6,242 results match your criteria Lab on a Chip [Journal]


A numbering-up strategy of hydrodynamic microfluidic filters for continuous-flow high-throughput cell sorting.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr 18. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Department of Applied Chemistry and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522, Japan.

Even though a number of microfluidic systems for particle/cell sorting have been proposed, facile and versatile platforms that provide sufficient sorting throughput and good operability are still under development. Here we present a simple but effective numbering-up strategy to dramatically increase the throughput of a continuous-flow particle/cell sorting scheme based on hydrodynamic filtration (HDF). A microfluidic channel equipped with multiple branches has been employed as a unit structure for size-based filtration, which realizes precise sorting without necessitating sheath flows. Read More

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http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C9LC00053D
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00053dDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Droplet-based single cell RNAseq tools: a practical guide.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr 18. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

St Vincent's School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia and Tumour Development, The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Droplet based scRNA-seq systems such as Drop-seq, inDrop and Chromium 10X have been the catalyst for the wide adoption of high-throughput scRNA-seq technologies in the research laboratory. In order to understand the capabilities of these systems to deeply interrogate biology; here we provide a practical guide through all the steps involved in a typical scRNA-seq experiment. Through comparing and contrasting these three main droplet based systems (and their derivatives), we provide an overview of all critical considerations in obtaining high quality and biologically relevant data. Read More

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http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C8LC01239C
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01239cDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

High-throughput electrical position detection of single flowing particles/cells with non-spherical shape.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr 18. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Department of Civil Engineering and Computer Science, University of Rome Tor Vergata, 00133 Rome, Italy.

We present an innovative impedance cytometer for the measurement of the cross-sectional position of single particles or cells flowing in a microchannel. As predicted by numerical simulations and experimentally validated, the proposed approach is applicable to particles/cells with either spherical or non-spherical shape. In particular, the optics-free high-throughput position detection of individual flowing red blood cells (RBCs) is demonstrated and applied to monitor RBCs hydrodynamic focusing under different sheath flow conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00071bDOI Listing

Portable biohybrid odorant sensors using cell-laden collagen micropillars.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr 18. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Center for International Research on Integrative Biomedical Systems (CIBiS), Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 153-8505, Japan. and International Research Center for Neurointelligence, The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan.

Biohybrid odorant sensors (BOSs) composed of biological materials and artificial detectors have recently attracted much attention due to their high degree of sensitivity and selectivity. Although portability is crucial for the practical use of BOSs on site, the currently used artificial detectors for biological signals are unportable. In this study, we propose a portable cell-based odorant sensor, which uses cell-laden collagen micropillars to compensate the low optical abilities of portable artificial detectors. Read More

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http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C9LC00131J
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00131jDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Extraction of nucleic acids from blood: unveiling the potential of active pneumatic pumping in centrifugal microfluidics for integration and automation of sample preparation processes.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr 18. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

National Research Council of Canada, Life Sciences Division, 75 de Mortagne Boulevard, Boucherville, QC J4B 6Y4, Canada. and Department of Biomedical Engineering, McGill University, 3775 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2B4, Canada.

This paper describes the development of an on-chip nucleic acid (NA) extraction assay from whole blood using a centrifugal microfluidic platform that allows for pneumatic actuation of liquids during rotation. The combination of pneumatic and centrifugal forces makes it possible to perform fluidic operations without the need for integrating active control elements on the microfluidic cartridge. The cartridge is fabricated from thermoplastic polymers (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00276fDOI Listing

Outstanding Reviewers for Lab on a Chip in 2018.

Authors:

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1523

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc90041aDOI Listing

Automated detection and sorting of microencapsulation via machine learning.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA.

Microfluidic-based microencapsulation requires significant oversight to prevent material and quality loss due to sporadic disruptions in fluid flow that routinely arise. State-of-the-art microcapsule production is laborious and relies on experts to monitor the process, e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01394bDOI Listing

Smartphone-app based point-of-care testing for myocardial infarction biomarker cTnI using an autonomous capillary microfluidic chip with self-aligned on-chip focusing (SOF) lenses.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China.

