99 results match your criteria Labyrinthitis Ossificans


Etiology-Specific Mineralization Patterns in Patients with Labyrinthitis Ossificans.

AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 2019 Mar 21;40(3):551-557. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

From the Departments of Radiology (K.B., B.B., A.F., M.M.Q., K.T., O.S.)

Background And Purpose: Our aim was to identify whether specific patterns of ossification in labyrinthitis ossificans are associated with the known risk factors. Labyrinthitis ossificans has been described as sequela of prior temporal bone trauma, prior infection, and other disorders including sickle cell disease. Specific patterns of mineralization in the membranous labyrinth associated with these risk factors has not been previously described. Read More

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http://www.ajnr.org/lookup/doi/10.3174/ajnr.A5985
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3174/ajnr.A5985DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

"Emergency" Cochlear Implantation in Labyrinthitis Ossificans Secondary to Polyarteritis Nodosa: How to Face a Rare Entity.

J Int Adv Otol 2018 Dec 12. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pavia, IRCCS Policlinico "S. Matteo" Foundation, Pavia, Italy.

Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a systemic vasculitis affecting the small- and medium-sized arteries that may present with hearing impairment. In rare cases, PAN may be associated with progressive labyrinthitis ossificans (LO), an otologic emergency requiring early cochlear implantation (CI) to restore hearing before the complete, irreversible cochlear ossification. We report the first case in the literature of a patient affected by PAN with bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss and rapid LO who underwent "emergency" bilateral simultaneous CI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/iao.2018.5463DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

Facial Nerve Stimulation Patterns Associated With Cochlear Implantation in Labyrinthitis Ossificans.

Otol Neurotol 2018 Dec;39(10):e992-e995

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.

Objective: To describe and characterize facial nerve stimulation (FNS) patterns in patients with labyrinthitis ossificans who underwent cochlear implantation (CI) for sensorineural hearing loss.

Patients: Five ears in four patients with labyrinthitis ossificans who underwent CI and subsequently developed FNS.

Interventions: CI, electrode mapping, and/or explantation to resolve FNS. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00129492-201812000-0002
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000002028DOI Listing
December 2018
12 Reads

Cochlear implant in Thalassemia patient - Case report.

Cochlear Implants Int 2019 Jan 20;20(1):47-50. Epub 2018 Sep 20.

a Department of Otorhinolaryngology , SMS Medical College and Hospitals , Jaipur , India.

Introduction: Beta-thalassemias are a group of hereditary blood disorders characterized by anomalies in the synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin. Iron overload occurs in thalassemia, with blood transfusion therapy being the major cause. Deferoxamine continues to be the mainstay of therapy to remove excess iron in patients requiring long-term transfusions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14670100.2018.1522715DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Labyrinthitis Ossificans in a Cynomolgus Macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

Comp Med 2018 Apr 12. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

Labyrinthitis is inflammation of the membranous and bony labyrinth of the inner ear. Typical portals of entry includehematogenous spread from the cochlear vasculature, passage of otitis media pathogens through the round window, and mostcommonly, meningogenic spread from the subarachnoid space. The sequela of chronic inner ear inflammation is labyrinthitisossificans, in which inner ear structures are replaced by fibrous and osseous tissues. Read More

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http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/10.30802/AALAS-CM-17-0
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http://dx.doi.org/10.30802/AALAS-CM-17-000070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6008717PMC
April 2018
29 Reads

Radiological requirements for surgical planning in cochlear implant candidates.

Indian J Radiol Imaging 2017 Jul-Sep;27(3):274-281

Department of Otolaryngology, Sohag Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt.

Objective: This study is concerned with clarification of radiological findings that should be addressed and reported in patients listed for cochlear implant (CI) operation. These findings may force a surgeon to consider modifications of the surgical approach by a CI surgeon.

Materials And Methods: The study was performed from January 2015 to January 2016. Read More

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http://www.ijri.org/text.asp?2017/27/3/274/215589
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijri.IJRI_55_17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5644317PMC
November 2017
13 Reads

Pediatric Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the lateral skull base.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2017 Aug 15;99:135-140. Epub 2017 Jun 15.

Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. Electronic address:

Objective: Describe the presentation, imaging characteristics, management, and outcomes of pediatric patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) of the temporal bone.

Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed between 2000 and 2014 at a single tertiary care children's hospital. Fourteen patients were identified with a diagnosis of LCH and involvement of the temporal bone. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.06.011DOI Listing
August 2017
24 Reads

Bilateral Labyrinthine and Internal Auditory Canal Enhancement in an Infant With Severe Labyrinthine Dysplasia: A Previously Unreported Phenomenon.

Otol Neurotol 2017 06;38(5):e21-e25

*Department of Otorhinolaryngology †Department of Radiology ‡Department of Clinical Genomics §Department of Audiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Objective: To describe a novel case of congenital profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a patient with bilateral nodular internal auditory canal and labyrinthine enhancement and temporal bone dysplasia.

Patients: A 76-day-old female was referred to the authors' center for evaluation of congenital deafness. Behavioral observations and objective audiometric evaluation demonstrated bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss and a comprehensive multidisciplinary evaluation identified compound heterozygous pathogenic variants in MYO7A, a gene associated with Usher Syndrome Type 1B or DFNB2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000001392DOI Listing
June 2017
15 Reads

Deterioration of Vestibular Cells in Labyrinthitis.

Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2017 Feb 24;126(2):89-95. Epub 2016 Nov 24.

1 Department of Otolaryngology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

Objective: To quantitatively assess the effect of serous labyrinthitis, suppurative labyrinthitis, and labyrinthitis ossificans on vestibular hair cells, dark cells, and transitional cells.

Methods: We examined human temporal bone specimens with serous labyrinthitis, suppurative labyrinthitis, and labyrinthitis ossificans, then compared them with age-matched control groups without labyrinthitis. We evaluated the density of type I and II vestibular hair cells, dark cells, and transitional cells in the peripheral sensorial organs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003489416675356DOI Listing
February 2017
23 Reads

Contemporary surgical issues in paediatric cochlear implantation.

Int J Audiol 2016 7;55 Suppl 2:S77-87. Epub 2016 Jun 7.

a Department of Otolaryngology , The University of Melbourne , East Melbourne , Victoria , Australia.

Objective: To review the contemporary surgical issues in paediatric cochlear implantation (CI) based on published evidence.

Design: Narrative literature review.

Results: Surgical challenges in paediatric CI are discussed, with respect to post meningitic labyrinthitis ossificans; cochlear malformation; cochlear implantation in infants; auditory neuropathy and cochlear nerve deficiency; bilateral cochlear implantation; hearing preservation; otitis media; and device failure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14992027.2016.1184765DOI Listing
November 2017
27 Reads

Pathologic Findings of the Cochlea in Labyrinthitis Ossificans Associated with the Round Window Membrane.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2016 10 24;155(4):635-40. Epub 2016 May 24.

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Objective: To quantitatively demonstrate and classify the histopathologic changes in the cochlea of the human temporal bones with labyrinthitis ossificans (LO).

Study Design: Comparative human temporal bone study.

Setting: Tertiary academic medical center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599816651245DOI Listing
October 2016
11 Reads

Reversible hearing loss following cryptococcal meningitis: case study.

J Laryngol Otol 2016 Jul 23;130(7):691-5. Epub 2016 May 23.

Department of Otolaryngology,Tan Tock Seng Hospital,Singapore.

Background: Sensorineural hearing loss is a recognised complication of cryptococcal meningitis. The mechanism of hearing loss in patients with cryptococcal meningitis is different from that in bacterial meningitis.

Case Report: An immune-competent man with cryptococcal meningitis presented with sudden onset, bilateral, severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S002221511600801XDOI Listing
July 2016
19 Reads

Labyrinthitis ossificans after meningitis: Superiority of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging in demonstration of disease extent compared to high-resolution computed tomography.

J Neurosci Rural Pract 2016 Apr-Jun;7(2):327-9

Department of Radiodiagnosis and Imaging, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0976-3147.176191DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4821957PMC
April 2016
18 Reads
1 Citation

The Impact of Postmeningitic Labyrinthitis Ossificans on Speech Performance After Pediatric Cochlear Implantation.

Otol Neurotol 2015 Dec;36(10):1633-7

*Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas at Southwestern Medical Center †Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Children's Health ‡Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas §Department of Radiology, Children's Health ||Department of Radiology, University of Texas at Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, U.S.A.

