118 results match your criteria Mesenteric Adenitis Imaging


The role of abdominal ultrasound in the management of excessive crying in infants.

Pan Afr Med J 2018 28;30:68. Epub 2018 May 28.

Paediatric Medical Emergency Department, Children's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco.

Excessive or persistent crying is a common presentation to the pediatric emergency department, and often poses a diagnostic dilemma to emergency physicians. There are several reasons for excessive or persistent crying in children, ranging from benign causes like hunger, to life-threatening causes such as intussusception. The objective of this work is to specify the place of abdominal ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of incessant cries in the infant. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2018.30.68.12058DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6191276PMC
October 2018
2 Reads

Hypercalcemia as a rare presentation of angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma: a case report.

J Med Case Rep 2018 Apr 20;12(1):101. Epub 2018 Apr 20.

Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Rochester Hills, MI, USA.

Background: Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma is a rare malignancy, accounting for only 2% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas, first described in the 1970s and subsequently accepted as a distinct entity in the current World Health Organization classification. Due to the paucity of this disease, there is still no identifiable etiology, no consistent risk factors, and the pathogenesis remains unclear.

Case Presentation: An 83-year-old Caucasian man presented to an emergency department with palpitations and was found to have atrial fibrillation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13256-018-1669-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5909213PMC
April 2018
6 Reads

Course of acute nonspecific mesenteric lymphadenitis: single-center experience.

Eur J Pediatr 2018 Feb 14;177(2):243-246. Epub 2017 Sep 14.

Pediatric Department of Southern Switzerland, San Giovanni Hospital, 6500, Bellinzona, Switzerland.

Available reports dealing with acute nonspecific mesenteric lymphadenitis do not address the total duration of symptoms. However, it is commonly assumed a time for recovery ≤ 4 weeks. The purpose of this report was to investigate the course of acute nonspecific mesenteric lymphadenitis in childhood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-017-3010-0DOI Listing
February 2018
35 Reads

Acute Nonspecific Mesenteric Lymphadenitis: More Than "No Need for Surgery".

Biomed Res Int 2017 2;2017:9784565. Epub 2017 Feb 2.

Pediatric Emergency Department, Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy; Pediatric Unit, Università degli Studi di Milano, Foundation IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.

Acute nonspecific, or primary, mesenteric lymphadenitis is a self-limiting inflammatory condition affecting the mesenteric lymph nodes, whose presentation mimics appendicitis or intussusception. It typically occurs in children, adolescents, and young adults. White blood count and C-reactive protein are of limited usefulness in distinguishing between patients with and without mesenteric lymphadenitis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2017/9784565DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5312252PMC
April 2017
29 Reads

Characteristics of mesenteric lymphadenitis in comparison with those of acute appendicitis in children.

Eur J Pediatr 2017 Feb 16;176(2):199-205. Epub 2016 Dec 16.

Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.

Mesenteric lymphadenitis (ML) is considered as one of the most common alternative diagnosis in a child with suspected acute appendicitis (AA). In this retrospective study, patients diagnosed with ML (n = 99) were compared in terms of demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings to patients diagnosed with AA (n = 102). This comparison was applied for both lymph nodes smaller and larger than 10 mm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-016-2822-7DOI Listing
February 2017
33 Reads

A rare cause of colonic thickening and lymphadenopathy.

Gut 2017 01 27;66(1):78. Epub 2016 Jun 27.

Translational Gastroenterology Unit, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gutjnl-2016-311433DOI Listing
January 2017
9 Reads

Is mesenteric lymphadenitis a cause of ovarian reserve reduction? - Case Report.

JBRA Assist Reprod 2016 Mar 1;20(1):41-3. Epub 2016 Mar 1.

Assisted Reproduction Center - Department Gynecology and Obstetrics - Medical School - University of Ribeirão Preto (UNAERP), Ribeirão Preto/SP - Brazil.

Mesenteric lymphadenitis is a clinical condition that affects mostly children and teenagers. Its symptoms include fever, severe abdominal pain, nausea, and, in some cases, diarrhea, constipation, and acute abdomen. This paper describes the case of a 16-year-old patient with mesenteric lymphadenitis submitted to an exploratory laparoscopy for suppurative lymph nodes that evolved to a drastic reduction of ovarian reserve. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5935/1518-0557.20160010DOI Listing
March 2016
10 Reads

Sonography of Abdominal Pain in Children: Appendicitis and Its Common Mimics.