Cardiovascular disease is one of the most common causes of mortality in the world. Most of the diagnostic processes usually require bulky instruments and trained professionals, which cannot meet the demand for fast, early and regular bedside diagnosis. In this paper, a bespoke app on a smartphone and an autonomous capillary microfluidic chip (ACMC) are combined to realize the point-of-care testing of cardiac troponin I (cTnI). Read More

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http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C9LC00259F
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00259fDOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Two-dimensional computational method for generating planar electrode patterns with enhanced volumetric electric fields and its application to continuous dielectrophoretic bacterial capture.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr 11. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919, Republic of Korea. and Department of Biomedical Engineering, UNIST, Ulsan 44919, Republic of Korea.

An array of microfabricated interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) is one of the most commonly used forms of electrode geometry for dielectrophoretic manipulation of biological particles in microfluidic biochips owing to simplicity of fabrication and ease of analysis. However, the dielectrophoretic force dramatically reduces as the distance from the electrode surface increases; therefore, the effective region is usually close to the electrode surface for a given electric potential difference. Here, we present a novel two-dimensional computational method for generating planar electrode patterns with enhanced volumetric electric fields, which we call the "microelectrode discretization (MED)" method. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01288aDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

A hydrogel-driven microfluidic suction pump with a high flow rate.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

We propose a portable, non-powered, long-term working suction pump with a high flow rate for microfluidic devices. The pump is driven by a superabsorbent polymer enclosed in a housing with porous fins to accelerate water absorption. We experimentally demonstrate that the pump creates an outstanding flow rate of more than 80 μl min-1 and an absorption volume of ∼20 ml. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00062cDOI Listing

Hydroporator: a hydrodynamic cell membrane perforator for high-throughput vector-free nanomaterial intracellular delivery and DNA origami biostability evaluation.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr 9. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

Department of Bio-Convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea and School of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea. and Department of Bioengineering, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea.

The successful intracellular delivery of exogenous macromolecules is crucial for a variety of applications ranging from basic biology to the clinic. However, traditional intracellular delivery methods such as those relying on viral/non-viral nanocarriers or physical membrane disruptions suffer from low throughput, toxicity, and inconsistent delivery performance and are time-consuming and/or labor-intensive. In this study, we developed a single-step hydrodynamic cell deformation-induced intracellular delivery platform named "hydroporator" without the aid of vectors or a complicated/costly external apparatus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00041kDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Droplet CAR-Wash: continuous picoliter-scale immunocapture and washing.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1589-1598

Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

To address current limitations in adapting solid phase sample capture and washing techniques to continuously flowing droplet microfluidics, we have developed the "Coalesce-Attract-Resegment Wash" (CAR-Wash) approach. This module provides efficient, high-throughput magnetic washing by electrocoalescing magnetic bead-laden input droplets with a washing buffer flow and magnetophoretically transporting beads through the buffer into a secondary droplet formation streamline. In this work, we first characterized the technology in terms of throughput, sample retention, and flow-based exclusion of waste volume, demonstrating >500 Hz droplet processing with >98% bead retention and >100-fold dilution in final droplets. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00125eDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

A microfluidic approach for probing hydrodynamic effects in barite scale formation.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1534-1544

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-4004, USA.

Crystallization of mineral scale components ubiquitously plagues industrial systems for water treatment, energy production, and manufacturing. Chemical scale inhibitors and/or dissolvers are often employed to control scale formation, but their efficacy in flow conditions remains incompletely understood. We present a microfluidic platform to elucidate the time-resolved processes controlling crystallization and dissolution of barite, a highly insoluble and chemically resistant component of inorganic scale, in the presence of flow. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00061eDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Digestion-on-a-chip: a continuous-flow modular microsystem recreating enzymatic digestion in the gastrointestinal tract.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1599-1609

University of Groningen, Groningen Research Institute of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Analysis, P.O. Box 196, XB20, 9700 AD Groningen, The Netherlands.

In vitro digestions are essential for determining the bioavailability of compounds, such as nutrients. We have developed a cell-free, miniaturized enzymatic digestive system, employing three micromixers connected in series to mimic the digestive functions of the mouth, stomach and small intestine. This system continuously processes samples, e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01080cDOI Listing

Femtoliter nanofluidic valve utilizing glass deformation.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1686-1694

Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan.

In the field of micro/nanofluidics, the channel open/close valves are among the most important technologies for switching and partitioning actions and integration of various operations into fluidic circuits. While several types of valves have been developed in microfluidics, few are capable in nanofluidics. In this study, we proposed a femtoliter (fL) volume nanochannel open/close valve fabricated in glass substrates. Read More

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http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C8LC01340C
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01340cDOI Listing
April 2019
6 Reads

Generating digital drug cocktails via optical manipulation of drug-containing particles and photo-patterning of hydrogels.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr 3. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan. and Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013 Taiwan and Institute of NanoEngineering and Microsystems, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013 Taiwan.

