704 results match your criteria Medical Humanities [Journal]


Ethics in cross-cultural encounters: a medical concern?

Med Humanit 2019 Feb 18. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Unit for Migration and Health, NIPH, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.

Modern medicine's investment in the disembodied, objective 'science' of biomedicine, where patients are transformed from suffering subjects to objects of investigation, calls for heightened ethical awareness. Around the world, ethical codes of conduct emphasise beneficence and non-maleficence. Lately, we have also seen a quest for autonomy and equitable healthcare for diverse populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011546DOI Listing
February 2019

Bringing narratives from physicians, patients and caregivers together: a scoping review of published research.

Med Humanit 2019 Feb 8. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Centre for Education Research and Innovation, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.

Patients and family caregivers tell different stories about their illness and care experiences than their physicians do. Better understanding of the relationships among these narratives could offer insight into intersections and disconnections in patient, caregiver and physician perceptions of illness and care. Such understanding could support enhanced patient-centred care in medical education and practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011424DOI Listing
February 2019

Counterdiagnosis and the critical medical humanities: reading Susanna Kaysen's and Lauren Slater's .

Med Humanit 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

School of English, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.

This article is about the complicated intersections of mental illness, diagnosis and narrative in life writing. It analyses challenges posed to the authority of diagnosis-both as medical label and mode of reading-within two memoirs about mental illness and celebrates the ensuing literary innovation in each text. As such, this article is situated as part of the continuing move within the critical medical humanities to develop more sophisticated readings of illness narratives and emphasises the importance of the role of literary studies to achieve this aim. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011543DOI Listing
February 2019

Can Death Cafés resuscitate morale in hospitals?

Med Humanit 2019 Jan 19. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Critical Care, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

Death Cafés are non-profit social franchises that arise spontaneously in communities to serve as informal forums for discussing death. There is a great need within the medical community for the kind of conversation that Death Cafés foster: open, unstructured, spontaneous, genuine and interdisciplinary dialogue. Burnout in healthcare, with symptoms of exhaustion, depersonalisation and decreased efficacy, is a global crisis, with alarming estimates suggesting one in three practicing physicians experience burnout. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011607DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Public health crises in popular media: how viral outbreak films affect the public's health literacy.

Authors:
Evie Kendal

Med Humanit 2019 Jan 19. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Infectious disease epidemics are widely recognised as a serious global threat. The need to educate the public regarding health and safety during an epidemic is particularly apparent when considering that behavioural changes can have a profound impact on disease spread. While there is a large body of literature focused on the opportunities and pitfalls of engaging mass news media during an epidemic, given the pervasiveness of popular film in modern society there is a relative lack of research regarding the potential role of fictional media in educating the public about epidemics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011446DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Correction: .

Authors:

Med Humanit 2018 Dec 27. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011613corr1DOI Listing
December 2018

Illness as a phenomenon of being-in-the-world with others: Plato's , Kleinman and Merleau-Ponty.

Authors:
Susan Bredlau

Med Humanit 2018 Dec 11. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Department of Philosophy, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Plato's , I argue, is a remarkably productive text for confronting and questioning some common presuppositions about the body and illness, particularly when we take seriously Socrates' claim that healing Charmides' headaches requires first examining-and perhaps healing-his soul. I begin by turning to the work of the psychiatrist and medical anthropologist Arthur Kleinman to argue that even if the pain Charmides experiences is more 'physical'than 'mental', a physical exam and physical intervention alone will not necessarily be effective in treating his headaches. Next, I turn to the work of the phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty and his discussion of the phenomenon of the 'phantom limb' to argue that the body, rather than simply being a physical object is, instead, primarily an experiencing subject; the body is fundamentally our way of having a world. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011572DOI Listing
December 2018

Challenging perceptions of disciplinary divide: an ethnographer's experience of collegiality, collaboration and crisis.

Med Humanit 2018 Dec;44(4):e2

Wits Institute of Social and Economic Research (WISER), University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Warned by social scientists about 'the disciplinary divide' and the hostility of medical professionals to qualitative research, I was pleasantly surprised by the collegiality I experienced while conducting fieldwork among clinician-researchers in South Africa. This commentary is a challenge to common discourse, historically dominant in a global (north) anthropology, that biomedical practitioners are necessarily antagonistic to the humanities. Drawing on my field experiences, I propose an optimistic outlook for collaboration and inclusivity in developing medical and health humanities in Africa. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011476DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Field notes in the clinic: on medicine, anthropology and pedagogy in South Africa.

Med Humanit 2018 Dec;44(4):e1

Global Health and Social Medicine, Kings College London, London, UK.

This commentary is about medicine, anthropology and pedagogy: about the ways of knowing that different disciplinary orientations permit. I draw on a field note taken in the clinic to illustrate how cultures of healthcare and health sciences training in South Africa bracket the historical, social and political contexts of health and illness in this setting, at the expense of patient care and physician wellbeing. I consider what anthropological inquiry can offer to clinical practice, and advocate for critical orientations to clinical work and teaching that extend humanity to patients and providers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011473DOI Listing
December 2018

Beyond the lab: Eh!woza and knowing tuberculosis.

Med Humanit 2018 Dec;44(4):285-292

SAMRC/NHLS/UCT Molecular Mycobacteriology Research Unit, Department of Pathology, Institute of Infectious Diseases and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

Eh!woza is a public engagement initiative that explores the biomedical and social aspects of tuberculosis (TB) in South Africa. The project is a collaboration between scientists based in an infectious disease research institute, a local conceptual/visual artist, a youth-based educational non-governmental organization (NGO) and young learners from a high-burden TB community. The learners participate in a series of interactive science and media production workshops: initially presented with biomedical knowledge about TB and, in later sessions, are trained in creating documentary films and engage with ideas around visual representation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011479DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6288688PMC
December 2018
4 Reads

Representing disability and development in the global south.

Authors:
Leslie Swartz

Med Humanit 2018 Dec;44(4):281-284

I reflect on two aesthetics which are at play in the presentation of critical disability and development work in the global south. On the one hand, authors of critical texts commonly use very complex and abstruse language, which may make such texts relatively inaccessible to some disabled people in the global south. On the other hand, the ways in which development work in the south is portrayed sometimes emphasises methods of engagement which may seen to be infantilising. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011484DOI Listing
December 2018

Walking up hills, through history and in-between disciplines: MHH and Health Sciences Education at the tip of Africa.

Authors:
Carla Tsampiras

Med Humanit 2018 Dec;44(4):270-280

Celebration, frustration, contestation and imagination all manifest themselves when examining the evolution of the field of Medical and Health Humanities (MHH) at the University of Cape Town (UCT). That this field has been growing at the same time as access to, inclusion in, and social justice issues linked to higher education have come under the spotlight has the potential to shape how we think and plan for the future of the field. Doing this will require treks up hills, journeys through difficult histories and dynamic dances in-between disciplines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011494DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Reflections on a field across time and space: the emergent medical and health humanities in South Africa.

Med Humanit 2018 Dec;44(4):263-269

Division of Social and Behavioural Sciences, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

In this paper, we draw on our own cross-cultural experience of engaging with different incarnations of the medical and health humanities (MHH) in the UK and South Africa to reflect on what is distinct and the same about MHH in these locations. MHH spaces, whether departments, programmes or networks, have espoused a common critique of biomedical dualism and reductionism, a celebration of qualitative evidence and the value of visual and performative arts for their research, therapeutic and transformative social potential. However, there have also been differences, and importantly a different 'identity' among some leading South African scholars and practitioners, who have felt that if MHH were to speak from the South as opposed to the North, they would say something quite different. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011475DOI Listing
December 2018

Pharmaceuticals and modern statecraft in South Africa: the cases of opium, thalidomide and contraception.

Med Humanit 2018 Dec;44(4):253-262

History, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park, South Africa.

