124 results match your criteria Lionfish and Stonefish


Aquatic antagonists: lionfish (Pterois volitans).

Cutis 2018 Oct;102(4):232-234

Department of Dermatology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, USA.

Lionfish () are an invasive species originally from the Indian and Pacific oceans and the Red Sea that now are found all along the southeastern coast of the United States. Prompt and comprehensive treatment provides benefit to the patient. As lionfish numbers continue to increase, physicians across multiple specialties and regions may see an increase in envenomation injuries. Read More

View Article
October 2018

Ecological interactions between Gulf of Mexico snappers (Teleostei: Lutjanidae) and invasive red lionfish (Pterois volitans).

PLoS One 2018 1;13(11):e0206749. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Marine Sciences Program, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, North Miami, FL, United States of America.

Indo-Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans) have invaded the western Atlantic, and most recently the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM), at a rapid pace. Given their generalist habitat affinities and diet, and strong ecological overlap with members of the commercially valuable snapper-grouper complex, increased density and abundance of lionfish could result in significant competitive interactions with nGOM commercially important species. We experimentally investigated the intensity of behavioral interactions between lionfish and indigenous, abundant and economically important juvenile nGOM red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus), and other increasingly abundant juvenile tropical snapper species (gray snapper-L. Read More

View Article
November 2018
9 Reads

Regional differences in an established population of invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish ( and ) in south Florida.

PeerJ 2018 10;6:e5700. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Department of Marine Ecosystems and Society, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States of America.

About nine years ago (circa 2009), Indo-Pacific lionfishes ( and ) invaded the south Florida coral reef ecosystem. During the intervening period of time, there has been substantial research on their biology, life history, demography, and habitat preferences; however, little is known concerning their regional population status and trends in the region. Here, we use a large-scale fisheries independent reef fish visual survey to investigate lionfish population status among three south Florida regions: Dry Tortugas, Florida Keys, and southeast Florida. Read More

View Article
October 2018

Sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding for SpCTx: a lethal factor from scorpionfish venom ().

J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis 2018 29;24:24. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

1Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 Brazil.

Background: Lethal factors are multifunctional oligomeric proteins found in the venomous apparatus of Scorpaeniformes fish. These toxins elicit not only an array of biological responses in vitro but also cardiovascular disorders and strong hemolytic, nociceptive and edematogenic activities in vivo. This work describes the cloning and molecular identification of two toxin subunits, denominated Sp-CTx-α and Sp-CTx-β, from scorpionfish venom (). Read More

View Article
August 2018
7 Reads

Lionfish venom elicits pain predominantly through the activation of nonpeptidergic nociceptors.

Pain 2018 Nov;159(11):2255-2266

Department of Physiology and Cell Information Systems, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.

The lionfish (Pterois volitans) is a venomous invasive species found in the Caribbean and Northwestern Atlantic. It poses a growing health problem because of the increase in frequency of painful stings, for which no treatment or antidote exists, and the long-term disability caused by the pain. Understanding the venom's algogenic properties can help identify better treatment for these envenomations. Read More

View Article
November 2018

Environmental and Ecological Effects of Climate Change on Venomous Marine and Amphibious Species in the Wilderness.

Wilderness Environ Med 2018 09 27;29(3):343-356. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Medical Toxicology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Boston, MA (Dr Erickson).

Introduction: Recent analyses of data show a warming trend in global average air and sea surface ocean temperatures. The atmosphere and ocean have warmed, the amounts of snow and ice have diminished, the sea level has risen, and the concentrations of greenhouse gases have increased. This article will focus on climate change and projected effects on venomous marine and amphibious creatures with the potential impact on human health. Read More

View Article
September 2018
4 Reads

Investigation of ciguatoxins in invasive lionfish from the greater caribbean region: Implications for fishery development.

PLoS One 2018 20;13(6):e0198358. Epub 2018 Jun 20.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat Research, Beaufort, North Carolina, United States of America.

Lionfish, native to reef ecosystems of the tropical and sub-tropical Indo-Pacific, were introduced to Florida waters in the 1980s, and have spread rapidly throughout the northwestern Atlantic, Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. These invasive, carnivorous fish significantly reduce other fish and benthic invertebrate biomass, fish recruitment, and species richness in reef ecosystems. Fisheries resource managers have proposed the establishment of a commercial fishery to reduce lionfish populations and mitigate adverse effects on reef communities. Read More

View Article
June 2018
14 Reads

Bioaccumulation of mercury and other metal contaminants in invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles) from Curaçao.