An integrated microfluidic system combining 1) an optically-induced-dielectrophoresis (ODEP) module for manipulation of drug-containing particles and 2) an ultraviolet (UV) "direct writing" module capable of patterning hydrogels was established herein for automatic formulation of customized digital drug cocktails. Using the ODEP module, the drug-containing particles were assembled by using moving light patterns generated from a digital projector. The hydrogel, poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA), was used as the medium in the ODEP module such that the assembled drug-containing particles could be UV-cured and consequently encapsulated in "pills" of specific sizes and shapes by using the UV direct writing module. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00189aDOI Listing

Simultaneous detection of multiple NT-proBNP clinical samples utilizing an aptamer-based sandwich assay on an integrated microfluidic system.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1676-1685

Institute of NanoEngineering and Microsystems, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan. and Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan and Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan.

Although cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure (HF) affect 30 million people globally, the early detection of HF has, until recently, been difficult and prone to misdiagnoses. Monitoring the circulatory levels of a relatively new biomarker, the N-terminal prohormone of a B-type natriuretic peptide, could be used for early risk evaluation of HF. Therefore, we developed a pneumatically-driven, automatic integrated microfluidic platform equipped with micromixers, micropumps, and microvalves for the simultaneous detection of NT-proBNP in up to six clinical samples within 25 min by using a novel aptamer-based sandwich assay, and the limit of detection was only 1. Read More

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http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C9LC00115H
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00115hDOI Listing
April 2019
10 Reads

Microfluidic centrifugation assisted precipitation based DNA quantification.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1657-1664

Division of Nanobiotechnology, Department of Protein Science, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.

Nucleic acid amplification methods are increasingly being used to detect trace quantities of DNA in samples for various diagnostic applications. However, quantifying the amount of DNA from such methods often requires time consuming purification, washing or labeling steps. Here, we report a novel microfluidic centrifugation assisted precipitation (μCAP) method for single-step DNA quantification. Read More

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http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C9LC00196D
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00196dDOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Immature dendritic cells navigate microscopic mazes to find tumor cells.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1665-1675

Center for Soft and Living Matter, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Ulsan, 44919, Republic of Korea and Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan, 44919, Republic of Korea.

Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells with high sentinel ability to scan their neighborhood and to initiate an adaptive immune response. Whereas chemotactic migration of mature DCs (mDCs) towards lymph nodes is relatively well documented, the migratory behavior of immature DCs (imDCs) in tumor microenvironments is still poorly understood. Here, microfluidic systems of various geometries, including mazes, are used to investigate how the physical and chemical microenvironment influences the migration pattern of imDCs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00150fDOI Listing

Laser printing-enabled direct creation of cellular heterogeneity in lab-on-a-chip devices.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1644-1656

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.

Lab-on-a-chip devices, capable of culturing living cells in continuously perfused, micrometer-sized channels, have been intensively investigated to model physiological microenvironments for cell-related testing and evaluation applications. Various chemical, physical, and/or biological culture cues are usually expected in a designed chip to mimic the in vivo environment with defined spatial heterogeneity of cells and biomaterials. To create such heterogeneity within a given chip, typical methods rely heavily on sophisticated fabrication and cell seeding processes, and chips fabricated with these methods are difficult to readily adapt for other applications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00117dDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Traction microscopy with integrated microfluidics: responses of the multi-cellular island to gradients of HGF.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1579-1588

Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea.

Collective cellular migration plays a central role in development, regeneration, and metastasis. In these processes, mechanical interactions between cells are fundamental but measurement of these interactions is often hampered by technical limitations. To overcome some of these limitations, here we describe a system that integrates microfluidics with traction microscopy (TM). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00173eDOI Listing

Gel-on-a-chip: continuous, velocity-dependent DNA separation using nanoscale lateral displacement.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1567-1578

IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598, USA.

