1,589 results match your criteria Late Effects of Childhood Cancer and Treatment


Survival from cancer in young people: An overview of late effects focussing on reproductive health.

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2019 Feb 17. Epub 2019 Feb 17.

Leeds Institute of Health Research, School of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.

This paper provides a summary of the areas of survival from childhood, teenage and young adult cancer and the significant late-effects that can arise from treatment with particular focus on the area of reproductive health and the impact on both fertility and pregnancy. To complete this review, Web of Science and MEDLINE were used. Search terms included: "survival AND childhood OR teenage OR young adult cancer", "late effects", "childhood cancer", "teenage and/or young adult cancer", "and fertility after cancer", "pregnancy after cancer" and "fertility preservation". Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aogs.13584DOI Listing
February 2019

Late mortality and causes of death among 5-year survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed in the period 1960-1999 and registered in the Italian Off-Therapy Registry.

Eur J Cancer 2019 Feb 14;110:86-97. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Genova, Italy. Electronic address:

Introduction: Advances in paediatric oncology led to the increase in long-term survival, revealing the burden of therapy-related long-term side effects. We evaluated overall and cause-specific mortality in a large cohort of Italian childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) and adolescent cancer survivors identified through the off-therapy registry.

Materials And Methods: CCSs alive 5 years after cancer diagnosis occurring between 1960 and 1999 were eligible; the last follow-up was between 2011 and 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2018.12.021DOI Listing
February 2019

Schooling in Survivorship: Understanding Caregiver Challenges when Survivors Return to School.

Psychooncology 2019 Feb 13. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Kennedy Krieger Institute.

Objective: Schooling after treatment can hold challenges for survivors of childhood cancer and caregivers who may need to act as advocates on their behalf. This study seeks to understand caregiver experiences of survivor's school-related challenges. This understudied area is critical given the 85% survivor rate for those diagnosed with childhood cancer and the disproportionate risk of learning difficulties faced by those with brain tumor or who receive therapy that targets the central nervous system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pon.5026DOI Listing
February 2019

SYK Inhibition Potentiates the Effect of Chemotherapeutic Drugs on Neuroblastoma Cells in Vitro.

Cancers (Basel) 2019 Feb 10;11(2). Epub 2019 Feb 10.

Molecular Inflammation Research Group, Department of Medical Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Hansine Hansens veg 18, 9019 Tromsø, Norway.

Neuroblastoma is a malignancy arising from the developing sympathetic nervous system and the most common and deadly cancer of infancy. New therapies are needed to improve the prognosis for high-risk patients and to reduce toxicity and late effects. Spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) has previously been identified as a promising drug target in various inflammatory diseases and cancers but has so far not been extensively studied as a potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers11020202DOI Listing
February 2019

Guidelines for Treatment and Monitoring of Adult Survivors of Pediatric Brain Tumors.

Curr Treat Options Oncol 2019 Feb 9;20(1):10. Epub 2019 Feb 9.

Pediatric Endocrinology, Emory Children's Center/Emory Pediatric Institute, 2015 Uppergate Drive, Room 232, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA.

Opinion Statement: Pathologies of pediatric brain tumors are more varied than those diagnosed in adults and survival outcomes more optimistic. Therapies for pediatric brain tumors are also diverse and treatment options are expanding. The growing number of adult survivors of childhood brain tumors is quite diverse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11864-019-0602-0DOI Listing
February 2019

Michael Reese Hospital and the Campaign to Warn the US Public of the Long-Term Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation, 1973-1977.

Am J Public Health 2019 Mar;109(3):398-405

Itai Bavli is with the Interdisciplinary Studies Graduate Program and the W. Maurice Young Centre of Applied Ethics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Shifra Shvarts is with the Moshe Prywes Center for Medical Education, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, and The Israel National Institute for Health Policy and Health Services Research, Tel Hashomer, Israel.

