354 results match your criteria Molecular Oral Microbiology [Journal]


Resveratrol attenuates the pathogenic and inflammatory properties of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2019 Apr 4. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Oral Ecology Research Group, Faculty of Dentistry, Université Laval, 2420, de la Terrasse, Quebec City, QC, Canada, G1V 0A6.

Porphyromonas gingivalis has been strongly associated with chronic periodontitis, which affects tooth-supporting tissues. This Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium produces a repertoire of virulence factors that modulate tissue destruction directly or indirectly by the induction of inflammatory processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of resveratrol, a major polyphenol found in grapes and wine, on the growth and virulence properties of P. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/omi.12260
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12260DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Induction and Inhibition of Oral Malodor.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2019 Mar 30. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

Department of Preventive and Public Health Dentistry, Fukuoka Dental College.

Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) such as hydrogen sulfide (H S) and methyl mercaptan (CH SH) are the main components of oral malodor, and are produced as the end products of the proteolytic processes of oral microorganisms. The main pathway of proteolysis is the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids by Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria may promote VSC production by Gram-negative anaerobes by cleaving sugar chains from glycoproteins and thus providing proteins. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/omi.12259
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12259DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Plausible role of bacterial toxin anti-toxin system in persister cell formation and elimination.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2019 Mar 19. Epub 2019 Mar 19.

School of Biotechnology, KIIT Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, India.

Although, a large proportion of pathogenic bacteria gets eliminated from hosts after antibiotic treatment, a fraction of population confronts against such effects and undergoes growth arrest to form persisters. Persistence in bacteria is a dormant physiological state where cells escape the effects of antimicrobials as well as other host immune defences without any genetic mutations. The state of dormancy is achieved through various complex phenomena and it is known that, a gene pair named as toxin-anti toxin (TA) acts as key player of persister cell formation where the toxin is activated either stochastically or after an environmental insult, thereby silencing the physiological processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12258DOI Listing

DMBT1 involvement in the human aortic endothelial cell response to Streptococcus mutans.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2019 Mar 12. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Division of Preventive Dentistry, Kagoshima University Hospital, Kagoshima, Japan.

Streptococcus mutans is a causative organism of dental caries and has been reported to be associated with the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous studies have demonstrated that S. mutans invades human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and HAECs invaded by S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12257DOI Listing

The bare necessities: Uncovering essential and condition-critical genes with transposon sequencing.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2019 04 1;34(2):39-50. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Department of Bioengineering and Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois.

Querying gene function in bacteria has been greatly accelerated by the advent of transposon sequencing (Tn-seq) technologies (related Tn-seq strategies are known as TraDIS, INSeq, RB-TnSeq, and HITS). Pooled populations of transposon mutants are cultured in an environment and next-generation sequencing tools are used to determine areas of the genome that are important for bacterial fitness. In this review we provide an overview of Tn-seq methodologies and discuss how Tn-seq has been applied, or could be applied, to the study of oral microbiology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12256DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Global analysis of lysine succinylome in the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2019 04 18;34(2):74-83. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, PR China.

The gram-negative anaerobe Porphyromonas gingivalis is not only a keystone periodontal pathogen but also an emerging systemic pathogen. Although the newly discovered protein post-translational modification (PTM), lysine succinylation (Ksuc), appears to play an important role in modulating metabolic processes in bacteria, this PTM has not been investigated in P gingivalis. In this study, we used a highly sensitive proteomics approach combining affinity enrichment with high-resolution liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to examine Ksuc in P gingivalis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12255DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Streptococcus mutans serotypes and collagen-binding proteins Cnm/Cbm in children with caries analysed by PCR.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2019 04 26;34(2):64-73. Epub 2019 Feb 26.

Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

Streptococcus mutans, a primary bacterium associated with dental caries, has four known clinical serotypes (c, e, fand k). Certain serotypes, the presence of multiple serotypes and strains with collagen-binding proteins (CBP, Cnm and Cbm) have been linked with systemic disease. Evaluation of S mutans serotype distribution and caries association is needed in the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12254DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Regulation of water-soluble glucan synthesis by the Streptococcus mutans dexA gene effects biofilm aggregation and cariogenic pathogenicity.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2019 04 14;34(2):51-63. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Department of Preventive Dentistry, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

The cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans effectively utilizes dietary sucrose for the synthesis of exopolysaccharides (EPS), which act as a scaffold for its biofilm and thus contribute to its cariogenic pathogenicity. Dextranase (Dex), which is a type of glucanase, participates in the degradation of water-soluble glucan (WSG); however, the structural features of the EPS regulated by the dexAgene have received limited attention. Our recent studies reported novel protocols to fractionate and analyzed the structural characteristics of glucans from S mutans biofilms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12253DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

The roles of NADPH oxidase in modulating neutrophil effector responses.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2019 04 7;34(2):27-38. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.

Neutrophils are phagocytic innate immune cells essential for killing bacteria via activation of a wide variety of effector responses and generation of large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Majority of the ROS in neutrophils is generated by activation of the superoxide-generating enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. Independent of their anti-microbial function, NADPH oxidase-derived ROS have emerged as key regulators of host immune responses and neutrophilic inflammation. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/omi.12252
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12252DOI Listing
April 2019
18 Reads

Biofilm-induced profiles of immune response gene expression by oral epithelial cells.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2019 02;34(1)

College of Dentistry, Center for Oral Health Research, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.

This study examined the oral epithelial immunotranscriptome response patterns modulated by oral bacterial planktonic or biofilm challenge. We assessed gene expression patterns when epithelial cells were challenged with a multispecies biofilm composed of Streptococcus gordonii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis representing a type of periodontopathic biofilm compared to challenge with the same species of planktonic bacteria. Of the 579 human immunology genes, a substantial signal of the epithelial cells was observed to 181 genes. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/omi.12251
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12251DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6335182PMC
February 2019
14 Reads

Lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli stimulates osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament stem cells through Wnt/β-catenin-induced TAZ elevation.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2019 02 11;34(1). Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Tissue Regeneration, School of Stomatology, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, China.

Human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), a type of dental tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), can be clinically applied in periodontal tissue regeneration to treat periodontitis, which is initiated and sustained by bacteria. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, is a pertinent deleterious factor in the oral microenvironment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LPS on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs, as well as the mechanisms involved. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/omi.12249
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12249DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Transcriptional responses of Streptococcus gordonii and Fusobacterium nucleatum to coaggregation.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 12;33(6):450-464

School of Dental Sciences, Centre for Oral Health Research, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Cell-cell interactions between genetically distinct bacteria, known as coaggregation, are important for the formation of mixed-species biofilms such as dental plaque. Interactions lead to gene regulation in the partner organisms that may be critical for adaptation and survival in mixed-species biofilms. Here, gene regulation responses to coaggregation between Streptococcus gordonii and Fusobacterium nucleatum were studied using dual RNA-Seq. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/omi.12248
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12248DOI Listing
December 2018
119 Reads
2.784 Impact Factor

Genome editing in Streptococcus mutans through self-targeting CRISPR arrays.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 12 24;33(6):440-449. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Department of Preventive Dentistry, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

Streptococcus mutans is the primary etiological agent of human dental caries. Its major virulence factors, glucosyltransferases (Gtfs), utilize sucrose to synthesize extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), leading to the formation of dental plaque biofilm. The current study was designed to develop a novel self-targeting gene editing technology that targeted gtfs to inhibit biofilms formation. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/omi.12247
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12247DOI Listing
December 2018
29 Reads

Characterization and development of SAPP as a specific peptidic inhibitor that targets Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 12 30;33(6):430-439. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

Department of Oral Biology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, Tennessee.

Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone bacterium in the oral microbial communities that elicits a dysbiosis between the microbiota and the host. Therefore, inhibition of this organism in dental plaques has been one of the strategies for preventing and treating chronic periodontitis. We previously identified a Streptococcal ArcA derived Anti-P gingivalils Peptide (SAPP) that in vitro, is capable of repressing the expression of several virulence genes in the organism. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/omi.12246
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12246DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6246824PMC
December 2018
4 Reads

A tripartite toxin-antitoxin module induced by quorum sensing is associated with the persistence phenotype in Streptococcus mutans.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 12 24;33(6):420-429. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

The oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans communicates using a canonical Gram-positive quorum sensing system, CSP-ComDE. The CSP pheromone already known to be involved in the development of genetic competence positively influences the formation of persisters, dormant variants of regular cells that are highly tolerant to antimicrobial therapy. It is now believed that the persistence phenotype is the end result of a stochastic switch in the expression of toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/omi.12245
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12245DOI Listing
December 2018
10 Reads

The contribution of Tannerella forsythia dipeptidyl aminopeptidase IV in the breakdown of collagen.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 12 5;33(6):407-419. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

In this study, we characterized a serine protease from Tannerella forsythia that degrades gelatin, type I, and III collagen. Tannerella forsythia is associated with periodontitis progression and severity. The primary goal of this research was to understand the mechanisms by which T. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12244DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6246789PMC
December 2018
3 Reads

Lactobacillus rhamnosus LRB mediated inhibition of oral streptococci.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 10;33(5):396-405

Department of Microbiology, Molecular Genetics and Immunology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas.

Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a lactic acid bacterium with a diverse ecological habitat. We recently isolated a L. rhamnosus strain (LRB) from a healthy baby-tooth that had naturally fallen out. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12242DOI Listing
October 2018
24 Reads

Porphyromonas gingivalis inhibits M2 activation of macrophages by suppressing α-ketoglutarate production in mice.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 10 19;33(5):388-395. Epub 2018 Aug 19.

Department of Periodontics, The Affiliated Stomatology Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai, China.

Reprograming of metabolic pathways is critical in governing the polarization of macrophages into classical proinflammatory M1 or alternative anti-inflammatory M2 phenotypes in metabolic diseases, such as diabetes. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a keystone pathogen of periodontitis, causes an imbalance in M1/M2 activation, resulting in a hyperinflammatory environment that promotes the pathogenesis of periodontitis. However, whether P. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12241DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Antibiotics alter the window of competence for natural transformation in streptococci.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 10 27;33(5):378-387. Epub 2018 Aug 27.

Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Streptococcus pneumoniae transformation occurs within a short competence window, during which the alternative sigma factor X (SigX) is activated to orchestrate the expression of genes allowing extracellular DNA uptake and recombination. Importantly, antibiotic stress promotes transcriptional changes that may affect more than 20% of the S. pneumoniae genome, including competence genes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12240DOI Listing
October 2018
5 Reads

Transcriptome analysis of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Acinetobacter baumannii in polymicrobial communities.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 10 3;33(5):364-377. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

Department of Oral Immunology and Infectious Diseases, University of Louisville School of Dentistry, Louisville, Kentucky.

Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial, opportunistic pathogen that causes several serious conditions including meningitis, septicemia, endocarditis, and pneumonia. It can be found in the oral biofilm, which may be a reservoir for pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Subgingival colonization by A. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12238DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6158049PMC
October 2018
9 Reads

Live and let die: Hydrogen peroxide production by the commensal flora and its role in maintaining a symbiotic microbiome.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 10 15;33(5):337-352. Epub 2018 Jul 15.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon.

The majority of commensal oral streptococci are able to generate hydrogen peroxide (H O ) during aerobic growth, which can diffuse through the cell membrane and inhibit competing species in close proximity. Competing H O production is mainly dependent upon the pyruvate oxidase SpxB, and to a lesser extent the lactate oxidase LctO, both of which are important for energy generation in aerobic environments. Several studies point to a broad impact of H O production in the oral environment, including a potential role in biofilm homeostasis, signaling, and interspecies interactions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12231DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6158098PMC
October 2018
5 Reads

Deficiency of BrpA in Streptococcus mutans reduces virulence in rat caries model.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 10 17;33(5):353-363. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Center for Oral Biology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York.

