42 results match your criteria Massage Traction and Manipulation

  • Page 1 of 1

A Regional Analysis of U.S. Insurance Reimbursement Guidelines for Massage Therapy.

Int J Ther Massage Bodywork 2018 Mar 26;11(1):11-16. Epub 2018 Mar 26.

School of Health Professions, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, USA.

Introduction: Massage techniques fall within the scope of many different health care providers. Physical therapists, occupational therapists, and chiropractors receive insurance reimbursement for health care services, including massage. Although many patients pay out of pocket for massage services, it is unclear how the insurance company reimbursement policies factor provider qualifications into coverage. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5868896PMC
March 2018
7 Reads

The Global Spine Care Initiative: applying evidence-based guidelines on the non-invasive management of back and neck pain to low- and middle-income communities.

Eur Spine J 2018 Sep 19;27(Suppl 6):851-860. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Division of General Medical Rehabilitation, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

Purpose: The purpose of this review was to develop recommendations for the management of spinal disorders in low-income communities, with a focus on non-invasive pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapies for non-specific low back and neck pain.

Methods: We synthesized two evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of low back and neck pain. Our recommendations considered benefits, harms, quality of evidence, and costs, with attention to feasibility in medically underserved areas and low- and middle-income countries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00586-017-5433-8DOI Listing
September 2018
18 Reads

Massage for Low-back Pain.

Explore (NY) 2016 May-Jun;12(3):215-7. Epub 2016 Mar 2.

Unlabelled: FURLAN AD, GIRALDOM, BASKWILL A, IRVIN E, IMAMURA M. MASSAGE FOR LOW-BACK PAIN. COCHRANE DATABASE SYST REV 2015, ISSUE 9. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.explore.2016.02.014DOI Listing
July 2017
8 Reads

Management of neck pain and associated disorders: A clinical practice guideline from the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration.

Eur Spine J 2016 07 16;25(7):2000-22. Epub 2016 Mar 16.

, Toronto, Canada.

Purpose: To develop an evidence-based guideline for the management of grades I-III neck pain and associated disorders (NAD).

Methods: This guideline is based on recent systematic reviews of high-quality studies. A multidisciplinary expert panel considered the evidence of effectiveness, safety, cost-effectiveness, societal and ethical values, and patient experiences (obtained from qualitative research) when formulating recommendations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00586-016-4467-7DOI Listing
July 2016
35 Reads
2.473 Impact Factor

Massage for low-back pain.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2015 Sep 1(9):CD001929. Epub 2015 Sep 1.

Institute for Work & Health, 481 University Avenue, Suite 800, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5G 2E9.

Background: Low-back pain (LBP) is one of the most common and costly musculoskeletal problems in modern society. It is experienced by 70% to 80% of adults at some time in their lives. Massage therapy has the potential to minimize pain and speed return to normal function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD001929.pub3DOI Listing
September 2015
8 Reads

Effectiveness of Physical Therapy in Patients with Tension-type Headache: Literature Review.

J Jpn Phys Ther Assoc 2014 ;17(1):31-8

Occupational Health Service, Correos Group of Valencia Pza. Ayuntamiento, 24. PC: 46002 Valencia, Spain.

Background: Tension-type headache (TTH) is a disease with a great incidence on quality of life and with a significant socioeconomic impact.

Objectives: The aim of this review is to determine the effectiveness of physical therapy by using manual therapy (MT) for the relief of TTH.

Data Sources: A review was done identifying randomized controlled trials through searches in MEDLINE, PEDro, Cochrane and CINAHL (January 2002 - April 2012). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1298/jjpta.17.31DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4316547PMC
March 2015
13 Reads

Evidence-based guidelines for the chiropractic treatment of adults with neck pain.

J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2014 Jan 19;37(1):42-63. Epub 2013 Nov 19.

Chiropractor, Markham, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop evidence-based treatment recommendations for the treatment of nonspecific (mechanical) neck pain in adults.

Methods: Systematic literature searches of controlled clinical trials published through December 2011 relevant to chiropractic practice were conducted using the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, EMCARE, Index to Chiropractic Literature, and the Cochrane Library. The number, quality, and consistency of findings were considered to assign an overall strength of evidence (strong, moderate, weak, or conflicting) and to formulate treatment recommendations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmpt.2013.08.010DOI Listing
January 2014
7 Reads

WITHDRAWN: Spinal manipulative therapy for low-back pain.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2013 Jan 31(1):CD000447. Epub 2013 Jan 31.

Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, Leiden, Netherlands, 2300 RC.

Background: Low-back pain is a costly illness for which spinal manipulative therapy is commonly recommended. Previous systematic reviews and practice guidelines have reached discordant results on the effectiveness of this therapy for low-back pain.

Objectives: To resolve the discrepancies related to the use of spinal manipulative therapy and to update previous estimates of effectiveness, by comparing spinal manipulative therapy with other therapies and then incorporating data from recent high-quality randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) into the analysis. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/14651858.CD000447.pub3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD000447.pub3DOI Listing
January 2013
10 Reads

Mechanical therapy for low back pain.

Prim Care 2012 Sep;39(3):511-6

Southern Regional AHEC, 1601 Owen Drive, Fayetteville, NC 28304, USA.

Physical therapy and manual medicine for low back pain encompass many different treatment modalities. There is a vast variety of techniques that physical therapists commonly use in the treatment of low back pain. Some of the therapies include, but are certainly not limited to, education, exercise, lumbar traction, manual manipulation, application of heat, cryotherapy, and ultrasonography. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00954543120004
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pop.2012.06.006DOI Listing
September 2012
10 Reads

Chinese manipulation for mechanical neck pain: a systematic review.

Clin Rehabil 2012 Nov 3;26(11):963-73. Epub 2012 Apr 3.

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.

Objective: To assess whether Chinese manipulation improves pain, function/disability and global perceived effect in adults with acute/subacute/chronic neck pain.

Data Sources: CAJ Full-text Database (Chinese), Wanfang Database (Chinese), Cochrane Database (English) and Medline (English).

Review Methods: Literature searching was performed with the following keywords and their combination: 'manual therapy/bone setting/Chinese manipulation', 'neck/cervical pain', 'cervical vertebrae', 'cervical spondylosis/radiculopathy' and 'randomized controlled trial/review. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0269215512441485DOI Listing
November 2012
5 Reads

Diagnosis and treatment of acute low back pain.

Authors:
Brian A Casazza

Am Fam Physician 2012 Feb;85(4):343-50

University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Acute low back pain is one of the most common reasons for adults to see a family physician. Although most patients recover quickly with minimal treatment, proper evaluation is imperative to identify rare cases of serious underlying pathology. Certain red flags should prompt aggressive treatment or referral to a spine specialist, whereas others are less concerning. Read More

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http://medind.nic.in/iaa/t12/i8/iaat12i8p155.pdf
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http://unmfm.pbworks.com/w/file/fetch/68529143/Diagnosis%20a
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February 2012
11 Reads

Herniated lumbar disc.

BMJ Clin Evid 2011 Jun 28;2011. Epub 2011 Jun 28.

Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Primary Care Sciences, Keele University, Keele, UK.

Introduction: Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30 to 50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1. There is little evidence to suggest that drug treatments are effective in treating herniated disc. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3275148PMC
June 2011
32 Reads

Low back pain (acute).

BMJ Clin Evid 2011 May 9;2011. Epub 2011 May 9.

CBI Health Group Research Dept, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Introduction: Low back pain affects about 70% of people in resource-rich countries at some point in their lives. Acute low back pain can be self-limiting; however, 1 year after an initial episode, as many as 33% of people still have moderate-intensity pain and 15% have severe pain. Acute low back pain has a high recurrence rate; 75% of those with a first episode have a recurrence. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3217769PMC
May 2011
13 Reads

Notalgia paresthetica associated with cervical spinal stenosis and cervicothoracic disk disease at C4 through C7.

Cutis 2010 Feb;85(2):77-81

Department of Dermatology, University of California, Irvine, USA.

Notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a common refractory, sensory, neuropathic syndrome with the hallmark symptom of localized pruritus of the unilateral infrascapular back. It generally is a chronic noncurable condition with periodic remissions and exacerbations. While the dermatologic syndrome may be multifactorial in etiology, a possible association with underlying cervical spine disease should be evaluated for proper treatment. Read More

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February 2010
11 Reads

Low back pain (chronic).

Authors:
Roger Chou

BMJ Clin Evid 2010 Oct 8;2010. Epub 2010 Oct 8.

Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, USA.

Introduction: Over 70% of people in developed countries develop low back pain (LBP) at some time. But recovery is not always favourable: 82% of non recent-onset patients still experience pain 1 year later. Many patients with chronic LBP who were initially told that their natural history was good spend months or years seeking relief. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3217809PMC
October 2010
13 Reads

Herniated lumbar disc.

BMJ Clin Evid 2009 Mar 26;2009. Epub 2009 Mar 26.

Arthritis Research Campaign National Primary Care Centre, Primary Care Sciences, Keele University, Keele, UK.

Introduction: Herniated lumbar disc is a displacement of disc material (nucleus pulposus or annulus fibrosis) beyond the intervertebral disc space. The highest prevalence is among people aged 30-50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1. There is little evidence to suggest that drug treatments are effective in treating herniated disc. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2907819PMC
March 2009
20 Reads

Chronic mechanical neck pain in adults treated by manual therapy: a systematic review of change scores in randomized controlled trials of a single session.

J Man Manip Ther 2008 ;16(2):E42-52

Professor, Division of Research, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Toronto, ON, Canada.

We report a systematic analysis of group change scores of subjects with chronic neck pain not due to whiplash and without headache or arm pain, in randomized clinical trials of a single session of manual therapy. A comprehensive literature search of clinical trials of chronic neck pain treated with manual therapies up to December 2006 was conducted. Trials that scored above 60% on the PEDro Scale were included. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2565115PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/jmt.2008.16.2.42EDOI Listing
July 2011
3 Reads

Low back pain (acute).

BMJ Clin Evid 2008 Oct 3;2008. Epub 2008 Oct 3.

CBIHealth, Toronto, Canada.

Introduction: Low back pain (LBP) affects about 70% of people in resource-rich countries at some point. Acute low back pain is usually perceived as self-limiting; however, one year later, as many as 33% of people still have moderate-intensity pain and 15% have severe pain. It has a high recurrence rate; 75% of those with a first episode have a recurrence. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2907975PMC
October 2008
11 Reads

Low back pain (chronic).

BMJ Clin Evid 2008 Oct 1;2008. Epub 2008 Oct 1.

Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Introduction: Over 70% of people in resource-rich countries develop low back pain (LBP) at some time. But recovery is not always favourable: 82% of non-recent-onset patients still experience pain one year later. Many chronic patients who were initially told that their natural history was good spend months or years seeking relief. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2908004PMC
October 2008
7 Reads

Nonpharmacologic therapies for acute and chronic low back pain: a review of the evidence for an American Pain Society/American College of Physicians clinical practice guideline.

Ann Intern Med 2007 Oct;147(7):492-504

Oregon Evidence-based Practice Center and Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA.

Background: Many nonpharmacologic therapies are available for treatment of low back pain.

Purpose: To assess benefits and harms of acupuncture, back schools, psychological therapies, exercise therapy, functional restoration, interdisciplinary therapy, massage, physical therapies (interferential therapy, low-level laser therapy, lumbar supports, shortwave diathermy, superficial heat, traction, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and ultrasonography), spinal manipulation, and yoga for acute or chronic low back pain (with or without leg pain).

Data Sources: English-language studies were identified through searches of MEDLINE (through November 2006) and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2006, Issue 4). Read More

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October 2007
11 Reads

Chiropractic clinical practice guideline: evidence-based treatment of adult neck pain not due to whiplash.

J Can Chiropr Assoc 2005 Sep;49(3):158-209

Objective: To provide an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the chiropractic cervical treatment of adults with acute or chronic neck pain not due to whiplash. This is a considerable health concern considered to be a priority by stakeholders, and about which the scientific information was poorly organized.

Options: Cervical treatments: manipulation, mobilization, ischemic pressure, clinic- and home-based exercise, traction, education, low-power laser, massage, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pillows, pulsed electromagnetic therapy, and ultrasound. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1839918PMC
September 2005
16 Reads

Chronic mechanical neck pain in adults treated by manual therapy: a systematic review of change scores in randomized clinical trials.

J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2007 Mar-Apr;30(3):215-27

Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Objective: This study provides a systematic analysis of group change scores in randomized clinical trials of chronic neck pain not due to whiplash and not including headache or arm pain treated with manual therapy.

Methods: A comprehensive literature search of clinical trials of chronic neck pain treated with manual therapies up to December 2005. Only clinical trials scoring above 11. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S016147540700059
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmpt.2007.01.014DOI Listing
April 2007
8 Reads

Are manual therapies effective in reducing pain from tension-type headache?: a systematic review.

Clin J Pain 2006 Mar-Apr;22(3):278-85

Department of Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (URJC), Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain.

Objectives: A systematic review was performed to establish whether manual therapies have specific efficacy in reducing pain from tension-type headache (TTH).

Methods: Computerized literature searches were performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, MANTIS, CINAHL, PEDro, and Cochrane databases. Papers were included if they described clinical (open noncontrolled studies) or randomized controlled trials in which any form of manual therapy was used for TTH, and if they were published after 1994 in the English language. Read More

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http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/clinicalpain/2006/03000/Are_Man
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http://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:land
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ajp.0000173017.64741.86DOI Listing
April 2006
11 Reads

Reversal of the signs and symptoms of moderately severe idiopathic scoliosis in response to physical methods.

Stud Health Technol Inform 2002 ;91:365-8

Department of Plant Pathology, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721, USA.

This report describes improved signs and symptoms of previously untreated symptomatic spinal deformity in an adult female diagnosed with moderately severe thoracic scoliosis at the age of .7 years. Current treatment initiated at the age of forty included massage therapy, manual traction, ischemic pressure, and comprehensive manipulative medicine (CMM). Read More

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January 2005
4 Reads

Survey of general practitioner, family physician, and chiropractor's beliefs regarding the management of acute whiplash patients.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2004 Oct;29(19):2173-7

Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Study Design: Questionnaire Survey.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to survey the whiplash management beliefs for practicing general practitioners, family physicians, and chiropractors.

Summary Of Background Data: Many treatments are prescribed by general practitioners, family physicians, and chiropractors for acute whiplash, but to date no survey of management beliefs for acute whiplash has been reported. Read More

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October 2004
6 Reads

Effective physical treatment for chronic low back pain.

Authors:
C G Maher

Orthop Clin North Am 2004 Jan;35(1):57-64

School of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, New South Wales 1825, Australia.

It is now feasible to adopt an evidence-based approach when providing physical treatment for patients with chronic LBP. A summary of the efficacy of a range of physical treatments is provided in Table 1. The evidence-based primary care options are exercise, laser, massage, and spinal manipulation; however, the latter three have small or transient effects that limit their value as therapies for chronic LBP. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00305898030008
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0030-5898(03)00088-9DOI Listing
January 2004
24 Reads

Spinal manipulative therapy for low back pain.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2004 (1):CD000447

Department of Guideline Development and Research Policy, Dutch College of General Practioners, P.O. Box 3231, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Background: Low-back pain is a costly illness for which spinal manipulative therapy is commonly recommended. Previous systematic reviews and practice guidelines have reached discordant results on the effectiveness of this therapy for low-back pain.

Objectives: To resolve the discrepancies related to the use of spinal manipulative therapy and to update previous estimates of effectiveness, by comparing spinal manipulative therapy with other therapies and then incorporating data from recent high-quality randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) into the analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD000447.pub2DOI Listing
June 2004
12 Reads

Spinal manipulative therapy for low back pain. A meta-analysis of effectiveness relative to other therapies.

Ann Intern Med 2003 Jun;138(11):871-81

The Cochrane Back Review Group, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Low back pain is a costly illness for which spinal manipulative therapy is commonly recommended. Previous systematic reviews and practice guidelines have reached discordant results on the effectiveness of this therapy for low back pain.

Purpose: To resolve the discrepancies related to use of spinal manipulative therapy and to update previous estimates of effectiveness by comparing spinal manipulative therapy with other therapies and then incorporating data from recent high-quality randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) into the analysis. Read More

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June 2003
16 Reads

Techniques used by manipulative physiotherapists in the management of headaches.

Aust J Physiother 2000 ;46(3):215-222

School of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, 3083, Australia.

This study aimed to identify the techniques used by manipulative physiotherapists in the management of headaches. Two hundred and two patients with headache presented to 44 Victorian trained manipulative physiotherapists (MPTs) who completed questionnaires to determine techniques used. Upper cervical (O-C3) passive accessory intervertebral movement was the most frequently used technique (84. Read More

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http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0004951414603305/1-s2.0-S000495141460
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January 2000
15 Reads

[Rehabilitation for musculoskeltal disorders in geriatric patients].

Authors:
O Shirado

Hokkaido Igaku Zasshi 1997 Jul;72(4):389-96

Comprehensive Rehabilitation Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Japan.