J Ultrasound Med 2016 Mar 18;35(3):627-35. Epub 2016 Feb 18.

Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center Children's Hospital, Sacramento California USA (T.R.S., R.S.-W.); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California USA (M.T.C., R.S.-W.); and University of California, Davis, Sacramento, California USA (A.D.).

Abdominal pain is very common in the pediatric population (<18 years of age). Sonography is a safe modality that can often differentiate the frequently encountered causes of abdominal pain in children. This pictorial essay will discuss the sonographic findings of acute appendicitis, including the imaging appearance of a perforated appendicitis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7863/ultra.15.04047DOI Listing
March 2016
9 Reads

Rapid acquisition axial and coronal T2 HASTE MR in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain.

Eur J Radiol 2016 Jan 9;85(1):286-290. Epub 2015 Oct 9.

Diagnostic Imaging, Royal Preston Hospital, Sharoe Green Lane, Preston, Lancashire PR2 9HT, UK. Electronic address:

Purpose: To assess T2 HASTE MR in acute abdominal imaging and ascertain if it is a reliable alternative to CT in patients under 60.

Method And Materials: In a prospective diagnostic performance study from January 2009 to December 2013, patients under 60 presenting with acute abdominal pain, that required imaging following surgical review, were imaged with T2 HASTE MR. Rapid acquisition HASTE (Half Fourier Acquisition Single Shot Turbo Spin Echo) coronal and axial sequences were obtained, without intravenous contrast. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0720048X153012
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2015.10.002DOI Listing
January 2016
15 Reads

Evaluating the Patient with Right Lower Quadrant Pain.

Radiol Clin North Am 2015 Nov 13;53(6):1159-70. Epub 2015 Aug 13.

NorthShore University HealthSystem, University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine, 2650 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, IL 60201, USA.

Right lower quadrant pain is one of the most common indications for imaging evaluation of the abdomen in the emergency department setting. This article reviews important imaging findings associated with acute appendicitis as well as major differential considerations including: mesenteric adenitis, Meckel diverticulum, neutropenic colitis, right-sided diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, omental infarction, and inflammatory bowel diseaseRight lower quadrant pain is one of the most common indications for imaging evaluation of the abdomen in the emergency department setting. This article reviews important imaging findings associated with acute appendicitis as well as major differential considerations including: mesenteric adenitis, Meckel diverticulum, neutropenic colitis, right-sided diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, omental infarction, and inflammatory bowel disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rcl.2015.06.004DOI Listing
November 2015
4 Reads

Alternative diagnoses at paediatric appendicitis MRI.

Clin Radiol 2015 Aug 11;70(8):881-9. Epub 2015 Jun 11.

Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, The Pennsylvania State University, College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA.

As the utilization of MRI in the assessment for paediatric appendicitis increases in clinical practice, it is important to recognize alternative diagnoses as the cause of abdominal pain. The purpose of this review is to share our institution's experience using MRI in the evaluation of 510 paediatric patients presenting with suspected appendicitis over a 30 month interval (July 2011 to December 2013). An alternative diagnosis was documented in 98/510 (19. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crad.2015.03.001DOI Listing
August 2015
4 Reads
1.663 Impact Factor

Sonographic distinction between acute suppurative appendicitis and viral appendiceal lymphoid hyperplasia ("pink appendix") with pathological correlation.

Ultrasound Q 2015 Jun;31(2):95-8

Departments of *Radiology and †Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.

The viral etiology of mesenteric lymphadenitis may also affect the lymphoid tissue of the appendix in children giving rise to symptomatic appendiceal lymphoid hyperplasia, the so-called "pink appendix." The present study used ultrasound (US) to determine if certain sonographic features correlated with appendiceal pathological findings. Our results indicate that a fluid-filled appendix always correlates with a suppurative or mixed pathological appearance that likely merits surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RUQ.0000000000000146DOI Listing
June 2015
10 Reads

Diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced MR for acute appendicitis and alternative causes of abdominal pain in children.

Pediatr Radiol 2014 Aug 29;44(8):948-55. Epub 2014 Mar 29.

Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, 200 W. Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA, 92103-8756, USA,

Objective: Unenhanced MRI has emerged as a useful tool for diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis. The use of contrast-enhanced MRI for diagnosing pediatric appendicitis has not been documented. The purpose of this study is to examine the diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced MRI for acute appendicitis and alternative entities in the pediatric population presenting with acute abdominal pain. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s00247-014-2952
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00247-014-2952-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-014-2952-xDOI Listing
August 2014
4 Reads

The role of US in finding intussusception and alternative diagnosis: a report of 100 pediatric cases.

Acta Radiol 2015 Feb 13;56(2):228-33. Epub 2014 Feb 13.

Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Kangwon-do, Republic of Korea.

Background: The clinical diagnosis of intussusception remains challenging, because many children with intussusception may present with non-specific signs and symptoms, which overlap with other conditions. Therefore imaging, in particular ultrasonography (US), plays a significant role in the management of these patients.

Purpose: To evaluate how US can contribute to the diagnosis in clinically suspected intussusception and finding alternative diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0284185114524088DOI Listing
February 2015
4 Reads

Mesenteric lymph node abscess due to Yersinia enterocolitica: case report and review of the literature.

Clin J Gastroenterol 2014 Feb 9;7(1):41-7. Epub 2014 Jan 9.

Department of Gastroenterology, Akita University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita, 010-8543, Japan.

We describe the case of a 74-year-old female with a mesenteric lymph node abscess caused by a Yersinia enterocolitica infection. She had been administered an immunosuppressive drug and was admitted to the hospital due to a high fever, right lower abdominal pain and advanced leukocytosis. We initially diagnosed her with lymphadenitis based on the symptoms and the imaging studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12328-013-0452-4DOI Listing
February 2014
8 Reads

Etiology of non-traumatic acute abdomen in pediatric emergency departments.

World J Clin Cases 2013 Dec;1(9):276-84

Wen-Chieh Yang, Chun-Yu Chen, Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Changhua Christian Hospital, 500 Changhua, Taiwan.

Acute abdominal pain is a common complaint in pediatric emergency departments. A complete evaluation is the key factor approaching the disease and should include the patient's age, any trauma history, the onset and chronicity of the pain, the related symptoms and a detailed physical examination. The aim of this review article is to provide some information for physicians in pediatric emergency departments, with the age factors and several causes of non-traumatic acute abdominal pain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12998/wjcc.v1.i9.276DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3868711PMC
December 2013
6 Reads

Cross-sectional imaging of nontraumatic peritoneal and mesenteric emergencies.

Can Assoc Radiol J 2013 May 22;64(2):148-53. Epub 2013 Mar 22.

Division of Emergency/Trauma Radiology, Department of Radiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Multiple nontraumatic peritoneal and mesenteric emergencies are encountered at imaging of patients in the emergency department. Peritoneal and mesenteric emergencies are usually detected in patients in the emergency department during evaluation of nonspecific abdominal pain. A high index of suspicion is required for the establishment of early diagnosis and aversion of life-threatening complications in cases of peritoneal carcinomatosis, nontraumatic hemoperitoneum, and peritonitis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carj.2013.02.001DOI Listing
May 2013
2 Reads

Diagnostic approach and management of acute abdominal pain.

Acta Med Indones 2012 Oct;44(4):344-50

Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia - Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. Jl. Diponegoro no. 71, Jakarta Pusat 10430, Indonesia.

The incidence of acute abdominal pain ranges between 5-10% of all visits at emergency department. Abdominal emergencies of hospital visits may include surgical and non-surgical emergencies. The most common causes of acute abdomen are appendicitis, biliary colic, cholecystitis, diverticulitis, bowel obstruction, visceral perforation, pancreatitis, peritonitis, salpingitis, mesenteric adenitis and renal colic. Read More

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October 2012
2 Reads

Infection of the right iliac fossa.

Diagn Interv Imaging 2012 Jun 1;93(6):441-52. Epub 2012 Jun 1.

Medical Imaging Department, hôpital Lapeyronie, 371, avenue du Doyen Gaston-Giraud, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France.

Febrile pain in the right iliac fossa is one of the most common reasons for consulting at an emergency service. Within this framework, the main diagnosis that is considered is appendicitis, the main complication of which is perforation. However, a certain number of other conditions can be responsible for this clinical picture, primarily including digestive tract and mesentery disorders including mesenteric lymphadenitis, Crohn's disease, infectious enterocolitis, small intestine or colonic diverticulitis, ischaemic colitis or cancer of the caecum. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diii.2012.04.026DOI Listing
June 2012
7 Reads

Nongynecologic findings on pelvic ultrasound: focus on gastrointestinal diseases.

