2,037 results match your criteria Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network JNCCN[Journal]


Highlights of the NCCN Oncology Research Program.

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J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1):xxxvii

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2019.0005DOI Listing
January 2019

Metastatic Anal Carcinoma: The Role of Radiotherapy.

Authors:
Yi-Jen Chen

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1):98-100

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7112DOI Listing
January 2019

Role of Immunotherapy in the Management of Locally Advanced and Recurrent/Metastatic Cervical Cancer.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1):91-97

Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California; Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; and Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Services, and Department of Radiation Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California.

Despite combined therapeutic approaches, there is an unmet clinical need to identify effective strategies for improved patient outcomes in treating locally advanced and metastatic cervical cancer (CC). Immunotherapy is emerging as a novel therapeutic approach in this disease for which the causative agent, human papillomavirus (HPV), has dynamic, complex immunomodulatory effects. This review explores the biologic rational of immuno-oncology in the treatment of CC and discusses the initial clinical efficacy, ongoing clinical trials, and rationale for combined multimodal treatment approaches for locally advanced and recurrent/metastatic CC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7108DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Revisiting Minimally Invasive Surgery in the Management of Early-Stage Cervical Cancer.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1):86-90

Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) was previously considered an acceptable alternative to open radical hysterectomy in the management of early-stage cervical cancer (ESCC), but adequately powered, high-quality prospective trials evaluating survival outcomes were lacking. Recently, a large randomized phase III trial, the Laparoscopic Approach to Cervical Cancer (LACC) trial, showed that MIS for ESCC is associated with a higher risk of recurrence and death compared with open surgery. We review the LACC trial findings in depth, as well as a recent National Cancer Database analysis using propensity score weighting that supports the LACC trial findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7263DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Cervical Cancer, Version 3.2019, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1):64-84

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Stanford Cancer Institute; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; City of Hope National Medical Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Patient advocate; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

Cervical cancer is a malignant epithelial tumor that forms in the uterine cervix. Most cases of cervical cancer are preventable through human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination, routine screening, and treatment of precancerous lesions. However, due to inadequate screening protocols in many regions of the world, cervical cancer remains the fourth-most common cancer in women globally. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2019.0001DOI Listing
January 2019
15 Reads

Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials of Exercise Interventions Using Digital Activity Trackers in Patients With Cancer.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1):57-63

Wilmot Cancer Institute, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York; Monmouth Medical Center, Monmouth, New Jersey; Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; and Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Exercise can ameliorate cancer- and treatment-related toxicities, but poor adherence to exercise regimens is a barrier. Exercise interventions using digital activity trackers (E-DATs) may improve exercise adherence, but data are limited for patients with cancer. We conducted a systematic review examining the feasibility of E-DATs in cancer survivors and effects on activity level, body composition, objective fitness outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), self-reported symptoms, and biomarkers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7082DOI Listing
January 2019

Real-World Outcomes of Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Node-Negative and Node-Positive HER2-Positive Breast Cancer.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1):47-56

Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario; Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta; CancerControl Alberta, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta; and Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Comparative real-world outcomes for patients with HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer receiving adjuvant trastuzumab outside of clinical trials are lacking. This study sought to retrospectively characterize outcomes for patients with node-negative and node-positive breast cancer receiving adjuvant trastuzumab in combination with docetaxel/cyclophosphamide (DCH), docetaxel/carboplatin/trastuzumab (TCH), or fluorouracil/epirubicin/cyclophosphamide followed by docetaxel/trastuzumab (FEC-DH) chemotherapy in Alberta, Canada, from 2007 through 2014. Disease-free survival and overall survival (OS) analyses for node-negative cohorts receiving DCH (n=111) or TCH (n=371) and node-positive cohorts receiving FEC-DH (n=146) or TCH (n=315) were compared using chi-square, Kaplan-Meier, or Cox multivariable analysis where appropriate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7066DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read
4.178 Impact Factor

Incorporating Tumor Characteristics to Maximize 21-Gene Assay Utility: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1):39-46

Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale University School of Public Health; Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center, Yale Cancer Center and Yale University School of Medicine; and Section of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology, and Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Literature suggests that Oncotype DX (ODX) is cost-effective. These studies, however, tend to ignore clinical characteristics and have not incorporated population-based data regarding the distribution of ODX results across different clinical risk groups. Accordingly, this study assessed the cost-effectiveness of ODX across strata of clinical risk groups using population-based ODX data. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7077
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7077DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Definitive Pelvic Radiotherapy and Survival of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Anal Cancer.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1):29-37

Department of Radiation Oncology, West Cancer Center, and Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska; and Department of Hematology/Oncology, West Cancer Center, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee.