We studied the trajectories of polymers being advected while diffusing in a pressure driven flow along a periodic pillar nanostructure known as nanoscale deterministic lateral displacement (nanoDLD) array. We found that polymers follow different trajectories depending on their length, flow velocity and pillar array geometry, demonstrating that nanoDLD devices can be used as a continuous polymer fractionation tool. As a model system, we used double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with various contour lengths and demonstrated that dsDNA in the range of 100-10 000 base pairs (bp) can be separated with a size-selective resolution of 200 bp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01408fDOI Listing

Simplified Drop-seq workflow with minimized bead loss using a bead capture and processing microfluidic chip.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1610-1620

Laboratory of Systems Biology and Genetics, Institute of Bioengineering, School of Life Sciences, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland. and Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) has revolutionized biomedical research by enabling the in-depth analysis of cell-to-cell heterogeneity of tissues with unprecedented resolution. One of the catalyzing technologies is single cell droplet microfluidics, which has massively increased the overall cell throughput, routinely allowing the analysis of thousands of cells per experiment at a relatively low cost. Among several existing droplet-based approaches, the Drop-seq platform has emerged as one of the most widely used systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00014cDOI Listing

A high-speed, high-performance, microfabricated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatograph.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1633-1643

Nano and Micro Sensors, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185, USA.

A small, consumable-free, low-power, ultra-high-speed comprehensive GC×GC system consisting of microfabricated columns, nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) cantilever resonators for detection, and a valve-based stop-flow modulator is demonstrated. The separation of a highly polar 29-component mixture covering a boiling point range of 46 to 253 °C on a pair of microfabricated columns using a Staiger valve manifold in less than 7 seconds, and just over 4 seconds after the ensemble holdup time is demonstrated with a downstream FID. The analysis time of the second dimension was 160 ms, and peak widths in the second dimension range from 10-60 ms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00027eDOI Listing

High-throughput acoustofluidic fabrication of tumor spheroids.

Lab Chip 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Department of Intelligent Systems Engineering, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. and Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.

Three-dimensional (3D) culture of multicellular spheroids, offering a desirable biomimetic microenvironment, is appropriate for recapitulating tissue cellular adhesive complexity and revealing a more realistic drug response. However, current 3D culture methods are suffering from low-throughput, poor controllability, intensive-labor, and variation in spheroid size, thus not ready for many high-throughput screening applications including drug discovery and toxicity testing. Herein, we developed a high-throughput multicellular spheroid fabrication method using acoustofluidics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00135bDOI Listing

AC electrokinetic biased deterministic lateral displacement for tunable particle separation.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1386-1396

School of Electronics and Computer Science, and Institute for Life Sciences, University of Southampton, UK.

We describe a novel particle separation technique that combines deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) with orthogonal electrokinetic forces. DLD is a microfluidic technique for continuous flow particle separation based on size. We describe new tunable devices that use a combination of AC electric fields with DLD to separate particles below the critical diameter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01416gDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Semi-automated on-demand control of individual droplets with a sample application to a drug screening assay.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1490-1501

Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering at University of Waterloo, 200, University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

Automated control of individual droplets in microfluidic channels offers tremendous potential for applications requiring high accuracy and minimal user involvement. The feasibility of active droplet control has been previously demonstrated with pressure-driven flow control and visual feedback, but the manual operation required to perform droplet manipulations limited the accuracy, repeatability, and throughput. The present study improves upon the aforementioned challenges with a higher-level algorithm capturing the dynamics of droplet motion for a semi-automated control system. Read More

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http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C9LC00128J
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00128jDOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Passive sweat collection and colorimetric analysis of biomarkers relevant to kidney disorders using a soft microfluidic system.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1545-1555

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA. and Center for Bio-Integrated Electronics, Simpson Querry Institute for BioNanotechnology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.

The rich range of biomarkers in sweat and the ability to collect sweat in a non-invasive manner create interest in the use of this biofluid for assessments of health and physiological status, with potential applications that range from sports and fitness to clinical medicine. This paper introduces two important advances in recently reported classes of soft, skin-interfaced microfluidic systems for sweat capture and analysis: (1) a simple, broadly applicable means for collection of sweat that bypasses requirements for physical/mental exertion or pharmacological stimulation and (2) a set of enzymatic chemistries and colorimetric readout approaches for determining the concentrations of creatinine and urea in sweat, throughout ranges that are physiologically relevant. The results allow for routine, non-pharmacological capture of sweat for patient populations, such as infants and the elderly, that cannot be expected to sweat through exercise, and they create potential opportunities in the use of sweat for kidney disease screening/monitoring. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00103dDOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

A smartphone fluorescence imaging-based mobile biosensing system integrated with a passive fluidic control cartridge for minimal user intervention and high accuracy.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1502-1511

Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences & Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 16419, Republic of Korea.

A key challenge for realizing mobile device-based on-the-spot environmental biodetection is that a biosensor integrated with a fluid handling sensor cartridge must have acceptable accuracy comparable to that of conventional standard analytical methods. Furthermore, the user interface must be easy to operate, technologically plausible, and concise. Herein, we introduced an advanced smartphone imaging-based fluorescence microscope designed for Hg2+ monitoring by utilizing a biosensor cartridge that reduced user intervention via time-sequenced passive fluid handling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01344fDOI Listing

High-throughput single-particle detections using a dual-height-channel-integrated pore.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1352-1358

The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Japan.

We report a proof-of-principle demonstration of particle concentration to achieve high-throughput resistive pulse detections of bacteria using a microfluidic-channel-integrated micropore. We fabricated polymeric nanochannels to trap micrometer-sized bioparticles via a simple water pumping mechanism that allowed aggregation-free size-selective particle concentration with negligible loss. Single-bioparticle detections by ionic current measurements were then implemented through releasing and transporting the thus-collected analytes to the micropore. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01371cDOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Asymmetric confinement for defining outgrowth directionality.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1484-1489

Cancer Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, UK.

Directional connectivity is required to develop accurate in vitro models of the nervous system. This research investigated the interaction of murine neuronal outgrowths with asymmetric microstructured geometries to provide insights into the mechanisms governing unidirectional outgrowth bias. The structures were designed using edge-guidance and critical turning angle principles to study different prohibitive to permissive edge-guidance ratios. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00078jDOI Listing

Waveguide-based chemo- and biosensors: complex emulsions for the detection of caffeine and proteins.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1327-1331

Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.

We report on a new modular sensing approach in which complex emulsions serve as efficient transducers in optical evanescent field-based sensing devices. Specifically, we leverage the tunable refractive index upon chemically triggered changes in droplet morphology or orientation. Variations in the optical coupling result in readily detectable changes in the light transmitted from a waveguide. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00070dDOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

An integrated microfluidic flow-focusing platform for on-chip fabrication and filtration of cell-laden microgels.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1621-1632

School of Engineering, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7, Canada.

We present the development of a stable continuous, and integrated microfluidic platform for the high-throughput fabrication of monodisperse cell-laden microgel droplets with high and maintained cellular viability. This is through combining onto one chip all the required processes from the droplet generation in a flow focusing microfluidic junction passing through on-chip photocrosslinking to the separation of the droplets from the continuous oil phase. To avoid cellular aggregation during the droplet generation process, cells were treated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) before mixing with gelatin methacrylate (GelMA). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00073aDOI Listing

MEMS-based condensation particle growth chip for optically measuring the airborne nanoparticle concentration.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1471-1483

School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 03722, Republic of Korea.

To monitor airborne nanoparticles at a particular point of interest sensitively and accurately, we developed a compact and inexpensive but highly-precise nanoparticle detection system. The proposed system, based on nucleation light-scattering, consists of two components: a microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based particle growth chip that grows nanoparticles to micro-sized droplets through condensation and a miniaturized optical particle counter (mini-OPC) that detects individual grown droplets using a light-scattering method. To minimize the dimensions and cost of this system, all elements of the particle growth chip were integrated onto a glass slide through simple photolithography and 3D printing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00035fDOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Hydrodynamic shuttling for deterministic high-efficiency multiple single-cell capture in a microfluidic chip.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1370-1377

Ph.D. Program in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.

Studies on cellular heterogeneity have emerged as a powerful approach for developing new strategies to treat diseases including cancer. However, it is difficult to set up an in vitro co-culture experiment to study the interaction of individual live cells. In this paper, we report a hydrodynamic shuttling chip (HSC) which can deterministically capture single cells into microfluidic chambers to set up multiple single-cell co-culture experiments in which individual live cells can be microscopically observed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00036dDOI Listing

Microfluidic device for expedited tumor growth towards drug evaluation.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1458-1470

Department of Bioengineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA.

Patient derived organoids have emerged as robust preclinical models for screening anti-cancer therapeutics. Current 2D culturing methods do not provide physiological responses to therapeutics, therefore 3D models are being developed to better reproduce physiological responses. 3D culturing however often requires large initial cell populations and one week to one month to grow tumors ready for therapeutic testing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01250dDOI Listing

Non-contact monitoring of extra-cellular field potentials with a multi-electrode array.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1448-1457

Neuroscience Research Institute, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA.

Developing tools to enable non-invasive, high-throughput electrophysiology measurements of large functional-networks of electrogenic cells used as in vitro disease models for the heart and brain remains an outstanding challenge for preclinical drug discovery, where failures are costly and can prove to be fatal during clinical trials. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to perform non-contact monitoring of extra-cellular field potentials with a multi-electrode array (MEA). To do this preliminary demonstration we built a prototype with a custom mechanical stage to micro-position cells grown on conventional glass coverslips over the recording surface of a MEA sensor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc00984hDOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Extracellular vesicles as cancer liquid biopsies: from discovery, validation, to clinical application.

Lab Chip 2019 Mar;19(7):1114-1140

Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

Substantial research has been devoted to elucidate the roles that extracellular vesicles (EVs) play in the regulation of both normal and pathological processes, and multiple studies have demonstrated their potential as a source of cancer biomarkers. However, several factors have slowed the development of liquid biopsy EV biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, including logistical and technical difficulties associated with reproducibly obtaining highly purified EVs suitable for diagnostic analysis. Significant effort has focused on addressing these problems, and multiple groups have now reported EV analysis methods using liquid biopsies that have the potential for clinical translation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01123kDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6469512PMC

3D impedimetric sensors as a tool for monitoring bacterial response to antibiotics.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1436-1447

BioMEMS Group, Institute of Microelectronics of Barcelona (IMB-CNM, CSIC), Esfera UAB-CEI, Campus Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain.

The presence of antimicrobial contaminants like antibiotics in the environment is a major concern because they promote the emergence and the spread of multidrug resistant bacteria. Since the conventional systems for the determination of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics rely on culturing methods that require long processing times, the implementation of novel strategies is highly required for fast and point-of-care applications. Here the development and characterization of a novel label-free biosensing platform based on a microbial biosensor approach to perform antibiotic detection bioassays in diluted solution is presented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01220bDOI Listing

Overcoming transport limitations in miniaturized electrophoretic delivery devices.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1427-1435

Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, 60174 Norrköping, Sweden.

Organic electronic ion pumps (OEIPs) have been used for delivery of biological signaling compounds, at high spatiotemporal resolution, to a variety of biological targets. The miniaturization of this technology provides several advantages, ranging from better spatiotemporal control of delivery to reduced invasiveness for implanted OEIPs. One route to miniaturization is to develop OEIPs based on glass capillary fibers that are filled with a polyelectrolyte (cation exchange membrane, CEM). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00038kDOI Listing

A miniaturized push-pull-perfusion probe for few-second sampling of neurotransmitters in the mouse brain.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1332-1343

BIOS - Microdevices for Chemical Analysis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Techmed Centre, University of Twente, Hallenweg 15, 7522 NH Enschede, The Netherlands.

Measuring biomolecule concentrations in the brain of living animals, in real time, is a challenging task, especially when detailed information at high temporal resolution is also required. Traditionally, microdialysis probes are used that generally have sampling areas in the order of about 1 mm2, and provide information on concentrations with a temporal resolution of at least several minutes. In this paper, we present a novel miniaturized push-pull perfusion sampling probe that uses an array of small 3 μm-wide sampling channels to sample neurotransmitters at a typical recovery rate of 61%, with a reduced risk of clogging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01137kDOI Listing

Label-free separation of leukocyte subpopulations using high throughput multiplex acoustophoresis.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1406-1416

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.

Multiplex separation of mixed cell samples is required in a variety of clinical and research applications. Herein, we present an acoustic microchip with multiple outlets and integrated pre-alignment channel to enable high performance and label-free separation of three different cell or particle fractions simultaneously at high sample throughput. By implementing a new cooling system for rigorous temperature control and minimal acoustic energy losses, we were able to operate the system isothermally and sort suspensions of 3, 5 and 7 μm beads with high efficiencies (>95. Read More

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http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C9LC00181F
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00181fDOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Multiparameter antibiotic resistance detection based on hydrodynamic trapping of individual E. coli.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1417-1426

Department of Physics, University of York, YO105DD, York, UK.

There is an urgent need to develop novel methods for assessing the response of bacteria to antibiotics in a timely manner. Antibiotics are traditionally assessed via their effect on bacteria in a culture medium, which takes 24-48 h and exploits only a single parameter, i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01397gDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Quantifying the pH shift induced by selective anodic electrochemical reactions in the ion concentration polarization phenomenon.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1359-1369

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea.

Recently, the ion concentration polarization (ICP) phenomenon has been actively utilized for low abundance biomolecular preconcentration applications. Since ICP significantly rearranges the ion distribution near a permselective membrane, its detailed investigation should be conducted for developing efficient platforms. In particular, proton transport through the membrane critically affects the pH of sample solutions so that continuous monitoring or batch measurement of pH is the priority task to be carried out. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01363bDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Tailoring surface acoustic wave atomisation for cryo-electron microscopy sample preparation.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1378-1385

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.

Surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomisation has been widely explored for use in pharmacological delivery, hence performance is characterised predominately in terms of droplet size and maximum delivery of fluid, to ensure sufficient dosage is delivered to the right location. For the application of cryo electron microscopy grid preparation, however, what is required is the transfer of very little fluid onto the grid in a well-defined manner. To meet this requirement, the analysis of SAW atomisation needs to focus on very different characteristics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01347kDOI Listing

Microfluidic arenas for war games between neutrophils and microbes.

Lab Chip 2019 Mar;19(7):1205-1216

BioMEMS Resource Center, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Shriners Burns Hospital, Boston, MA 02129, USA.

Measurements of neutrophil activities such as cell migration and phagocytosis are generally performed using low-content bulk assays, which provide little detail activity at the single cell level, or flow cytometry methods, which have the single cell resolution but lack perspective on the kinetics of the process. Here, we present a microfluidic assay for measuring the essential functions that contribute to the antimicrobial activity of neutrophils: migration towards the target, and killing of microbes. The assay interrogates the interactions between isolated human neutrophils and populations of live, proliferating microbes. Read More

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http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C8LC01263F
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01263fDOI Listing
March 2019
7 Reads

A high-throughput microfluidic microphysiological system (PREDICT-96) to recapitulate hepatocyte function in dynamic, re-circulating flow conditions.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(9):1556-1566

Draper, 555 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.

Microphysiological systems (MPSs) are dynamic cell culture systems that provide micro-environmental and external cues to support physiologically relevant, organ-specific functions. Recent progresses in MPS fabrication technologies have enabled the development of advanced models to capture microenvironments with physiological relevance, while increasing throughput and reducing material-based artefacts. In addition to conventional cell culture systems, advanced MPSs are emerging as ideal contenders for disease modeling and incorporation into drug screening. Read More

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http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C8LC01262H
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01262hDOI Listing
April 2019
7 Reads

Array based real-time measurement of fluid viscosities and mass-densities to monitor biological filament formation.

Lab Chip 2019 Mar;19(7):1305-1314

Center for Cellular Imaging and Nanoanalytics (C-CINA), University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 26, Basel, Switzerland.

Liquid mass density and viscosity are fundamental characteristics of fluids. Their quantification by means of classical viscosity and density meters has several drawbacks: (i) the liquid-density and the viscosity cannot be measured simultaneously, (ii) sample volumes in the mL-range are consumed, (iii) the measurements cannot be multiplexed, and, (iv) the quantifications are time-consuming (minutes). Nano-mechanical transducers promise to overcome these limitations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01343hDOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

An electric-field-dependent drop selector.

Lab Chip 2019 Mar;19(7):1296-1304

Institute of Fundamental and Frontier Sciences, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, China.

Drop manipulation on hydrophobic surfaces is of importance in lab-on-a-chip applications. Recently, superhydrophobic surface-assisted lab-on-a-chips have attracted significant attention from researchers due to their advantages of contamination resistance and low adhesion between the drop and the surface during manipulation. However, control over both static and dynamic interactions between a drop and a superhydrophobic surface has been rarely achieved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01403eDOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Sorting by interfacial tension (SIFT): label-free selection of live cells based on single-cell metabolism.

Lab Chip 2019 Apr;19(8):1344-1351

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA 95053, USA.

Selection of live cells from a population is critical in many biological studies and biotechnologies. We present here a novel droplet microfluidic approach that allows for label-free and passive selection of live cells using the glycolytic activity of individual cells. It was observed that with the use of a specific surfactant utilized to stabilize droplet formation, the interfacial tension of droplets was very sensitive to pH. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c8lc01328dDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6456419PMC
April 2019
1 Read