In July 1973, a study at the University of Chicago linked radiation treatment during childhood to a variety of diseases, including thyroid cancer. A few months later, a worker at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago, Illinois found a registry of 5266 former patients who had been treated with radiation during the 1950s and 1960s. Hospital officials decided to contact these patients and arrange for follow-up medical examinations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2018.304763DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Long-term survivors of childhood, adolescent and young adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Br J Haematol 2019 Feb 3. Epub 2019 Feb 3.

Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA.

Progress in overall survival rates for childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) can be largely attributed to effective development and conduct of a number of international treatment studies. Knowledge gained from these studies has shifted the treatment paradigm from a "one-size fits all" strategy to a histologically dependent approach. More specifically, many now adhere to a risk-stratified approach, prescribing cumulative doses and intensities of chemotherapeutic exposures based upon the aggressiveness of disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.15775DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Postmenopausal osteoporotic fracture-associated COLIA1 variant impacts bone accretion in girls.

Bone 2019 Jan 31;121:221-226. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Division of Human Genetics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America; Department of Genetics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America; Center for Spatial and Functional Genomics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America. Electronic address:

Over the past two decades, a low frequency variant (rs1800012) within the first intron of the type I collagen alpha 1 (COLIA1) gene has been implicated in lower areal BMD (aBMD) and increased risk of osteoporotic fracture. This association is particularly strong in postmenopausal women, in whom net bone loss arises in the context of high bone turnover. High bone turnover also accompanies childhood linear growth; however, the role of rs1800012 in this stage of net bone accretion is less well understood. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S87563282193003
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2019.01.026DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

The genetic changes of Wilms tumour.

Nat Rev Nephrol 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Wellcome Sanger Institute, Cambridge, UK.

Wilms tumour is the most common renal malignancy of childhood. The disease is curable in the majority of cases, albeit at considerable cost in terms of late treatment-related effects in some children. However, one in ten children with Wilms tumour will die of their disease despite modern treatment approaches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41581-019-0112-0DOI Listing
January 2019

Treatment abandonment in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in China: a retrospective cohort study of the Chinese Children's Cancer Group.

Arch Dis Child 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Hematology/Oncology, Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Key Lab of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology of China Ministry of Health, and National Children's Medical Center, Shanghai, China.

Objectives: Before 2003, most children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) abandoned treatment, with only approximately 30% treated in China. With the development of national insurance for underprivileged patients, we assessed the current frequency and causes of treatment abandonment among patients with ALL who were enrolled in the Chinese Children's Cancer Group ALL protocol between 2015 and 2016.

Methods: Demographic, clinical and laboratory data on patients who abandoned treatment, as well as economic and sociocultural data of their families were collected and analysed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2018-316181DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Hypogonadism in Children with a Previous History of Cancer: Endocrine Management and Follow-Up.

Horm Res Paediatr 2019 Jan 31:1-11. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Hypogonadism after treatment for childhood cancer is a recognized complication and its cause may be subdivided into primary gonadal failure and central hypogonadism. Here, we provide an overview of the risk factors for the development of hypogonadism, assessment and potential interventions and give a summary of the current recommendations for management and follow-up of hypogonadism in childhood cancer survivors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000495943DOI Listing
January 2019

Chronic fatigue and associated factors among long-term survivors of cancers in young adulthood.

Acta Oncol 2019 Jan 30:1-10. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

a National Advisory Unit on Late Effects after Cancer Treatment, Department of Oncology , Oslo University Hospital , Oslo , Norway.

Background: Chronic fatigue (CF) is scarcely explored among young adult cancer survivors (YACSs), and more knowledge is needed to develop targeted interventions for YACSs with CF. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of CF and associated factors in YACSs. Also, the change of fatigue with time was explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0284186X.2018.1557344DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Hypothalamic-pituitary function following childhood brain tumors: Analysis of prospective annual endocrine screening.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2019 Jan 28:e27631. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Divisions of Pediatric Endocrinology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Background: Outcomes for childhood brain tumors are now associated with a five-year survival rate of 75%. Endocrine effects of brain tumors are common, occurring in 43% of patients by 10 years from tumor diagnosis. Optimal timing of screening for endocrinopathies remains undefined. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.27631DOI Listing
January 2019

Health-Related Quality of Life Among Survivors of Cancer in Adolescence: An Integrative Literature Review.