Chemotherapy with or without pelvic radiotherapy (RT) is included in the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for metastatic anal cancer (MAC), despite limited clinical evidence for RT in this setting. In addition, increasing evidence shows that local therapies, including RT, may increase patient survival for some types of metastatic cancers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patterns of care and association between definitive pelvic RT and overall survival (OS) for patients with MAC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7085DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Use of Bisphosphonates in Elderly Patients With Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1):22-28

Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons; Department of Biostatistics, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health; Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons; Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health; and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York.

Bisphosphonates reduce skeletal-related events (SREs) in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and, in some studies, improved survival. Since 2011, bisphosphonate use has been recommended by NCCN for all patients with newly diagnosed MM receiving antineoplastic therapy independent of the presence of bone disease. This study investigated their use after these guidelines were established. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7079DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Version 2.2019.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1):12-20

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; Stanford Cancer Institute; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; University of Colorado Cancer Center; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Fox Chase Cancer Center; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; City of Hope National Medical Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is generally characterized by an indolent disease course. Histologic transformation (also known as Richter's transformation) to more aggressive lymphomas, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma, occurs in approximately 2% to 10% of patients and is associated with a poor prognosis. These NCCN Guidelines Insights discuss the recommendations for the diagnosis and management of patients with histologic transformation. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2019.0002
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2019.0002DOI Listing
January 2019
14 Reads

Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma in Cowden Syndrome.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1):7-11

Département de Génétique Médicale, Maladies Rares et Médecine Personnalisée, Oncogénétique Clinique, CHU Montpellier, Université de Montpellier, Montpellier; Unité d'Oncogénétique, Institut Bergonié, INSERM U1218, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux; Département d'Oncologie Médicale, Service de Gynécologie-Obstétrique, and Service d'Anatomopathologie, CHU Montpellier, Université de Montpellier, Montpellier; Unité d'Anatomie Pathologique, Institut Bergonié, INSERM U1218, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux; Service de Dermatologie, CHU Montpellier, Université de Montpellier, Montpellier; Service d'Oncogénétique, Hôpital Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux; Service d'Oncogénétique, Hôpital Charles Nicolle, CHU de Rouen; and Service de Génétique Médicale, CHU de Toulouse, Université de Médecine Toulouse III, Toulouse, France.

Cowden syndrome (CS) is an autosomal dominant mendelian disease related to germline pathogenic variants affecting the -gene. CS is characterized by macrocephaly, mucocutaneous lesions, and an increased risk of breast and thyroid cancers. Rare ovarian cancer cases (mostly embryonic tumors) associated with have been described in the literature, but no current CS guidelines are available for ovarian cancer risk management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7065DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

New Year, New Look!

Authors:
Margaret Tempero

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2019 Jan;17(1)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2019.0003DOI Listing
January 2019

Reviewer Page.

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J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):xxxi

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December 2018

Anti-EGFR Therapy in Right-Sided Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Right or Wrong?

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):1547-1548

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7107DOI Listing
December 2018

Do All Patients With Polycythemia Vera or Essential Thrombocythemia Need Cytoreduction?

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):1539-1545

Department of Medicine, and Division of Hematology and Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine; and Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

Polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) are Philadelphia chromosome-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), characterized by expansion of normal blood counts, bleeding, thrombosis, and the potential for transformation to myelofibrosis (MF) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The primary goals of treatment for MPNs are to reduce the risk of thrombosis, alleviate systemic symptom burden (eg, fatigue, pruritus, microvascular symptoms, and symptomatic splenomegaly), and to prevent transformation to MF/AML. Preventing transformation is clearly important, but not expected with current therapies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7073DOI Listing
December 2018

Systemic Mastocytosis, Version 2.2019, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):1500-1537

