44 results match your criteria Lycanthropy

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Uncommon and/or bizarre features of dementia. Part II.

Acta Neurol Belg 2018 Jun 22;118(2):187-191. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

Department of Psychiatry, Versilia Hospital, Via Aurelia 335, 55041, Lido Di Camaiore, Italy.

In the past decades, clinicians have recognized that dementia may appear as atypical or variant syndromes, as well as the typical form. This study aimed at describing uncommon or bizarre symptoms/syndromes observed in patients suffering from dementia. Medline and Google scholar searches were conducted for relevant articles, chapters, and books published before 2017. Read More

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June 2018
0.60 Impact Factor

[Lycanthropy and medicine].

Ann Dermatol Venereol 2015 Dec 26;142(12):793-7. Epub 2015 Nov 26.

Service de dermatologie, institut Alfred-Fournier, 25, boulevard Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France.

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December 2015
1 Read

Kynanthropy: canine madness in Byzantine late antiquity.

Authors:
Nadine Metzger

Hist Psychiatry 2015 Sep;26(3):318-31

Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU)

Those afflicted bark like dogs, scramble on all fours and loiter around graveyards - canine madness, referred to as kynanthropy, was an illness concept in its own right in the medicine of late antiquity. At roughly the same time as the medical description produced by Aëtius of Amida, the Syrian chronicler John of Ephesus, also from Amida, reported an epidemic of dog-like madness sweeping his home town in ad 560. The symptoms are identical and both authors are from Amida - what is the connection between the two depictions? In addition to the history of the medical concept, the example of the canine madness of Amida and its cultural embedding allows us to contextualize and interpret the significance of dog-like behaviour for the people of the sixth century AD. Read More

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September 2015
7 Reads

The ‘snake’ man: ophidianthropy in a case of schizophrenia, along with literature review.

Asian J Psychiatr 2014 Dec;12:148-9

Clinical lycanthropy is a rare form of reverse intermetamorphosis; intermatamorphosis being one of the delusional misidentification syndromes, in which patients believe that they are undergoing transformation or have transformed into a non-human animal. Psychiatric diseases commonly associated with it are schizophrenia, affective disorders, substance use, personality disorders and general medical conditions. Here we report the unique case of an ophidianthropy along with other psychopathologies in a patient of schizophrenia. Read More

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December 2014
5 Reads

When doctors cry wolf: a systematic review of the literature on clinical lycanthropy.

Authors:
Jan Dirk Blom

Hist Psychiatry 2014 Mar;25(1):87-102

Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, The Hague, and Groningen University.

This paper provides an overview and critical reassessment of the cases of clinical lycanthropy reported in the medical literature from 1850 onwards. Out of 56 original case descriptions of metamorphosis into an animal, only 13 fulfilled the criteria of clinical lycanthropy proper. The remaining cases constituted variants of the overarching class of clinical zoanthropy. Read More

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March 2014
15 Reads

Battling demons with medical authority: werewolves, physicians and rationalization.

Authors:
Nadine Metzger

Hist Psychiatry 2013 Sep;24(3):341-55

University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany.

Werewolves and physicians experienced their closest contact in the context of early modern witch and werewolf trials. For medical critics of the trials, melancholic diseases served as reference points for medical explanations of both individual cases and werewolf beliefs in general. This paper attempts to construct a conceptual history of werewolf beliefs and their respective medical responses. Read More

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September 2013

Clinical lycanthropy: delusional misidentification of the "self".

Authors:
Rajeet Shrestha

J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci 2014 ;26(1):E53-4

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September 2014
2 Reads

Lycanthropy as a culture-bound syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

J Psychiatr Pract 2012 Jan;18(1):51-4

Hotel Dieu de France Hospital, Beirut.

Lycanthropy is an unusual belief or delusion that one has been transformed into an animal, or behaviors or feelings suggestive of such a belief. We report a case of lycanthropic delusions of becoming a snake in a 47-year-old woman who suffered from a major depressive disorder with psychotic features. We also present a literature review of articles published on the subject in English or French since 1975 identified via a MedLine search using the terms "lycanthropy" or "werewolf. Read More

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January 2012
2 Reads

Duke Ferdinand: patient or possessed? The reflection of contemporary medical discourse in John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi.

Authors:
Ellen Tullo

Med Humanit 2010 Jun;36(1):19-22

Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle University, Newcastle NE4 5PL, UK.