Mar Pollut Bull 2018 Jun 7;131(Pt A):38-44. Epub 2018 Apr 7.

Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, United States.

A wide range of ecological and environmental factors influence metal bioaccumulation in fish. Studies of mercury and other metal contaminants in invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish are limited, yet consumption of the invasive predator is increasingly utilized as a management strategy. In this study, we examined the effects of body size, body condition, sex, trophic level, carbon source, diet, depth and capture location on mercury concentrations in lionfish collected from Curaçao. Read More

View Article
June 2018
1 Read

Constructing the genetic population demography of the invasive lionfish Pterois miles in the Levant Basin, Eastern Mediterranean.

Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal 2018 Jun 6:1-7. Epub 2018 Jun 6.

f School of Zoology, The George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences and the Steinhardt Museum of Natural History , Tel Aviv University , Tel Aviv , Israel.

The recent invasion of the lionfish Pterois miles to the Mediterranean draws major concerns to the fate of the indigenous ecosystem, based on previous knowledge of the species' detrimental capabilities as an introduced species in the Western Atlantic Ocean. In order to determine invasive patterns in the Eastern Mediterranean, we compared the genetic divergence of two mtDNA markers, the COI and D-loop, between and within the introduced Levantine and native range Red Sea populations of the lionfish. COI region presented a remarkably shallow genealogy, and both genes have failed to show a definite geographic population structure, with non-significant AMOVA and low pairwise F values. Read More

View Article

Genetic homogeneity of the invasive lionfish across the Northwestern Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico based on Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms.

Sci Rep 2018 Mar 22;8(1):5062. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science (RSMAS), University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Cswy, FL, 33149, Miami, USA.

Despite the devastating impact of the lionfish (Pterois volitans) invasion on NW Atlantic ecosystems, little genetic information about the invasion process is available. We applied Genotyping by Sequencing techniques to identify 1,220 single nucleotide polymorphic sites (SNPs) from 162 lionfish samples collected between 2013 and 2015 from two areas chronologically identified as the first and last invaded areas in US waters: the east coast of Florida and the Gulf of Mexico. We used population genomic analyses, including phylogenetic reconstruction, Bayesian clustering, genetic distances, Discriminant Analyses of Principal Components, and coalescence simulations for detection of outlier SNPs, to understand genetic trends relevant to the lionfish's long-term persistence. Read More

View Article

The lionfish Pterois sp. invasion: Has the worst-case scenario come to pass?

J Fish Biol 2018 Mar;92(3):660-689

Earth to Ocean Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5A S6, Canada.

This review revisits the traits thought to have contributed to the success of Indo-Pacific lionfish Pterois sp. as an invader in the western Atlantic Ocean and the worst-case scenario about their potential ecological effects in light of the more than 150 studies conducted in the past 5 years. Fast somatic growth, resistance to parasites, effective anti-predator defences and an ability to circumvent predator recognition mechanisms by prey have probably contributed to rapid population increases of lionfish in the invaded range. Read More

View Article

Invasive predator tips the balance of symmetrical competition between native coral-reef fishes.

Authors:
Tye L Kindinger

Ecology 2018 Apr 28;99(4):792-800. Epub 2018 Feb 28.

Department of Integrative Biology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, 97331, USA.

The importance of competition and predation in structuring ecological communities is typically examined separately such that interactions between these processes are seldom understood. By causing large reductions in native prey, invasive predators may modify native species interactions. I conducted a manipulative field experiment in The Bahamas to investigate the possibility that the invasive Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans) alters competition between planktivorous fairy and blackcap basslets (Gramma loreto and Gramma melacara, respectively). Read More

View Article
April 2018
1 Read

[Distribution and abundance of the lionfish Pterois volitans (Scorpaeniformes: Scorpaenidae) and associated native species in Parque Marino Cayos de San Felipe, Cuba].