Mastocytosis is a group of heterogeneous disorders resulting from the clonal proliferation of abnormal mast cells and their accumulation in the skin and/or in various extracutaneous organs. Systemic mastocytosis is the most common form of mastocytosis diagnosed in adults, characterized by mast cell infiltration of one or more extracutaneous organs (with or without skin involvement). The identification of KIT D816V mutation and the emergence of novel targeted therapies have significantly improved the diagnosis and treatment of systemic mastocytosis. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0088
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0088DOI Listing
December 2018
22 Reads

Variation in Integrated Head and Neck Cancer Care: Impact of Patient and Hospital Characteristics.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 12;16(12):1491-1498

Scientific Center for Quality of Healthcare

Monitoring and effectively improving oncologic integrated care requires dashboard information based on quality registrations. The dashboard includes evidence-based quality indicators (QIs) that measure quality of care. This study aimed to assess the quality of current integrated head and neck cancer care with QIs, the variation between Dutch hospitals, and the influence of patient and hospital characteristics. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7061
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7061DOI Listing
December 2018
14 Reads

Impact of Patient- and Clinician-Reported Cumulative Toxicity on Quality of Life in Patients With Metastatic Castration-Naïve Prostate Cancer.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):1481-1488

Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, Cancer Center Amsterdam, and Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Inserm, UMR 912 'Economic and Social Sciences, Health Systems and Societies (SESSTIM)', Aix-Marseille Université, IRD, Marseille, France; Department of Medical Psychology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Cancer Center Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Medical Oncology, Centre François Baclesse - CHU Côte de Nacre, Caen, France; Department of Cancer Medicine, Institut Gustave Roussy, University of Paris Sud, Villejuif, France; UNICANCER, Paris, France; Department of Biostatistic, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille, France; Aix Marseille Université, INSERM, IRD, SESSTIM, Marseille, France; Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Rangueil, Toulouse, France; Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris, France; and Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille University, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de Marseille (CRCM), Marseille, France.

Current toxicity evaluation is primarily focused on high-grade adverse events (AEs) reported by clinicians. However, the cumulative effect of multiple lower-grade AEs may also impact patients' quality of life (QoL). Further, patient-reported toxicity may be more representative of patients' treatment experiences. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7069
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7069DOI Listing
December 2018
14 Reads

Comparison of Overall Survival Between Preoperative Chemotherapy and Chemoradiotherapy for Resectable Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):1468-1475

Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, and Department of Clinical Science, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.

Preoperative therapy is being increasingly used in the treatment of resectable pancreatic cancer. Because there are only limited data on the optimal preoperative regimen, we compared overall survival (OS) between preoperative chemotherapy (CT) and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients receiving preoperative therapy and resection for clinical T1-3N0-1M0 adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were identified in the National Cancer Database for 2006 through 2012. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7068
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7068DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

New Cancer Drug Approvals From the Perspective of a Universal Healthcare System: Analyses of the Pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review Recommendations.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):1460-1466

CancerCare Manitoba, and University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

FDA approvals do not consider cost, but they set the tone for regulatory approvals worldwide, including in countries with universal healthcare where cost-effectiveness, utility, and adoption feasibility are considered rigorously. Data from the pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review (pCODR), a national drug review system that makes evidence-based funding recommendations to Canada's provinces and territories, were collected. Our objectives were to assess (1) temporal trends in cost and efficacy of drugs reviewed, (2) correlations among magnitude of benefits, cost, and pCODR decisions, and (3) predictors of approvals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7084DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Delays in Diagnosis and Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Safety-Net Population Profile.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):1451-1457

Department of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora; Department of Surgery and Department of Medicine, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver; ACCORDS at University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora; Health Services Research, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver; Institute for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente Colorado, Denver; and Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado.

Timely detection and treatment of breast cancer is important in optimizing survival and minimizing recurrence. Given disparities in breast cancer outcomes based on socioeconomic status, we examined time to diagnosis and treatment in a safety-net hospital. : We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with breast cancer diagnosed between July 1, 2010, and June 30, 2012 (N=120). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7067DOI Listing
December 2018

Metastatic Bulk Independently Predicts Outcomes for EGFR Precision Targeting in Colorectal Cancer.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):1442-1450

Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center; Department of Oncology, McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research; and Departments of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Statistics, and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin.