Ultrasound Q 2012 Jun;28(2):65-85

Department of Radiology, Jefferson Medical College, Jefferson Ultrasound Research & Education Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107-5244, USA.

Ultrasound (US) is considered the first-line imaging modality of choice in women presenting with pelvic complaints. Although imaging is focused on detecting abnormalities of the uterus and adnexa, occasionally nongynecologic findings are detected, which may or may not explain the patient's symptoms. Many of these findings are related to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RUQ.0b013e31824f933aDOI Listing
June 2012
8 Reads

[Mesadenitis in children with acute abdominal pain syndrome: clinical and echographic parallels].

Vestn Rentgenol Radiol 2011 Jul-Aug(3):45-8

The paper pools the experience of ultrasound assessment of acute mesadenitis in children with acute abdominal pain syndrome. It reviews the literature on its etiology, pathology, and diagnosis and treatment principles. B-mode and Doppler echograms made by general practice ultrasound diagnosticians are shown. Read More

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February 2012
2 Reads

Incidentally detected misty mesentery on CT: risk of malignancy correlates with mesenteric lymph node size.

J Comput Assist Tomogr 2012 Jan-Feb;36(1):26-9

Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.

Objective: To determine the natural history of incidentally detected misty mesentery on computed tomography (CT) and to correlate the risk of malignancy with size of mesenteric lymph nodes.

Methods: A retrospective review of all CT abdomen/pelvic examinations from January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2008 identified cases of misty mesentery. The largest mesenteric lymph node was measured, and additional areas of lymphadenopathy were identified. Read More

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http://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:land
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RCT.0b013e3182436c4dDOI Listing
April 2012
21 Reads

Coeliac disease inducing mesenteric lymphadenopathy and intussusception.

Intern Med J 2011 May;41(5):434

Warrington Hospital, Gastroenterology, Warrington, Cheshire, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1445-5994.2011.02476.xDOI Listing
May 2011
3 Reads

Acute mesenteric adenitis mimicking appendicitis in an HIV patient.

Intern Med 2011 1;50(7):783. Epub 2011 Apr 1.

Department of Internal Medicine, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taiwan.

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July 2011
4 Reads

Ultrasound for pelvic pain II: nongynecologic causes.

Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am 2011 Mar;38(1):69-83, viii

Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.

Acute pelvic pain in women is a common presenting complaint that can result from various conditions. Because these conditions can be of gynecologic or nongynecologic origin, they may pose a challenge to the diagnostic acumen of physicians, including radiologists. A thorough workup should include clinical history, physical examination, laboratory data, and appropriate imaging studies, all of which should be available to the radiologist for evaluation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ogc.2011.02.004DOI Listing
March 2011
4 Reads

Clinical differentiation between acute appendicitis and acute mesenteric lymphadenitis in children.

Eur J Pediatr Surg 2011 Mar 14;21(2):120-3. Epub 2010 Dec 14.

Leiden University Medical Center, Surgery, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Introduction: Acute mesenteric lymphadenitis in children has a clinical presentation very similar to that of acute appendicitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether it is possible to clinically differentiate between acute appendicitis and acute mesenteric lymphadenitis in children.

Methods: A prospective cohort analysis was performed for all children (<17 years) presenting to the emergency department of our institution with acute abdominal pain between June 2005 and July 2006. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0030-1267979DOI Listing
March 2011
3 Reads

Cavitating mesenteric lymph node syndrome: a rare complication of refractory celiac disease.

Z Gastroenterol 2010 Sep 13;48(9):1133-7. Epub 2010 Sep 13.

Medical Department III, University Hospital Aachen, RWTH Aachen, Aachen, Germany.

Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy characterized by mucosal inflammation and villous atrophy of the small bowel upon exposure to ingested gluten. Refractory celiac disease (RCD), defined as persisting villous atrophy with crypt hyperplasia despite strict gluten-free diet, is a rare form of celiac disease with poor prognosis due to a higher rate of severe complications such as life-threatening malnutrition or the development of intestinal T-cell lymphoma. The cavitating mesenteric lymph node syndrome (CMLNS) represents a rare complication of celiac disease with unknown pathogenesis which is associated with but not restricted to RCD and not necessarily associated with a malignant course. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0028-1109948DOI Listing
September 2010
4 Reads

Two cases of disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection associated with a new immunodeficiency syndrome related to CXCR4 dysfunctions.