Rev Biol Trop 2017 Mar;65(1):117-25

The first lionfish sighting at the National Park "Cayos de San Felipe" was in 2009 and could be a threat to its marine ecosystem diversity and their capacity to generate services. To analyze the incidence of the lionfish invasion in the area, an annual sampling was conducted between 2013 and 2015. Lionfish abundance and size was investigated on mangroves through visual census on ten transects of 30x2 m/station, and on coral reefs (15 and 25 m deep) with stereo video on six transects of 50x2 m/station. Read More

View Article
March 2017
4 Reads

Incidence and clinical characteristics of ciguatera fish poisoning in Guadeloupe (French West Indies) between 2013 and 2016: a retrospective cases-series.

Sci Rep 2018 Feb 15;8(1):3095. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Poison and Toxicovigilance Centre, Fernand Widal Hospital, Paris, France.

This retrospective case study analysed the incidence and symptoms of ciguatera fish poisoning (ciguatera) in Guadeloupe (French West Indies) between 2013 and 2016. Cases attending the emergency departments of the two public hospitals and the reports received by the regional health authority in charge of monitoring (ARS) were compiled. Two hundred and thirty-four cases of poisoning were observed, with a mean annual incidence of 1. Read More

View Article
February 2018
5 Reads

Simulations indicate that scores of lionfish () colonized the Atlantic Ocean.

PeerJ 2017 19;5:e3996. Epub 2017 Dec 19.

HoBi Lab, Department of Life Sciences, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, TX, United States of America.

The invasion of the western Atlantic Ocean by the Indo-Pacific red lionfish () has had devastating consequences for marine ecosystems. Estimating the number of colonizing lionfish can be useful in identifying the introduction pathway and can inform policy decisions aimed at preventing similar invasions. It is well-established that at least ten lionfish were initially introduced. Read More

View Article
December 2017
3 Reads

Identification of a moronecidin-like antimicrobial peptide in the venomous fish Pterois volitans: Functional and structural study of pteroicidin-α.

Fish Shellfish Immunol 2018 Jan 11;72:318-324. Epub 2017 Nov 11.

Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, Sorbonne Universités, MNHN, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UA, CNRS, IRD, Biologie des Organismes et Ecosystèmes Aquatiques (BOREA), 14032 Caen, France. Electronic address:

The present study characterizes for the first time an antimicrobial peptide in lionfish (Pterois volitans), a venomous fish. Using a peptidomic approach, we identified a mature piscidin in lionfish and called it pteroicidin-α. We detected an amidated form (pteroicidin-α- CONH) and a non-amidated form (pteroicidin-α-COOH), and then performed their functional and structural study. Read More

View Article
January 2018
8 Reads

Ongoing removals of invasive lionfish in Honduras and their effect on native Caribbean prey fishes.

PeerJ 2017 18;5:e3818. Epub 2017 Oct 18.

Coral Reef Ecology Group, Marine Ecology Department, Faculty of Biology and Chemistry, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.

The invasion of Indo-Pacific lionfish is one of the most pressing concerns in the context of coral reef conservation throughout the Caribbean. Invasive lionfish threaten Caribbean fish communities by feeding on a wide range of native prey species, some of which have high ecological and economic value. In Roatan (Honduras) a local non-governmental organisation (i. Read More

View Article
October 2017
1 Read

Occurrence of a stonefish toxin-like toxin in the venom of the rabbitfish Siganus fuscescens.

Toxicon 2017 Dec 18;140:139-146. Epub 2017 Oct 18.

Department of Food Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Konan-4, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8477, Japan.

Rabbitfish belonging to the order Perciformes are well-known venomous fish that are frequently involved in human accidents. However little research has been done into either the whole venom toxicities or the structures and properties of their venom toxins. In this study, we first examined biological activities of the crude venom extract prepared from dorsal spines of Siganus fuscescens, a rabbitfish most commonly found along the coasts of Japan. Read More

View Article
December 2017

A Case of Lionfish Envenomation Presenting to an Inland Emergency Department.

Case Rep Emerg Med 2017 13;2017:5893563. Epub 2017 Aug 13.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Ave. Box 655, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.

Lionfish envenomation can cause erythema, edema, necrosis, and severe pain at the exposed site. Treatment often includes supportive wound care, pain management, and hot water immersion. We report a case of lionfish exposure presenting to an inland emergency department treated successfully with these measures. Read More

View Article
August 2017
2 Reads

Lionfish ( spp.) invade the upper-bathyal zone in the western Atlantic.

PeerJ 2017 17;5:e3683. Epub 2017 Aug 17.

Nekton Foundation, Begbroke Science Park, Begbroke, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom.

Non-native lionfish have been recorded throughout the western Atlantic on both shallow and mesophotic reefs, where they have been linked to declines in reef health. In this study we report the first lionfish observations from the deep sea (>200 m) in Bermuda and Roatan, Honduras, with lionfish observed to a maximum depth of 304 m off the Bermuda platform, and 250 m off West End, Roatan. Placed in the context of other deeper lionfish observations and records, our results imply that lionfish may be present in the 200-300 m depth range of the upper-bathyal zone across many locations in the western Atlantic, but currently are under-sampled compared to shallow habitats. Read More

View Article
August 2017
4 Reads

Comparison of biochemical and cytotoxic activities of extracts obtained from dorsal spines and caudal fin of adult and juvenile non-native Caribbean lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles).

Toxicon 2017 Oct 5;137:158-167. Epub 2017 Aug 5.

Instituto Clodomiro Picado, Facultad de Microbiología, Universidad de Costa Rica, San José, Costa Rica; Departamento de Bioquímica, Escuela de Medicina, Universidad de Costa Rica, San José, Costa Rica. Electronic address:

Pterois volitans/miles lionfish (adult and juvenile) dorsal spines and caudal fin extracts were compared in their general composition, enzymatic activities and hemolytic and cytotoxic effects on bovine aortic endothelial cells and murine myoblasts, to distinguish between the activities present in the venom and epidermal mucus. Intradermal and intramuscular injections were also administered in mice to determine in vivo effects. This work shows that crude venom of Caribbean species of lionfish, present in dorsal spines, induces several in vitro effects including hemolysis, weak cytotoxicity, proteolytic and hyaluronidase activities, whereas in vivo, it is not hemorrhagic nor myotoxic, but causes edema, plasma extravasation and a thrombotic-associated lesion on the skin. Read More

View Article
October 2017
2 Reads

Genetics reveal the identity and origin of the lionfish invasion in the Mediterranean Sea.

Sci Rep 2017 Jul 28;7(1):6782. Epub 2017 Jul 28.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA, 95060, USA.

Following aquarium releases, invasive lionfishes have colonized large areas of the Caribbean and western Atlantic, resulting in an immense ecological damage. The early stages of that invasion are poorly known. Indeed, a lag of time between the introduction and detection often preclude genetic characterization of that crucial phase. Read More

View Article

Phylogeography of Lionfishes (Pterois) Indicate Taxonomic Over Splitting and Hybrid Origin of the Invasive Pterois volitans.

J Hered 2018 Feb;109(2):162-175

Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology, Kane'ohe, HI.

The lionfish is an iconic marine fish, and recently renowned for a disastrous introduction into the West Atlantic. Genetic surveys of the putative invaders (Pterois volitans and Pterois miles) in their natural Indo-Pacific range can illuminate both topics. Previous research indicated that P. Read More

View Article
February 2018

Depth-dependent effects of culling-do mesophotic lionfish populations undermine current management?

R Soc Open Sci 2017 May 24;4(5):170027. Epub 2017 May 24.

Operation Wallacea, Wallace House, Old Bolingbroke, Spilsby, Lincolnshire PE23 4EX, UK.

Invasive lionfish ( and ) have spread widely across the western Atlantic and are recognized as a major threat to native marine biodiversity. Although lionfish inhabit both shallow reefs and mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs; reefs from 30 to 150 m depth), the primary management response implemented by many countries has been diver-led culling limited to reefs less than 30 m. However, many reef fish undergo ontogenetic migrations, with the largest and therefore most fecund individuals found at greatest depths. Read More

View Article
May 2017
6 Reads

Invasive lionfish had no measurable effect on prey fish community structure across the Belizean Barrier Reef.

PeerJ 2017 25;5:e3270. Epub 2017 May 25.

Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapell Hill, NC, United States of America.

Invasive lionfish are assumed to significantly affect Caribbean reef fish communities. However, evidence of lionfish effects on native reef fishes is based on uncontrolled observational studies or small-scale, unrepresentative experiments, with findings ranging from no effect to large effects on prey density and richness. Moreover, whether lionfish affect populations and communities of native reef fishes at larger, management-relevant scales is unknown. Read More

View Article
May 2017
7 Reads

A new mesophotic goby, Palatogobius incendius (Teleostei: Gobiidae), and the first record of invasive lionfish preying on undescribed biodiversity.