J Pediatr Nurs 2019 Jan - Feb;44:97-106. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, NC, USA.

Problem: Adolescence is a critical developmental period, but little research is available on the quality of life for individuals ages 10-19, especially those who have faced a life-threatening illness. This integrative review examines factors related to quality of life among survivors of a childhood cancer that occurred during adolescence.

Eligibility Criteria: The Garrard Matrix Method guided this review of studies that were conducted from 1990 to 2017. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08825963183007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2018.11.009DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Pediatric Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (PENTEC): An International Collaboration to Analyse Normal Tissue Radiation Dose-Volume Response Relationships for Paediatric Cancer Patients.

Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol) 2019 Mar 19;31(3):199-207. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

With advances in multimodality therapy, childhood cancer cure rates approach 80%. However, both radiotherapy and chemotherapy can cause debilitating or even fatal late adverse events that are critical to understand, mitigate or prevent. QUANTEC (Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic) identified radiation dose constraints for normal tissues in adults and pointed out the uncertainties in those constraints. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S09366555193002
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clon.2019.01.002DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

The perceived impact of infertility on romantic relationships and singlehood among adult survivors of childhood cancer.

Psychooncology 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Center for Biobehavioral Health, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA.

Objective: To examine whether adult survivors of childhood cancer perceive a direct impact of potential/confirmed infertility on their romantic relationships/singlehood.

Methods: Open-ended qualitative phone interviews were conducted with 57 adult survivors of childhood cancer and analyzed through thematic content analysis until saturation was reached (N = 30).

Results: Interviews revealed three major themes: (1) impact on survivors, (2) impact on partners/romantic relationships, and (3) alternative routes to parenthood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pon.4999DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Drug Repurposing for Retinoblastoma: Recent Advances.

Curr Top Med Chem 2019 Jan 19. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

CSIR- Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Uppal Road, Habsiguda, Hyderabad 500 007. India.

Retinoblastoma is the intraocular malignancy that occurs during early childhood. The current standard of care includes chemotherapy followed by focal consolidative therapies, and enucleation. Unfortunately, these are associated with many side and late effects. Read More

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http://www.eurekaselect.com/169178/article
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1568026619666190119152706DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Knowledge of Late Effects Risks and Healthcare Responsibility in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated for Childhood Cancer.

J Pediatr Psychol 2019 Jan 8. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.

Objective: This study aimed to examine the level and predictors of knowledge of late effects risks from childhood cancer treatment in adolescent and young adult (AYA) survivors.

Methods: Seventy-three AYAs, aged 14-21, completed measures of knowledge of late effect risks, executive functioning, and responsibility for health self-management. Sixty-seven parents of these AYA survivors (91. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jpepsy/jsy102DOI Listing
January 2019

Risk and Temporal Changes of Heart Failure Among 5-Year Childhood Cancer Survivors: a DCOG-LATER Study.

J Am Heart Assoc 2019 Jan;8(1):e009122

1 Department of Pediatric Oncology Emma Children's Hospital Amsterdam UMC University of Amsterdam The Netherlands.

Background Heart failure is one of the most important late effects after treatment for cancer in childhood. The goals of this study were to evaluate the risk of heart failure, temporal changes by treatment periods, and the risk factors for heart failure in childhood cancer survivors ( CCS ). Methods and Results The DCOG-LATER (Dutch Childhood Oncology Group-Long-Term Effects After Childhood Cancer) cohort includes 6,165 5-year CCS diagnosed between 1963 and 2002. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.118.009122DOI Listing
January 2019

p53, stem cell biology and childhood blastomas.