Molecular profiles guide the clinical management of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), particularly related to the use of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies. Tumor sidedness has also been implicated in resistance to these therapies, but has largely been studied in the first-line setting. We examined the role of tumor sidedness and disease bulk in predicting clinical outcomes to anti-EGFR therapy in the treatment-refractory setting. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7074
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7074DOI Listing
December 2018
5 Reads

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Thyroid Carcinoma, Version 2.2018.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):1429-1440

Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; University of Washington/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; Stanford Cancer Institute; City of Hope National Medical Center; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; University of Colorado Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center-James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; Duke Cancer Institute; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

The NCCN Guidelines for Thyroid Carcinoma provide recommendations for the management of different types of thyroid carcinoma, including papillary, follicular, Hürthle cell, medullary, and anaplastic carcinomas. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the panel discussion behind recent updates to the guidelines, including the expanding role of molecular testing for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, implications of the new pathologic diagnosis of noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features, and the addition of a new targeted therapy option for V600E-mutated anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0089
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0089DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads
4.178 Impact Factor

Pathologic Complete Response in a Large Gastric GIST: Using Molecular Markers to Achieve Maximal Response to Neoadjuvant Imatinib.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):1424-1428

Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgical Pathology, Department of Medical Oncology, and Division of Gastroenterology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent 1% of alimentary tract neoplasms. Up to 90% of GISTs are driven by activating mutations in tyrosine kinase or α genes. Imatinib mesylate is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has recently been used in a neoadjuvant role for locally advanced GIST. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7063DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

In Memoriam: Arti Hurria, MD.

Authors:
June M McKoy

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):1421-1422

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0093DOI Listing
December 2018

Letter to the Editor: Could Immunogenicity of Kaposi Sarcoma Be More Linked to Viral Antigens Than to the Tumor Mutational Burden?

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 12;16(12):1418-1419

Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris Diderot University, Paris, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7088DOI Listing
December 2018

An Oncologist's Letter to Santa: Bring Me Drugs!

Authors:
Margaret Tempero

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(12):1411

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0090DOI Listing
December 2018

Use of Novel Combination Therapies in the Treatment of Advanced HR+/HER2- Breast Cancer.

Authors:

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Dec;16(suppl 1):S5-S17

Endocrine therapy remains the backbone for treatment of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in the metastatic setting. Despite the effectiveness of endocrine therapy, primary and acquired endocrine resistance continue to be important clinical challenges. The landscape of metastatic breast cancer treatment has changed considerably with the incorporation of novel agents, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0200DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Screening Mammography for Average-Risk Women: The Controversy and NCCN's Position.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Nov;16(11):1398-1404

Department of Radiology and Rogel Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; and Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.

Breast cancer remains the most common nonskin cancer among women and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Early detection through screening and advances in treatment have contributed to a 39% mortality reduction in the United States since 1990. The NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer Screening and Diagnosis recommend annual mammographic screening for average-risk women beginning at age 40 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7081DOI Listing
November 2018
26 Reads

Diagnosis and Management of High-Risk Breast Lesions.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Nov;16(11):1391-1396

Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.

Atypical hyperplasia (AH) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) are nonmalignant breast lesions that confer a 4- to 10-fold increased risk for breast cancer in women. Often, AH and LCIS are diagnosed through breast biopsy due to a mammographic or palpable finding. Although AH and LCIS are benign breast disease, further management is necessary due to their high-risk nature and premalignant potential. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7099
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7099DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Breast Cancer Screening and Diagnosis, Version 3.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Nov;16(11):1362-1389

The NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer Screening and Diagnosis have been developed to facilitate clinical decision making. This manuscript discusses the diagnostic evaluation of individuals with suspected breast cancer due to either abnormal imaging and/or physical findings. For breast cancer screening recommendations, please see the full guidelines on NCCN. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0083
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0083DOI Listing
November 2018
58 Reads

Undertreatment of High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer in the California Latino Population.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Nov;16(11):1353-1360

Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry, Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, California; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California; Division of Urology, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California; Department of Urology, and Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California; Departments of Population Health Science and Policy, and Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York; and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology recommend definitive therapy for all men with high-risk localized prostate cancer (PCa) who have a life expectancy >5 years or who are symptomatic. However, the application of these guidelines may vary among ethnic groups. We compared receipt of guideline-concordant treatment between Latino and non-Latino white men in California. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7060
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7060DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6314834PMC
November 2018
14 Reads

Evaluation of New Tests and Interventions for Prostate Cancer Management: A Systematic Review.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Nov;16(11):1340-1351

Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, McGill University, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, McGill University Health Centre, and Division of Medical Oncology and Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; and Lund University, Lund, Sweden.

