1,595 results match your criteria Journal of the International AIDS Society [Journal]


Early outcomes after implementation of treat all in Rwanda: an interrupted time series study.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Apr;22(4):e25279

Department of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA.

Introduction: Nearly all countries in sub-Saharan Africa have adopted policies to provide antiretroviral therapy (ART) to all persons living with HIV (Treat All), though HIV care outcomes of these programmes are not well-described. We estimated changes in ART initiation and retention in care following Treat All implementation in Rwanda in July 2016.

Methods: We conducted an interrupted time series analysis of adults enrolling in HIV care at ten Rwandan health centres from July 2014 to September 2017. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jia2.25279
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25279DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Low risk of neurodevelopmental impairment among perinatally acquired HIV-infected preschool children who received early antiretroviral treatment in Thailand.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Apr;22(4):e25278

Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Introduction: Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) infants immediately upon diagnosis. We aimed to compare neurodevelopmental outcomes between PHIV children who initiated ART within 12 months of life and perinatally HIV-exposed uninfected (PHEU) children and to assess neurodevelopmental outcomes by timing of ART.

Methods: This prospective cohort study included Thai children aged 12 to 56 months who were assessed with the Mullen Scales of Early Learning (MSEL) at enrolment and at 48 weeks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25278DOI Listing

Cardiovascular risk factors among ART-experienced people with HIV in South Africa.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Apr;22(4):e25274

Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Disease & Molecular Medicine and Department of Medicine Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

Introduction: People with HIV (PWH) are at increased risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Screening for CVD risk factors is recommended but not routine in South African HIV clinics. We sought to describe the prevalence of CVD risk factors among antiretroviral treatment (ART)-experienced patients in South Africa. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jia2.25274
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25274DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Pursuing use of optimal formulations for paediatric HIV epidemic control - a look at the use of LPV/r oral pellets and oral granules.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Apr;22(4):e25267

United States Agency for International Development, Washington, DC, USA.

Introduction: Despite a significant reduction in mother-to-child transmission of HIV, an estimated 180,000 children were infected with HIV in 2017, and only 52% of children under 15 years of age living with HIV (CLHIV) are on life-saving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Without effective treatment, half of CLHIV die before the age of two years and only one in five survives to five years of age.

Discussion: Over the past four years, the United States Food and Drug Administration tentatively approved new formulations of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) in the form of oral pellets and oral granules. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25267DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6462808PMC

Viral suppression among children and their caregivers living with HIV in western Kenya.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Apr;22(4):e25272

Department of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

Introduction: Despite the central role of caregivers in managing HIV treatment for children living with HIV, viral suppression within caregiver-child dyads in which both members are living with HIV is not well described.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of children living with HIV <15 years of age and their caregivers living with HIV attending HIV clinics affiliated with the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) in Kenya between 2015 and 2017. To be included in the analysis, children and caregivers must have had ≥1 viral load (VL) during the study period while receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) for ≥6 months, and the date of the caregiver's VL must have occurred ±90 days from the date of the child's VL. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jia2.25272
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25272DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6462809PMC
April 2019
1 Read

PrEP and the syndemic of substance use, violence, and HIV among female and male sex workers: a qualitative study in Kisumu, Kenya.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Apr;22(4):e25266

Department of Anthropology, University of California, Riverside, CA, USA.

Introduction: Female and male sex workers experience heightened vulnerability to HIV and other health harms that are compounded by substance use, physical and sexual violence, and limited access to health services. In Kisumu, Kenya, where sex work is widespread and substance use is a growing public health concern, offering pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention could help curtail the HIV epidemic. Our study examines "syndemics," or mutually reinforcing epidemics of substance use, violence and HIV, in relation to PrEP acceptability and feasibility among female and male sex workers in Kenya, one of the first African countries to approve PrEP for HIV prevention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25266DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6462807PMC

Erratum.

Authors:

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Apr;22(4):e25280

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25280DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6462806PMC

In utero exposure to HIV and/or antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review of preclinical and clinical evidence of cognitive outcomes.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Apr;22(4):e25275

Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.