PLoS One 2017 25;12(5):e0177179. Epub 2017 May 25.

Department of Vertebrate Zoology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC, United States of America.

A new species of deep-reef fish in the goby genus Palatogobius is described from recent submersible collections off Curaçao and Dominica. Video footage of schools of this species reveal predation by the invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois spp.), the first record of undescribed fauna potentially being eaten by lionfish outside of its native range. Read More

View Article
September 2017

The roar of the lionfishes Pterois volitans and Pterois miles.

J Fish Biol 2017 Jun 3;90(6):2488-2495. Epub 2017 May 3.

NOAA National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, 101 Pivers Island Rd, Beaufort, NC 28516, U.S.A.

Through the analysis of acoustic recordings of captive Pterois spp., this study has confirmed anecdotal evidence that Pterois spp. are soniferous. Read More

View Article
June 2017
8 Reads

Effectiveness of removals of the invasive lionfish: how many dives are needed to deplete a reef?

PeerJ 2017 23;5:e3043. Epub 2017 Feb 23.

HoBi Lab, Department of Life Sciences, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, TX, United States.

Introduced Indo-Pacific red lionfish () have spread throughout the greater Caribbean and are associated with a number of negative impacts on reef ecosystems. Human interventions, in the form of culling activities, are becoming common to reduce their numbers and mitigate the negative effects associated with the invasion. However, marine managers must often decide how to best allocate limited resources. Read More

View Article
February 2017
1 Read

Predator effects on reef fish settlement depend on predator origin and recruit density.

Ecology 2017 Apr;98(4):896-902

Department of Integrative Biology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, 97331, USA.

During major life-history transitions, animals often experience high mortality rates due to predation, making predator avoidance particularly advantageous during these times. There is mixed evidence from a limited number of studies, however, regarding how predator presence influences settlement of coral-reef fishes and it is unknown how other potentially mediating factors, including predator origin (native vs. nonnative) or interactions among conspecific recruits, mediate the non-consumptive effects of predators on reef fish settlement. Read More

View Article

Lionfish misidentification circumvents an optimized escape response by prey.

Conserv Physiol 2016 15;4(1):cow064. Epub 2016 Dec 15.

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia; Department of Marine Biology and Aquaculture, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia.

Invasive lionfish represent an unprecedented problem in the Caribbean basin, where they are causing major changes to foodwebs and habitats through their generalized predation on fishes and invertebrates. To ascertain what makes the red lionfish () such a formidable predator, we examined the reaction of a native damselfish prey, the whitetail damsel (), to a repeatable startle stimulus once they had been forewarned of the sight or smell of lionfish. Fast-start responses were compared with prey forewarned of a predatory rockcod (), a corallivorous butterflyfish () and experimental controls. Read More

View Article
December 2016
3 Reads

Corrigendum to "Description of histopathological changes induced by the venom of the Persian Gulf Lionfish (Pterois russelli) in a mouse model of multiorgan toxicity" [Toxicon 122 (2016) 94-102].

Toxicon 2017 Jan 10;125:122. Epub 2016 Dec 10.

Biotechnology Research Center, Medical Biotechnology Dept., Venom and Biotherapeutics Molecules Lab, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

View Article
January 2017
2.490 Impact Factor

Age, growth and population structure of invasive lionfish () in northeast Florida using a length-based, age-structured population model.

PeerJ 2016 1;4:e2730. Epub 2016 Dec 1.

Department of Biology, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL, United States.

The effective management of invasive species requires detailed understanding of the invader's life history. This information is essential for modeling population growth and predicting rates of expansion, quantifying ecological impacts and assessing the efficacy of removal and control strategies. Indo-Pacific lionfish () have rapidly invaded the western Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea with documented negative impacts on native ecosystems. Read More

View Article
December 2016
2 Reads

Central-place foraging and ecological effects of an invasive predator across multiple habitats.

Ecology 2016 Oct 1;97(10):2729-2739. Epub 2016 Sep 1.

Department of Integrative Biology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, 97331, USA.

Cross-habitat foraging movements of predators can have widespread implications for predator and prey populations, community structure, nutrient transfer, and ecosystem function. Although central-place foraging models and other aspects of optimal foraging theory focus on individual predator behavior, they also provide useful frameworks for understanding the effects of predators on prey populations across multiple habitats. However, few studies have examined both the foraging behavior and ecological effects of nonnative predators across multiple habitats, and none has tested whether nonnative predators deplete prey in a manner predicted by these foraging models. Read More

View Article
October 2016

Possible Ballast Water Transfer of Lionfish to the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

PLoS One 2016 2;11(11):e0165584. Epub 2016 Nov 2.

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, Maryland, United States of America.

The Indo-Pacific Red Lionfish was first reported off the Florida coast in 1985, following which it has spread across much of the SE USA, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea. Lionfish negatively impact fish and invertebrate assemblages and abundances, thus further spread is cause for concern. To date, the fish has not been reported on the Pacific coast of North or Central America. Read More

View Article

Description of histopathological changes induced by the venom of the Persian Gulf Lionfish (Pterois russelli) in a mouse model of multiorgan toxicity.

Toxicon 2016 Nov 3;122:94-102. Epub 2016 Sep 3.

Biotechnology Research Center, Medical Biotechnology Dept., Venom and Biotherapeutics Molecules Lab., Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Pterois russelli is a venomous fish belongs to Scorpaenidae family. Envenomation by the Persian Gulf lionfish is associated with local pain, marked inflammation and local heat. The present study was aimed to document the histopathological changes in liver, heart, lung, kidney and alterations in release of critical enzymes such as LDH, CK. Read More

View Article
November 2016
2.490 Impact Factor

Invasive lionfish reduce native fish abundance on a regional scale.

Sci Rep 2016 08 31;6:32169. Epub 2016 Aug 31.

National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Beaufort Laboratory, 101 Pivers Island Road, Beaufort, NC 28516 USA.

Invasive lionfish pose an unprecedented threat to biodiversity and fisheries throughout Atlantic waters off of the southeastern United States, the Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico. Here, we employ a spatially replicated Before-After-Control-Impact analysis with temporal pairing to quantify for the first time the impact of the lionfish invasion on native fish abundance across a broad regional scale and over the entire duration of the lionfish invasion (1990-2014). Our results suggest that 1) lionfish-impacted areas off of the southeastern United States are most prevalent off-shore near the continental shelf-break but are also common near-shore and 2) in impacted areas, lionfish have reduced tomtate (a native forage fish) abundance by 45% since the invasion began. Read More

View Article

Denaturing the Lionfish.

Eplasty 2016 23;16:ic20. Epub 2016 May 23.

Department of Plastic Surgery, SHO, Guys and St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK.

View Article
June 2016
6 Reads

Lionfish envenomation: Relapses controlled by intralesional triamcinolone.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2016 Jul-Aug;82(4):438-9

Department of Medicine, Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust and Medway Hospitals NHS Trust, Kent, United Kingdom.

View Article
April 2017
1 Read

The status and management of the lionfish, Pterois sp. in Trinidad and Tobago.

Authors:
Jahson B Alemu I

Mar Pollut Bull 2016 Aug 26;109(1):402-408. Epub 2016 May 26.

Biodiversity and Ecology Research Programme, Institute of Marine Affairs, Hilltop Lane, Chaguaramas, W.I., Trinidad and Tobago. Electronic address:

Trinidad and Tobago was the last Caribbean island to be invaded by the lionfish and since its invasion in 2012 they have spread to most coral reef and hard bottom environments. Standard reef fish surveys were used to assess lionfish population densities and size distributions from 2013-2015. Total lengths ranged between 6. Read More

View Article

Stonefish envenomation of hand with impending compartment syndrome.

J Occup Med Toxicol 2016 10;11:23. Epub 2016 May 10.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Background: Marine stings and envenomation are fairly common in Malaysia. Possible contact to various marine life occurs during diving, fishing and food handling. Even though majority of fish stings are benign, there are several venomous species such as puffer fish, scorpion fish, lionfish, stingray and stonefish that require urgent medical treatment. Read More

View Article
May 2016
17 Reads

Invasive Lionfish (Pterosis volitans) Pose Public Health Threats.

Authors:
James H Diaz

J La State Med Soc 2015 Jul-Aug;167(4):166-71. Epub 2015 Aug 15.

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans.

The lionfish, Pterosis volitans, a native of Indo-Pacific oceans, is a popular saltwater aquarium fish despite venomous spines on its fins. Lionfish were inadvertently introduced into the western Atlantic from Florida in the early 1990s and have overpopulated and dispersed widely into the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. Initiatives to control lionfish populations were launched, including the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-sponsored "Lionfish as Food Campaign". Read More

View Article
September 2017
3 Reads

The invasive lionfish, Pterois volitans, used as a sentinel species to assess the organochlorine pollution by chlordecone in Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles).

Mar Pollut Bull 2016 Jun 23;107(1):102-106. Epub 2016 Apr 23.

UMR BOREA CNRS-7208, IRD-207, MNHN, UPMC, UCBN - DYNECAR, Université des Antilles, Campus de Fouillole, BP 592, 97159 Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe.

In Guadeloupe, many marine organisms are affected by an organochlorine pollution used in the past by the banana industry to fight against the banana weevil. In the present study, we evaluated the level of contamination of the invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish, Pterois volitans, all around the island. Concentrations of chlordecone varied from 3 to 144μg. Read More

View Article
June 2016
6 Reads

[Size structure as evidence of population establishment of Pterois volitans (Scorpaeniformes: Scorpaenidae) in the South Mexican Caribbean].

Rev Biol Trop 2016 03;64(1):353-62

The lionfish (P. volitans) has now invaded all the Mexican Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, with the potential to cause negative impacts on the reefs. In the South Mexican Caribbean was firstly reported in July 2009, and six years after this report, some control measures such as fish tournament and local marketing have been implemented. Read More

View Article
March 2016
1 Read

Marine envenomations in returning French travellers seen in a tropical diseases unit, 2008-13.

J Travel Med 2016 Feb 8;23(2):tav022. Epub 2016 Feb 8.

Service des maladies infectieuses et tropicales, groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, AP-HP, 47-83 bd de l'hôpital, 75013 Paris, France, PRES Sorbonne universités, Université Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC), faculté de médecine Pitié-Salpêtrière, 91 bd de l'hôpital, 75013 Paris, France.

Background: Travel and aquatic activities are increasing in tropical regions. The risk and the spectrum of marine envenomation are unknown in travellers. This work aims to evaluate the prevalence and the characteristics of marine envenomations in returning travellers. Read More

View Article
February 2016
9 Reads

Envenomation by the invasive Pterois volitans species (lionfish) in the French West Indies--a two-year prospective study in Martinique.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2016 9;54(4):313-8. Epub 2016 Feb 9.

a Department of Critical Care & Emergency Unit , University Hospital of Martinique , Fort-de-France , France ;

Context: The invasion of the lionfish (Pterois volitans) in the French West Indies represents one of the most important marine invasions by alien species in history. Since its first recognition in Martinique in February 2011, the lionfish presence has strongly progressed, resulting in increasing envenomation cases. Our objective was to report features of lionfish envenomation and outcome. Read More

View Article
September 2016
15 Reads

The first report on coagulation and phospholipase A2 activities of Persian Gulf lionfish, Pterois russelli, an Iranian venomous fish.

Toxicon 2016 Apr 4;113:25-31. Epub 2016 Feb 4.

Biotechnology Research Center, Medical Biotechnology Dept., Venom and Biotherapeutics Molecules Lab, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Pterois russelli is a venomous fish belonging to scorpionidae family. Regarding to high significance value for tracing potential therapeutic molecules and special agents from venomous marine creatures, the present study was aimed to characterization of the Persian Gulf lionfish venom. Proteolytic, phospholipase, hemolytic, coagulation, edematogenic and dermonecrotic activities were determined for extracted venom. Read More

View Article
April 2016
1 Read
2.490 Impact Factor

Photo-identification as a simple tool for studying invasive lionfish Pterois volitans populations.

J Fish Biol 2016 Feb 23;88(2):800-4. Epub 2015 Dec 23.

Earth to Ocean Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A1S6, Canada.

Photo-tagging, i.e. using a specific software to match colour patterns on photographs, was tested as a means to identify individual Indo-Pacific Pterois volitans to assist with population and movement studies of this invasive species. Read More

View Article
February 2016
5 Reads