Clin Microbiol Infect 2011 Feb;17(2):135-9

Service d'Hématologie Clinique, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Rennes, Rennes, France.

Disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection is a rare but severe disease mostly seen in patients with AIDS. It has been previously described in patients suffering from other kinds of immunodeficiency (e.g. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1198743X1461651
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-0691.2010.03187.xDOI Listing
February 2011
9 Reads

[Unexplained lymphadenopathy: Whipple disease].

Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2009 ;153:B497

Tergooiziekenhuizen, locatie Hilversum, Afd. Interne Geneeskunde, Hilversum, The Netherlands.

A 58-year-old man was referred to the internal medicine outpatient department because of abdominal pain and lymphadenopathy. CT imaging revealed multiple mediastinal, para-aortic, mesenteric and pelvic lymphoma. Biopsy of an inguinal lymph node for histology purposes revealed granulomatous lymphadenitis. Read More

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February 2010
6 Reads

In disguise as an acute flare: an unusual differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease.

Gut 2009 Jun;58(6):742, 832

Department of Medicine I, J-W-Goethe University Frankfurt, D-60590 Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/gut.2008.167874DOI Listing
June 2009
3 Reads

Systemic phaeohyphomycosis due to Exophiala (Wangiella) in an immunocompetent child.

Med Mycol 2009 ;47(6):653-7

Pediatric Infectious Diseases Department, Cukurova University, Adana, Turkey.

We report a rare case of systemic lymphadenitis and hepatic involvement due to Exophiala (Wangiella) dermatitidis in a pediatric patient. An 8-year-old immunocompetent boy with chronic fever was examined through the use of sonography and CT scan which demonstrated cervical and mesenteric lymph node enlargement and numerous small hepatic lesions. The etiologic agent was isolated by means of lymph node aspiration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13693780802715815DOI Listing
March 2010
8 Reads

Sonography of acute right lower quadrant pain: importance of increased intraabdominal fat echo.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2009 Jan;192(1):174-9

Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Hospital and Konkuk University School of Medicine, Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul, 143-729, Korea.

Objective: The purpose of our study was to assess the diagnostic usefulness of increased intraabdominal fat echo during the sonographic evaluation of patients with acute right lower quadrant (RLQ) pain.

Subjects And Methods: A total of 328 consecutive patients (132 male and 196 female; mean age, 28+/-15 [SD] years) with acute RLQ pain prospectively underwent transabdominal sonography by one of three experienced radiologists. The radiologists prospectively graded intraabdominal fat echo using a 3-point scale: 1, normal; 2, slight increase; and 3, marked and diffuse increase. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/ajr.192.5_supplement.a174DOI Listing
January 2009
6 Reads

Acute abdomen: an unusual presentation of disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection.

Indian J Med Microbiol 2008 Apr-Jun;26(2):180-2

Department of Medicine, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore-632 004, Tamil Nadu, India.

Varied clinical presentations of Penicillium marneffei, an opportunistic pathogen in HIV disease has been rarely described in literature. We report a patient with advanced AIDS who presented to us with prolonged fever and had features of an acute abdomen. On radiologic imaging he had features of intestinal obstruction and mesenteric lymphadenitis. Read More

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August 2008
2 Reads

Increased echogenicity of renal cortex: a transient feature in acutely ill children.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2008 Jan;190(1):240-3

Department of Radiology, Haga Teaching Hospital, Location Leyweg, Leyweg 275, 2545 CH, The Hague, The Netherlands.

Objective: The purpose of our study was to determine the frequency of hyperechogenicity of renal parenchyma in children with acute abdominal illness and to evaluate the assumed transient feature of this hyperechogenicity.

Materials And Methods: Between January 2005 and February 2006, 189 consecutive patients (112 boys and 77 girls; mean age, 10 years) presenting with acute abdominal pain were examined with sonography. Patients with a known history of renal disease and those with acute urinary tract infection were excluded from the study. Read More

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http://www.ajronline.org/doi/10.2214/AJR.07.2606
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/AJR.07.2606DOI Listing
January 2008
8 Reads

Clinical and laboratory methods in diagnosis of acute appendicitis in children.

Croat Med J 2007 Jun;48(3):353-61

Department of Pediatric Surgery and Intensive Care, University Medical Center, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination, white blood cell and differential count, and C-reactive protein as routine tests for acute appendicitis with that of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and ultrasonography.

Methods: Eighty-two children were admitted to the Department of Pediatric Surgery and Intensive Care, Ljubljana, Slovenia because of suspected acute appendicitis. Among them, 49 children underwent surgery for acute appendicitis and 33 had abdominal pain but were not treated surgically and were diagnosed with non-specific abdominal pain or mesenteric lymphadenitis on sonography. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2080535PMC
June 2007
6 Reads

Importance of sonographic detection of enlarged abdominal lymph nodes in children.

J Ultrasound Med 2007 May;26(5):581-4

Department of Radiology, Hadassah Medical Center, Hebrew University Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.

Objective: Abdominal lymph nodes are frequently visualized by sonography in the pediatric population. The term "mesenteric lymphadenitis" is frequently used in the radiologic literature to describe this finding, whereas in the pediatric literature, this term is reserved for specific inflammation of the lymph nodes. The purpose of this study was to compare by sonography the incidence of appearance of enlarged abdominal lymph nodes (EALNs) in healthy children compared with that in children with abdominal pain of various causes. Read More

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http://www.jultrasoundmed.org/content/26/5/581.full.pdf
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May 2007
3 Reads

Laparoscopic biopsy in patients with abdominal lymphadenopathy.

J Minim Access Surg 2007 Jan;3(1):14-8

Department of Minimal Access Surgery, P. D. Hinduja National Hospital, Veer Savarkar Road, Mahim, Mumbai, India.

Background: Abdominal lymphadenopathy (AL) - a common clinical scenario faced by clinicians - often poses a diagnostic challenge. In the absence of palpable peripheral nodes, tissue has to be obtained from the abdominal nodes by image-guided biopsy or surgery. In this context a laparoscopic biopsy avoids the morbidity of a laparotomy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0972-9941.30681DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2910374PMC
January 2007
3 Reads

[Mesenteric lymphadenopathy - a valid health problem in children].

Med Wieku Rozwoj 2006 Apr-Jun;10(2):453-62

Klinika Pediatrii, Gastroenterologii i Onkologii Dzieciecej, Akademia Medyczna, ul. Nowe Ogrody 1-6, 80-803 Gdansk, Poland.

The Aim: of the study is to evaluate the reasons of mesenteric lymphadenopathy and its clinical picture in hospitalized children.

Material And Methods: the study was performed on 127 children (49 girls and 78 boys age of 8 months to 18 years; mean age 9 years and 3 months) hospitalized in the Department of Paediatrics, and Paediatric Gastroenterology and Oncology, Medical University of Gdansk. Ultrasonography showed enlarged abdominal lymph nodes in all children. Read More

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February 2007
8 Reads

Intraabdominal cryptococcal lymphadenitis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

J Korean Med Sci 2005 Dec;20(6):1059-61

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kangnam St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

Cryptococcal infection is a rare, yet well recognized complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We present a case of mesenteric and retroperitoneal cryptococcal lymphadenitis resulting in the obstruction of the stomach and proximal duodenum in a patient suffering from SLE, while recently she did not receive any immunosuppressive treatment. A 42-yr-old woman was admitted due to high fever and diffuse abdominal pain for three weeks. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2779309PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2005.20.6.1059DOI Listing
December 2005
4 Reads

Infectious ileocecitis--appendicitis mimicking syndrome.

Bratisl Lek Listy 2005 ;106(6-7):201-2

Department of Pediatric Surgery, Children's Hospital Zagreb, Croatia.

The purpose of our study is to emphasize the central role of ultrasound (US) in finding the cause of abdominal pain in children. Ultrasound of the lower abdomen quadrant should be considered in all cases in which the clinical signs and symptoms are not diagnostic of appendicitis. There is a wide range of clinical syndromes and diseases which can easily be diagnosed using a high resolution ultrasound with adjunct of color and power Doppler. Read More

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November 2005
12 Reads

Imaging of chronic granulomatous disease in children.

Radiographics 2005 Sep-Oct;25(5):1183-95

Department of Radiology, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, USA.

Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare immunodeficiency disorder. The inability of phagocytic cells to kill catalase-positive organisms, such as Staphylococcus and Aspergillus species, causes recurrent infections, persistent inflammation, and granuloma formation. The imaging findings in nine cases of CGD were studied. Read More

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http://pubs.rsna.org/doi/10.1148/rg.255055011
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/rg.255055011DOI Listing
March 2006
7 Reads

Unusual nonneoplastic peritoneal and subperitoneal conditions: CT findings.

Radiographics 2005 May-Jun;25(3):719-30

Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI 53792, USA.

Peritoneal disease can manifest at computed tomography (CT) as fluid accumulation within the peritoneal cavity (ascites) or soft-tissue infiltration of the various peritoneal ligaments and mesenteries. Beyond the commonly encountered cases of typical ascites and peritonitis, there is a wide spectrum of uncommon nonneoplastic conditions that may involve the peritoneal and subperitoneal spaces. For example, systemic or organ-based diseases that occasionally involve the peritoneum include eosinophilic gastroenteritis, amyloidosis, extramedullary hematopoiesis, Erdheim-Chester disease, sarcoidosis, and mesenteric cavitary lymph node syndrome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/rg.253045145DOI Listing
March 2006
4 Reads

Mesenteric lymph nodes in children: what is normal?

Pediatr Radiol 2005 Aug 10;35(8):774-7. Epub 2005 May 10.

Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.

Background: Enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) are frequently seen in children with abdominal pain and, in the absence of other disorders, have been attributed to primary mesenteric lymphadenitis.

Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of enlarged MLN (short axis>or=5 mm) as detected by abdominal CT in children with a low likelihood for mesenteric lymphadenopathy.

Materials And Methods: During a 14-month period, we identified all non-contrast abdominal CT examinations performed at a tertiary care pediatric hospital for evaluation of suspected or known renal stones. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-005-1462-2DOI Listing
August 2005
17 Reads

Mesenteric lymph nodes seen at imaging: causes and significance.

Radiographics 2005 Mar-Apr;25(2):351-65

Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, 88 E Newton St, Atrium 2, Boston, MA 02118, USA.

With the advent of multidetector computed tomography, routine evaluation of mesenteric lymph nodes is now possible. For the first time, normal mesenteric nodes may be reliably identified noninvasively. Because of the increasing volume of cross-sectional imaging examinations being performed, lymph nodes in the mesentery are being detected with increasing frequency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/rg.252045108DOI Listing
March 2006
5 Reads

[Acute abdominal pain in a 8-year-old girl with Epstein-Barr infection].

Arch Pediatr 2005 Mar;12(3):288-90

Service de médecine interne-oncologie, hôpital d'instruction des armées Sainte-Anne, 83800 Toulon, France.

Abdominal pain is uncommon in patient with Epstein-Barr infection and is usually attributed to an enlargement of the liver or spleen. We report on an 8-year-old girl with a pseudoperitonitis due to a mesenteric lymphadenitis associated with Epstein-Barr infection. Outcome was favourable without surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arcped.2004.11.025DOI Listing
March 2005
3 Reads

Imaging of acute appendicitis: US as the primary imaging modality.

Pediatr Radiol 2005 Apr 6;35(4):392-5. Epub 2005 Jan 6.

Department of Radiology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555, USA.

Background: The investigation of the acute abdomen in infants and children has evolved during the last two decades, placing imagers at the forefront of the evaluation and diagnosis of acute right lower quadrant abdominal problems. US and CT have recently been shown to be equally accurate in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis, but not everyone agrees.

Objective: To demonstrate the efficacy of triaging patients with acute abdominal problems that suggest appendicitis with US as the primary imaging modality. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s00247-004-1372
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00247-004-1372-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-004-1372-8DOI Listing
April 2005
4 Reads

I woke up, "my whole stomach hurts".

Pediatr Emerg Care 2004 Oct;20(10):687-9

Department of Radiology, Pediatric Radiology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA.

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October 2004
7 Reads

Mesenteric adenitis and portal vein thrombosis due to Fusobacterium nucleatum.

Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2004 Oct;16(10):1063-6

Service of Hepatogastroenterology, Hospital Antoine Béclère, Clamart, France.

We report the first description of portal and mesenteric vein thrombosis associated with suppurative mesenteric adenitis in a 71-year-old woman. The bacterium detected in mesenteric lymph nodes was Fusobacterium nucleatum, an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus. Our patient had a clinical syndrome of pharyngitis and fever preceding portal vein thrombosis. Read More

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October 2004
10 Reads