Our recent studies have shown that BrpA in Streptococcus mutans plays a critical role in cell envelope biogenesis, stress responses, and biofilm formation. In this study, a 10-species consortium was used to assess how BrpA deficiency influences the establishment, persistence, and competitiveness of S. mutans during growth in a community under conditions typical of the oral cavity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12230DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6158100PMC
October 2018
22 Reads

Potential role for Streptococcus gordonii-derived hydrogen peroxide in heme acquisition by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 08;33(4):322-335

School of Dentistry, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.

Streptococcus gordonii, an accessory pathogen and early colonizer of plaque, co-aggregates with many oral species including Porphyromonas gingivalis. It causes α-hemolysis on blood agar, a process mediated by H O and thought to involve concomitant oxidation of hemoglobin (Hb). Porphyromonas gingivalis has a growth requirement for heme, which is acquired mainly from Hb. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12229DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Tobacco-induced suppression of the vascular response to dental plaque.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 08 1;33(4):271-282. Epub 2018 Jul 1.

Department of Oral Immunology and Infectious Diseases, School of Dentistry, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA.

Cigarette smoking presents oral health professionals with a clinical and research conundrum: reduced periodontal vascular responsiveness to the oral biofilm accompanied by increased susceptibility to destructive periodontal diseases. This presents a significant problem, hampering diagnosis and complicating treatment planning. The aim of this review is to summarize contemporary hypotheses that help to explain mechanistically the phenomenon of a suppressed bleeding response to dysbiotic plaque in the periodontia of smokers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12228DOI Listing
August 2018
5 Reads

Periodontal infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis induces preterm birth and lower birth weight in rats.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 08 25;33(4):312-321. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology & Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, Ministry of Education, School & Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.

Preterm birth (PTB), accompanied by low birth weight (LBW) or not, is a syndrome with tremendous risk factors and long-term health consequences for children. In recent decades, overwhelming studies have shown that periodontitis contributes to prematurity and LBW. This study was conducted to determine the link between maternal periodontitis and the pathogenesis of PTB and/or LBW through a rat infection model induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontopathic bacterium. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12227DOI Listing
August 2018
6 Reads

Activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages by mycoplasmal lipoproteins and lipopeptides.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 08 29;33(4):300-311. Epub 2018 May 29.

Department of Oral Molecular Microbiology, Faculty of Dental Medicine and Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.

The NLRP3 inflammasome, an intracellular sensor consisting of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3), the adaptor protein apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase-recruitment domain (ASC), and procaspase-1, plays critical roles in host defense against microbial pathogens by inducing production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18. Mycoplasma salivarium and Mycoplasma pneumoniae cells activated murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) to induce production of IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-18. The IL-1β production-inducing activities of these mycoplasmas toward BMMs from Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-deficient mice were significantly attenuated compared with those from C57BL/6 mice (B6BMMs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12225DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Tannerella forsythia-produced methylglyoxal causes accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts to trigger cytokine secretion in human monocytes.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 08 2;33(4):292-299. Epub 2018 May 2.

Department of Oral Biology, School of Public Health and Health Related Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA.

The periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia has the unique ability to produce methylglyoxal (MGO), an electrophilic compound which can covalently modify amino acid side chains and generate inflammatory adducts known as advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). In periodontitis, concentrations of MGO in gingival-crevicular fluid are increased and are correlated with the T. forsythia load. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12224DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6041129PMC
August 2018
6 Reads

Antigen I/II mediates interactions between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 08 26;33(4):283-291. Epub 2018 Apr 26.

Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.

Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are frequently co-isolated from dental plaque of children with early childhood caries (ECC) and are only rarely found in children without ECC, suggesting that these species interact in a manner that contributes to the pathogenesis of ECC. Previous studies have demonstrated that glucans produced by S. mutans are crucial for promoting the formation of biofilm and cariogenicity with C. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12223DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6041162PMC
August 2018
10 Reads

Whole genome sequence and phenotypic characterization of a Cbm serotype e strain of Streptococcus mutans.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 06 17;33(3):257-269. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Department of Oral Biology, University of Florida, College of Dentistry, Gainesville, FL, USA.