This article provides a history of three pharmaceuticals in the making of modern South Africa. Borrowing and adapting Arthur Daemmrich's term 'pharmacopolitics', we examine how forms of pharmaceutical governance became integral to the creation and institutional practices of this state. Through case studies of three medicaments: opium (late 19th to early 20th century), thalidomide (late 1950s to early 1960s) and contraception (1970s to 2010s), we explore the intertwining of pharmaceutical regulation, provision and consumption. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011478DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6288691PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Community engagement with HIV drug adherence in rural South Africa: a transdisciplinary approach.

Med Humanit 2018 Dec;44(4):239-246

Family Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.

Digital storytelling (DST) is an emerging participatory visual method which combines storytelling traditions with computer and video production technology. In this project, at the heart of the HIV epidemic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, we used DST to create a culturally grounded community engagement intervention. Our aim was to use narratives of people living with HIV on antiretroviral therapy (ART) to stimulate dialogue among the wider community and to encourage reflection on the contextual factors that influence ART adherence in this setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011474DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6288689PMC
December 2018
6 Reads

Biomedicine and the humanities: growing pains.

Med Humanit 2018 Dec;44(4):230-238

Department of History, University of Dar es Salaam, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

In this article, we discuss the challenges facing humanities researchers approaching studies in clinical and community health settings. This crossing of disciplines has arguably been less often explored in the countries we discuss-Kenya, Tanzania and South Africa-but our experiences also speak to broader trouble with disciplinary 'ethnocentrism' that hampers the development of knowledge. After a brief contextualising overview of the structures within our universities that separate or link the humanities, medicine and social science, we use case studies of our experiences as an arts researcher, an anthropologist and a historian to draw attention to the methodological clashes that can hobble research between one disciplinary area and another, whether this manifests in the process of applying for ethical clearance or a professional wariness between healthcare practitioners and humanities scholars in health spaces. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011481DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Critical orientations for humanising health sciences education in South Africa.

Med Humanit 2018 Dec;44(4):221-229

Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

In this article, the authors make a case for the 'humanisation' and 'decolonisation' of health sciences curricula in South Africa, using as a guiding framework. refers to an education that is built on a consolidated conceptual framework that includes and equally values the natural or biomedical sciences as well as the humanities, arts and social sciences, respecting that all of this knowledge has value for the practice of healthcare. An integrated curriculum goes beyond add-on or elective courses in the humanities and social sciences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011472DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6288686PMC
December 2018

Inclusion, access and social justice: the rhizomic evolution of a field across a continent.

Med Humanit 2018 12;44(4):218-220

WiSER, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011613DOI Listing
December 2018

Editor's note: global outreach.

Authors:
Brandy Schillace

Med Humanit 2018 12;44(4):217

BMJ Medical Humanities, BMA House London.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011611DOI Listing
December 2018

How sociophenomenology of the body problematises the 'problem-oriented approach' to growth hormone treatment.

Med Humanit 2018 Nov 26. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Department of Thematic Studies: Technology and Social Change, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.

This article examines how people who are shorter than average make sense of their lived experience of embodiment. It offers a sociophenomenological analysis of 10 semistructured interviews conducted in the Netherlands, focusing on if, how, and why height matters to them. It draws theoretically on phenomenological discussions of lived and objective space, intercorporeality and norms about bodies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011548DOI Listing
November 2018

'This place is not for children like her': disability, ambiguous belonging and the claiming of disadvantage in postapartheid South Africa.

Med Humanit 2018 Nov 13. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Disability Studies Division, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

This paper presents an exploration of my experiences and unique positioning as a blind, White South African woman. It explores the complex intersections of multiple axes of identity in my own experience to do with disability, race, class and language and, in so doing, presents some ideas about the ways in which disability complicates and disturbs simplistic identity categories. It draws, in particular, on the experience of my first year of formal schooling which took place in 1994 as South Africa held its first democratic election, bringing a politico-legal, if not actual, end to decades of racial segregation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011560DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Toxic layering through three disciplinary lenses: childhood poisoning and street pesticide use in Cape Town, South Africa.

