13 results match your criteria Lionfish and Stonefish

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Sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding for SpCTx: a lethal factor from scorpionfish venom ().

J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis 2018 29;24:24. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

1Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 Brazil.

Background: Lethal factors are multifunctional oligomeric proteins found in the venomous apparatus of Scorpaeniformes fish. These toxins elicit not only an array of biological responses in vitro but also cardiovascular disorders and strong hemolytic, nociceptive and edematogenic activities in vivo. This work describes the cloning and molecular identification of two toxin subunits, denominated Sp-CTx-α and Sp-CTx-β, from scorpionfish venom (). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40409-018-0158-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6114736PMC
August 2018
9 Reads

Occurrence of a stonefish toxin-like toxin in the venom of the rabbitfish Siganus fuscescens.

Toxicon 2017 Dec 18;140:139-146. Epub 2017 Oct 18.

Department of Food Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Konan-4, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8477, Japan.

Rabbitfish belonging to the order Perciformes are well-known venomous fish that are frequently involved in human accidents. However little research has been done into either the whole venom toxicities or the structures and properties of their venom toxins. In this study, we first examined biological activities of the crude venom extract prepared from dorsal spines of Siganus fuscescens, a rabbitfish most commonly found along the coasts of Japan. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2017.10.015DOI Listing
December 2017

Stonefish envenomation of hand with impending compartment syndrome.

J Occup Med Toxicol 2016 10;11:23. Epub 2016 May 10.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Background: Marine stings and envenomation are fairly common in Malaysia. Possible contact to various marine life occurs during diving, fishing and food handling. Even though majority of fish stings are benign, there are several venomous species such as puffer fish, scorpion fish, lionfish, stingray and stonefish that require urgent medical treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12995-016-0112-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4862076PMC
May 2016
19 Reads

Marine envenomations in returning French travellers seen in a tropical diseases unit, 2008-13.

J Travel Med 2016 Feb 8;23(2):tav022. Epub 2016 Feb 8.

Service des maladies infectieuses et tropicales, groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, AP-HP, 47-83 bd de l'hôpital, 75013 Paris, France, PRES Sorbonne universités, Université Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC), faculté de médecine Pitié-Salpêtrière, 91 bd de l'hôpital, 75013 Paris, France.

Background: Travel and aquatic activities are increasing in tropical regions. The risk and the spectrum of marine envenomation are unknown in travellers. This work aims to evaluate the prevalence and the characteristics of marine envenomations in returning travellers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jtm/tav022DOI Listing
February 2016
11 Reads

Marine Scorpaenidae Envenomation in Travelers: Epidemiology, Management, and Prevention.

Authors:
James H Diaz

J Travel Med 2015 Jul-Aug;22(4):251-8. Epub 2015 Apr 17.

Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences and Department of Anesthesiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center (LSUHSC), School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA.

Background: The Scorpaenidae are a large family of venomous marine fish that include scorpionfish, lionfish, and stonefish. Although most stonefish are confined to the Indo-Pacific, scorpionfish are distributed in the tropics worldwide, and two species of Indo-Pacific lionfish were inadvertently introduced into the Eastern Atlantic in the 1990s. Since then, lionfish have invaded shallow reef systems in the Eastern Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/jtm.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jtm.12206DOI Listing
April 2016
3 Reads

Toxin gene determination and evolution in scorpaenoid fish.

Toxicon 2014 Sep 17;88:21-33. Epub 2014 Jun 17.

Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address:

In this study, we determine the toxin genes from both cDNA and genomic DNA of four scorpaenoid fish and reconstruct their evolutionary relationship. The deduced protein sequences of the two toxin subunits in Sebastapistes strongia, Scorpaenopsis oxycephala, and Sebastiscus marmoratus are about 700 amino acid, similar to the sizes of the stonefish (Synanceia horrida, and Synanceia verrucosa) and lionfish (Pterois antennata and Pterois volitans) toxins previously published. The intron positions are highly conserved among these species, which indicate the applicability of gene finding by using genomic DNA template. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00410101140017
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2014.06.013DOI Listing
September 2014
9 Reads

Enzymatic properties and primary structures of hyaluronidases from two species of lionfish (Pterois antennata and Pterois volitans).

Fish Physiol Biochem 2014 Aug 7;40(4):1043-53. Epub 2014 Jan 7.

Department of Food Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Konan-4, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8477, Japan.

Lionfish are representative venomous fish, having venomous glandular tissues in dorsal, pelvic and anal spines. Some properties and primary structures of proteinaceous toxins from the venoms of three species of lionfish, Pterois antennata, Pterois lunulata and Pterois volitans, have so far been clarified. Our recent survey established the presence of hyaluronidase, presumably a toxin-spreading factor, in the venoms of P. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s10695-013-9904
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10695-013-9904-5
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10695-013-9904-5DOI Listing
August 2014
20 Reads

Proteinaceous toxins from three species of scorpaeniform fish (lionfish Pterois lunulata, devil stinger Inimicus japonicus and waspfish Hypodytes rubripinnis): close similarity in properties and primary structures to stonefish toxins.

Toxicon 2013 Aug 9;70:184-93. Epub 2013 May 9.

Department of Food Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Konan-4, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8477, Japan.

The crude toxins from three species of venomous fish (lionfish Pterois lunulata, devil stinger Inimicus japonicus and waspfish Hypodytes rubripinnis) belonging to the order Scorpaeniformes exhibited mouse-lethal, hemolytic, edema-forming and nociceptive activities. In view of the antigenic cross-reactivity with the stonefish toxins, the primary structures of the stonefish toxin-like toxins from the three scorpaeniform fish were determined by cDNA cloning using primers designed from the highly conserved sequences of the stonefish toxins. Based on the data obtained in gel filtration, immunoblotting and cDNA cloning, each toxin was judged to be a 160 kDa heterodimer composed of 80 kDa α- and β-subunits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2013.04.021DOI Listing
August 2013
7 Reads

Some properties and cDNA cloning of proteinaceous toxins from two species of lionfish (Pterois antennata and Pterois volitans).

Toxicon 2011 Nov 26;58(6-7):494-501. Epub 2011 Aug 26.

Department of Food Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Konan-4, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8477, Japan.

Lionfish, members of the genera Pterois, Parapterois and Dendrochirus, are well known to be venomous, having venomous glandular tissues in dorsal, pelvic and anal spines. The lionfish toxins have been shown to cross-react with the stonefish toxins by neutralization tests using the commercial stonefish antivenom, although their chemical properties including structures have been little characterized. In this study, an antiserum against neoverrucotoxin, the stonefish Synanceia verrucosa toxin, was first raised in a guinea pig and used in immunoblotting and inhibition immunoblotting to confirm that two species of Pterois lionfish (P. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2011.08.010DOI Listing
November 2011
19 Reads

[Dangerous aquaria].

Przegl Lek 2005 ;62(6):617-8

Ośrodek Informacji Toksykologicznej Katedra Toksykologii Klinicznej i Sodowiskowej, Collegium Medicum, Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego, Krakowie.

World trends for a home breeding of exotic freshwater and marine fishes did not miss Poland. There are almost all species of aquarium fishes available in Polish pet shops, but there is not enough information about threat given to customers. In some fish, there are masses of one-cell glands, mainly serous, in the proximity of the spines. Read More

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December 2005
14 Reads

Modulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels by Scorpaenidae venoms.

Toxicon 2003 May;41(6):679-89

Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia.

The crude venoms of the soldierfish (Gymnapistes marmoratus), the lionfish (Pterois volitans) and the stonefish (Synanceia trachynis) display pronounced neuromuscular activity. Since [Ca(2+)](i) is a key regulator in many aspects of neuromuscular function we sought to determine its involvement in the neuromuscular actions of the venoms. In the chick biventer cervicis muscle, all three venoms produced a sustained contraction (approx 20-30% of 1mM acetylcholine). Read More

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May 2003
5 Reads

Adrenergic and cholinergic activity contributes to the cardiovascular effects of lionfish (Pterois volitans) venom.

Toxicon 2002 Jun;40(6):787-96

Monash Venom Group, Department of Pharmacology, Monash University, P.O. Box 13E, Clayton, Vic. 3800, Australia.

The aim of the present study was to further investigate the cardiovascular activity of Pterois volitans crude venom. Venom (0.6-18 microg protein/ml) produced dose- and endothelium-dependent relaxation in porcine coronary arteries that was potentiated by atropine (10nM), but significantly attenuated by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (NOLA; 0. Read More

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June 2002
7 Reads
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