Inaccurate risk classification and the burden of unnecessary biopsies are a challenge due to the limited ability of current risk assessment tools and modalities to diagnose prostate cancer (PCa) and distinguish indolent from aggressive disease. This systematic review assesses newly developed tests and interventions with high evidence of clinical utility that might be adopted in clinical practice during PCa management before initial and repeat biopsy, after positive biopsy, and after radical treatment. The Cochrane, Embase, MEDLINE, and Web of Science databases were searched for studies pertaining to the clinical utility of PCa diagnostic tests. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7055
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7055DOI Listing
November 2018
15 Reads

Impact of a Clinical Decision Support System on Guideline Adherence of Surveillance Recommendations for Colonoscopy After Polypectomy.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Nov;16(11):1321-1328

Department of Internal Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center; Parkland Health & Hospital System; Department of Clinical Sciences, UT Southwestern Medical Center; Harold C. Simmons Cancer Center; and Department of Pathology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; and Department of Internal Medicine, UC San Diego, San Diego, California.

Surveillance colonoscopy is required in patients with polyps due to an elevated colorectal cancer (CRC) risk; however, studies suggest substantial overuse and underuse of surveillance colonoscopy. The goal of this study was to characterize guideline adherence of surveillance recommendations after implementation of an electronic medical record (EMR)-based Colonoscopy Pathology Reporting and Clinical Decision Support System (CoRS). We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent colonoscopy with polypectomy at a safety-net healthcare system before (n=1,822) and after (n=1,320) implementation of CoRS in December 2013. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7050DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

A US Registry-Based Assessment of Use and Impact of Chemotherapy in Stage I HER2-Positive Breast Cancer.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Nov;16(11):1311-1320

Department of Medical Oncology, Gundersen Health System, and Department of Medical Research, Gundersen Medical Foundation, La Crosse, Wisconsin.

Despite the paucity of evidence supporting chemotherapy in the treatment of node-negative, HER2-positive breast cancer measuring <2 cm, use of trastuzumab-based chemotherapy has increased over the past decade. Therefore, we used the National Cancer Database to evaluate the use and impact of chemotherapy on survival in this population. We identified female patients aged 18 to 70 years with node-negative, HER2-positive breast cancer measuring <2 cm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7058DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Cancer-Associated Venous Thromboembolic Disease, Version 2.2018.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Nov;16(11):1289-1303

The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Moffitt Cancer Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; National Blood Clot Alliance; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Stanford Cancer Institute; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; City of Hope National Medical Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is common in patients with cancer and increases morbidity and mortality. VTE prevention and treatment are more complex in patients with cancer. The NCCN Guidelines for Cancer-Associated Venous Thromboembolic Disease outline strategies for treatment and prevention of VTE in adult patients diagnosed with cancer or in whom cancer is clinically suspected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0084DOI Listing
November 2018
17 Reads

The Adrenal Gland as a Sanctuary Site of Metastases After Pembrolizumab Treatment: A Case Series.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Nov;16(11):1279-1283

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, and The Ohio State University James Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio.

Therapeutic agents targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis have shown durable clinical responses in patients with various cancer types. Although objective responses are common, intrapatient heterogeneous responses have been described, and the mechanism for the different organ responses remains unknown. We present a series of patients in whom a lack of response was noted solely in the adrenal glands. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7059
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7059DOI Listing
November 2018
12 Reads

I'm Conflicted. Are You?

Authors:
Margaret Tempero

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Nov;16(11):1273

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0085DOI Listing
November 2018

Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy in Breast Cancer.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Oct;16(10):1259-1268

Breast and Ovarian Cancer Program, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, and Department of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Initial studies investigating single-agent activity of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) serve as proof of principle that harnessing the immune system can have anticancer activity in a variety of human malignancies. Although breast cancer was historically believed to be immunogenically silent, early studies indicate overall response rates with ICIs are similar to those observed with many other solid malignancies. Overall response rates in advanced breast cancer are low, but the responses are remarkably durable. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7046
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7046DOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads

Preventive Health in Cancer Survivors: What Should We Be Recommending?