Objective: 1) To characterize pediatric cochlear implant performance in patients with hearing loss secondary to bacterial meningitis. 2) To evaluate performance differences in patients with and without labyrinthitis ossificans (LO).

Study Design: Retrospective case review. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000000877DOI Listing
December 2015
25 Reads

Predicting depth of electrode insertion by cochlear measurements on computed tomography scans.

Laryngoscope 2016 07 4;126(7):1656-61. Epub 2015 Nov 4.

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, U.S.A.

Objectives/hypothesis: To evaluate the effectiveness of cochlear measures obtained by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan in predicting depth of cochlear implant insertion.

Study Design: Retrospective case review.

Methods: Patients who underwent cochlear implantation in an academic referral center between 2010 and 2013 were considered. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/lary.25742
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lary.25742DOI Listing
July 2016
5 Reads

Labyrinthitis Ossificans: On the Mechanism of Perilabyrinthine Bone Remodeling.

Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2015 Aug 10;124(8):649-54. Epub 2015 Mar 10.

Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery and Audiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Introduction: It has been suggested that remodeling of the otic capsule is highly suppressed by the action of anti-resorptive signals emanating from structures of the inner ear space. Labyrinthitis ossificans (LO) is a severe complication to bacterial meningitis and is characterized by destruction of inner ear structures by the formation of new bone. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of LO on bone remodeling of the otic capsule. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003489415573960DOI Listing
August 2015
12 Reads

Progression of autoimmune inner ear disease to labyrinthitis ossificans: clinical and radiologic correlation.

Ear Nose Throat J 2015 Mar;94(3):108-10

Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Changi General Hospital, 2 Simei St. 3, Singapore 529889.

We report the case of a 42-year-old man who presented with fluctuating bilateral sensorineural hearing loss that subsequently progressed to a complete hearing loss, and we describe the correlation between the clinical and radiologic features of this case. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate imaging evidence of progression from autoimmune inner ear disease to labyrinthitis ossificans. This is also the first reported case of a reversal of a loss of labyrinthine CISS (constructive interference in a steady state) signal, suggesting that T2-weighted hyposignal may be attributable to an alteration in labyrinthine fluid content and not to fibrosis only. Read More

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March 2015
9 Reads

Cochlear implantation in children with sickle cell disease.

Pediatr Int 2015 ;57(1):174-6

Auditory Implant Centre, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK.

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Although the hearing loss is usually mild, some develop severe-to-profound hearing loss, in whom cochlear implants (CI) may be an option. We present the cases of two children with SCD who developed bilateral severe-to-profound SNHL and underwent cochlear implantation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ped.12413DOI Listing
December 2016
10 Reads

Preoperative imaging of sensorineural hearing loss in pediatric candidates for cochlear implantation.

Radiographics 2014 Sep-Oct;34(5):E133-49

From the Department of Radiology (J.Y.Y., M.E.R.) and Department of Otolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery (N.M.Y.), Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Ill; Department of Medical Imaging (J.Y.Y., M.E.R.) and Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology (N.M.Y.), Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, 225 E Chicago Ave, Chicago, IL 60611; and Knowles Hearing Center, School of Communication, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill (N.M.Y.).

Cochlear implantation is the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for children with marked bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/rg.345130083DOI Listing
November 2015
7 Reads

Bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and labyrinthitis ossificans secondary to neurosarcoidosis.

Cochlear Implants Int 2014 Nov 5;15(6):337-40. Epub 2014 Sep 5.

Objective: To report a case of cochlear ossification as a result of neurosarcoidosis in a patient with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss.

Study Design: Case report: Setting University teaching hospital, tertiary referral center.

Patient: Forty-year-old man with neurosarcoidosis and bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/1754762814Y.0000000073DOI Listing
November 2014
20 Reads

The incidence of tympanogenic labyrinthitis ossificans.

J Laryngol Otol 2014 Jul;128(7):618-20

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery,Mackay Memorial Hospital Taipei Branch,New Taipei City,Taiwan.

Objective: To estimate the incidence of tympanogenic labyrinthitis ossificans.

Methods: The records of patients treated with mastoidectomy for various tympanogenic aetiologies from January 2007 to December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients whose high-resolution computed tomography scans showed evidence of labyrinthine calcification of the temporal bone were enrolled. Read More

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http://search.proquest.com/openview/6174d5d6163da3d117f77ddf
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http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S002221511400111X
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S002221511400111XDOI Listing
July 2014
27 Reads

Utility of MRIs in adult cochlear implant evaluations.

Otol Neurotol 2014 Oct;35(9):1533-5

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas at Southwestern, Dallas, Texas, U.S.A.

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of MRI abnormalities in adults undergoing cochlear implantation and to correlate abnormalities to audiology data.

Study Design: Case series.

Setting: Academic medical center. Read More

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https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00129492-201410000-000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000000453DOI Listing
October 2014
18 Reads

Cochlear implantation versus auditory brainstem implantation in bilateral total deafness after head trauma: personal experience and review of the literature.

Otol Neurotol 2014 Feb;35(2):260-70

*Gruppo Otologico Piacenza-Roma and University of Chieti; †Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Otolaryngology Unit, University Hospital of Parma, Parma, Italy; and ‡Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain.

Objective: To determine the effectiveness of cochlear implant (CI) in hearing restoration after temporal bone (TB) fractures and investigate the adequacy of auditory brainstem implant (ABI) indication for TB fractures.

Study Design: Retrospective clinical study; a systematic review of the literature in PubMed was also performed to identify all published cases of bilateral TB fractures or bilateral deafness after head trauma treated by means of CI or ABI.

Settings: Quaternary otology and skull base surgery referral center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000000235DOI Listing
February 2014
33 Reads
2 Citations
1.600 Impact Factor

Clinical outcome after cochlear implantation in patients with unilateral hearing loss due to labyrinthitis ossificans.

Otol Neurotol 2013 Sep;34(7):1278-83

Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.

Objectives: Cochlear implantation (CI) is the treatment of choice in bilateral labyrinthitis ossificans (LO). The aim of this clinical case study was to evaluate audiologic and subjective outcomes after CI treatment for unilateral hearing loss (UHL) because of LO and to identify optimal timing for treatment.

Patients: Three subjects (age 40, 54, and 68 yr) with UHL because of LO were enrolled. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0b013e3182937ad4DOI Listing
September 2013
13 Reads

High-resolution 3-D T2-weighted imaging in the diagnosis of labyrinthitis ossificans: emphasis on subtle cochlear involvement.

Pediatr Radiol 2013 Dec 11;43(12):1584-90. Epub 2013 Jul 11.

Department of Radiology, Children's Medical Center of Dallas, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 1935 Medical District Drive, Dallas, TX, 75235, USA,

Background: Meningitis is the most common cause of acquired sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in children. Labyrinthitis ossificans develops in a significant number of patients with meningitis-related SNHL. Reduced T2 signal on MRI within the membranous labyrinth is often noted in the fibrous and ossifying stages of labyrinthitis ossificans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-013-2747-5DOI Listing
December 2013
12 Reads

Labyrinthitis ossificans in a cochlear implant patient with Usher syndrome.

Otol Neurotol 2013 Apr;34(3):e10-1

Department of Otology and Neurotology, Fundacion Universitaria de Ciencias de la Salud, Hospital Infantil de San Jose, Bogota, Colombia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0b013e3182814d15DOI Listing
April 2013
23 Reads

Labyrinthine sequestrum: four case studies.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2012 Sep 30;147(3):535-7. Epub 2012 Mar 30.

Department of Radiology, Shanghai Eye and ENT Hospital, Shanghai Medical Center of Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Labyrinthine sequestrum, a rare form of labyrinthitis, is highly distinct from the more commonly encountered labyrinthitis ossificans based on its unique clinical, radiologic, and histologic characteristics. The study included 4 such patients who had undergone clinical and laboratory investigations, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessments followed by surgical procedures and pathological evaluation. Their major symptoms were otorrhea, otalgia, tinnitus, and profound hearing loss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599812443491DOI Listing
September 2012
26 Reads

Acoustic brainstem implant in a post-meningitis deafened child-Lessons learned.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2012 Feb 26;76(2):300-2. Epub 2011 Dec 26.

Centre for Hearing & Ear Implants, Department of Otolaryngology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore 169608, Republic of Singapore.

We report a case of a deafened child with advanced labyrinthitis ossificans resulting from meningo-encephalitis. She received a cochlear implant in the right ear, following a drill-out procedure. Post-implant hearing outcomes were satisfactory initially, but deteriorated over time as a result of partial electrode migration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2011.11.026DOI Listing
February 2012
7 Reads

Radiology quiz case 2. Labyrinthitis ossificans secondary to suppurative labyrinthitis.

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2011 Mar;137(3):303, 305

Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego, San Diego, California, and the University of California, San Diego, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archoto.2011.27-aDOI Listing
March 2011
3 Reads

Cochlear osteoneogenesis after meningitis in cochlear implant patients: a retrospective analysis.

Otol Neurotol 2010 Sep;31(7):1072-8

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical University of Hannover, Hannover, Germany.

Study Design: Retrospective clinical study.

Setting: Academic tertiary referral center at the Medical University of Hannover.

Patients: Computed tomographic findings of 126 patients (95 children and 31 adults) profoundly deafened by meningitis during a period of 20 years were evaluated. Read More

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September 2010
9 Reads

Clinical and radiologic manifestations of sickle cell disease in the head and neck.

Radiographics 2010 Jul-Aug;30(4):1021-34

Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

Sickle cell disease is a common inherited blood disorder that is characterized by the presence of sickle-shaped red blood cells. The clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease vary, but they may be attributed to three mechanisms: vaso-occlusion, chronic hemolytic anemia, and infection. The imaging appearances of central nervous system and musculoskeletal involvement by sickle cell disease have been well documented; however, involvement in the head and neck often is underappreciated, although it is not uncommon. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/rg.304095171DOI Listing
November 2010
2 Reads

Frequency and diagnostic utility of intralabyrinthine FLAIR hyperintensity in the evaluation of internal auditory canal and inner ear pathology.

Acad Radiol 2010 Aug;17(8):992-1000

Department of Radiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.

Rationale And Objectives: Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging can detect elevated protein levels in fluid that may be difficult or impossible to detect with T1- or T2-weighted imaging. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the frequency and asses the diagnostic utility of abnormal FLAIR signal in various types of inner ear and internal auditory canal (IAC) pathology.

Materials And Methods: A retrospective review of medical records and magnetic resonance images from 187 consecutive patients who underwent imaging of the temporal bones for possible inner ear or IAC pathology over a 1-year period were reviewed for abnormal increased FLAIR signal, increased intrinsic T1 signal, abnormal enhancement after gadolinium administration, and the presence of a mass lesion within the cerebellopontine angle, IAC, or inner ear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2010.04.002DOI Listing
August 2010
9 Reads

Labyrinthitis ossificans secondary to autoimmune inner ear disease: a previously unreported condition.

Authors:
Aaron G Benson

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2010 May 16;142(5):772-3. Epub 2010 Feb 16.

Toledo Ear, Nose and Throat, Maumee, OH, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.otohns.2009.10.048DOI Listing
May 2010
5 Reads

Cochlear implantation in postmeningitic deafness.

Otol Neurotol 2010 Jan;31(1):83-7

Département d'otorhinolaryngologie et de chirurgie cervico-faciale, Hôtel-Dieu-de-Québec du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, Canada.

Objectives/hypothesis: To propose guidelines in the management of a profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss after bacterial meningitis.

Study Design: Retrospective chart review.

Patients: All 40 postmeningitic cochlear implantation surgeries performed between August 1987 and April 2007. Read More

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January 2010
8 Reads

Posttraumatic labyrinthitis ossificans with perilymphatic fistulization.

Diagn Interv Radiol 2009 Dec 27;15(4):239-41. Epub 2009 Oct 27.

Department of Radiology, Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Antalya, Turkey.

Labyrinthitis ossificans is fibrosis or ossification of the membranous labyrinth. Tympanogenic, meningogenic, and hematogenous etiologies are more common than trauma in the development of labyrinthitis ossificans. We present a case complaining of right-sided hearing loss and symptoms of otitis media and positional vertigo resulting from perilymphatic fistulization. Read More

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http://www.dirjournal.org/sayilar/25/buyuk/pdf_dir_243.pdf
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http://www.dirjournal.org/eng/makale/368/25/Full-Text
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4261/1305-3825.DIR.1621-08.1DOI Listing
December 2009
7 Reads

Labyrinthitis ossificans in a child with sickle cell disease: CT and MRI findings.

Pediatr Radiol 2009 Sep 5;39(9):999-1001. Epub 2009 May 5.

Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA.

The association between sensorineural hearing loss and sickle cell disease has been described, and labyrinthine hemorrhage has been reported with sickle cell disease. We report the CT and MRI findings of labyrinthitis ossificans in a child with sickle cell disease who presented with sensorineural hearing loss. Labyrinthitis ossificans is associated with an infectious, inflammatory, or destructive insult to the membranous labyrinth; however, it has not been specifically described with sickle cell disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-009-1286-6DOI Listing
September 2009
5 Reads

Intraoperative use of cone-beam computed tomography in a cadaveric ossified cochlea model.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2009 May;140(5):697-702

Departments of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Surgical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Objectives: To describe a cadaveric temporal bone model of labyrinthitis ossificans and investigate the utility of intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the facilitating cochlear implantation.

Design: Cadaveric temporal bone study.

Methods: Five cadaveric heads had cement introduced into the 10 cochleas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.otohns.2008.12.046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2876243PMC
May 2009
7 Reads

Labyrinthitis ossificans: how accurate is MRI in predicting cochlear obstruction?

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2009 May;140(5):692-6

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.

Objective: To determine the accuracy of preoperative MRI in predicting cochlear obstruction in pediatric patients with a history of bacterial meningitis.

Methods: A case series with chart review was performed at a tertiary care multidisciplinary cochlear implant program. Forty-five children with hearing loss that resulted from bacterial meningitis were implanted from 1991 to 2006. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1016/j.otohns.2008.12.029
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.otohns.2008.12.029DOI Listing
May 2009
32 Reads

Labyrinthitis ossificans.

Otol Neurotol 2009 Jun;30(4):579-80

Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California, USA.

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https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00129492-200906000-000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0b013e31819fe81cDOI Listing
June 2009
6 Reads

Hearing and vestibular loss in Streptococcus suis infection from swine and traditional raw pork exposure in northern Thailand.

J Laryngol Otol 2009 Aug 11;123(8):857-62. Epub 2009 Mar 11.

Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Objectives: To describe a series of 40 culture-proven, Streptococcus suis infected patients, focusing on route of entry and on hearing and vestibular dysfunction.

Methods: Retrospective study of patient records in a tertiary care hospital in northern Thailand, 2003-2007.

Results: The majority (75 per cent) of cases were men with heavy drinking habits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022215109004939DOI Listing
August 2009
34 Reads

Anatomy of the middle-turn cochleostomy.

Laryngoscope 2008 Dec;118(12):2200-4

Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9035, USA.

Objective: Middle-turn cochleostomies are occasionally used for cochlear implant electrode placement in patients with labyrinthitis ossificans. This study evaluates the anatomic characteristics of the middle-turn cochleostomy and its suitability for placement of implant electrodes.

Methods: Ten cadaveric human temporal bones were dissected using a facial recess approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MLG.0b013e318182ee1cDOI Listing
December 2008
28 Reads

Case report: early bilateral simultaneous cochlear implantation in a five-year-old following head injury complicated by acute bacterial meningitis.

Cochlear Implants Int 2004 Sep;5(3):112-6

Department of Otolaryngology, Diana, Princess of Wales Children's Hospital, Birmingham, UK.

Meningitis is an important cause of profound sensorineural hearing loss, especially in children. In this case, a five-year-old suffered a head injury complicated by bacterial meningitis and developed a profound hearing loss. Magnetic resonance imaging at four weeks following injury showed evidence of developing labyrinthitis ossificans and a decision was made to perform bilateral cochlear implantation at an early stage. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1179/cim.2004.5.3.112
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/cim.2004.5.3.112DOI Listing
September 2004
9 Reads

Meningitis resulting in hearing loss and labyrinthitis ossificans - does the causative organism matter?

Cochlear Implants Int 2008 Jun;9(2):90-6

The Sydney Cochlear Implant Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney Australia.

Our aim was to demonstrate whether one causative agent of meningitis is more likely to cause profound hearing loss and labyrinthitis ossificans. We obtained data from the New South Wales health department for cases of meningitis between 1995 and 2005 (1568 cases) and the Sydney Cochlear Implant Centre for cochlear implant patients with hearing loss secondary to meningitis from 1984 to 2005 (70 ears in 59 patients). The aetiological agents were compared with regard to their ability to cause profound hearing loss and cochlear ossification. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/cim.2008.9.2.90DOI Listing
June 2008
8 Reads

Radiology quiz case 1. Labyrinthitis ossificans (LO)-stage of fibrosis.

Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2007 Mar;133(3):298, 300

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/archotol.133.3.298DOI Listing
March 2007
8 Reads

Advancement in post-meningitic lateral semicircular canal labyrinthitis ossificans.

J Laryngol Otol 2007 Feb 23;121(2):105-9. Epub 2006 Nov 23.

Department of Audiological Medicine, St Ann's Hospital, London, UK.

Objective: To assess whether lateral semicircular canal (LSCC) ossification is more advanced than that in the cochlear basal turn, in order to judge the value of the former as a predictor.

Methods: Retrospective review of 33 paediatric patients from our cochlear implant programme, with profound sensorineural hearing loss after bacterial meningitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) scans and operative findings were reviewed. Read More

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http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S002221510600377X
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S002221510600377XDOI Listing
February 2007
26 Reads

Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae meningitis complicated by hearing loss in a 9-year-old HIV-infected boy.

AIDS Patient Care STDS 2006 Aug;20(8):531-5

Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA.

A 9-year old boy with perinatal HIV infection developed meningitis due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. His course was complicated by progressive hearing loss due to labyrinthitis ossificans. Placement of cochlear implant improved hearing thresholds. Read More

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http://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/apc.2006.20.531
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/apc.2006.20.531DOI Listing
August 2006
8 Reads

Inhibition of post-meningitic cochlear injury with cerebrospinal fluid irrigation.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2006 Feb;134(2):214-24

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Objective: Labyrinthitis ossificans, the pathologic ossification of the otic capsule associated with profound deafness and loss of vestibular function occurs frequently as a sequella of bacterial meningitis and subsequent purulent labyrinthitis. Experimentally, in Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis, it has been shown that a vigorous inflammatory response to teichoic acids in the bacterial cell wall contributes to cochlear damage and subsequent fibrosis and ossification. The hypothesis of this study is that a dilution of concentration of inflammatory mediators through cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) irrigation will lead to a reduction in both inner ear pathology and permanent hearing loss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.otohns.2005.09.022DOI Listing
February 2006
6 Reads

Computed tomography findings of labyrinthitis ossificans secondary to meningitis: a case report.

Kulak Burun Bogaz Ihtis Derg 2005 ;15(1-2):36-9

Department of Radiology, Medicine Faculty of Başkent University Adana Research Medical Center, Adana, Turkey.

A 26-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with chronic left ear drainage. He had a history of meningitis when he was a child. Computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone showed complete obliteration of the otic labyrinth by sclerotic tissue. Read More

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June 2008
9 Reads

Cochlear implantation in ossified cochlea-Merf experience.

Indian J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2005 Oct;57(4):327-9

Madras ENT Research Foundation, 15 Sivasamy Salai, Mylapore, 600-004 Chennai, Tamil Nadu India.

Labyrinthitis Ossificans is a sequelae secondary to meningitis wherein ossification of the cochlea may be partial or complete. Among four of our patients who underwent cochlear implantation, two patients required double array insertion while the other two had a partial insertion of straight array electrodes. Despite partial insertion of electrodes, no significant differences in auditory benefit was noted&matched the peers who had complete insertion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02907702DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3451464PMC
October 2005
21 Reads

Role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in sensorineural hearing loss after bacterial meningitis.

Otol Neurotol 2005 Jul;26(4):602-9

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, California 95616, USA.

Hypothesis: Blockade of tumor necrosis factor-alpha with tumor necrosis factor-alpha antibody will reduce the extent of cochlear injury and hearing loss associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis.

Background: Inflammatory mediators play a significant role in the morbidity associated with bacterial meningitis, including hearing loss and labyrinthitis ossificans. Previous studies have shown the attenuation of hearing loss by the nonspecific blockade of such pathways. Read More

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July 2005
8 Reads