Introducion: With the increasing number of children exposed to HIV or antiretroviral therapy in utero, there are concerns that this population may have worse neurodevelopmental outcomes compared to those who are unexposed. The objective of this study was to systematically review the clinical and preclinical literature on the effects of in utero exposure to HIV and/or antiretroviral therapy (ART) on neurodevelopment.

Methods: We systematically searched OVID Medline, PsycINFO and Embase, as well as the Cochrane Collaborative Database, Google Scholar and bibliographies of pertinent articles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25275DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6462810PMC

Retest and treat: a review of national HIV retesting guidelines to inform elimination of mother-to-child HIV transmission (EMTCT) efforts.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Apr;22(4):e25271

HIV Department, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.

Introduction: High maternal HIV incidence contributes substantially to mother-to-child HIV transmission (MTCT) in some settings. Since 2006, HIV retesting during the third trimester and breastfeeding has been recommended by the World Health Organization in higher prevalence (≥5%) settings to reduce MTCT. However, many countries lack clarity on when and how often to retest pregnant and postpartum women to optimize resources and service delivery. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jia2.25271
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25271DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6452920PMC
April 2019
6 Reads

Access to sexual and reproductive health services for women living with HIV in Latin America and the Caribbean: systematic review of the literature.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Apr;22(4):e25273

Department of Communicable Diseases and Environmental Determinants of Health, HIV, Hepatitis, Tuberculosis, and Sexually Transmitted Infections Unit, Pan American Health Organization, Washington, DC, USA.

Introduction: Systematic reviews show that women living with HIV (WLHIV) have high unmet sexual and reproductive health (SRH) needs due to barriers to access sexual and reproductive health services (SRHS). In Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), as of 2016, there were nearly one million WLHIV, but the existing evidence of their SRH needs comes from a few individual studies. This systematic review provides an overview of these women's needs to help define new and/or adapt existing public health strategies to the local context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25273DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6452919PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Implementation of a comprehensive safer conception intervention for HIV-serodiscordant couples in Kenya: uptake, use and effectiveness.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Apr;22(4):e25261

Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Introduction: Safer conception strategies minimize HIV risk during condomless sex to become pregnant. Gaps remain in understanding the acceptability, feasibility and choices HIV-serodiscordant couples make when multiple safer conception options are available.

Methods: We conducted a pilot study of a comprehensive safer conception package for HIV-serodiscordant couples with immediate fertility desires in Kenya from March 2016 to April 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25261DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6452026PMC

HIV-1 exposure and immune activation enhance sexual transmission of Hepatitis C virus by primary Langerhans cells.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22(3):e25268

Department of Experimental Immunology, Amsterdam Infection and Immunity Institute, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Introduction: The significant rise in incidence of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) living with HIV-1 suggests that HCV under specific circumstances is transmitted via sexual contact. During sexual transmission HCV has to cross the epithelial barrier to either directly enter the blood stream or indirectly via mucosal immune cells. However, the mechanisms of sexual transmission of HCV remain unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25268DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6442005PMC
March 2019
7 Reads

Acceptability, perceived reliability and challenges associated with distributing HIV self-test kits to young MSM in Uganda: a qualitative study.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22(3):e25269

University of California, Global Health Sciences, San Francisco, CA.

Introduction: HIV self-testing is a flexible, accessible and acceptable emerging technology with a particular potential to identify people living with HIV who are reluctant to interact with conventional HIV testing approaches. We assessed the acceptability, perceived reliability and challenges associated with distributing HIV self-test (HIVST) to young men who have sex with men (MSM) in Uganda.

Methods: Between February and May, 2018, we enrolled 74 MSM aged ≥18 years purposively sampled and verbally consented to participate in six focus group discussions (FGDs) in The AIDS Support Organization (TASO Masaka and Entebbe). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25269DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441924PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis decreases tuberculosis risk among Asian patients with HIV.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22(3):e25264

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Introduction: Cotrimoxazole (CTX) is recommended as prophylaxis against Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, malaria and other serious bacterial infections in HIV-infected patients. Despite its in vitro activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the effects of CTX preventive therapy on tuberculosis (TB) remain unclear.