Med Humanit 2018 Dec 20;44(4):247-252. Epub 2018 Oct 20.

Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

This article focuses on the devastating hidden perils of agricultural pesticides repurposed by informal sellers in urban South African townships to kill rats and other unwanted pests. Drawing on collaborative research techniques, we investigate the causal relationship between child poisoning episodes and the household use of illegal street pesticides. Such pesticides are used to safeguard homes from pests in an attempt to protect children from the harmful consequences of rodent bites and vectorborne diseases. Read More

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http://mh.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/medhum-2018-011488
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011488DOI Listing
December 2018
9 Reads

'': an audience response to an art installation representing the complexity of congenital heart disease and heart transplantation.

Med Humanit 2018 Oct 18. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

Cardiorespiratory Division, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

The arts can aid the exploration of individual and collective illness narratives, with empowering effects on both patients and caregivers. The artist, partly acting as conduit, can translate and re-present illness experiences into artwork. But how are these translated experiences received by the viewer-and specifically, how does an audience respond to an art installation themed around paediatric heart transplantation and congenital heart disease? The installation, created by British artist Sofie Layton and titled , was presented at an arts-and-health event. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011466DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

The politics of female pain: women's citizenship, twilight sleep and the early birth control movement.

Med Humanit 2018 Sep 28. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

College of Law, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

The medical intervention of 'twilight sleep', or the use of a scopolamine-morphine mixture to anaesthetise labouring women, caused a furore among doctors and early 20th-century feminists. Suffragists and women's rights advocates led the Twilight Sleep Association in a quest to encourage doctors and their female patients to widely embrace the practice. Activists felt the method revolutionised the notoriously dangerous and painful childbirth process for women, touting its benefits as the key to allowing women to control their birth experience at a time when the maternal mortality rate remained high despite medical advances in obstetrics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011419DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Using graphic illustrations to uncover how a community of practice can influence the delivery of compassionate healthcare.

Med Humanit 2018 Sep 26. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Our modern-day frenetic healthcare culture has progressed to a state where healthcare professionals tend to detach themselves from the emotions of their patients/clients, rather than embed compassion into their daily practice. The was implemented with the goal to instil and sustain empathy and compassion in environments where clinicians learn and work. The purpose of this study is to report on how an interprofessional community of practice (CoP) of healthcare educators can contribute to a cultural shift in promoting and delivering compassion in healthcare through health professionals education. Read More

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http://mh.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/medhum-2018-011508
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011508DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Exploring gendered leadership stereotypes in a shared leadership model in healthcare: a case study.

Med Humanit 2018 Sep 22. Epub 2018 Sep 22.

Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton, UK.

The existing literature on leadership often describes it within fairly rigid gender roles. Entire models of leadership have been ascribed gendered labels. Shared leadership is, in traditional leadership theory, a feminine model. Read More

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http://mh.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/medhum-2018-011517
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011517DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads

Graphic illustration of impairment: science fiction, and the social model of disability.

Authors:
Richard Gibson

Med Humanit 2018 Sep 18. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

The following paper examines the cyberpunk transhumanist graphic novel through the theoretical lens of disability studies to demonstrate how science fiction, and in particular this series, illustrate and can influence how we think about disability, impairment and difference. While is most often read as a scathing political and social satire about abuse of power and the danger of political apathy, the comic series also provides readers with representations of impairment and the source of disability as understood by the Social Model of Disability (SMD). Focusing on the setting and fictional world in which takes place, as well as key events and illustration styling, this paper demonstrates that the narrative in this work encompasses many of the same theoretical underpinnings and criticisms of society's ignorance of the cause of disability as the SMD does. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011506DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Acting by persuasion- values and rhetoric in medical certificates of work incapacity: A qualitative document analysis.

Med Humanit 2018 Sep 18. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Institute of Health and Society, Department of Community Medicine and Global Health, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

When the patient applies for disability benefit in Norway, the general practitioner (GP) is required by the National Insurance Administration (NAV) to confirm that the patient is unfit for work due to disease. Considering the important social role of medical certificates, they have been given surprisingly little attention by the medical critique. They may make essential differences to peoples' lives, legitimise large social costs and, in addition, the GPs report that issuing certificates can be problematic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011496DOI Listing
September 2018

Phenomenology and its relevance to medical humanities: the example of Hermann Schmitz's theory of feelings as half-things.

Authors:
Mathias Wirth

Med Humanit 2018 Sep 11. Epub 2018 Sep 11.

University of Bern, Faculty of Theology, Bern, Switzerland.

One leitmotif that medical humanities shares with phenomenology and most contemporary medical ethics is emphasising the importance of appreciating the patient as a whole person and not merely as an object. With this also comes a focus on marginalisation and invisibility. However, it is not entirely clear what exactly patient-centred care means. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011464DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

Epilepsy, literature and linguistics: spotlighting subjective symptoms.

Med Humanit 2018 Sep 3. Epub 2018 Sep 3.

Literature can offer a wealth of information about epilepsy: from complex narratives to children's picture books, it can help broaden people's understanding, show what it is like to live with epilepsy and provide a medium to which people with epilepsy (PWE) can relate. The latter being particularly important in such cases where seizure experiences are highly subjective, such as those associated with 'focal seizures', a common seizure type, which are known for their variable and hard-to-describe symptoms, causing complications with diagnosis as many of the symptoms overlap with those of other psychological health conditions.Literature, however, has more to offer than acting as a source for demystifying epilepsy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011460DOI Listing
September 2018

Sharing a vision: conversation, global outreach and public engagement.

Authors:
Brandy Schillace

Med Humanit 2018 09 7;44(3):145. Epub 2018 Aug 7.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011563DOI Listing
September 2018

Genetics, molar pregnancies and medieval ideas of monstrous births: the lump of flesh in .

Med Humanit 2018 Aug 7. Epub 2018 Aug 7.

Department of Human Genetics and Genomics Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.

The medieval English romance gives an account of a birth of a lump of flesh. This has been considered as fantastic and monstrous in past literature, the horrific union of a Christian and Saracen. However, while the text certainly speaks to miscegenation, we propose that this lump of flesh is actually a hydatidiform mole. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011387DOI Listing
August 2018
2 Reads

'Master My Demons': art therapy montage paintings by active-duty military service members with traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress.

Med Humanit 2018 Aug 4. Epub 2018 Aug 4.

Creative Arts Therapies, Drexel University College of Nursing and Health Professions, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

This study involved a thematic analysis of montage paintings and of related clinical records of 240 active-duty military service members collected during their art therapy treatment for traumatic brain injury and underlying psychological health concerns, including post-traumatic stress, at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Congruent with other research findings, the qualitative analyses of this study suggest that the group art therapy experiences fostered improvement in interpersonal relatedness, hopefulness and gratification for the service members in treatment, aiding in externalisation, progressive exposure and construction of a trauma narrative imperative for recovery. The mixed media nature of the montage painting supported the expression of a range of postcombat symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011493DOI Listing

Putting the 'me' in mechanical: lessons from the mechanical men of health 1928-1948.

Authors:
Catherine Stones

Med Humanit 2018 Jul 24. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

School of Design, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK.

During the interwar years, health exhibitions and pavilions were commonplace in Europe and the USA. Within these exhibitions were a small number of life-sized or oversized mechanical men used to represent physiological processes. Although they received significant press attention at the time, little academic analysis exists to date. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011453DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

Twenty years of management of care in Chile: what we know, what we do not know, what is yet to come. An analysis of arguments.

Authors:
Ricardo A Ayala

Med Humanit 2018 Jul 16. Epub 2018 Jul 16.

Department of Sociology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

For over 20 years, the notion of 'management of care' has been foregrounded as key in the jurisdiction of the nursing profession, with the aim of detaching itself from the wider medical umbrella. A number of voices have advocated such centrality. These include juridical, academic and occupational perspectives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011394DOI Listing

It's like another world: the perceived beneficial effects of an artistically designed multisensory environment.

Med Humanit 2018 Jul 16. Epub 2018 Jul 16.

School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia.

Self-management strategies have been identified as having a key role in supporting mental health and preventing mental illness. Evidence suggests that spending time in nature, experiencing or viewing artwork and accessing sensory rooms all support self-management and positive mental health among varied clinical populations. This evidence informed the design of the sensory-art space (SAS), an artistically designed multisensory environment, which drew on themes and images of nature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011492DOI Listing

Sophistry in American medicine? Platonic reflections on expertise, influence and the public's health in the democratic context.

Authors:
Evan V Goldstein

Med Humanit 2018 Jul 14. Epub 2018 Jul 14.

Without question, the American medical craft-the physicians, clinicians and healthcare organisations that comprise the American healthcare sector-provides immense value to patients and contributes expertise on matters relevant to the public's health. However, several conspicuous realities about healthcare in America should give the reader pause. Most problematic are the comparative measures of access to care, quality of care, life expectancy, racial health disparity and cost, all of which demonstrate how many Americans experience relatively lower value public health than other Western liberal democratic states. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011469DOI Listing

Lessons from : narrative myth as ethical model.

Authors:
Yvette Koepke

Med Humanit 2018 Jul 10. Epub 2018 Jul 10.

As Frankenstein's 200th anniversary nears, its use as a shorthand for ethical critique only increases. This article argues, though, that its lessons inhere in its unique structure, which enacts an interpretive process that models the multiplicity and uncertainty constitutive of ethical decision-making. Frankenstein deliberately functions as a modern myth, rewriting classical and Christian mythology to challenge the straightforward moral lessons often ascribed to the text. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011376DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

A politics of the senses: the political role of the King's-Evil in Richard Wiseman's .

Med Humanit 2018 Jul 3. Epub 2018 Jul 3.

Department of Psychiatry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Written by Richard Wiseman, sergeant-surgeon to King Charles II of England, 'A Treatise on the King's-Evil' within his magnum opus (1676), acts as a proto-case series which explores the treatment and cure of 91 patients with the King's-Evil. Working within the confines of the English monarch's ability to cure the disease with their miraculous (or thaumaturgic) touch, Wiseman simultaneously elevates and extends the potential to heal to biomedicine. Wiseman's work on the King's-Evil provides an interesting window through which the political expediency of the monarch's thaumaturgic touch may be explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011390DOI Listing
July 2018
6 Reads

The Participatory Zeitgeist: an explanatory theoretical model of change in an era of coproduction and codesign in healthcare improvement.

Med Humanit 2018 Jun 28. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Department of Adult Nursing, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London, UK.

Healthcare systems redesign and service improvement approaches are adopting participatory tools, techniques and mindsets. Participatory methods increasingly used in healthcare improvement coalesce around the concept of coproduction, and related practices of cocreation, codesign and coinnovation. These participatory methods have become the new Zeitgeist-the spirit of our times in quality improvement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011398DOI Listing
June 2018
6 Reads

Culturally shared metaphors expand contemporary concepts of resilience and post-traumatic growth: contrasting an indigenous Brazilian community and a Swiss rural community.

Med Humanit 2018 Jun 28. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Department of Psychopathology and Clinical Intervention, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

The metaphorical concepts and (PTG) reflect the contemporary Western understanding of overcoming highly challenging life events. However, it is known that across different cultures, a broad range of metaphorical idioms for describing adaptive responses to severe adversity exists. This study aimed to explore and contrast two distinct cultural groups' culturally shared metaphors for overcoming severe adversities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011450DOI Listing

Vulnerability as practice in diagnosing multiple conditions.

Med Humanit 2018 Jun 27. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

Institute for Medical Humanities, Durham University, Durham, UK.

The paper contributes to contemporary understandings of vulnerability by expanding their scope with an understanding of vulnerability as generated through institutionalised practices. The argument draws on experiential accounts of navigating the practices of diagnosis by people living with multiple conditions of ill-health and disability. Vulnerability as a concept is used widely across different domains and conveys a multitude of meanings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011433DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

Opioids and pain in the emergency department: a narrative crisis.

Med Humanit 2018 Sep 26;44(3):213-216. Epub 2018 Jun 26.

Center for Evidence Synthesis in Health, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.

The opioid crisis poses challenges to patients who come to the emergency department (ED) in pain and the clinicians who have a duty to offer relief. In search of help, patients often find suspicion. But clinicians have reasons to be concerned about feeding addiction and its lethal consequences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011429DOI Listing
September 2018

Essential(ist) medicine: promoting social explanations for racial variation in biomedical research.

Authors:
Iliya Gutin

Med Humanit 2018 Jun 25. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Department of Sociology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.

Biomedical research has a long and complicated history as a tool of oppression, exemplary of the racial science used to legitimise and maintain racial hierarchies in the USA and abroad. While the explicit racism and racial inferiority supported by this research has dissipated and modern methods of inquiry have increased in sophistication and rigor, contemporary biomedical research continues to essentialise race by distilling racial differences and disparities in health to an underlying, biogenetic source. Focusing on the persistence of essentialism in an era of genomic medicine, this paper examines the deep social origins and social implications of the essentialist viewpoint in biomedicine and how it relates to the broader construction of social and scientific knowledge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011432DOI Listing

'The few cubic centimetres inside your skull': a neurological reading of George Orwell's .

Authors:
Lisa J Mullen

Med Humanit 2018 Jun 25. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Worcester College, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

(1949), George Orwell's political satire on state surveillance and mind control, was written between 1946 and 1948, at a time when new thinking in forensic psychiatry coincided with scientific breakthroughs in neurology to bring questions of criminality, psychotherapy and mental health to the forefront of the popular imagination. This paper examines how inverts psychiatric paradigms in order to diagnose what Orwell sees as the madness of totalitarian regimes. It then goes on to place the novel's dystopian vision of total surveillance and mind control in the context of the neurological research and brain scanning techniques of the mid-20th century. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011404DOI Listing
June 2018
4 Reads

From post-traumatic stress disorder to absolute dependence in an intensive care unit: reflections on a clinical account.

Authors:
Tina Sideris

Med Humanit 2018 Jun 20. Epub 2018 Jun 20.

Clinical Psychologist Private Practice Wits Donald Gordon Medical Centre, Johannesburg, South Africa.

This paper tells the story of one man's experience of terrifying hallucinations and nightmares in an intensive care unit (ICU), drawing attention to the reality that intensive care treatment induces emotional suffering severe enough to be identified as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A body of international research, confirmed by South African studies, links life-saving critical care to symptoms which qualify for secondary psychiatric diagnosis including of post-traumatic stress. Risk factors include pre-ICU comorbid psychopathology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011435DOI Listing
June 2018
8 Reads

Pain and the human condition.

Med Humanit 2018 06;44(2):72-73

Center for Bioethics & Humanities, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011519DOI Listing

Editor's note: pain and paradoxes.

Authors:
Brandy Schillace

Med Humanit 2018 06;44(2):71

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2018-011518DOI Listing

"A kind of agonie in my thoughts": writing puritan and non-conformist women's pain in 17th-century England.

Authors:
Alison Searle

Med Humanit 2018 Jun 13;44(2):125-136. Epub 2018 Jun 13.

The relationship between pain as a physical and emotional experience and the concept of suffering as an essential aspect of sanctification for faithful believers was a paradoxical and pressing theological and phenomenological issue for puritan and non-conformist communities in 17th-century England. Pain allows the paradox of non-conformists' valorisation and suppression of corporeality to be explored due to its simultaneous impact on the mind and body and its tendency to leak across boundaries separating an individual believer from other members of their family or faith community. The material world and the human body were celebrated as theatres for the display of God's glory through the doctrines of creation and providence despite the fall. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/medhum-2017-011407DOI Listing