fluctuations greatly affected the distribution and population divergence of tropical organisms. Landscape genomic analyses coupled with paleoclimatic distribution models provide a powerful way to understand the consequences of past climate changes on the present-day tropical biota. Using genome-wide SNP data and mitochondrial DNA, combined with projections of the species distribution across the late Quaternary until the present, we evaluate the effect of paleoclimatic shifts on the genetic structure and population differentiation of Hypsiboas lundii, a treefrog endemic to the South American Cerrado savanna. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15045DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Dispersal of a nearshore marine fish connects marine reserves and adjacent fished areas along an open coast.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 9. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Department of Ocean Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, USA.

Marine species with pelagic larvae typically exhibit little population structure, suggesting long distance dispersal and high gene flow. Directly quantifying dispersal of marine fishes is challenging but important, particularly for design of marine protected areas (MPAs). Here, we studied kelp rockfish (Sebastes atrovirens) sampled along ~25 km of coastline in a boundary current-dominated ecosystem and used genetic parentage analysis to identify dispersal events and characterize them, since the distance between sedentary parents and their settled offspring is the lifetime dispersal distance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15044DOI Listing
February 2019
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Is genomic diversity a useful proxy for census population size? Evidence from a species-rich community of desert lizards.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 9. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Museum of Zoology and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109.

Species abundance data are critical for testing ecological theory, but obtaining accurate empirical estimates for many taxa is challenging. Proxies for species abundance can help researchers circumvent time and cost constraints that are prohibitive for long-term sampling. Under simple demographic models, genetic diversity is expected to correlate with census size, such that genome-wide heterozygosity may provide a surrogate measure of species abundance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15042DOI Listing
February 2019

Phenotypic and Genetic Introgression Across a Moving Woodpecker Hybrid Zone.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 9. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, 82071.

In hybrid zones in which two divergent taxa come into secondary contact and interbreed, selection can maintain phenotypic diversity despite widespread genetic introgression. Red-breasted (Sphyrapicus ruber) and Red-naped (S. nuchalis) sapsuckers meet and hybridize along a narrow contact zone that stretches from northern California to southern British Columbia. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mec.15043
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15043DOI Listing
February 2019
8 Reads

Broadening the taxonomic scope of coral reef paleoecological studies using ancient DNA.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, 5005, Australia.

Marine environments face acute pressures from human impacts, often resulting in substantial changes in community structure. On the inshore Great Barrier Reef (GBR), paleoecological studies show the collapse of the previously dominant coral Acropora from the impacts of degraded water quality associated with European colonization. Even more dramatic impacts can result in the replacement of corals by fleshy macroalgae on modern reefs, but their past distribution is unknown because they leave no fossil record. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15038DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Postglacial ecotype formation under outcrossing and self-fertilization in Arabidopis lyrata.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Basel, Schönbeinstrasse 6, CH-4056, Basel, Switzerland.

The formation of ecotypes has been invoked as an important driver of postglacial biodiversity, because many species colonized heterogeneous habitats and experienced divergent selection. Ecotype formation has been predominantly studied in outcrossing taxa, while far less attention has been paid to the implications of mating system shifts. Here we addressed whether substrate-related ecotypes exist in selfing and outcrossing populations of Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/mec.15035
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15035DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Retention of a chromosomal inversion from an anadromous ancestor provides the genetic basis for alternative freshwater ecotypes in rainbow trout.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 3. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, Box 355020, 98195, USA.

Migratory behavior patterns in animals are controlled by a complex genetic architecture. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is a salmonid fish that spawns in streams but exhibits three primary life history pathways: stream-resident (fluvial), lake-migrant (adfluvial), and ocean-migrant (anadromous). Previous studies examining fluvial and anadromous O. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15037DOI Listing
February 2019
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Comparative Phylogeography of Trans-Andean Freshwater Fishes Based on Genome-Wide Nuclear and Mitochondrial Markers.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 3. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Laboratorio de Ictiología, Unidad de Ecología y Sistemática (UNESIS), Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.