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Oct;16(10):1251-1258

University of Colorado Cancer Center, and Division of General Internal Medicine and Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.

Individuals with a history of cancer, often referred to as , may experience late and long-term effects of their treatment. Because these individuals live longer in the survivorship phase, some of these late effects may also be considered risk factors for other chronic conditions. With cancer and cardiovascular disease now the top 2 leading causes of death in the United States and with common risk factors for both, as well as the morbidity that can occur after cancer treatment, preventive health is becoming an important issue in cancer survivorship care. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7083
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7083DOI Listing
October 2018
5 Reads

Survivorship, Version 2.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Oct;16(10):1216-1247

The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for common physical and psychosocial consequences of cancer and cancer treatment to help healthcare professionals who work with survivors of adult-onset cancer in the posttreatment period. This portion of the guidelines describes recommendations regarding the management of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and lymphedema. In addition, recommendations regarding immunizations and the prevention of infections in cancer survivors are included. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0078
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0078DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

Tumor Board Conferences for Multidisciplinary Skin Cancer Management: A Survey of US Cancer Centers.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Oct;16(10):1209-1215

Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Department of Dermatology, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; and Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Oncology Service, Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Oncology Service, Department of Medicine, Head and Neck Service, Department of Surgery, Ophthalmic Oncology Service, Department of Surgery, Gastric and Mixed Tumor Service, Department of Surgery, Department of Pathology, and Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Tumor board conferences (TBCs) are used by oncologic specialists to review patient cases, exchange knowledge, and discuss options for cancer management. These multidisciplinary meetings are often a cornerstone of treatment at leading cancer centers and are required for accreditation by certain groups, such as the American College of Surgeons' Commission on Cancer. Little is known regarding skin cancer TBCs. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7044
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7044DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

A Study of Novel Febrile Neutropenia Risk Factors Related to Bone Marrow or Immune Suppression, Barrier Function, and Bacterial Flora.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Oct;16(10):1201-1208

Office of Health Assessment and Epidemiology, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Los Angeles; Center for Observational Research, Amgen Inc., South San Francisco; Department of Research and Evaluation, Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Pasadena; and Center for Observational Research, and Hematology/Oncology, Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, California.

Previously identified patient-level risk factors for chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN) indicate several potential underlying pathogenic mechanisms, including bone marrow suppression, impaired neutrophil function, or disturbances of barrier function. This study evaluated whether additional clinical characteristics related to these pathogenic mechanisms were risk factors for FN. The study population included patients diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian, or gastric cancer between 2000 and 2009 at Kaiser Permanente Southern California and treated with myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7051DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Systemic Therapy for Combined Hepatocellular-Cholangiocarcinoma: A Single-Institution Experience.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Oct;16(10):1193-1199

Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Radiology, and Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri.

Combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinoma tumors (cHCC-CCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare malignancies that have no established optimal treatment. We identified patients with cHCC-CCA treated at a tertiary center and retrospectively examined their histology, interventions, and outcomes. We calculated disease control rate (DCR), disease progression, overall survival, and progression-free survival (PFS) between treatment subgroups. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7053
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7053DOI Listing
October 2018
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A Routine Laboratory Data-Based Model for Predicting Recurrence After Curative Resection of Stage II Colorectal Cancer.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Oct;16(10):1183-1192

Department of Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong, China; Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Department of Pathology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Urology, Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; and Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.

Use of chemotherapy in stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) is controversial because it improves survival only in some patients. We aimed to develop a statistical model using routine and readily available blood tests to predict the prognosis of patients with stage II CRC and to identify which patients are likely to benefit from chemotherapy. We divided 422 patients with stage II CRC into a training and a testing set. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.7048DOI Listing
October 2018

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Small Cell Lung Cancer, Version 2.2018.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw 2018 Oct;16(10):1171-1182

University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center; Stanford Cancer Institute; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Patient advocate; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; City of Hope National Medical Center; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Cancer Center; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; Moffitt Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

The NCCN Guidelines for Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) address all aspects of disease management. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on recent updates to the NCCN Guidelines for SCLC regarding immunotherapy, systemic therapy, and radiation therapy. For the 2018 update, new sections were added on "Signs and Symptoms of SCLC" and "Principles of Pathologic Review. Read More

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http://www.jnccn.org/lookup/doi/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0079
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6004/jnccn.2018.0079DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads