133 results match your criteria Mental Health Services Research[Journal]


The ARC organizational and community intervention strategy for implementing evidence-based children's mental health treatments.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Dec;7(4):243-59

Children's Mental Health Services Research Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-3332, USA.

This paper reviews the implications of organizational and community intervention research for the implementation of effective mental health treatments in usual community practice settings. The paper describes an organizational and community intervention model named ARC for Availability, Responsiveness and Continuity, that was designed to support the improvement of social and mental health services for children. The ARC model incorporates intervention components from organizational development, interorganizational domain development, the diffusion of innovation, and technology transfer that target social, strategic, and technological factors in effective children's services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11020-005-7456-1DOI Listing
December 2005
8 Reads

Treatment for dual diagnosis patients in the psychiatric and substance abuse systems.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Dec;7(4):229-42

Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Center for Health Care Evaluation, Palo Alto, California 94025, USA.

The purpose of this study was to describe and compare the extent to which psychiatric and substance abuse programs treating dual diagnosis patients in the residential and outpatient modalities offered the components recommended for this client group. Surveys were completed by managers of 753 programs in the Department of Veterans Affairs that had a treatment regimen oriented to dual diagnosis patients. Programs within both the psychiatric and substance abuse systems had some of the key services of integrated treatment (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11020-005-7455-9DOI Listing
December 2005
6 Reads

Relationship between preventative physical health care and mental health in individuals with schizophrenia: a survey of caregivers.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Dec;7(4):225-8

Pfizer Inc., New York, NewYork 10017, USA.

The relationship between preventative physical health care and mental health in individuals with schizophrenia was assessed retrospectively by questionnaires completed by 504 caregivers. Psychiatric symptom severity and quality-of-life data on 332 respondents were evaluable. Suboptimal preventative physical health care was defined as absence of > or =2 examinations within a specified time: physical and dental within 12 months, eye within 24 months. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11020-005-7454
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11020-005-7454-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11020-005-7454-xDOI Listing
December 2005
4 Reads

Child behavioral health service use and caregiver strain: comparison of managed care and fee-for-service Medicaid systems.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Dec;7(4):197-211

Center for Evaluation and Program Improvement, Vanderbilt University, 1207 18th Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

This study compares behavioral health service utilization patterns and their determinants among Medicaid-enrolled children, ages 5-17 (N = 676) who were being served under managed care in Tennessee or a traditional fee-for-service system in Mississippi. Children in the fee-for-service program were significantly more likely than their counterparts in the managed care Medicaid program to receive behavioral health services (i.e. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11020-005-7452-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11020-005-7452-zDOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Exploring the relationship between race/ethnicity, age of first school-based services utilization, and age of first specialty mental health care for at-risk youth.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Sep;7(3):185-96

Child and Adolescent Services Research Center, Children's Hospital, San Diego, California, USA.

This study investigated race/ethnic variations in age of entry into school-based services and specialty mental health outpatient services among 1552 high-risk youths served in a publicly funded system of care. Non-Hispanic White youths were more likely to receive school-based services as compared to ethnic minority groups, and to begin use at an earlier age. In addition, the earlier a child was identified for school-based services, the earlier the child first utilized specialty outpatient mental health services. Read More

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September 2005
7 Reads

Reliability and acceptability of automated telephone surveys among Spanish- and English-speaking mental health services recipients.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Sep;7(3):181-4

TeleSage Inc, PO Box 750, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514, USA.

Interactive Voice Response (IVR), an automated system that administers surveys over the phone, is a potentially important technology for mental health services research. Although a number of studies have compared IVR to live interviews, few have looked at IVR in comparison to pencil-and-paper survey administration. Further, few studies have included subjects from those populations most likely to benefit from IVR technology, namely patients with lower education levels and non-English-speaking patients. Read More

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September 2005
4 Reads

Disability and health service utilization associated with psychological distress: the influence of ethnicity.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Sep;7(3):171-9

Faculty of Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

This study examined levels of disability and use of health services, as a result of psychological distress, across various ethnic groups after taking into account selected sociodemographic factors such as age, gender, education, and employment. We have analyzed data from the 1997-1998 New South Wales Health Survey, Australia. A telephone interview of 35,025 adults aged 16 years and over selected from each of the 17 Health Service Areas in the state. Read More

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September 2005
9 Reads

The relationship of depression treatment quality indicators to employee absenteeism.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Sep;7(3):161-9

Center for Studies in Family Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

Although employers commonly review administrative database indicators to assess depression treatment quality, they do not know whether these indicators predict relevant outcomes like absenteeism. In 230 employed patients in five health plans, we tested how administrative database-derived indicators for antidepressant medication and psychotherapy provided during the first 6 months of a new depression treatment episode predicted patient-reported absenteeism change over 12 months. The medication indicator was not significantly associated with absenteeism change over 12 months (p = . Read More

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September 2005
7 Reads

Psychometric properties of the Spanish version of two mental health outcome measures: World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II and Lehman's Quality Of Life Interview.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Sep;7(3):145-59

Behavioral Sciences Research Institute Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico.

This study presents data on the cultural adaptation to Latino populations of two outcome measures that respond to the need for developing comprehensive instruments for outcome assessments in minority populations. We examined the psychometric properties of outcome measures designed to assess impairment in functioning, and quality of life. Impairment in functioning was measured with the Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DASII) developed by the World Health Organization (1997) and quality of life was measured with A. Read More

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September 2005
9 Reads

A service system planning model for individuals with serious mental illness.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Sep;7(3):135-44

Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.

An institutional-based care system in mental health has been replaced by a network of community-based services with different levels of structure and support. This poses both an opportunity and a challenge to provide appropriate and effective care to persons with serious mental illnesses. This paper describes a simulation-based approach for mental health system planning, focused on hospital and residential service components that can be used as a decision support tool. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4465552PMC
September 2005
4 Reads

The effects of race and criminal justice involvement on access to atypical antipsychotic medications among persons with schizophrenia.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Jun;7(2):123-34

Services Effectiveness Research Program, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.

This study examined the impact of race and arrest history on the likelihood of being prescribed, and maintaining an atypical antipsychotic prescription for 90 or more days among patients with schizophrenia in the community. Participants were 224 adults with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders receiving services in public-sector mental health systems in North Carolina. The data used for this report were from a subsample of a larger group of participants being followed in an observational study and consisted of individuals who were prescribed either an atypical or conventional antipsychotic medication for 90 or more days. Read More

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June 2005
11 Reads

Correlates of family contact with the mental health system: allocation of a scarce resource.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Jun;7(2):113-21

VA Connecticut Healthcare System, NEPEC (182), 950 Campbell Avenue, West Haven, CT 06516, USA.

This study explored correlates of informal and formal contact between clinicians and families of individuals with schizophrenia. We reanalyzed data from 902 individuals with schizophrenia from the Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT) client survey and a Veterans Affairs extension. Only 31% of families had any informal contact with a clinician and 7. Read More

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June 2005
7 Reads

Clinical improvement associated with conformance to HEDIS-based depression care.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Jun;7(2):103-12

Center for Studies in Family Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, UCHSC at Fitzsimons, P.O. Box 6508 Mail Stop F496, Aurora, CO 80045-0508, USA.

Background: Employers recently requested a valid metric of depression treatment quality. Such an indicator needs to measure the proportion of the population in need who receive high-quality care, and to predict clinical improvement.

Methods: We constructed an administrative database indicator derived from HEDIS criteria for antidepressant medication management, and tested it in 230 employed patients in five health plans. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1350978PMC
June 2005
5 Reads

Employment outcomes and PTSD symptom severity.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Jun;7(2):89-101

Cooperative Studies Program and Health Services Research & Development Service, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA.

A diagnosis of chronic war-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been linked consistently to poor employment outcomes. This study investigates the relation further, analyzing how symptom severity correlates with work status, occupation type, and earnings. Study participants were male Vietnam veterans with severe or very severe PTSD who received treatment in the Department of Veterans Affairs system (N = 325). Read More

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June 2005
18 Reads

Internet-based mental health interventions.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Jun;7(2):75-87

Center for Adolescent Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Following recent reviews of community- and practice-based mental health interventions, an assessment of Internet-based interventions is provided. Although relatively new, many Internet mental health interventions have reported early results that are promising. Both therapist-led as well as self-directed online therapies indicate significant alleviation of disorder-related symptomatology. Read More

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June 2005
5 Reads

What is the evidence for evidence-based treatments? A hard look at our soft underbelly.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Mar;7(1):53-74

Center for the Advancement of Children's Mental Health at Columbia University/NYSPI, New York, New York 10032, USA.