Curr Opin Oncol 2019 Mar;31(2):84-91

Department of Paediatrics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Purpose Of Review: Childhood blastomas, unlike adult cancers, originate from developing organs in which molecular and cellular features exhibit differentiation arrest and embryonic characteristics. Conventional cancer therapies, which rely on the generalized cytotoxic effect on rapidly dividing cells, may damage delicate organs in young children, leading to multiple late effects. Deep understanding of the biology of embryonal cancers is crucial in reshaping the cancer treatment paradigm for children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCO.0000000000000504DOI Listing

Survivor clinic attendance among pediatric- and adolescent-aged survivors of childhood cancer.

J Cancer Surviv 2019 Feb 17;13(1):56-65. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of Epidemiology, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Purpose: Childhood cancer survivors need regular, risk-adapted, long-term survivor care. This retrospective study describes the proportion of survivors seen for an initial survivor clinic visit within a large pediatric oncology program.

Methods: Patients diagnosed with non-central nervous system childhood malignancies from 2007 to 2012 were followed from the time of survivor clinic eligibility (2 years following completion of therapy) through their initial survivor clinic visit or end of study. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11764-018-0727-3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11764-018-0727-3DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

Respiratory morbidity in young people surviving cancer: Population-based study of hospital admissions, treatment-related risk factors and subsequent mortality.

Int J Cancer 2018 Dec 14. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Clinical and Population Science Department, School of Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom.

Respiratory diseases are a major cause of late morbidity and mortality amongst childhood cancer survivors. This population-based study investigates respiratory hospital admissions in long-term survivors of cancers diagnosed in young people to identify specific respiratory morbidities, treatment-related risks and their relationship to subsequent morbidity and mortality. Population-based cancer registrations in Yorkshire, England, diagnosed between 1990 and 2011 aged 0-29 years, were linked to inpatient Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) for admissions up to 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.32066DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Thyroid Sequelae of Pediatric Cancer Therapy.

Horm Res Paediatr 2018 Dec 12:1-14. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is a common site of unintended, acquired disease either during or after the treatment of cancer. Children treated with external radiation therapy are at the highest risk for developing a thyroid-related late effect, but thyroid dysfunction and second primary thyroid neoplasms can also occur after treatment with radiopharmaceutical agents such as 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine. Increasingly recognized is the development of early thyroid dysfunction as an off-target consequence of the more novel cancer therapeutics such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000495040DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads

Long-term health and social function in adult survivors of paediatric astrocytoma: A report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

Eur J Cancer 2019 Jan 5;106:171-180. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Division of Haematology, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada; Division of Oncology, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada; Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada; Department of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada.

Background: Although paediatric astrocytoma has an excellent 5-year survival rate, survivors remain at risk for morbidity and late mortality. This study aimed to estimate the risk of late mortality, chronic conditions, poor health status and social impairment in ageing paediatric astrocytoma survivors.

Methods: We longitudinally evaluated 1182 5-year astrocytoma survivors diagnosed between 1970 and 1986 and 4023 siblings enrolled in a retrospective cohort study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2018.10.016DOI Listing
January 2019

Long-term complications in adolescent and young adult leukemia survivors.

Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program 2018 11;2018(1):146-153

Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer, defined by the National Cancer Institute as having been diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 39 years old, have not benefited from the same improvements in quality of outcomes and survival that have been seen for individuals diagnosed in childhood or as older adults. Although is leukemia composed of a diverse group of diagnoses, leukemia AYA survivors share unique vulnerabilities with other AYA diagnostic groups. They will spend the majority of their lives as survivors, with clear evidence of adverse medical conditions, health care requirements, and social and psychological needs that differ not only from their peers but also, from the needs of other cancer survivor populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/asheducation-2018.1.146DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245964PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Long-term Endocrine and Metabolic consequences of Cancer Treatment: A Systematic Review.

Endocr Rev 2018 Nov 23. Epub 2018 Nov 23.

Exp. & Clin Endocrinology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Germany.

The number of patients surviving five or more years after initial cancer diagnosis has significantly increased over the last decades due to considerable improvements in the treatment of many cancer entities. A negative consequence of this is the emergence of long-term sequelae and endocrine disorders account for a high proportion of these. These late effects can occur decades after cancer treatment and affect up to 50% of childhood cancer survivors. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/edrv/advance-article/doi/10.1210/er
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/er.2018-00092DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Reproductive Outcomes After a Childhood and Adolescent Young Adult Cancer Diagnosis in Female Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

J Adolesc Young Adult Oncol 2018 Nov 16. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

2 Kids Cancer Centre, Sydney Children's Hospital , Sydney, Australia .

Improvements in cancer therapy for childhood and adolescent and young adult (AYA) survivors have increased in excess of 80% among pediatric patients and in excess of 85% among AYA cancer patients. Our research group explored the late effects consequences of cancer treatment on pregnancy and birth outcomes subsequent to a childhood (0-14 years) or AYA (15-25 years) diagnosis of cancer in female cancer survivors. Embase and Medline databases were searched. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/jayao.2018.0036
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jayao.2018.0036DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

Childhood Cancer Treatments and Associated Endocrine Late Effects: A Concise Guide for the Pediatric Endocrinologist.

Horm Res Paediatr 2018 Nov 7:1-9. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Department of Pediatrics, Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA.

Endocrine complications are frequently observed in childhood cancer survivors (CCS); in many instances, these complications develop months to years after the completion of cancer therapy. The estimated prevalence of endocrine late effects is 50% among CCS; the main risk factors are external beam radiation that includes key endocrine organs (the hypothalamus/pituitary, thyroid and gonads) and/or alkylating agents. Novel agents targeting tumor growth have increased the options available to a small number of patients albeit with the need for treatment over long periods of time. Read More

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https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/493943
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000493943DOI Listing
November 2018
18 Reads

Late Effects of Therapy in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors

Turk J Haematol 2019 02 1;36(1):1-11. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

Texas Children’s Hematology and Oncology Centers, Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Houston, TX, USA

Over the last 50 years, the survival rates in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have increased remarkably. The optimal use of antileukemic agents in cooperative group protocols, central nervous system-directed treatment, improvements in supportive care, and recognition of biological, clinical, and treatment response characteristics that predict patients with a higher or a lower risk of treatment failure have improved 5-year event-free survival rates, reaching more than 85%, and 5-year overall survival rates, reaching more than 90%. Consequently, it has become increasingly important to characterize the occurrence of long-term late effects. Read More

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https://www.journalagent.com/z4/download_fulltext.asp?pdir=t
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4274/tjh.galenos.2018.2018.0150DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6373511PMC
February 2019
27 Reads

Long-term effects of cancer on earnings of childhood, adolescent and young adult cancer survivors - a population-based study from British Columbia, Canada.

BMC Health Serv Res 2018 Nov 1;18(1):826. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Background: The patterns and determinants of long-term income among young people surviving cancer, and differences compared to peers, have not yet been fully explored. The objectives of this paper are to describe long-term income among young survivors of cancer, the impact of socio-demographic, disease, and treatment factors on long-term income, and income relative to the general population.

Methods: Retrospective cohort study with comparison group from the general population, using linked population-based registries, clinical data, and tax-records. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12913-018-3617-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6211561PMC
November 2018
10 Reads

Post-transplantation employment status of adult survivors of childhood allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant: A report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR).

Cancer 2019 Jan 12;125(1):144-152. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), Department of Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Background: Data are scarce regarding employment outcomes of survivors of childhood allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) and the factors that affect their employment status.

Methods: By using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database, the authors studied employment outcomes of ≥1-year survivors of childhood alloHCT who were age ≥18 years at their most recent assessment (year of transplantation, 1985-2010). Employment status was assessed at their attained ages (ages 18-22, 23-27, and 28-32 years) and according to transplantation center (TC) location (United States or International). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/cncr.31781
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.31781DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6310211PMC
January 2019
20 Reads

Purchases of antidepressants after cancer at a young age in Finland.

Int J Cancer 2019 Mar 3;144(6):1227-1233. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Turku University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, and Turku University, Turku, Finland.

According to previous studies, childhood cancer survivors have an elevated risk for late mental health effects. However, only few studies exist on young adulthood (YA) cancer survivors' mental health outcomes. In our study, we examined first time antidepressant (AD) medication purchases of childhood and YA cancer patients compared to siblings. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ijc.31942
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.31942DOI Listing
March 2019
7 Reads

Esophageal Varices in Adolescent and Young Adult Males with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia.

J Adolesc Young Adult Oncol 2018 Oct 18. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

1 Department of Pediatrics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

Hepatic late effects are not commonly reported in survivors of childhood leukemia. Four young male patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were diagnosed with bleeding esophageal varices (EVs) during or shortly after completion of maintenance chemotherapy. EVs were identified from 0 to 60 months after completion of leukemia therapy. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/jayao.2018.0098
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jayao.2018.0098DOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads

Current status of proton therapy outcome for paediatric cancers of the central nervous system - Analysis of the published literature.

Cancer Treat Rev 2018 Nov 9;70:272-288. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

Cancer Research Institute and School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia; School of Physical Sciences, University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia. Electronic address:

Introduction: The most common solid tumours that develop in children are cancers of the central nervous system. Due to the increased rate of survival over the past decades, greater focus has been placed on the minimisation of long term side effects. In childhood cancer survivors, over 60% report one or more radiation-related late toxicities while half of these adverse events are graded as life-threatening or severe. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03057372183016
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctrv.2018.10.003DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Hearing loss and quality of life in survivors of paediatric CNS tumours and other cancers.

Qual Life Res 2019 Feb 10;28(2):515-521. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Bern, Mittelstrasse 43, 3012, Bern, Switzerland.

Purpose: Hearing loss, a complication of cancer treatment, may reduce health-related quality of life (HRQoL), especially in childhood cancer survivors of central nervous system (CNS) tumours who often have multiple late effects. We examined the effect of hearing loss on HRQoL in young survivors of CNS and other childhood cancers.

Methods: Within the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, we sent questionnaires about hearing loss and HRQoL (KIDSCREEN-27) to parents of survivors aged 8-15 years. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11136-018-2021-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11136-018-2021-2DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

The PanCareSurFup consortium: research and guidelines to improve lives for survivors of childhood cancer.

Eur J Cancer 2018 Nov 1;103:238-248. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Lund, Sweden.

Background: Second malignant neoplasms and cardiotoxicity are among the most serious and frequent adverse health outcomes experienced by childhood and adolescent cancer survivors (CCSs) and contribute significantly to their increased risk of premature mortality. Owing to differences in health-care systems, language and culture across the continent, Europe has had limited success in establishing multi-country collaborations needed to assemble the numbers of survivors required to clarify the health issues arising after successful cancer treatment. PanCareSurFup (PCSF) is the first pan-European project to evaluate some of the serious long-term health risks faced by survivors. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S09598049183133
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2018.08.017DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

PanCareLIFE: The scientific basis for a European project to improve long-term care regarding fertility, ototoxicity and health-related quality of life after cancer occurring among children and adolescents.

Eur J Cancer 2018 Nov 29;103:227-237. Epub 2018 Sep 29.

German Childhood Cancer Registry (GCCR), Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University Medical Center, Mainz, Germany.

Aims: Survival after cancer diagnosed during childhood or adolescence continues to improve with new treatments and supportive therapies. Optimal long-term care requires that risks to vulnerable organs are clearly defined and translated into guidelines that are implemented into practice. PanCareLIFE is a pan-European consortium that addresses survivorship issues comprising fertility, hearing impairment and quality of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2018.08.007DOI Listing
November 2018
15 Reads

Late-onset cardiomyopathy among survivors of childhood lymphoma treated with anthracyclines: a systematic review.

Hellenic J Cardiol 2018 Sep 29. Epub 2018 Sep 29.

Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Unit of Clinical Epidemiology, Medical School, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Medical advances in pediatric oncology have led to increases in survival but the long-term adverse effects of treatment in childhood cancer survivors have not yet been examined in depth. In this systematic review, we aimed to study the prevalence and risk factors of late-onset cardiomyopathy (LOCM) among survivors of childhood lymphoma treated with anthracyclines. Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines we searched Pubmed/Medline, abstracted data and rated studies on quality regarding late-onset (>1 year following treatment) cardiotoxicity of anthracyclines in survivors of childhood lymphoma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hjc.2018.09.004DOI Listing
September 2018
7 Reads

Genetic variation in gonadal impairment in female survivors of childhood cancer: a PanCareLIFE study protocol.

BMC Cancer 2018 Sep 26;18(1):930. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Lundlaan 6, 3584, EA, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: Improved risk stratification, more effective therapy and better supportive care have resulted in survival rates after childhood cancer of around 80% in developed countries. Treatment however can be harsh, and three in every four childhood cancer survivors (CCS) develop at least one late effect, such as gonadal impairment. Gonadal impairment can cause involuntary childlessness, with serious consequences for the well-being of CCS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-018-4834-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6158859PMC
September 2018
6 Reads

[Late effects following childhood cancer treatment : A special challenge for transition medicine].

Internist (Berl) 2018 Nov;59(11):1157-1162

Klinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Bereich pädiatrische Hämatologie und Onkologie, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23562, Lübeck, Deutschland.

Background: Childhood cancer survivors are at risk of cancer- and treatment-related chronic health conditions. Since these sequelae may occur years after the end of treatment, many patients are already adults and have completed pediatric oncological care. Thus, successful transition is essential in order to ensure long-term surveillance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00108-018-0496-0DOI Listing
November 2018
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Fertility Among Female Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancer: Protocol for Two Pan-European Studies (PanCareLIFE).

JMIR Res Protoc 2018 Sep 14;7(9):e10824. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Background: Despite a significant number of studies on female fertility following childhood, adolescent, and young adult (CAYA) cancer, studies establishing precise (dose-related) estimates of treatment-related risks are still scarce. Previous studies have been underpowered, did not include detailed treatment information, or were based on self-report only without any hormonal assessments. More precise assessments of who is at risk for sub- or infertility are needed. Read More

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http://www.researchprotocols.org/2018/9/e10824/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/10824DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6231763PMC
September 2018
10 Reads

Alcohol consumption behaviors and neurocognitive dysfunction and emotional distress in adult survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

Addiction 2019 Feb 19;114(2):226-235. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA.

Aims: To estimate the level of alcohol consumption behaviors in adult survivors of childhood cancer and to test associations between alcohol consumption behaviors and symptoms of neurocognitive impairment and emotional distress.

Design: Retrospective cohort study with longitudinal follow-up of self-reported health outcomes.

Setting: Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS), a 26-center study of ≥ 5-year survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed ≤ 21 years of age between 1970 and 1986 in the United States and Canada. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/add.14439
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/add.14439DOI Listing
February 2019
35 Reads

Radiation Therapy for Treatment of Adolescent and Young Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma and Risk for Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer.

J Adolesc Young Adult Oncol 2019 Feb 15;8(1):1-8. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

2 Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Purpose: To estimate the risk for hospitalizations among survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed in adolescence or young adulthood according to exposure to treatment with radiation therapy.

Methods: Through the files of the Danish Cancer Registry, we identified 1684 five-year survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma, diagnosed at age 15-39 years during the period 1943-2004, and for whom information on radiation therapy was available in the Cancer Registry. Population-based comparisons were identified through the Danish Civil Registration System and matched to the survivors on year of birth and sex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jayao.2018.0060DOI Listing
February 2019

A population based pediatric oncology registry in Southern Sweden: the BORISS registry.

Eur J Epidemiol 2018 Nov 6;33(11):1125-1129. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Pediatrics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.

A population based registry, with the acronym BORISS, was established. It contains all individuals (0-18 years of age at diagnosis) diagnosed with cancer from 1970-01-01 until 2016-12-31 in Southern Sweden. The treatment data has been entered into the registry after confirmation of the diagnosis by the Swedish national cancer registry and updates on vital status from the Swedish population registry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10654-018-0437-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6208984PMC
November 2018
4 Reads

Hospitalization and mortality among pediatric cancer survivors: a population-based study.

Cancer Causes Control 2018 Nov 5;29(11):1047-1057. Epub 2018 Sep 5.

Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC), PO 19024, Mailstop M4-C308, Seattle, WA, USA.

Purpose: We examined serious long-term outcomes among childhood cancer survivors using population-based data.

Methods: We used 1982-2014 Washington State data to compare hospitalization and/or death (including cause-specific) during up to 27 years follow-up among all 5+ year childhood cancer survivors < 20 years at diagnosis (n = 3,152) and a sample of comparison children within birth cohorts, with assessment by cancer type and child/family characteristics.

Results: During follow-up (9 years median), 12% of survivors had hospitalizations; 4% died. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10552-018-1078-0DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

The Role Of Primary Care Physicians in Childhood Cancer Survivorship Care: Multiperspective Interviews.

Oncologist 2018 Aug 31. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

Kids Cancer Centre, Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: Primary care physicians (PCPs) are well placed to provide holistic care to survivors of childhood cancer and may relieve growing pressures on specialist-led follow-up. We evaluated PCPs' role and confidence in providing follow-up care to survivors of childhood cancer.

Subjects, Materials, And Methods: In Stage 1, survivors and parents (of young survivors) from 11 Australian and New Zealand hospitals completed interviews about their PCPs' role in their follow-up. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1634/theoncologist.2018-0103DOI Listing
August 2018
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Parent perspectives on oncology team communication regarding neurocognitive impacts of cancer therapy and school reentry.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2019 Jan 29;66(1):e27427. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

Department of Pediatric Oncology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Background: Neurocognitive deficits are common after childhood cancer and impact academic performance. Parents need to be knowledgeable of long-term complications impacting school and the resources necessary to support educational achievement. The oncology team plays an important role in preparing parents for the challenges of returning to school after treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.27427DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

The 'Survivorship Passport' for childhood cancer survivors.

Eur J Cancer 2018 Oct 20;102:69-81. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

St. Anna Children's Cancer Research Institute, Vienna, Austria.

Background: Currently, there are between 300,000 and 500,000 childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) in Europe. A significant proportion is at high risk, and at least 60% of them develop adverse health-related outcomes that can appear several years after treatment completion. Many survivors are unaware of their personal risk, and there seems to be a general lack of information among healthcare providers about pathophysiology and natural history of treatment-related complications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2018.07.006DOI Listing
October 2018
13 Reads

Neurological Complications of the Treatment of Pediatric Neoplastic Disorders.

Pediatr Neurol 2018 Aug 2;85:33-42. Epub 2018 Jun 2.

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Division of Pediatric Oncology, Baltimore, Maryland.

Neurological complications resulting from childhood cancer treatments are common. Treatment for childhood neoplastic disorders is often multimodal and may include procedures, cranial irradiation, chemotherapy, transplant, and immunotherapy, each of which carries distinct neurological risks. Procedures, such as lumbar punctures, are commonly used in this population for diagnostic purposes as well as intrathecal medication administration. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08878994183012
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2018.05.011DOI Listing
August 2018
7 Reads