The Neotropical region represents one of the greatest biodiversity hotspots on earth. Despite its unparalleled biodiversity, regional comparative phylogeographic studies are still scarce, with most focusing on model clades (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15036DOI Listing
February 2019
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Genomics, environment and balancing selection in behaviorally bimodal populations: the caribou case.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 3. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Dept. of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Veterinary Medicine (Joint Appointment), University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4, Canada.

Selection forces that favor different phenotypes in different environments can change frequencies of genes between populations along environmental clines. Clines are also compatible with balancing forces, such as negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS), which maintains phenotypic polymorphisms within populations. For example, NFDS is hypothesized to maintain partial migration, a dimorphic behavioral trait prominent in species where only a fraction of the population seasonally migrates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15039DOI Listing
February 2019

Correlation and causation between the microbiome, Wolbachia and host functional traits in natural populations of drosophilid flies.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 3. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Department of Entomology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14850, USA.

Resident microorganisms are known to influence the fitness and traits of animals under controlled laboratory conditions, but, the relevance of these findings to wild animals is uncertain. This study investigated the host functional correlates of microbiota composition in a wild community of three sympatric species of mycophagous drosophilid flies, Drosophila falleni, D. neotestacea and D. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15041DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Density-dependent fitness, not dispersal movements, drives temporal variation in spatial genetic structure in dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis).

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 3. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Department of Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA.

Some studies have found that dispersal rates and distances increase with density, indicating that density-dependent dispersal likely affects spatial genetic structure. In an 11-year mark-recapture study on a passerine, the dark-eyed junco, we tested whether density affected dispersal distance and/or fine-scale spatial genetic structure. Contrary to expectations, we found no effect of pre-dispersal density on dispersal distance or the proportion of locally-produced juveniles returning to the population from which they hatched. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15040DOI Listing
February 2019

Seed traits are pleiotropically regulated by the flowering time gene PERPETUAL FLOWERING 1 (PEP1) in the perennial Arabis alpina.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 3. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Carl-von-Linné-Weg 10, 50829, Cologne, DE.

The life cycles of plants are characterized by two major life history transitions-germination and the initiation of flowering-the timing of which are important determinants of fitness. Unlike annuals, which make the transition from the vegetative to reproductive phase only once, perennials iterate reproduction in successive years. The floral repressor PERPETUAL FLOWERING 1 (PEP1), an orthologue of FLOWERING LOCUS C, in the alpine perennial Arabis alpina ensures the continuation of vegetative growth after flowering and thereby restricts the duration of the flowering episode. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15034DOI Listing
February 2019

Louse flies of Eleonora's falcons that also feed on their prey are evolutionary dead-end hosts for blood parasites.

Mol Ecol 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Wetland Ecology, Estación Biológica de Doñana (EBD-CSIC), Seville, Spain.

Host shifts are widespread among avian haemosporidians, although the success of transmission depends upon parasite-host and parasite-vector compatibility. Insular avifaunas are typically characterized by a low prevalence and diversity of haemosporidians, although the underlying ecological and evolutionary processes remain unclear. We investigated the parasite transmission network in an insular system formed by Eleonora's falcons (the avian host), louse flies that parasitize the falcons (the potential vector), and haemosporidians (the parasites). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15020DOI Listing
February 2019
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Antibiotic disturbance affects aquatic microbial community composition and foodweb interactions but not community resilience.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Microbial Ecology Group, National Research Council - Water Research Institute (CNR-IRSA), Largo Tonolli 50 28822, Verbania, Italy.

Notwithstanding the fundamental role that environmental microbes play for ecosystem functioning, data on how microbes react to disturbances are still scarce, and most factors that confer stability to microbial communities are unknown. In this context, antibiotic discharge into the environment is considered a worldwide threat for ecosystems with potential risks to human health. We therefore tested resilience of microbial communities challenged by the presence of an antibiotic. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mec.15033
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15033DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Riverscape genetic variation, migration patterns, and morphological variation of the threatened Round Rocksnail, Leptoxis ampla.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Troy University, Troy, AL, 36082.

Within riverine systems, headwater populations are hypothesized to harbor higher amounts of genetic distinctiveness than populations in the main stem of a river and display increased genetic diversity in large, downstream habitats. However, these hypotheses were mostly developed with insects and fish, and they have not been tested on many invertebrate lineages. Pleuroceridae gastropods are of particular ecological importance to rivers of eastern North America, sometimes comprising over 90% of macroinvertebrate biomass. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15032DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Editorial 2019.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan;28(1):1-28

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.14976DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

When Do We Eat? The Clock is Ticking.

Authors:
Allen G Gibbs

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan;28(1):33-34

School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada.

Ticks are simultaneously fascinating and disgusting. Anyone who has removed a bloated blood-filled tick from themselves or a pet understands the "yuck" factor they arouse. But ticks are also fascinating from a physiological perspective. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.14962DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Workers' sons rescue genetic diversity at the sex locus in an invasive honey bee population.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Behaviour and Genetics of Social Insects Laboratory, School of Life and Environment Sciences, Macleay Building A12, University of Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia.

The hallmark of eusociality is the division of labour between reproductive (queen) and non-reproductive (worker) females. Yet in many eusocial insects, workers retain the ability to produce haploid male offspring from unfertilized eggs. The reproductive potential of workers has well-documented consequences for the structure and function of insect colonies, but its implications at the population level are less often considered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15031DOI Listing
January 2019

Deciphering the worldwide invasion of the Asian long-horned beetle: a recurrent invasion process from the native area together with a bridgehead effect.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

INRA UR633 Zoologie Forestière, 2163 Avenue de la Pomme de Pin, CS40001 Ardon, 45075 Orléans cedex 2, France.

Retracing introduction routes is crucial for understanding the evolutionary processes involved in an invasion, as well as for highlighting the invasion history of a species at the global scale. The Asian long-horned beetle (ALB) Anoplophora glabripennis is a xylophagous pest native to Asia and invasive in North America and Europe. It is responsible for severe losses of urban trees, in both its native and invaded ranges. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15030DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

A trait-based approach to predict population genetic structure in bees.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Institute for Biology, Martin-Luther University, Halle-Wittenberg, 06120, Halle (Saale), Germany.

Understanding population genetic structure is key to developing predictions about species susceptibility to environmental change, such as habitat fragmentation and climate change. It has been theorized that life-history traits may constrain some species in their dispersal and lead to greater signatures of population genetic structure. In this study, we use a quantitative comparative approach to assess if patterns of population genetic structure in bees are driven by three key species-level life-history traits: body size, sociality, and diet breadth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15028DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Integrating life history traits into predictive phylogeography.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Ecology, Evolution and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.

Predictive phylogeography seeks to aggregate genetic, environmental and taxonomic data from multiple species in order to make predictions about unsampled taxa using machine-learning techniques such as Random Forests. To date, organismal trait data have infrequently been incorporated into predictive frameworks due to difficulties inherent to the scoring of trait data across a taxonomically broad set of taxa. We refine predictive frameworks from two North American systems, the inland temperate rainforests of the Pacific Northwest (PNW) and the Southwestern Aridlands (SWAL), by incorporating a number of organismal trait variables. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15029DOI Listing
January 2019
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Higher contribution of globally rare bacterial taxa reflects environmental transitions across the surface ocean.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

Microbial taxa range from being ubiquitous and abundant across space to extremely rare and endemic, depending on their ecophysiology and on different processes acting locally or regionally. However, little is known about how cosmopolitan or rare taxa combine to constitute communities and whether environmental variations promote changes in their relative abundances. Here we identified the Spatial Abundance Distribution (SpAD) of individual prokaryotic taxa (16S rDNA-defined Operational Taxonomic Units, OTUs) across 108 globally-distributed surface ocean stations. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mec.15026
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15026DOI Listing
January 2019
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Do estimates of contemporary effective population size tell us what we want to know?

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Department of Mathematics, Stockholm University, SE-106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.

Estimation of effective population size (N ) from genetic marker data is a major focus for biodiversity conservation because it is essential to know at what rates inbreeding is increasing and additive genetic variation is lost. But are these the rates assessed when applying commonly used N estimation techniques? Here we use recently developed analytical tools and demonstrate that in the case of substructured populations the answer is no. This is because the following: Genetic change can be quantified in several ways reflecting different types of N such as inbreeding (N ), variance (N ), additive genetic variance (N ), linkage disequilibrium equilibrium (N ), eigenvalue (N ) and coalescence (N ) effective size. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15027DOI Listing
January 2019
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Variation in juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) transcription profiles among and within eight population crosses from British Columbia, Canada.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

University of Windsor, Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, ON, CAN, N9B 3P4.

Phenotypic differences among populations within a species have been reported for a variety of traits, ranging from life history to physiology to gene transcription. Population-level phenotypic variation has been attributed to genetic differences resulting from genetic drift and/or local adaptation as well as environmental differences resulting from plasticity. We studied population- and family-level variation in gene transcription for 22 fitness-related genes, comprising immune, growth, metabolic, and stress processes in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15025DOI Listing
January 2019
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Changes in melanocyte RNA and DNA methylation favor pheomelanin synthesis and may avoid systemic oxidative stress after dietary cysteine supplementation in birds.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 20. Epub 2019 Jan 20.

Departamento de Ecología Evolutiva, Estación Biológica de Doñana, CSIC, Sevilla, Spain.

Cysteine plays essential biological roles, but excessive amounts produce cellular oxidative stress. Cysteine metabolism is mainly mediated by the enzymes cysteine dioxygenase and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, respectively coded by the genes CDO1 and GCLC. Here we test a new hypothesis posing that the synthesis of the pigment pheomelanin also contributes to cysteine homeostasis in melanocytes, where cysteine can enter the pheomelanogenesis pathway. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15024DOI Listing
January 2019
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Conservation genomics in the fight to help the recovery of the critically endangered Siamese crocodile Crocodylus siamensis.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 19. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, 14 Science Drive 4, Republic of Singapore.

Endangered species are often characterized by low genetic diversity and it is imperative for conservation efforts to incorporate the knowledge obtained from genetic studies for effective management. However, despite the promise of technological advances in sequencing, application of genome-wide data to endangered populations remains uncommon. In the present study we pursued a holistic conservation-genomic approach to inform a field-based management program of a Critically Endangered species, the Siamese crocodile Crocodylus siamensis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15023DOI Listing
January 2019
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Footprints of adaptive evolution revealed by whole Z chromosomes haplotypes in flycatchers.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Evolutionary Biology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, University of Uppsala, Norbyvägen, 18D, SE-75236, Uppsala, Sweden.

Detecting positive selection using genomic data is critical to understanding the role of adaptive evolution. Of particular interest in this context is sex chromosomes since they are thought to play a special role in local adaptation and speciation. We sought to circumvent the challenges associated with statistical phasing when using haplotype-based statistics in sweep scans by benefitting from that whole-chromosome haplotypes of the sex chromosomes can be obtained by re-sequencing of individuals of the hemizygous sex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15021DOI Listing
January 2019

How many came home? Evaluating ex-situ conservation of green turtles in the Cayman Islands.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 13. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Statistics and IRBio, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 643, 08028, Barcelona, Spain.

Ex-situ management is an important conservation tool that allows the preservation of biological diversity outside natural habitats while supporting survival in the wild. Captive breeding followed by reintroduction is a possible approach for endangered species conservation and preservation of genetic variability. The Cayman Turtle Centre Ltd was established in 1968 to market green turtle (Chelonia mydas) meat and other products and replenish wild populations, thought to be locally extirpated, through captive breeding. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mec.15017
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15017DOI Listing
January 2019
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Contrasting evolutionary histories in Neotropical birds: divergence across an environmental barrier in South America.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 13. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

División Ornitología, Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales 'Bernardino Rivadavia' (MACN-CONICET), Ángel Gallardo 470, C1405DJR, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Avian diversity in the Neotropics has been traditionally attributed to the effect of vicariant forces promoting speciation in allopatry. Recent studies have shown that phylogeographic patterns shared among co-distributed species cannot be explained by a single vicariant event, as species responses to a common barrier depend on the biological attributes of each taxon. The open vegetation corridor (OVC) isolates Amazonia and the Andean forests from the Atlantic Forest, creating a notorious pattern of avian taxa that are disjunctly co-distributed in these forests. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15018DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

The role of structural genomic variants in population differentiation and ecotype formation in Timema cristinae walking sticks.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 13. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S10 2TN, UK.

Theory predicts that structural genomic variants such as inversions can promote adaptive diversification and speciation. Despite increasing empirical evidence that adaptive divergence can be triggered by one or a few large inversions, the degree to which widespread genomic regions under divergent selection are associated with structural variants remains unclear. Here we test for an association between structural variants and genomic regions that underlie parallel host-plant associated ecotype formation in Timema cristinae stick insects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15016DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

A suite of complementary biocontrol traits allows a native consortium of root-associated bacteria to protect their host plant from a fungal sudden-wilt disease.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans-Knöll-Str. 8, Jena, 07745, Germany.

The beneficial effects of plant-bacterial interactions in controlling plant pests have been extensively studied with single bacterial isolates. However, in nature, bacteria interact with plants in multi-taxa consortia, systems which remain poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that a consortium of five native bacterial isolates protected their host plant Nicotiana attenuata from a sudden wilt disease (Santhanam et al. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mec.15012
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15012DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Disentangling structural genomic and behavioral barriers in a sea of connectivity.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Norway.

Genetic divergence among populations arises through natural selection or drift and is counteracted by connectivity and gene flow. In sympatric populations, isolating mechanisms are thus needed to limit the homogenizing effects of gene flow to allow for adaptation and speciation. Chromosomal inversions act as an important mechanism maintaining isolating barriers, yet their role in sympatric populations and divergence with gene flow is not entirely understood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15010DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Speciation in protists: Spatial and ecological divergence processes cause rapid species diversification in a freshwater chrysophyte.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Department of Botany, Palacký University, Olomouc, Czech Republic.

Though eukaryotic microorganisms are extremely numerous, diverse, and essential to global ecosystem functioning, they are largely understudied by evolutionary biologists compared to multicellular macroscopic organisms. In particular, very little is known about the speciation mechanisms which may give rise to the diversity of microscopic eukaryotes. It was postulated that enormous population sizes and ubiquitous distribution of these organisms could lead to a lack of population differentiation and therefore very low speciation rates. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mec.15011
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15011DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

Impact of polymorphic transposable elements on linkage disequilibrium along chromosomes.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Institute of Plant Sciences, University of Berne, Altenbergrain 21, CH-3013, Bern, Switzerland.

Recombination and selection drive the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) among loci and therefore affect the reshuffling of adaptive genetic variation. However, it is poorly known to what extent the enrichment of transposable elements (TEs) in recombinationally-inert regions reflects their inefficient removal by purifying selection and whether the presence of polymorphic TEs can modify the local recombination rate. In this study, we investigate how TEs and recombination interact at fine scale along chromosomes and possibly support linked selection in natural populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15014DOI Listing
January 2019

Association mapping of ectomycorrhizal traits in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.).

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

University of Mississippi, Department of Biology, P.O. Box 1848, MS, 38677.

To understand how diverse mutualisms coevolve and how species adapt to complex environments, a description of the underlying genetic basis of the traits involved must be provided. For example, in diverse coevolving mutualisms, such as the interaction of host plants with a suite of symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi, a key question is whether host plants can coevolve independently with multiple species of symbionts, which depends on whether those interactions are governed independently by separate genes or pleiotropically by shared genes. To provide insight into this question, we employed an association mapping approach in a clonally replicated field experiment of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mec.15013
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15013DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Genetic association with high-resolution climate data reveals selection footprints in the genomes of barley landraces across the Iberian Peninsula.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Estación Experimental de Aula Dei (EEAD-CSIC), Av. Montañana 1005, 50059, Zaragoza, Spain.

Landraces are local populations of crop plants adapted to a particular environment. Extant landraces are surviving genetic archives, keeping signatures of the selection processes experienced by them until settling in their current niches. This study intends to establish relationships between genetic diversity of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mec.15009
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15009DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Evolutionary dynamics of hybridization and introgression following the recent colonization of Glossy Ibis (Aves: Plegadis falcinellus) into the New World.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Museum of Natural Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.

Geographic range shifts can cause secondary contact and hybridization between closely related species, revealing mechanisms of species formation and integrity. These dynamics typically play out in restricted geographic regions, but highly vagile species may experience major distributional changes resulting in broad areas of contact. The Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus) is a dispersive waterbird of the Old World and Australia that colonized eastern North America in the early 19th Century and came into contact with the native White-faced Ibis (P. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15008DOI Listing
January 2019
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Responses of foraminifera communities to aquaculture-derived organic enrichment as revealed by environmental DNA metabarcoding.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 3190 Hammond Bay Road, Nanaimo, BC, Canada, V9T 6N7.

Current monitoring methods to assess benthic impacts of marine finfish aquaculture are either based on complex biological indices or geochemistry data. The former requires benthic macrofauna morpho-taxonomic characterization that is time- and cost-intensive, while the latter provides rapid assessment of the organic enrichment status of sediments but does not directly measure biotic impacts. In this study, sediment samples were collected from seven stations at six salmon farms in British Columbia, Canada, and analyzed for geochemical parameters and by eDNA metabarcoding to investigate linkages between geochemistry and foraminifera. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mec.15007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15007DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Phylogeography, population genetics, and distribution modeling reveal vulnerability of Scirpus longii (Cyperaceae) and the Atlantic Coastal Plain Flora to climate change.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 5. Epub 2019 Jan 5.

Department of Botany, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 430 Lincoln Drive, Madison, WI, 53706.

A proactive approach to conservation must be predictive, anticipating how habitats will change and which species are likely to decline or prosper. We use composite species distribution modeling to identify suitable habitats for 18 members of the North American Atlantic Coastal Plain Flora (ACPF) since the Last Glacial Maximum and project these into the future. We then use Scirpus longii (Cyperaceae), a globally imperiled ACPF sedge with many of the characteristics of extinction vulnerability, as a case study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15006DOI Listing
January 2019

Testing an hypothesis of hybrid zone movement for toads in France.

Mol Ecol 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Taxonomy and Systematics, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Hybrid zone movement may result in substantial unidirectional introgression of selectively neutral material from the local to the advancing species, leaving a genetic footprint. This genetic footprint is represented by a trail of asymmetric tails and displaced cline centres in the wake of the moving hybrid zone. A peak of admixture linkage disequilibrium is predicted to exist ahead of the centre of the moving hybrid zone. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15005DOI Listing
January 2019

The consequences of an introgression event.

Mol Ecol 2018 Dec;27(24):4973-4975

IST Austria, Klosterneuburg, Austria.

Hanemaaijer et al. (Molecular Ecology, 27, 2018) describe the genetic consequences of the introgression of an insecticide resistance allele into a mosquito population. Linked alleles initially increased, but many of these later declined. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.14950DOI Listing
December 2018
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The genetic architecture underlying diapause termination in a planktonic crustacean.

Mol Ecol 2018 Dec 28. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

Laboratory of Aquatic Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, KU, Leuven, Charles Deberiotstraat 32, 3000, Belgium.

Diapause is a feature of the life cycle of many invertebrates by which unfavourable environmental conditions can be outlived. The seasonal timing of diapause allows organisms to adapt to seasonal changes in habitat suitability and thus is key to their fitness. In the planktonic crustacean Daphnia, various cues can induce the production of diapause stages that are resistant to heat, drought or freezing and contain one to two embryos in developmental arrest. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15001DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Early-life telomere length predicts lifespan and lifetime reproductive success in a wild bird.

Mol Ecol 2018 Dec 28. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, 25 Rainforest Walk, Clayton, Victoria, 3800, Australia.

Poor conditions during early development can initiate trade-offs that favour current survival at the expense of somatic maintenance and subsequently, future reproduction. However, the mechanisms that link early and late life-history are largely unknown. Recently it has been suggested that telomeres, the nucleoprotein structures at the terminal end of chromosomes, could link early-life conditions to lifespan and fitness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.15002DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads