512 results match your criteria Literature and medicine[Journal]


Not Playing Around: Games in Graphic Illness Narratives.

Lit Med 2018 ;36(1):230-256

Why do recent graphic narratives about illness play with metaphors of merry-go-rounds, board games, and games of pretend and performance to explain the experience of being ill? Play and game typically associate with nostalgia, with pleasure, and with a sense of freedom, none of which come to mind as viable images to discuss a struggle with difficult physical and mental illnesses. Acclaimed graphic narratives including Miriam Engelberg's Cancer Made Me a Shallower Person (2006), Daryl Cunningham's Psychiatric Tales (2011), Ellen Forney's Marbles (2012), Marisa Acocella Marchetto's Cancer Vixen (2006), and Brian Fies's Mom's Cancer (2006) use the rich narrative ambiguities of game situations to work against the grain, correlating the gap between "player" and "played" with the gap between an active, organically healthy self and a self being unmade by illness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2018.0010DOI Listing
January 2018
23 Reads

Printing Parasites: Hookworm and Public Health Narratives in Southern Fiction.

Authors:
S A Larson

Lit Med 2018 ;36(1):208-229

During the early twentieth century, public health campaigns taught Americans from all strata of society to recognize that a great threat to the health and prosperity of the South was not an enemy abroad, but rather a bloodsucking parasite living underfoot in Southern soil: hookworm. According to the information widely disseminated by these campaigns, hookworm infection was responsible for the physical "backwardness" of Southern men, women, and children. By linking physical and cognitive symptoms to a parasitic source, the public health campaign introduced a new literary tool for constructing characters who are not "quite right" that continues to be employed in contemporary fiction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2018.0009DOI Listing
January 2018

Showing that Medical Ethics Cases Can Miss the Point: Rewriting Short Stories as Cases.

Authors:
Woods Nash

Lit Med 2018 ;36(1):190-207

I propose a new role for literature in medical ethics: rewriting short stories as ethics cases. This activity is instructive for its power to show that our standard ways of analyzing cases can overlook deeper ethical problems, such as those the short stories raise. To illustrate this claim, I begin by distilling Richard Selzer's story "Fetishes" to an ethics case. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2018.0008DOI Listing
January 2018
17 Reads

An Economy of Illness: The Poetics of Women in Pain.

Authors:
Sarah Nance

Lit Med 2018 ;36(1):164-189

This essay examines the position of illness within a capitalist economy, exploring how labor, production, and consumption change through the bodily experiences of illness. Using contemporary poetry by Elizabeth Arnold and Anne Boyer, I suggest first that the experience of illness places women in an alternative economy, not unlike the familiar ways in which women are routinely devalued when their labor is under-appreciated or under(/un)compensated. I argue that being ill often challenges the productivity required by capitalism, and that as a response, experiences of illness play a role in the formation of an alternative economy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2018.0007DOI Listing
January 2018

"There Is No Miracle More Cruel Than This": Readian Relaxation and Maternal Agency in Plath's Three Women.

Lit Med 2018 ;36(1):146-163

In this article, I contend that Plath's Three Women (1962) stages a poetic commentary on the theory of natural childbirth pioneered by Dr. Grantly Dick Read and popularized during the mid-1950s in Great Britain and the United States as an alternative to the "Twilight Sleep." Plath annotated Read's bestseller Childbirth Without Fear (1959) and attended relaxation classes before the birth of her daughter Frieda; however, the long poem has yet to be read in terms of this medical intertext. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2018.0006DOI Listing
January 2018
3 Reads

Traces of Stigma in John Banville's The Sea.

Lit Med 2018 ;36(1):124-145

Despite acknowledging the centrality of Anna's illness in studies of John Banville's The Sea, scholars have not attended to the close relationship between Anna's cancer and her husband Max's process of self-stigmatization. Drawing on Paul Ricoeur's notion of the trace, I analyze Max's experience of his wife's illness to show how Banville depicts disease imprinting psychic traces not only on the patient but also on his/her family. My main contention is that an assay of Max's self-stigma creates new insights into The Sea that show how the novel's superb reflections on disease, stigma, pain, suffering, age, death, and artistic creation promote a narrative destabilization of time categories. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2018.0005DOI Listing
January 2018

Of Drugs and Droogs: Cultural Dynamics, Psychopharmacology, and Neuroscience in Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange.

Authors:
Lorenzo Servitje

Lit Med 2018 ;36(1):101-123

Anthony Burgess's A Clockwork Orange is rarely considered in terms of psychopharmacology. Furthermore, the connection between the novel and the development of neuroscience-including the use of drugs that affect the brain-has yet to be considered. This essay explains the function and representation of drugs in the novel within the context of neuroscience's development during the 1960s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2018.0004DOI Listing
January 2018

The Carnivalesque in Illness: Hollis Seamon's Somebody Up There Hates You.

Authors:
Pascale Antolin

Lit Med 2018 ;36(1):85-100

This article analyzes Hollis Seamon's Somebody Up There Hates You in light of Mikhail Bakhtin's theory of the carnivalesque as it is developed both in Rabelais and His World and in Problems of Dostoevsky's Poetics. The novel shows the power of carnivalesque episodes and ironic laughter to question both the conventional approach to illness and death, and to illness literature in general. However, it also exposes the limits of parody and laughter in the face of death-no matter how regenerating this carnivalesque novel may prove to be for literature as a whole. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2018.0003DOI Listing
January 2018

Utopian Literature and Bioethics: Exploring Reproductive Difference and Gender Equality.

Authors:
Evie Kendal

Lit Med 2018 ;36(1):56-84

This essay explores how feminist utopian literature can inform bioethical debates regarding the fundamental differences between female and male experiences of human reproduction, focusing on the use of biological and technological methods to redress natural inequalities arising from biological difference. Inherently speculative, utopian fiction serves as a useful tool for interrogating social and political attitudes toward procreation and childrearing, adopting a similar degree of abstraction as a philosophical thought experiment. Thus, there is the potential for bioethicists to engage more thoroughly with this form of literature in order to communicate key ethical issues related to reproductive rights and sexual equality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2018.0002DOI Listing
January 2018

Mary Todd Lincoln, Elizabeth Keckley, and America's Psychiatric Republic.

Lit Med 2018 ;36(1):27-55

This article reveals how Elizabeth Keckley framed American citizenship as a psychiatric rather than political category. In Behind the Scenes (1868), Keckley emblematizes Mary Todd Lincoln's "scandalous" behavior to describe and critique what I call the psychiatric republic: a politico-economic paradigm that paradoxically condemns women as mad, often for expressing the very traits required of men elected to public office, while simultaneously positing feminine virtues as foundational for republican citizenship. Focusing on how notions of civic femininity were originally linked to psychiatric nosology, I show how nineteenth-century women were circumscribed temporally in a seemingly inescapable loop of diagnosis, treatment, and moral refinement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2018.0001DOI Listing
January 2018
23 Reads

Disability and Dissent in Ann Petry's The Street.

Authors:
Jay Sibara

Lit Med 2018 ;36(1):1-26

I argue that Ann Petry in her novel The Street (1946) portrays chronic illness, disfigurement, and disability as embodied effects of racism resulting from labor exploitation, crowded and unsafe housing conditions, and lack of access to nourishing food and respectful, thorough, and effective health care. Further, Petry conveys that Western medicine (as practiced in the United States) reproduces and maintains white supremacy through mechanisms including how treatment resources are allocated, how medical institutions collaborate with law enforcement officials and institutions, and how medical professionals and spaces authorize the objectification of Black bodies. Some of the conditions Petry portrays as disabling are not recognized by Western medicine or measured in health disparities research; other conditions, Petry shows, are misrecognized by those discourses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2018.0000DOI Listing
January 2018

The Fat Person on the Edgware Road Omnibus: Fat, Fashion, and Public Shaming in the British Long Eighteenth Century.

Authors:
Sander L Gilman

Lit Med 2017;35(2):431-447

Dieting as a fashionable undertaking in the public sphere appears in the course of the long eighteenth century. It is part of a shift to an awareness of the public stigma of obesity and marks the rise of a dieting culture focused on psychological rather than a purely somatic phenomenon. It is coterminous with the redefinition of the "reasonable" (rational) person both in law as well as in the public sphere. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0013DOI Listing
March 2018
6 Reads

"All the World Is Gone to the Assembly": Elizabeth Carter's Headaches, Nerves, and (In)Sociability.

Authors:
Mascha Hansen

Lit Med 2017;35(2):409-430

Elizabeth Carter suffered from severe headaches all her life. Her letters are peppered with references to fits of "head-ach" so bad they made her bold enough to demand her own room wherever she visited, and to cherish a preference for solitude contrary to the ideal of Bluestocking sociability. Following her friends and physicians, she bowed to fashionable diagnoses in considering these headaches the result of a nervous constitution, and she was prescribed the usual remedies, including sociable trips to fashionable watering places. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0019DOI Listing
March 2018
3 Reads

Authenticity and Fashionable Disease in Eighteenth-Century Britain.

Authors:
Jessica Monaghan

Lit Med 2017;35(2):387-408

Throughout the eighteenth century the issue of authenticity shaped portrayals of fashionable diseases. From the very beginning of the century, writers satirized the behavior of elite invalids who paraded their delicacy as a sign of their status. As disorders such as the spleen came to be regarded as "fashionable," the legitimacy of patients' claims to suffer from distinguished diseases was called further into question, with some observers questioning the validity of the disease categories themselves. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0014DOI Listing
March 2018
9 Reads

"The History of Half the Sex": Fashionable Disease, Capitalism, and Gender in the Long Eighteenth Century.

Authors:
Clark Lawlor

Lit Med 2017;35(2):355-386

This essay examines the way in which disease was framed and narrated as fashionable in the long eighteenth century, and argues that the intensifying focus on women's fashionable disorders in the period grew in tandem with the rise of an unstable capitalism in its manifold forms. Using the satirical articles written by Henry Southern in the London Magazine-"On Fashions" (August 1825), "On Fashions in Physic" (October 1825), and "On Dilettante Physic" (January 1826)-and the literature that led to them, I analyze the role that women were now taking in the newly capitalized world of the early nineteenth century. This world was characterized by a burgeoning medical market, a periodical and print market which could adequately reflect and promote fashionable diseases and the medical market that spawned them, and the nexus of actors in the whole drama of the production, maintenance, and dissolution of fashionable diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6348801PMC
March 2018
5 Reads

Recipe Collections and the Realities of Fashionable Diseases in Eighteenth-Century Elite Domestic Medicine.

Authors:
Katherine Allen

Lit Med 2017;35(2):334-354

This chapter focuses on the individualistic nature of medicine by considering manuscript recipe collections, and the concerns and rhetoric of the elite patients who wrote about fashionable diseases and experienced them. Domestic medicine in the eighteenth century was a facet of elite health care that included commercial medicine and professional assistance. Looking broadly at the fashionability of health care, including the fashionability of the consumer goods and services linked to self-management and leisure time, reveals the realities of fashionable diseases in elite lives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0018DOI Listing
March 2018
11 Reads

Experiencing, Exploiting, and Evacuating Bile: Framing Fashionable Biliousness from the Sufferer's Perspective.

Lit Med 2017;35(2):292-333

This article examines how sufferers experienced, understood, and expressed themselves as bilious, focusing on the late Georgian era when the disease became one of the most fashionable and oft diagnosed amongst the elites. We show that responses to bile were more complex, varied, and less credulous than contemporary diatribes and subsequent historiography imply. Nonetheless, we foreground the socioculturally negotiated elements of the malady rather than its "reality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0016DOI Listing
March 2018
3 Reads

Life in the Year 6000 by Santiago Ramón y Cajal: A Translation of an Unpublished "Vacation Story".

Authors:
Andrew W Perez

Lit Med 2017;35(1):203-228

In 2006, Laura Otis provided the first English translation of five short stories written by the Spanish artist, neuroscientist, and histologist Santiago Ramón y Cajal. These stories, originally published in 1905 by Cajal under the pseudonym "Dr. Bacteria," are called "Cuentos de vacaciones: narraciones seudocientíficas" or "Vacation Stories: Pseudoscientific Tales. Read More

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https://muse.jhu.edu/article/659113
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0009DOI Listing
August 2017
6 Reads

"All in the Day's Work": Cold War Doctoring and Its Discontents in William Burroughs's Naked Lunch.

Authors:
Michael Jarvis

Lit Med 2017;35(1):183-202

In Naked Lunch, the institutions and practices of science and medicine, specifically with regard to psychiatry/psychology, are symptoms of a bureaucratic system of control that shapes, constructs, defines, and makes procrustean alterations to both the mind and body of human subjects. Using sickness and junk (or heroin) as convenient metaphors for both a Cold War binary mentality and the mandatory consumption of twentieth-century capitalism, Burroughs presents modern man as fundamentally alienated from any sense of a personal self. Through policing the health of citizens, the doctors are some of the novel's most overt "Senders," or agents of capital-C Control, commodifying and exploiting the individual's humanity (mind and body) as a raw material in the generation of a knowledge that functions only in the legitimation and reinforcement of itself as authoritative. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0008DOI Listing
August 2017
11 Reads

Alternative Medicine: Contagion and Cure in Karel Čapek's The White Plague.

Authors:
Alexis Soloski

Lit Med 2017;35(1):167-182

Though written amid an atmosphere of unprecedented medical advance in both diagnosis and therapeutics, Karel Čapek's The White Plague takes a starkly critical stance against overconfidence in medical science and its dubious ethical orbit. This article explores Čapek's censure of those who would privilege scientific interest in disease over the holistic plight of the sufferer. Provocatively, Čapek achieves this not only via the play's content, but also-prefiguring aspects of contemporary live art practice by several decades-by placing audience members in worrying proximity to abject ill bodies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0007DOI Listing
August 2017
9 Reads

"In Utter Fearlessness of the Reigning Disease": Imagined Immunities and the Outbreak Narratives of Charles Brockden Brown.

Lit Med 2017;35(1):144-166

With an increased focus on the intersection of literature and medicine, contagion has become something of a scholarly buzzword in early American studies: it serves metaphorically to demarcate the postcolonial other, demonstrates the transmissibility of revolutionary rhetoric, highlights the instability of republican government, and embodies fears of racial mixture. In this essay, I shift the emphasis from a discourse of contagion (often associated with a fear of the foreign) to a discourse of immunity (a fear associated with foreign immunities) in order to demonstrate a more affirmative biopolitics in Charles Brockden Brown's 1790s outbreak narratives. This affirmative biopolitics can emerge only after deconstructing the intersection of biology and politics in the so-called "age of democratic revolutions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0006DOI Listing
August 2017
2 Reads

The Medicinal Rod: Slave Health and Redhibition Law in George Washington Cable's The Grandissimes.

Authors:
Heather Chacón

Lit Med 2017;35(1):123-143

The economic transactions and litigation necessary for slavery to function, coupled with the South's honor culture, meant skepticism and posturing frequently attended the buying and selling of enslaved people. This atmosphere provided opportunities for enslaved individuals familiar with the symbiotic ways their health and value intertwined to manipulate owners by feigning illness or adopting behaviors contrary to those of a "sound and sane" captive under Louisiana's redhibitory (slave warranty) law. Such actions offered a chance at preserving that which slavery denied its victims: proximity to family, a reduced chance of being sold, and an opportunity to exert agency within a strictly oppressive system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0005DOI Listing
August 2017
3 Reads

Backwards Medicine: Female Atavism, Whiteness, and the Medical Profession in "The Pineal Eye".

Lit Med 2017;35(1):98-122

This article examines atavism as a theory of racial science in the nineteenth-century United States that illuminates how the developing medical profession reinforced racial, class, and gender hierarchies to gain cultural authority. I use John S. Partridge's "The Pineal Eye," a little-known short story published in San Francisco's The Wave in 1894, as a case study that reveals how atavism was conceived as pathology within the purview of medical study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0004DOI Listing
August 2017
2 Reads

Alzheimer's Disease Metaphors as Mirror and Lens to the Stigma of Dementia.

Lit Med 2017;35(1):71-97

This essay gives an overview of the metaphors that patients in comparison to caregivers employ to conceptualize their experience with the chronic degenerative, cognitive, and incurable aspects of Alzheimer's disease. It explores how the images (such as the journey, darkness, the death sentence, and torture) relate to the narration of cognitive decline and memory loss, and how these personal accounts negotiate with the culturally dominant dementia narrative that centers on the patient's passivity and dependence and is, usually, found in caregiver stories. This analysis, based on English, French, and German language texts, argues that the metaphors of this mainstream dementia narrative are, first, grounded in medico-scientific dementia discourse and, second, encapsulated in "Alzheimer's disease" as metaphor itself. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0003DOI Listing
August 2017
2 Reads

The Adolescent Condition in Thomas Hardy's The Woodlanders.

Authors:
Rosanna Nunan

Lit Med 2017;35(1):46-70

In The Woodlanders, Hardy examines the intersections between adolescence as scientific fact and adolescence as utilitarian economic construction. Hardy posits that the emergence of adolescence as a social category provides an opportunity for further, excessive control of young women in a patriarchal society when science is taken at its word, but, paradoxically, also opens up a space for a new kind of freedom and rebellion when the adolescent condition of nineteenth-century scientific theorists is seized for the very subversive qualities which the Victorians oppose. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0002DOI Listing
August 2017
3 Reads

Frances Burney's Mastectomy Narrative and Discourses of Breast Cancer in the Long Eighteenth Century.

Authors:
Heather Meek

Lit Med 2017;35(1):27-45

This paper examines Frances Burney's 1812 mastectomy letter alongside contemporaneous medical treatises on the subject of breast cancer. Burney's letter offers a critique of a medical community that misconstrues her experience and can be viewed as pathography, or disability memoir. Examining the letter and the treatises in this way illuminates the brutality of some medical practices and the frequent incongruity between the patients' and the physicians' understandings of pain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0001DOI Listing
August 2017
41 Reads

"The Absence Doubled?" Photo-Poetic Narratives of Prophylactic Mastectomy.

Authors:
Stella Bolaki

Lit Med 2017;35(1):1-26

This essay considers Clare Best's poetic sequence Self-portrait without Breasts (2011) and her collaboration with photographer Laura Stevens, which explore preventive surgery and questions of genetics/hereditary breast cancer. In an era when risk and cosmetic reconstruction guide treatment and the development of new breast cancer subjects, Best reclaims the "flat simple scarred chest with no extras." I situate her poems in the context of statistics and the neoliberal postfeminist subject as well as in a poetic tradition about the post-mastectomy body as landscape. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2017.0000DOI Listing
August 2017
4 Reads

Reading Malaria Literature.

Authors:
Alvan A Ikoku

Lit Med Spring 2016;34(1):207-36

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0002DOI Listing
January 2017
3 Reads

The Boy Doctor of Empire: Malaria and Mobility in Kipling's Kim.

Authors:
Jessica Howell

Lit Med Spring 2016;34(1):158-84

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0009DOI Listing
January 2017
3 Reads

"Triumphant Health": Joseph Conrad and Tropical Medicine.

Authors:
Lorenzo Servitje

Lit Med Spring 2016;34(1):132-57

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0007DOI Listing
January 2017
6 Reads

Health Policy in Dystopia.

Authors:
Phillip Barrish

Lit Med Spring 2016;34(1):106-31

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0006DOI Listing
January 2017
5 Reads

Eating One's Friends: Fiction as Argument in Bioethics.

Authors:
Tod Chambers

Lit Med Spring 2016;34(1):79-105

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0005DOI Listing
January 2017
4 Reads

Structural Racism and Practices of Reading in the Medical Humanities.

Authors:
Olivia Banner

Lit Med Spring 2016;34(1):25-52

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0001DOI Listing
January 2017
4 Reads

Bioethics as a Way of Life: The Radical Bioethos of Van Rensselaer Potter.

Authors:
Jenell Johnson

Lit Med Spring 2016;34(1):7-24

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0010DOI Listing
January 2017
7 Reads

Introduction: From Bioethics and Humanities to Biohumanities?

Lit Med Spring 2016;34(1):1-6

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0008DOI Listing
January 2017
5 Reads

Reading Disorders: Pro-Eating Disorder Rhetoric and Anorexia Life-Writing.

Authors:
Emma Seaber

Lit Med 2016;34(2):484-508

This article explores the relationship between eating disorders and reading behaviors, arguing that there is a meaningful difference in a minority of readers' approach to and understanding of anorexia life-writing, and of literary texts more broadly. To illuminate this distinction, this article begins by considering the reported deleterious influence of Marya Hornbacher's anorexia memoir, Wasted, elaborating the ways Hornbacher offers a positive presentation of anorexia nervosa that may, intentionally or not, induce certain readers to "try it" themselves. This is followed by an exploration of how Hornbacher's own reading praxis is implicated in a discursive feedback loop around anorexia narratives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5341784PMC
September 2017
21 Reads

The Discourse on Dangerous Reading in Nineteenth-Century Latvia.

Lit Med 2016;34(2):468-483

During the nineteenth century, Latvian society experienced significant social and cultural changes due to a transition from agrarian to modern society and the emergence of a Latvian national culture. Reading, previously a mostly religious and practical activity, took new forms among the Latvian middle class and steadily began to be depicted as a dangerous pastime. In this essay, we have explored the connection between social change and pathological reading by turning attention to the rhetoric of the dangerous reading discourse, representations of effects of reading in the press, and the condemnation of female reading. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0022DOI Listing
September 2017
3 Reads

The Lazy Reader: Labor, Books, and Disease in Nineteenth-Century Germany.

Authors:
Norman Aselmeyer

Lit Med 2016;34(2):440-467

Looking at nineteenth-century Germany, this article investigates the origin of the idea that fiction causes disease, among both the bourgeoisie and the working class. I argue that the socially constructed notions of reading addiction, which were consistent with medical concepts at that time, touched the bourgeois virtues of industriousness and health. However, little has been written about the transfer of the bourgeois attitudes towards reading to the German working class. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0021DOI Listing
September 2017
8 Reads

Radical Contagion and Healthy Literature in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine.

Authors:
Jessica Roberts

Lit Med 2016;34(2):418-439

During the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the revolution in France served as a catalyst for heavily allegorical political rhetoric, and the idea that radical politics were contagious became commonplace in conservative writing and oratory. This political contagion is described by Blackwood's as raging through the ranks of the rural poor as late as 1830. Confronted by this threat, Blackwood's promoted itself alternatively as a stimulant or as a cure for the metaphorical poison or infection that radical publications were seen to be spreading amongst the poor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0020DOI Listing
September 2017
2 Reads

French Hoffmania: Théophile Gautier's "Onuphrius" (1833) and the Critique of the Etiology of Pathological Reading.

Lit Med 2016;34(2):370-388

"Of unknown cause"- in the conclusion of the eponymous tale written by Théophile Gautier in 1833, it is not clear what exactly the protagonist Onuphrius dies of after his infatuation with E. T. A. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0018DOI Listing
September 2017
3 Reads

The Visceral Novel Reader and Novelized Medicine in Georgian Britain.

Authors:
Monika Class

Lit Med 2016;34(2):341-369

The article introduces "the visceral novel reader" as a diachronic, context-sensitive mode of novelistic reception, in which fact and fiction overlap cognitively: the mental rehearsal of the activity of seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting, and touching while reading novels and, vice versa, the mental rehearsal of novels in the act of perceiving the real world. Located at the intersection of literature, medicine and science, "the visceral novel reader" enhances our understanding of the role that novels played in the dialectic construction of erudition in English. In Georgian Britain, reading practices became a testing ground for the professionalization of physicians, natural philosophers, and men of letters. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0017DOI Listing
September 2017
4 Reads

Leaky Bodies, Bawdy Books: Gonorrhea and Reading in Eighteenth-Century Britain.

Authors:
Darren N Wagner

Lit Med 2016;34(2):320-340

In eighteenth-century Britain, reading lewd books was understood to exacerbate gonorrhea. That pathology corresponded to a specific physiological model, which historians describe as the leaky male body. This article demonstrates how the connection between reading and gonorrhea correlated to three phenomena: 1) the neuro-sexual economy of bodily fluids; 2) the effects of reading on the sensible mind and body; and 3) the crossover of erotic and medical literatures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0016DOI Listing
September 2017
3 Reads

The Medical Dangers of Literary Genius.

Authors:
Sharon Ruston

Lit Med 2016;34(2):299-319

This essay examines three key texts by William Buchan, Isaac D'Israeli, and Richard Robert Madden, which demonstrate the emergence of the newly conceived idea of literary genius in the Romantic period. It considers the role of a new genre, the "medical biography," in the development of this phenomenon. While the mental precariousness of the Romantic genius has been much commented upon, this essay concentrates instead on the bodily or physical aspects of genius, which is itself figured as a disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0015DOI Listing
September 2017
6 Reads

Toxic Texts and Reading Remedies: Literary Medicine in Eighteenth-Century Print Cultures.

Lit Med 2016;34(2):278-298

Today the idea of reading for health is perhaps most commonly associated with the term bibliotherapy. This seemingly new practice might be considered a significant shift of public and professional medical attitudes when compared with historical interpretations of the impact of reading on individuals' health. Much historiography concerning the reception of popular literature in eighteenth-century print culture has focused on the belief that readers of fiction, most often women, were at risk of corrupting their own minds and bodies through their reading choices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0014DOI Listing
September 2017
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Two Kinds of "Literary Poison": Diseases of the Learned and Overstimulating Novels in Georgian Britain.

Authors:
James Kennaway

Lit Med 2016;34(2):252-277

This article will analyze the complex relationship between two separate traditions of anxiety about the medical impact of reading. On the one hand there was the older concept of the diseases of the learned (Gelehrtenkrankheiten), associated with crabbed, often impecunious academics. This is a tradition that went back centuries and drew on the six non-naturals of Galenic medicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/lm.2016.0013DOI Listing
September 2017
3 Reads