We report the whole genome sequence of the serotype e Cbm strain LAR01 of Streptococcus mutans, a dental pathogen frequently associated with extra-oral infections. The LAR01 genome is a single circular chromosome of 2.1 Mb with a GC content of 36. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12222DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5945312PMC
June 2018
9 Reads

Plasminogen binding and degradation by Treponema denticola: Identification of the plasminogen binding interface on the FhbB protein.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 06 23;33(3):249-256. Epub 2018 Apr 23.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, VA, USA.

Treponema denticola is a proteolytic-anaerobic spirochete whose abundance in the subgingival crevice correlates with periodontal disease severity. Treponema denticola evades serum-mediated killing through the binding of factor H (FH), a negative regulator of the complement system. The T. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12221DOI Listing
June 2018
10 Reads

In vivo expression of proteases and protease inhibitor, a serpin, by periodontal pathogens at teeth and implants.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 06 17;33(3):240-248. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Department of Periodontology, University of Bern, School of Dental Medicine, Bern, Switzerland.

Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia secrete proteases, gingipains and KLIKK-proteases. In addition, T. forsythia produces a serpin (miropin) with broad inhibitory spectrum. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12220DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5945316PMC
June 2018
8 Reads

Porphyromonas gingivalis: the gift of community involvement.

Authors:
H M Fletcher

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 04 20;33(2):111-112. Epub 2018 Feb 20.

Division of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Department of Basic Sciences, School of Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12218DOI Listing
April 2018
6 Reads

Historical aspects of studies on roles of the inflammasome in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases.

Authors:
K Shibata

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 06 20;33(3):203-211. Epub 2018 Feb 20.

Department of Oral Molecular Microbiology, Faculty of Dental Medicine and Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido, Japan.

The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is produced as inactive proIL-1β and then processed by caspase-1 to become active. In 2002, it was demonstrated that the intracellular multiprotein complex known as the inflammasome functions as a molecular platform to trigger activation of caspase-1. Inflammasomes are known to function as intracellular sensors for a broad spectrum of various pathogen-associated and damage-associated molecular patterns. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12217DOI Listing
June 2018
7 Reads

Streptococcus oralis maintains homeostasis in oral biofilms by antagonizing the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 06 20;33(3):234-239. Epub 2018 Feb 20.

Division of Oral Diseases, Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Bacteria residing in oral biofilms live in a state of dynamic equilibrium with one another. The intricate synergistic or antagonistic interactions between them are crucial for determining this balance. Using the six-species Zürich "supragingival" biofilm model, this study aimed to investigate interactions regarding growth and localization of the constituent species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12216DOI Listing
June 2018
6 Reads

Identification and functional characterization of type II toxin/antitoxin systems in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 06 20;33(3):224-233. Epub 2018 Feb 20.

Department of Oral Immunology and Infectious Disease, University of Louisville School of Dentistry, Louisville, KY, USA.

Type II toxin/antitoxin (TA) systems contribute to the formation of persister cells and biofilm formation for many organisms. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans thrives in the complex oral microbial community subjected to continual environmental flux. Little is known regarding the presence and function of type II TA systems in this organism or their contribution to adaptation and persistence in the biofilm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12215DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5969271PMC
June 2018
10 Reads

Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis and associated infections in a novel organotypic model.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 06 20;33(3):212-223. Epub 2018 Feb 20.

Department of Oral Health and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA.

Oral mucositis is a common side effect of cancer chemotherapy, with significant adverse impact on the delivery of anti-neoplastic treatment. There is a lack of consensus regarding the role of oral commensal microorganisms in the initiation or progression of mucositis because relevant experimental models are non-existent. The goal of this study was to develop an in vitro mucosal injury model that mimics chemotherapy-induced mucositis, where the effect of oral commensals can be studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12214DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5945319PMC
June 2018
10 Reads

The competence system of Streptococcus anginosus and its use for genetic engineering.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 04 12;33(2):194-202. Epub 2018 Feb 12.

Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hospital Hygiene, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.

Streptococcus anginosus is considered a human commensal but improvements in species identification in recent years have highlighted its role as an emerging pathogen. However, our knowledge about the pathogenicity mechanisms in this species is scarce. One reason for this is the lack of published genetic manipulation techniques in the S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12213DOI Listing
April 2018
8 Reads

Extracellular matrix influence in Streptococcus mutans gene expression in a cariogenic biofilm.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 04 12;33(2):181-193. Epub 2018 Feb 12.

Department of Dental Materials and Prosthodontics, São Paulo State University (Unesp), School of Dentistry, Araraquara, São Paulo, Brazil.

Caries etiology is biofilm-diet-dependent. Biofilms are highly dynamic and structured microbial communities enmeshed in a three-dimensional extracellular matrix. The study evaluated the expression dynamics of Streptococcus mutans genes associated with exopolysaccharides (EPS) (gtfBCD, gbpB, dexA), lipoteichoic acids (LTA) (dltABCD, SMU_775c) and extracellular DNA (eDNA) (lytST, lrgAB, ccpA) during matrix development within a mixed-species biofilm of S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12212DOI Listing
April 2018
7 Reads

Peptidoglycan synthesis in Tannerella forsythia: Scavenging is the modus operandi.

Authors:
A Ruscitto A Sharma

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 04 12;33(2):125-132. Epub 2018 Feb 12.

Department of Oral Biology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA.

Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative oral pathogen strongly associated with periodontitis. This bacterium has an absolute requirement for exogenous N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc), an amino sugar that forms the repeating disaccharide unit with amino sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) of the peptidoglycan backbone. In silico genome analysis indicates that T. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12210DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6167743PMC
April 2018
8 Reads

In silico analysis of the competition between Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mutans in the dental biofilm.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 04 1;33(2):168-180. Epub 2018 Feb 1.

Cariology Unit, Department of Oral Rehabilitation and Interdisciplinary Excellence Research Program on Healthy Aging (PIEI-ES), University of Talca, Talca, Chile.

During dental caries, the dental biofilm modifies the composition of the hundreds of involved bacterial species. Changing environmental conditions influence competition. A pertinent model to exemplify the complex interplay of the microorganisms in the human dental biofilm is the competition between Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mutans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12209DOI Listing
April 2018
8 Reads

Immune response profiling of primary monocytes and oral keratinocytes to different Tannerella forsythia strains and their cell surface mutants.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 04 7;33(2):155-167. Epub 2018 Feb 7.

Department of NanoBiotechnology, NanoGlycobiology unit, Universität für Bodenkultur Wien, Vienna, Austria.

The oral pathogen Tannerella forsythia possesses a unique surface (S-) layer with a complex O-glycan containing a bacterial sialic acid mimic in the form of either pseudaminic acid or legionaminic acid at its terminal position. We hypothesize that different T. forsythia strains employ these stereoisomeric sugar acids for interacting with the immune system and resident host tissues in the periodontium. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12208DOI Listing
April 2018
8 Reads

Extracellular proteinases of Candida species pathogenic yeasts.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 04 19;33(2):113-124. Epub 2018 Jan 19.

Department of Analytical Biochemistry, Faculty of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland.

The increased incidence of severe disseminated infections caused by the opportunistic yeast-like fungi Candida spp. highlights the urgent need for research into the major virulence factors of these pathogens-extracellular aspartic proteinases of the candidapepsin and yapsin families. Classically, these enzymes were considered to be generally destructive factors that damage host tissues and provide nutrients for pathogen propagation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12206DOI Listing
April 2018
5 Reads

ArcR modulates biofilm formation in the dental plaque colonizer Streptococcus gordonii.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 04 25;33(2):143-154. Epub 2018 Jan 25.

School of Dental Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Biofilm formation and cell-cell sensing by the pioneer dental plaque colonizer Streptococcus gordonii are dependent upon arginine. This study aimed to identify genetic factors linking arginine-dependent responses and biofilm formation in S. gordonii. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12207DOI Listing
April 2018
5 Reads

Cultivation of Peptidiphaga gingivicola from subgingival plaque: The first representative of a novel genus of Actinomycetaceae.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 02 7;33(1):105-110. Epub 2017 Dec 7.

Division of Biosciences, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, Columbus, OH, USA.

A novel bacterium was isolated from the subgingival plaque of a patient with periodontal disease. Bacterial strain BA112 is a facultative Gram-positive coccus. It metabolizes alanine, arginine, glycine, histidine, leucine, proline, serine and tyrosine, but does not appear to use carbohydrates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12205DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5771945PMC
February 2018
10 Reads

Role of extracytoplasmic function sigma factor PG1660 (RpoE) in the oxidative stress resistance regulatory network of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 02 15;33(1):89-104. Epub 2017 Dec 15.

Division of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Department of Basic Sciences, School of Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA.

In Porphyromonas gingivalis, the protein PG1660, composed of 174 amino acids, is annotated as an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor (RpoE homologue-σ24). Because PG1660 can modulate several virulence factors and responds to environmental signals in P. gingivalis, its genetic properties were evaluated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12204DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5823243PMC
February 2018
10 Reads

Response of MG63 osteoblasts on bacterial challenge is dependent on the state of differentiation.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 04 26;33(2):133-142. Epub 2017 Dec 26.

Department of Periodontology, Operative and Preventive Dentistry, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.

The present in vitro study examines molecular processes that are relevant during bone homeostasis after Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis infection with a focus on the differentiation level of osteoblasts. Regenerative processes are often hindered by the recurrence of bacterial infections, which can ultimately provoke a severe destruction of bone tissue. To obtain more detailed insights into such a complex scenario, we have used undifferentiated MG63 osteoblast-like cells as an experimental paradigm to examine the impact of two oral pathogens, A. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12203DOI Listing
April 2018
6 Reads

Immunoprotective effects of a hemin-binding peptide derived from hemagglutinin-2 against infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 02 9;33(1):81-88. Epub 2017 Nov 9.

Beijing Institute for Dental Research, Beijing Stomatological Hospital and School of Stomatology, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

The principal etiologic agent in periodontal disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis, generates cysteine proteases that bind heme with domains such as hemagglutinin-2 (HA2). High-affinity HA2-hemin binding supplies the porphyrin and ferric iron needed for growth and virulence. The DHYAVMISK peptide, recently identified at the hemin-binding site of HA2, inhibits hemin binding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12202DOI Listing
February 2018
19 Reads

Two-dimensional and three-dimensional models for studying atherosclerosis pathogenesis induced by periodontopathogenic microorganisms.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 02 6;33(1):29-37. Epub 2017 Nov 6.

Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Pharmacy, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, Colombia.

Epidemiological studies have established a clinical association between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis. Bacteremia and endotoxemia episodes in patients with periodontitis appear to link these two diseases by inducing a body-wide production of cardiovascular markers. The presence of oral bacteria in atherosclerotic lesions in patients with periodontitis suggests that bacteria, or their antigenic components, induce alterations in the endothelium associated with atherosclerosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12201DOI Listing
February 2018
9 Reads

Metabolic nuclear receptors in periodontal host-microbe interactions and inflammation.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2017 12 5;32(6):443-445. Epub 2017 Oct 5.

Department of Oral Immunology and Infectious Diseases, School of Dentistry, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12198DOI Listing
December 2017
6 Reads

Identification of genes encoding glycosyltransferases involved in lipopolysaccharide synthesis in Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 02 17;33(1):68-80. Epub 2017 Nov 17.

Department of Microbiology and Oral Infection, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.

Porphyromonas gingivalis can synthesize both A-LPS and O-LPS lipopolysaccharides, which contain anionic O-polysaccharides and conventional O-polysaccharides, respectively. A-LPS can anchor virulence proteins to the cell surface, so elucidating the mechanism of A-LPS synthesis is important for understanding the pathogenicity of this bacterium. To identify the genes involved in LPS synthesis, we focused on uncharacterized genes encoding the glycosyltransferases, PGN_0361, PGN_1239, PGN_1240 and PGN_1668, which were tentatively named gtfC, gtfD, gtfE and gtfF, respectively, and characterized their mutants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12200DOI Listing
February 2018
9 Reads