In the rising quest for evidence-based interventions, recent research often does not give adequate attention to "nonspecific therapeutic factors," including the effects of attention, positive regard, and therapeutic alliance, as well as the effects of treatment dose, intensity and actual processes mediating therapeutic change. To determine the extent to which recent clinical trial designs fully this problem, the authors conducted a systematic review of Psych-Lit/Medline of all controlled child psychotherapy treatment studies from 1995 to 2004. A total of 52 studies were identified that met review criteria: two or more therapy conditions and random assignment of participants to intervention groups. Read More

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March 2005
3 Reads

A theoretical model of common process factors in youth and family therapy.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Mar;7(1):35-51

Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620, USA.

Recently there has been an increasing emphasis in the youth and family mental health treatment literature on the use of empirically supported treatments (ESTs). In contrast there has been scant attention paid to more universal aspects of the therapy process that may have even greater impact upon therapy outcomes. It is likely that the success of the techniques proposed by ESTs may depend on the presence of common process factors. Read More

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March 2005
3 Reads

Client expectancies about therapy.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Mar;7(1):21-33

Center for Evaluation and Program Improvement, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University, USA.

Client expectancies about therapy are considered a common factor, that is, a feature of therapy that is not specific to any particular technique or approach. This review includes both child- and adult-focused studies from the expectancies literature, emphasizing findings about the relationship between expectancies and factors including client improvement, attrition, and therapeutic alliance (TA). Results suggest that expectancies are related to both client improvement and TA, but do not support a relationship between expectancies and attrition. Read More

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March 2005
4 Reads

Identifying and selecting the common elements of evidence based interventions: a distillation and matching model.

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Mar;7(1):5-20

Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA.

A model is proposed whereby the intervention literature can be empirically factored or distilled to derive profiles from evidence-based approaches. The profiles can then be matched to individual clients based on consideration of their target problems, as well as demographic and contextual factors. Application of the model is illustrated by an analysis of the youth treatment literature. Read More

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March 2005
5 Reads

A common factors approach to improving mental health services.

Authors:
Leonard Bickman

Ment Health Serv Res 2005 Mar;7(1):1-4

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March 2005
3 Reads

A method for analyzing longitudinal outcomes with many zeros.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Dec;6(4):239-46

Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA.

Health care utilization and cost data have challenged analysts because they are often correlated over time, highly skewed, and clumped at 0. Traditional approaches do not address all these problems, and evaluators of mental health and substance abuse interventions often grapple with the problem of how to analyze these data in a way that accurately represents program impact. Recently, the traditional 2-part model has been extended to mixed-effects mixed-distribution model with correlated random effects to deal simultaneously with excess zeros, skewness, and correlated observations. Read More

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December 2004
3 Reads

Inpatient hospitalizations and emergency service visits among participants in an Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model program.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Dec;6(4):227-37

Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Supported employment (SE) is considered an "evidence-based" practice for people with serious mental illness. We examined inpatient hospitalizations and emergency service visits among clients in a SE program based on the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) model in comparison to a propensity score matched group of clients who did not participate in IPS. A significant interaction showed that only IPS/SE clients who were also high in regular mental health services had fewer hospitalizations and emergency service visits than matched controls. Read More

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December 2004
9 Reads

Use of mental health services by youths in public sectors of care.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Dec;6(4):213-26

Child and Adolescent Services Research Center, Children's Hospital, San Diego, California 92123-4282, USA.

The present paper examined the lifetime rates of mental health service use in a representative sample of youths identified as receiving services in at least one sector of care in a publicly funded service system of a large, metropolitan area. Service use was examined in relation to age, gender, mental health diagnostic status, and service sector involvement. Participants were 1706 youths ages 6-17 years who were active in at least one of the following service sectors: alcohol and drug services, child welfare, juvenile justice, mental health, and special education services for serious emotional disturbance. Read More

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December 2004
5 Reads

Outcomes of supported housing for homeless veterans with psychiatric and substance abuse problems.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Dec;6(4):199-211

Northeast Program Evaluation Center of the Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, Connecticut 06156, USA.

This study examines the effect of previous participation in time limited residential treatment and other factors on treatment outcomes among homeless veterans with serious mental illness placed into permanent supported housing. The sample consisted of 655 veterans placed into supported housing at 18 sites through the VA's Healthcare for Homeless Veterans (HCHV) Supported Housing Program during the period 1993-2000. Data on client and program characteristics, and treatment outcomes, were documented by HCHV case managers staffing these programs. Read More

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December 2004
4 Reads

Building a model to understand youth service access: the gateway provider model.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Dec;6(4):189-98

George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, USA.

Enhancing the functioning of parents, teachers, juvenile justice authorities, and other health and mental heal professionals who direct children and adolescents to services is a major mental health services concern. The Gateway Provider Model is an elaborated testable subset of the Network-Episode Model (NEM; B. A. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3745273PMC
December 2004
3 Reads

Cognitive functioning predicts outpatient service utilization in schizophrenia.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Sep;6(3):185-8

Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029-6574, USA.

Aim of the study was to evaluate the cognitive and symptom predictors of outpatient service utilization in schizophrenia. The relationships between cognitive functioning (verbal learning and memory, executive functions), symptoms (positive symptoms, negative symptoms), and outpatient service utilization (case management, medication monitoring), were examined in 20 patients receiving outpatient services at a psychosocial clubhouse over a 12-month period. Executive functions, as measured on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), were the only significant predictor of outpatient service utilization, accounting for over 20% of the variance in total outpatient services used, with greater impairment associated with higher service utilization. Read More

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September 2004
4 Reads

Children of mothers diagnosed with serious mental illness: patterns and predictors of service use.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Sep;6(3):167-83

School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1106, USA.

Children who have a parent diagnosed with a mental illness are at risk of psychiatric and behavioral problems; yet, these children do not necessarily receive needed services. Research has investigated correlates of child mental health service use, but not for these high-risk children. This study is part of an NIMH-funded, longitudinal investigation and describes child problems, service use, and predictors of service use for 506 children of 252 mothers diagnosed with serious mental illness. Read More

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September 2004
6 Reads

Cost assessment of a school-based mental health screening and treatment program in New York City.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Sep;6(3):155-66

Center for Multicultural Mental Health Research, Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School, Somerville, Massachusetts 02143, USA.

Although school-based mental health screening and treatment programs have been proposed as a viable means of reaching youth with unmet mental health needs, no previous reports have attempted to comprehensively document the costs of such programs. The purposes of this report are (1) to estimate the cost of a school-based mental health screening and treatment program in a real-world school setting, and (2) to outline the methods and procedures that should be employed by future investigators to explore the costs of such programs. The program, located in a middle school in a low-income, largely Hispanic neighborhood in New York City, aimed to screen all students in Grades 6-8 for anxiety, depression, and substance use disorders. Read More

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https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Peter_Jensen/publicatio
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September 2004
3 Reads

Untangling the web: an approach to analyzing the impacts of individually tailored, multicomponent treatment interventions.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Sep;6(3):143-53

Department of Mental Health Law and Policy, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612-3807, USA.

In this paper the use of a maximum individualized change score is proposed as an analytic alternative to the more traditional MANOVA and latent variable approaches in studies examining the use of individually tailored interventions. This strategy offers a number of significant advantages when multiple indicators are used to assess a broad array of potential outcomes that might result from client-specific treatments. Data on 146 children from a study examining the effectiveness of 3 short-term intensive in-home services were used to contrast the results of our proposed analytic strategy with those from the MANOVA and latent variable approaches. Read More

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September 2004
4 Reads

Predictors of outpatient mental health service use--the role of foster care placement change.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Sep;6(3):127-41

Child and Adolescent Services Research Center, Children's Hospital, San Diego, California, USA.

This study examined the relationship between placement change and outpatient mental health service use. It is based on (1) conceptual propositions about the impact of the foster care living context on mental health service use, and (2) empirical knowledge about the adverse consequences of placement change. Results of the study, which were based on a cohort of 570 children in foster care in San Diego County, suggest an association between placement changes in child welfare and use of outpatient mental health services. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1550708PMC
September 2004
4 Reads

Evaluation of the Mississippi PTSD Scale--Revised using Rasch measurement.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Jun;6(2):117-25

University of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 210038, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221, USA.

This study used Rasch measurement theory to examine the Mississippi Scale--Revised for its utility in the development of an interval measure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Rasch is a probability-based theory that provides both a measure of the person responding to the instrument and the location of each item calibration on one common construct or dimension. The study used a largely male sample of 153 veterans to evaluate the quality of the items defining PTSD, to describe how the items represent the symptom range of the disorder, and to assess the functioning of items in evaluating PTSD with and without comorbid MDD. Read More

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June 2004
3 Reads

Access to mental health services: are uninsured children falling behind?

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Jun;6(2):109-16

Health Policy and Administration, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Previous research has established that insurance status is not a significant determinant of children's use of mental health services (S. Glied, C. W. Read More

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June 2004
3 Reads

Racial/ethnic disparities in parent perception of child need for mental health care following school disciplinary events.

Authors:
Eric P Slade

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Jun;6(2):75-92

Department of Health Policy and Management, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Disciplinary problems at school potentially affect parent perception of child need for mental health care. This article explores effects of a child's first school suspension or expulsion on parent perception of child need for services in three racial-ethnic subgroups. Subjects were mothers participating in a national longitudinal study and their children. Read More

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June 2004
4 Reads

Mental health provider attitudes toward adoption of evidence-based practice: the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS).

Authors:
Gregory A Aarons

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Jun;6(2):61-74

Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of California, Child & Adolescent Services Research Center, San Diego, California, USA.

Unlabelled: Mental health provider attitudes toward organizational change have not been well studied. Dissemination and implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) into real-world settings represent organizational change that may be limited or facilitated by provider attitudes toward adoption of new treatments, interventions, and practices. A brief measure of mental health provider attitudes toward adoption of EBPs was developed and attitudes were examined in relation to a set of provider individual difference and organizational characteristics. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1564126PMC
June 2004
11 Reads

Return to work and claim duration for workers with long-term mental disabilities: impacts of mental health coverage, fringe benefits, and disability management.

Ment Health Serv Res 2003 Sep;5(3):173-86

Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins University, Hampton House Room 429, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 N. Broadway, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

This paper examines the relationship of mental health benefits provided by 116 employers, to return to work and duration of disability claims for 407 of their employees who were on long-term disability (LTD) leave for mental disorders. Mental health benefits data were coded from summary plan description booklets provided by employers. Information on other fringe benefits and employers' disability management practices were obtained from a survey of the employers. Read More

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September 2003
3 Reads

Functioning mediates between symptoms and provider assessment.

Ment Health Serv Res 2003 Sep;5(3):155-71

Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

The gap between service need and service use for youth with behavioral health problems is well documented. Although provider perception of need predicts service access, studies have found low associations between youth report and provider perception. This paper posits that provider perception of functioning mediates the relationship between youth need as measured by symptoms and provider assessment of that need. Read More

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September 2003
4 Reads

Administrative prescription review procedures and use of atypical antipsychotic medications in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Ment Health Serv Res 2003 Sep;5(3):149-53

Yale Departments of Psychiatry and Epidemiology and Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Atypical antipsychotic medications vary in cost with limited evidence of differences in effectiveness. Administrative prescription review has been proposed as a way of encouraging use of less expensive medication when there is no specific clinical justification for using more expensive medication. This study examined data from a national GAO survey of 876 veterans affairs (VA) psychiatrists, and national administrative data on the proportion of veterans actually receiving atypical antipsychotic medications. Read More

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September 2003
5 Reads

Racial/ethnic differences in caregiver strain and perceived social support among parents of youth with emotional and behavioral problems.

Ment Health Serv Res 2003 Sep;5(3):137-47

Child and Adolescent Services Research Center, Children's Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, Department of Psychology, University of San Diego, San Diego, California, USA.

This study examined several hypotheses related to racial/ethnic variations in caregiver strain and perceived social support among parents caring for children with emotional/behavioral problems. A subsample of youth from the Patterns of Care (POC) study, which drew a stratified random sample of high-risk youth active to 1 of 5 public sectors of care, was used to test these hypotheses. When controlling for youth age, parental education, presence in an alcohol/drug or mental health (ADM) sector, and severity of child problems, African Americans reported significantly lower caregiver strain then did non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs), whereas Asian/Pacific Islanders (APIs) and Latinos did not differ significantly from NHWs. Read More

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September 2003
6 Reads

Assessing preferences for schizophrenia outcomes: comprehension and decision strategies in three assessment methods.

Ment Health Serv Res 2003 Sep;5(3):121-35

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.

Quantifying the importance of treatment outcomes by measuring preferences allows construction of aggregate outcome indicators that reflect the relative importance of multiple outcomes, trade-offs between outcomes, and the perspectives of different stakeholders. However, standard preference assessment methods are cognitively complex and may be particularly challenging for persons with schizophrenia and other serious mental illnesses. Preferences may not be meaningful or comparable across stakeholder groups if the groups do not use the methods in similar ways. Read More

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September 2003
6 Reads

Adolescents with substance diagnoses in an HMO: factors associated with medical provider referrals to substance abuse and mental health treatment.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Mar;6(1):47-60

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicans and Surgeons New York, New York 10032, USA.

This study examines the factors related to referrals of adolescents with substance use disorders to substance abuse or mental health treatment by their medical providers. Administrative and chart review data from the membership of a large private health maintenance organization (HMO) were collected from a probability sample of 400 adolescents, ages 13-18, who were diagnosed with a substance use disorder in 1999. Logistic regression analyses examined referral to substance abuse treatment and referral to mental health treatment in the aggregate and stratified by gender. Read More

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March 2004
4 Reads

Assessing population need for mental health care: a review of approaches and predictors.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Mar;6(1):33-46

Centre for Mental Health Services Research, West Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

This review aimed to clarify the concept of need, explore the different approaches used to assess need, and contribute to an improved understanding of predictor and intervening factors in assessing need for mental health services. Two population-based needs assessment approaches have been identified: modeling need for services and surveys of the general population. The most widely used model was that based on the Jarman-8 index of social deprivation. Read More

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March 2004
3 Reads

Parent/caregiver satisfaction with their child's Medicaid plan and behavioral health providers.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Mar;6(1):23-32

Department of Human and Organizational Development, Peabody College, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

The experiences of children in FFS and MC managed care plans (n = 715) were examined through satisfaction ratings by their parents/caregivers about their behavioral health provider and their Medicaid behavioral health plan. Multivariate regression analyses compared satisfaction ratings among children enrolled in FFS versus MC while controlling for other known predictors of satisfaction including child and parent/caregiver demographic characteristics, behavioral health status, and child history of behavioral health service use. Caregiver satisfaction with their children's behavioral health provider did not differ significantly between those children in managed care plans and those in fee-for-service plans. Read More

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March 2004
3 Reads

Association between demographic and diagnostic factors and employment outcomes for people with psychiatric disabilities: a synthesis of recent research.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Mar;6(1):9-21

Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Employment outcome for individuals with psychiatric disabilities has been a focus of empirical research over the past decade or so. The purpose of this paper is to review recent literature on the association between demographic and diagnostic factors and employment outcome, and to conduct meta analyses of the results of studies that report the association between these variables. Seventeen studies were included in these meta analyses. Read More

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March 2004
5 Reads

Assessing the strengths of children referred for community-based mental health services.

Ment Health Serv Res 2004 Mar;6(1):1-8

ORC Macro, New York, New York, USA.

This study investigated the relationship between child strengths and functional impairment, specifically whether youth with greater levels of functional impairment also exhibit strengths. The relationship was investigated for children (N = 1,838) of different genders, ages, race, and ethnic backgrounds and whose families were living at different income levels. A moderate relationship was found between child strengths and functional impairment. Read More

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March 2004
4 Reads

Examination of treatment pattern differences by race.

Ment Health Serv Res 2003 Dec;5(4):241-50

Medstat, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, NW Suite 330, Washington, District of Columbia 20008, USA.

Examine differences in treatment patterns among Blacks and non-Blacks in the U.S. Schizophrenia Care and Assessment Program. Read More

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December 2003
4 Reads

Transportability of multisystemic therapy: evidence for multilevel influences.

Ment Health Serv Res 2003 Dec;5(4):223-39

Family Services Research Center, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 67 President Street-Suite CPP, PO. Box 250861, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA.

This study examines factors associated with the implementation and short-term outcomes in dissemination sites of Multisystemic Therapy (MST), an intensive, short-term, family- and community-based treatment for serious antisocial behavior in youth. Participants were 666 children and families served by 217 therapists in 39 sites. Pre- (T1) to immediate posttreatment (T2) differences in child problems and functioning were similar in magnitude to those found in randomized trials of MST. Read More

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http://www.springerlink.com/index/r683536w10247218.pdf
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December 2003
5 Reads

CONNECT: a measure of continuity of care in mental health services.

Ment Health Serv Res 2003 Dec;5(4):209-21

Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, 641 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

This paper introduces a measure of continuity of care (CONNECT) developed for mental health services research. CONNECT addresses qualities of interpersonal interaction in service-user/practitioner relationships through 13 scales and one single-item indicator. The scales are grouped into five domains: knowledge, flexibility, availability, coordination, and transitions. Read More

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December 2003
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Effects of racial match on Asian American mental health consumer satisfaction.

Ment Health Serv Res 2003 Dec;5(4):197-208

Department of Psychology, University of La Verne, 1950 Third St., La Verne, California 91750, USA.

This study investigated the effects of consumer-provider racial match on consumer service satisfaction and treatment outcomes (i.e., Client Satisfaction Questionnaire and GAF-Posttest) of 96 outpatient consumers, 66 of whom were adults and 30 of whom were parent/caregivers of child consumers. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1023/A:1026224901243
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December 2003
17 Reads