3 results match your criteria Legal and Criminological Psychology [Journal]

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Relations between Attorney Temporal Structure and Children's Response Productivity in Cases of Alleged Child Sexual Abuse.

Legal Criminol Psychol 2017 Sep 5;22(2):228-241. Epub 2016 Jul 5.

University of Southern California.

Purpose: Previous research has demonstrated that attorney question format relates to child witness' response productivity. However, little work has examined the relations between the extent to which attorneys provide temporal structure in their questions, and the effects of this structure on children's responding. The purpose of the present study was to address this gap in the literature in order to identify methods by which attorneys increase children's response productivity on the stand without risking objections from opposing counsel for "calling for narrative answers". Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/lcrp.12096DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5650203PMC
September 2017
10 Reads

'Where were your clothes?' Eliciting descriptions of clothing placement from children alleging sexual abuse in criminal trials and forensic interviews.

Legal Criminol Psychol 2017 Sep 1;22(2):197-212. Epub 2016 Jun 1.

University of Southern California.

Purpose: The present study examined how children alleging sexual abuse are asked about clothing placement during abusive episodes, both in criminal trials and forensic interviews. The placement of clothing is of great importance, because it facilitates distinguishing abusive touch from non-abusive touch, as well as the severity of abuse when the touching is in fact sexual. If clothing has not been removed, then sexual abuse appears less likely and certain types of sexual contact are physically impossible (or at least highly improbable). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/lcrp.12094DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5588022PMC
September 2017
8 Reads

The Effects of the Putative Confession and Parent Suggestion on Children's Disclosure of a Minor Transgression.

Legal Criminol Psychol 2017 Feb 10;22(1):60-73. Epub 2015 Oct 10.

University of Southern California.

Purpose: This study examined the effects of the putative confession (telling the child that an adult "told me everything that happened and he wants you to tell the truth") on children's disclosure of a minor transgression after questioning by their parents.

Methods: Children ( = 188; 4 - 7-year-olds) played with a confederate, and while doing so, for half of the children, toys broke. Parents then questioned their children about what occurred, and half of the parents were given additional scripted suggestive questions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/lcrp.12086DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5342253PMC
February 2017
15 Reads
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