Aging is typically accompanied by gradual but progressive physiological changes and an increased prevalence of acute and chronic illness in any organs. Musculoskeltal system is one of the most involved organs in geriatric patients. Appropriate roles in geriatric rehabilitation for musculoskeltal disorders should be emphasized not only to treat the disorders, but also to prevent many complications cause by specific disease or injury. Read More

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July 1997
6 Reads

Issues in determining treatment effectiveness of manual therapy.

Phys Ther 1994 Mar;74(3):227-33

Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, Hahnemann University, Philadelphia, PA 19102.

The purpose of this article is to examine issues pertinent to the study of the clinical effectiveness of manual therapy. The need for complete operational definitions of treatment procedures, criteria for altering treatment, and criteria for subject selection is discussed. The need for studies that examine the relationship among impairment, functional limitations, and disability is also discussed. Read More

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March 1994
4 Reads

Physiatric therapeutics. 3. Traction, manipulation, and massage.

Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1990 Mar;71(4-S):S264-6

University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor 48109.

This self-directed learning module highlights advances in this topic area. It is part of the chapter on physiatric therapeutics for the Self-Directed Medical Knowledge Program Study Guide for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This section discusses physiologic effects of, and indications and contraindications for, traction, manipulation, and massage. Read More

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March 1990
4 Reads

[Manual therapy in the combined treatment of spinal osteochondrosis].

Authors:
P V Lomakin

Ortop Travmatol Protez 1989 Sep(9):4-7

The article reflects the experience in the work of the manual therapy consulting-room at the Smela town hospital named after N. A. Semashko in Chernigov Province from November 1985 to December 1987 inclusive. Read More

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September 1989
3 Reads

Spinal mobilisation and manipulation.

Authors:
C Kenna J Murtagh

Aust Fam Physician 1989 Jun;18(6):630-1, 633, 637-8 passim

Used in a general sense, manipulation refers to the use of hands in a skillful manner for therapeutic techniques. Hence it can refer to any manual technique involving a passive movement be it specific manipulation, mobilisation, traction, soft tissue techniques or massage. In this paper manipulation refers to those manual techniques that apply a high velocity thrust at the end range of the joint; and mobilisation refers to a gentle repetitive rhythmic movement. Read More

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June 1989
6 Reads

Therapeutic modalities and procedures. Part III: Kinetic procedures, surgical considerations, direct and alternating currents.

Authors:
A E Helfand J Bruno

Clin Podiatry 1984 Aug;1(2):323-41

Among the topics discussed in this article are kinetic procedures such as massage, manipulation, vibration, traction, and exercise; electrosurgery with high-frequency currents; and electrical stimulation. Read More

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August 1984
5 Reads

Spinal manipulative therapy. A status report.

Authors:
S Haldeman

Clin Orthop Relat Res 1983 Oct(179):62-70

Spinal manipulative therapy is one of the most commonly used treatments for patients with low back pain. It is both a manual diagnostic and a treatment method. Manual diagnosis includes the palpation of vertebral position, vertebral motion, joint play, end feel, soft tissue texture changes, and muscle contracture. Read More

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October 1983
4 Reads

The modern thrust of manipulation and traction therapy.

Authors:
R L Swezey

Semin Arthritis Rheum 1983 Feb;12(3):322-31

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February 1983
5 Reads

Orthopedic manual therapy--an overview. Part II: the spine.

Authors:
J C Cookson

Phys Ther 1979 Mar;59(3):259-67

The focus of this article is orthopedic manual therapy for the spine: 1) precautions and contraindications for manual methods of treatment; 2) definitions of general terms for therapeutic techniques of mobilization and traction; and 3) the general concepts and the evaluation, treatment, and aftertreatment procedures of James Cyriax, MD, MRCP; Freddy Kaltenborn, DO, RPT; Geoffrey Maitland, MAPA, FCSP; and John McM. Mennell, MD. Read More

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March 1979
12 Reads

Manipulation: a tool in the armamentarium of the physical therapist.

Authors:
M C Showers

Prog Phys Ther 1970 ;1(3):275-8

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March 1972
5 Reads

[The combined use of traction, rotation and vibration in the therapy of lumbar diskopathies].

Authors:
R Shandor

Ortop Travmatol Protez 1967 Apr;28(4):34-9

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April 1967
4 Reads
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