The Duchess of Malfi, a tragedy written by John Webster, makes frequent reference to contemporary Jacobean concerns about health and disease for dramatic effect. Most notably Webster chooses to highlight lycanthropy through the evolution of the condition in the character of Duke Ferdinand. This paper examines Webster's knowledge of contemporary medical, religious and political texts and explores the reflection of both a natural humoral understanding of lycanthropy as a disease, and the concurrent importance of supernatural concerns prevalent at the time. Read More

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June 2010
5 Reads

[The cenesthesiopathies].

Tijdschr Psychiatr 2010 ;52(10):695-704

Background: Up till a century ago the classic concepts of cenesthesis and cenesthesiopathy played a major role in the conceptualisation of aberrant somatosensory sensations and disturbances in the sensation of physical existence. Although these concepts are considered obsolete by a number of authors, the conceptual work of the German psychiatrist Gert Huber and the results of modern neuroimaging studies point to the need for a re-evaluation of the concepts cenesthesis and cenesthesiopathy.

Method: Background information was obtained from PubMed, Embase and the medical historical literature. Read More

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January 2011

Electroconvulsive therapy for lycanthropy and Cotard syndrome: a case report.

J ECT 2010 Dec;26(4):280-1

Department of Psychiatry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

We present a case of psychotic depression presenting with lycanthropy (being converted to a pig) and Cotard syndrome simultaneously and treated with electroconvulsive therapy. A 37-year-old female patient developed psychotic depression after a stressor (a possibility of having a malignancy). As her depression worsened, she developed delusional belief of self being metamorphosed to a pig and her children also being metamorphosed into pig. Read More

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December 2010
2 Reads
2 PubMed Central Citations(source)
1.39 Impact Factor

Lycanthropy in Byzantine times (AD 330-1453).

Hist Psychiatry 2009 Dec;20(80 Pt 4):468-79

medical School, University of Athens.

In this paper, the original Greek language texts of the Byzantine medical literature about lycanthropy are reviewed. The transformation of a human being into a wolf and the adoption of animal-like behaviour, which were already known from mythology and had been presented in the scientific works of ancient Greek and Roman physicians, were examined by six Byzantine physicians and explained as a type of melancholic depression or mania. In spite of the influence of Byzantine medicine, its rationality in the interpretation of lycanthropy was forgotten in medieval and Renaissance times when it was replaced by explanations based on demonic possession and witchcraft. Read More

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December 2009
2 Reads

Lycanthropy in alcohol intoxication.

Aust N Z J Psychiatry 2009 Nov;43(11):1086

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November 2009
5 Reads

Rare variant of lycanthropy and ecstasy.

Addict Health 2009 ;1(1):53-6

Resident of Psychiatry, School of Medicine and Neuroscience Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.

Background: Lycanthropy is an unusual belief or delusion in which the patient thinks that he/she has been transformed into an animal. In rare cases, the patient believes that another person has been transformed into an animal.

Case Report: We report a patient with an uncommon variant of lycanthropy is introduced. Read More

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February 2014
2 Reads

Lycanthropy alive in Babylon: the existence of archetype.

Acta Psychiatr Scand 2009 Feb 4;119(2):161-4; discussion 164-5. Epub 2008 Dec 4.

Department of Psychiatry and Behaviours Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, UAE University, Al Ain, UAE.

Objective: Lycanthropy is the belief in the capacity of human metamorphosis into animal form. It has been recorded in many cultures. Apart from historic description of lycanthropy, there has been several case reports described in the medical literature over the past 30 years. Read More

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February 2009
1 Read

Belief in transforming another person into a wolf: could it be a variant of lycanthropy?

Authors:
A G Nejad

Acta Psychiatr Scand 2007 Feb;115(2):159-61; discussion 161

Department of Psychiatry, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Beheshti Hospital, Boulvar Avenue, 761994-1151 Kerman, Iran.

Unlabelled: Lycanthropy is a rare psychiatric condition in which the patient believes in being transformed into an animal. Belief in the transformation of another person into an animal has not been reported, so far. Here, a patient with an impression of bipolar mood disorder (mixed type) and such delusion is reported. Read More

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February 2007
3 Reads

[Ancient lycanthropy--when man identified with wolves].

Authors:
Nadine Metzger

Praxis (Bern 1994) 2006 Feb;95(8):299-302

Institut für Geschichte der Medizin der Universität Freiburg.

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February 2006
8 Reads

Co-existence of lycanthropy and Cotard's syndrome in a single case.

Authors:
A G Nejad K Toofani

Acta Psychiatr Scand 2005 Mar;111(3):250-2; discussion 252

Beheshti Hospital, Kerman, Iran.

Objective: Lycanthropy is an unusual psychiatric syndrome involving the delusion of being an animal. Cotard's syndrome is another rare condition in which the patient has nihilistic delusions and ideation of immortality. We report a psychiatric patient who had both syndromes simultaneously. Read More

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March 2005
2 Reads

Lycanthropy and delusional misidentification.

Acta Psychiatr Scand 2005 Feb;111(2):162; author reply 162

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February 2005

Lycanthropy: wolf-men and werewolves.

Acta Psychiatr Scand 2005 Jan;111(1):79; author reply 79

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January 2005
1 Read

[The berserks--what was wrong with them?].

Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2004 Dec;124(24):3247-50

Kompetansesenter for sikkerhets-, fengsels- og rettspsykiatri, Haukeland Universitetssjukehus, Postboks 23, 5812 Bergen.

The terms berserk and going berserk reflect the violent and ferocious warriors and ruthless murderers of Scandinavia and Northern Europe, active from before the Viking age until the advent of Christianity. The main source on the phenomenon is the Old Norse literature, mainly the Icelandic sagas with their sober descriptive accounts of the berserks and their behaviour. The berserks are frequently depicted as having had antisocial character traits; often as bullies who evince, by way of autosuggestion, an enormous and uncontrollable rage, slaughtering and killing. Read More

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December 2004
4 Reads

Lycanthropy--psychopathological and psychodynamical aspects.

Acta Psychiatr Scand 2004 Jan;109(1):19-22

Department of Social Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

Objective: The imagination of being transformed into an animal or being an animal is called lycanthropy. The phenomenon is presented and psychodynamical aspects are discussed.

Method: A literature review forms the base of this discussion of a psychopathological phenomenon. Read More

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January 2004
1 Read

Paranormal phenomena in the medical literature sufficient smoke to warrant a search for fire.

Authors:
Robert S Bobrow

Med Hypotheses 2003 Jun;60(6):864-8

Department of Family Medicine, Health Sciences Center, Stony Brook, New York 11794-8461, USA.

Paranormal phenomena - events that cannot be explained by existing science - are regularly reported in medicine. Surveys have shown that a majority of the population of the United States and Great Britain hold at least one paranormal belief. Information was retrieved by MEDLINE searches using keywords 'paranormal' and 'psychic', and from the author's own collection. Read More

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June 2003
3 Reads

Lycanthropy: 2 case reports.

Can J Psychiatry 2001 Sep;46(7):659

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September 2001
1 Read

[Lycanthropy-zooanthropism--discussion of a psychopathological phenomenon].

Fortschr Neurol Psychiatr 2001 May;69(5):215-20

Abteilung Sozialpsychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover.

The belief to be transformed into an animal is named Lycanthropy. "Zooanthropismus" is the German equivalent. Three case reports raised the question how this phenomenon, in our cases to be transformed into a frog, a bee or a wolf/dog, can be interpreted in a psychopathological and diagnostic regard. Read More

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May 2001
1 Read

A case of partial lycanthropy.

Can J Psychiatry 2000 Mar;45(2):201-2

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Lycanthropy: new evidence of its origin.

Authors:
H F Moselhy

Psychopathology 1999 Jul-Aug;32(4):173-6

Bushey Fields Hospital, Dudley, UK.

Two cases of lycanthropy will be described. Its possible aetiology and psychopathology will be discussed. In the first case there is clear evidence of an organic origin of the syndrome which is reported for the first time. Read More

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September 1999

Lycanthropy in depression: two case reports.

Psychopathology 1999 Jul-Aug;32(4):169-72

National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India.

Two cases of lycanthropy presenting as part of a depressive disorder are described. The patients responded favorably to pharmacotherapy. In both cases, a positive history of dog bite influenced the presentation of symptoms. Read More

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September 1999
1 Read

A partial form of lycanthropy with hair delusion in a manic-depressive patient.

Br J Psychiatry 1993 Nov;163:684-6

University of Bordeaux, France.

A 45-year-old man was admitted with a hair growth delusion and depressive symptoms. The delusion persisted for three years and disappeared after a manic episode. This odd delusion has some similarities with lycanthropy. Read More

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November 1993
2 Reads

[Anorexia and lycanthropy ++: grandiosity and fall].

Ann Med Psychol (Paris) 1993 Mar;151(3):285-9

Hôpital La Colombière, Montpellier.

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Psychopharmacology of lycanthropy.

CMAJ 1992 Apr;146(7):1191-7

Orphan Drug Research Institute, Jefferson, Miss.

Objective: To develop pharmacotherapies for the orphan disease lycanthropy through the pursuit of the etiologic hypothesis of a genetically determined hypersecretion of endogenous lycanthropogens.

Design: Quadruple-blind, Rubik's Cube matrix analysis.

Setting: Community practice and malpractice. Read More

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[The delusion of lycanthropic transformation].

Actas Luso Esp Neurol Psiquiatr Cienc Afines 1990 Sep-Oct;18(5):327-31

Facultad de Medicina, Valencia.

The authors describe one case of Lycanthropy and revise the literature about this theme. They observe that Lycanthropy has received scant attention in the modern literature, but appears to have survived into modern times. In some cases the patient (as a Delusion) has the belief that he has been transformed into an animal. Read More

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April 1991
1 Read

Lycanthropy and demonomania: some psychopathological issues.

Psychol Med 1990 Aug;20(3):629-33

University Psychiatric Clinic, Bonn, West Germany.

Modern reports on lycanthropy mainly concentrate on the content of patients' beliefs in being transformed into an animal. By contrast, an interest in the form of the symptomatology is usually minimal. This paper draws on Karl Jaspers' phenomenological views and focuses on some important albeit neglected psychopathological issues related to form which are relevant to any comprehensive consideration of lycanthropic phenomena. Read More

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Lycanthropy and self-identification.

J Nerv Ment Dis 1990 Feb;178(2):134-7

Department of Psychiatry, McLean Hospital, Belmont, Massachusetts 02178.

Lycanthropy, an unusual psychiatric syndrome involving the delusion of being an animal, usually occurs as a transient symptom of severe psychosis. A review of the historical and modern medical literature, as well as of contemporary anthropological reports, suggests multiple etiologies for lycanthropy, including seizure disorders and use of psychotomimetic drugs. A clinical illustration is presented in which the delusion of being an animal in human form has persisted for over 15 years and has been refractory to treatment. Read More

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February 1990
1 Read

[A case of lycanthropy with deadly violence].

Ann Med Psychol (Paris) 1989 Jul-Aug;147(4):464-70

Service Médico-Psychologique Régional des Prisons, Centre Hospitalier Spécialisé Charles-Perrens, Bordeaux.

After a short historical review of the contemporary medical literature, the authors analyze a new and original observation of lycanthropy. He is a 28 years old man, imprisoned for deadly violence, who has been showing, for many years, the belief of being transformed into a werewolf during depersonalization episodes when he presents a lycanthropic behaviour. Our observation is closer to hysteria and mythomania on an antisocial personality, although it seems difficult to place the mental pathology of this alcoholic recidivist delinquent into a nosographical frame. Read More

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December 1989
1 Read

Lycanthropy: a review.

Authors:
T A Fahy

J R Soc Med 1989 Jan;82(1):37-9

Bethlem Royal and Maudsley Hospital, London.

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January 1989
2 Reads

Multiple serial lycanthropy. A case report.

Authors:
T R Dening A West

Psychopathology 1989 ;22(6):344-7

St Crispin Hospital, Northampton, UK.

A case is described who exhibited lycanthropy during an acute psychotic illness. During a short period she experienced herself as four different species of animal, an occurrence not previously reported. The phenomenon of lycanthropy is most appropriately regarded as a delusion, but the abnormal subjective experience is stressed, not just the falsely-held belief. Read More

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Lycanthropy: alive and well in the twentieth century.

Psychol Med 1988 Feb;18(1):113-20

Epidemiology Laboratory, McLean Hospital, Belmont, MA 02178.

Lycanthropy, the belief that one has been transformed into an animal (or behaviour suggestive of such a belief), has been described by physicians and clerics since antiquity, but has received scant attention in the modern literature. Some have even thought the syndrome extinct. However, in a review of patients admitted to our centre since 1974, we identified twelve cases of lycanthropy, ranging in duration from one day to 13 years. Read More

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February 1988

Lycanthropy lives on.

Br J Psychiatry 1985 Aug;147:201-2

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August 1985
1 Read

Another case of lycanthropy.

Authors:
P M Jackson

Am J Psychiatry 1978 Jan;135(1):134-5

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January 1978

A case of lycanthropy.

Am J Psychiatry 1977 Oct;134(10):1147-9

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October 1977

Lycanthropy revisited.

Can Psychiatr Assoc J 1975 Nov;20(7):537-42

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November 1975
1 Read
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