Methods: Adults living with HIV enrolled in a regional observational cohort in Asia who had initiated combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) were included in the analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25264DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6439318PMC
March 2019
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Hypertension and diabetes control along the HIV care cascade in rural South Africa.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22(3):e25213

Department of Global Health & Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Introduction: Participation in antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes has been associated with greater utilization of care for hypertension and diabetes in rural South Africa. The objective of this study was to assess whether people living with HIV on ART with comorbid hypertension or diabetes also have improved chronic disease management indicators.

Methods: The Health and Aging in Africa: a longitudinal study of an INDEPTH Community in South Africa (HAALSI) is a cohort of 5059 adults >40 years old. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25213DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6436499PMC
March 2019
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The Self-Testing AfRica (STAR) Initiative: accelerating global access and scale-up of HIV self-testing.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22 Suppl 1:e25249

Department of HIV/AIDS, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.

Introduction: HIV self-testing (HIVST) was first proposed as an additional option to standard HIV testing services in the 1980s. By 2015, two years after the first HIVST kit was approved for the American market and the year in which Unitaid invested in the "HIV Self-Testing AfRica (STAR) Initiative," HIVST remained unexplored with negligible access in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). However, rapid progress had been made. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jia2.25249
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25249DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6432103PMC
March 2019
5 Reads

Applying user preferences to optimize the contribution of HIV self-testing to reaching the "first 90" target of UNAIDS Fast-track strategy: results from discrete choice experiments in Zimbabwe.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22 Suppl 1:e25245

Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

Introduction: New HIV testing strategies are needed to reach the United Nations' 90-90-90 target. HIV self-testing (HIVST) can increase uptake, but users' perspectives on optimal models of distribution and post-test services are uncertain. We used discrete choice experiments (DCEs) to explore the impact of service characteristics on uptake along the testing cascade. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25245DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6432101PMC

Re-reading of OraQuick HIV-1/2 rapid antibody test results: quality assurance implications for HIV self-testing programmes.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22 Suppl 1:e25234

Department of International Public Health, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

Introduction: Scale-up of HIV self-testing (HIVST) will play a key role in meeting the United Nation's 90-90-90 targets. Delayed re-reading of used HIVST devices has been used by early implementation studies to validate the performance of self-test kits and to estimate HIV positivity among self-testers. We investigated the stability of results on used devices under controlled conditions to assess its potential as a quality assurance approach for HIVST scale-up. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25234DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6432491PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Regulation of HIV self-testing in Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe: a qualitative study with key stakeholders.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22 Suppl 1:e25229

Community Health Systems Group, Department of International Public Health, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK.

Introduction: HIV self-testing (HIVST) is being introduced as a new way for more undiagnosed people to know their HIV status. As countries start to implement HIVST, assuring the quality and regulating in vitro diagnostics, including HIVST, are essential. We aimed to document the emerging regulatory landscape and perceptions of key stakeholders involved in HIVST policy and regulation prior to implementation in three low- and middle-income countries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25229DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6432109PMC

Exploring social harms during distribution of HIV self-testing kits using mixed-methods approaches in Malawi.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22 Suppl 1:e25251

Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme, Blantyre, Malawi.

Introduction: HIV self-testing (HIVST) provides couples and individuals with a discreet, convenient and empowering testing option. As with all HIV testing, potential harms must be anticipated and mitigated to optimize individual and public health benefits. Here, we describe social harms (SHs) reported during HIVST implementation in Malawi, and propose a framework for grading and responding to harms, according to their severity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25251DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6432111PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Optimizing HIV testing services in sub-Saharan Africa: cost and performance of verification testing with HIV self-tests and tests for triage.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22 Suppl 1:e25237

Global HIV and Hepatitis Department, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.

Introduction: Strategies employing a single rapid diagnostic test (RDT) such as HIV self-testing (HIVST) or "test for triage" (T4T) are proposed to increase HIV testing programme impact. Current guidelines recommend serial testing with two or three RDTs for HIV diagnosis, followed by retesting with the same algorithm to verify HIV-positive status before anti-retroviral therapy (ART) initiation. We investigated whether clients presenting to HIV testing services (HTS) following a single reactive RDT must undergo the diagnostic algorithm twice to diagnose and verify HIV-positive status, or whether a diagnosis with the setting-specific algorithm is adequate for ART initiation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25237DOI Listing
March 2019
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HIV self-testing: breaking the barriers to uptake of testing among men and adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa, experiences from STAR demonstration projects in Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22 Suppl 1:e25244

Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

Introduction: Social, structural and systems barriers inhibit uptake of HIV testing. HIV self-testing (HIVST) has shown promising uptake by otherwise underserved priority groups including men, young people and first-time testers. Here, we use characteristics of HIVST kit recipients to investigate delivery to these priority groups during HIVST scale-up in three African countries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25244DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6432104PMC
March 2019
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Economic cost analysis of door-to-door community-based distribution of HIV self-test kits in Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22 Suppl 1:e25255

Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

Introduction: HIV self-testing (HIVST) is recommended by the World Health Organization in addition to other testing modalities to increase uptake of HIV testing, particularly among harder-to-reach populations. This study provides the first empirical evidence of the costs of door-to-door community-based HIVST distribution in Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Methods: HIVST kits were distributed door-to-door in 71 sites across Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe from June 2016 to May 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25255DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6432106PMC
March 2019
3 Reads
5.090 Impact Factor

The impact and cost-effectiveness of community-based HIV self-testing in sub-Saharan Africa: a health economic and modelling analysis.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22 Suppl 1:e25243

Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

Introduction: The prevalence of undiagnosed HIV is declining in Africa, and various HIV testing approaches are finding lower positivity rates. In this context, the epidemiological impact and cost-effectiveness of community-based HIV self-testing (CB-HIVST) is unclear. We aimed to assess this in different sub-populations and across scenarios characterized by different adult HIV prevalence and antiretroviral treatment programmes in sub-Saharan Africa. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25243DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6432108PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Ability to understand and correctly follow HIV self-test kit instructions for use: applying the cognitive interview technique in Malawi and Zambia.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22 Suppl 1:e25253

Department of International Public Health, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK.

Introduction: The ability to achieve an accurate test result and interpret it correctly is critical to the impact and effectiveness of HIV self-testing (HIVST). Simple and easy-to-use devices, instructions for use (IFU) and other support tools have been shown to be key to good performance in sub-Saharan Africa and may be highly contextual. The objective of this study was to explore the utility of cognitive interviewing in optimizing the local understanding of manufacturers' IFUs to achieve an accurate HIVST result. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25253DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6432102PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Challenges in measurement of linkage following HIV self-testing: examples from the STAR Project.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22 Suppl 1:e25238

MRC Tropical Epidemiology Group, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25238DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6432105PMC

Routine versus Targeted Viral Load Strategy among Patients Starting Antiretroviral in Hanoi, Vietnam.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22(3):e25258

Center for Applied Research on Men and Community Health (CARMAH), Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Introduction: HIV viral load (VL) testing is recommended by the WHO as the preferred method for monitoring patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, evidence that routine VL (RVL) monitoring improves clinical outcomes is lacking.

Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized controlled trial of RVL monitoring every six months versus a targeted VL (TVL) strategy (routine CD4 plus VL testing if clinical or immunological failure) in patients starting ART between April 2011 and April 2014 at Bach Mai Hospital in Hanoi. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25258DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6428502PMC

ART adherence clubs in the Western Cape of South Africa: what does the sustainability framework tell us? A scoping literature review.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22(3):e25235

Maastricht Centre for Global Health, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Introduction: In 2007, the antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence club (AC) model was introduced to South Africa to combat some of the health system barriers to ART delivery, such as staff constraints and increasing patient load causing clinic congestion. It aimed to absorb the growing number of stable patients on treatment, ensure quality of care and reduce the workload on healthcare workers. A pilot project of ACs showed improved outcomes for club members with increased retention in care, reduced loss to follow-up and a reduction in viral rebound. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25235DOI Listing

Going off antiretroviral treatment in a closely monitored HIV "cure" trial: longitudinal assessments of acutely diagnosed trial participants and decliners.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22(3):e25260

RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.

Introduction: The South East Asia Research Collaboration in HIV (SEARCH) RV411 clinical trial in Thailand was a systematic investigation of analytic treatment interruption (ATI) in individuals diagnosed and treated since Fiebig stage I acute HIV infection. Here, we explore decision-making processes and perceptions of trial participation in a phase I trial that raised important ethical considerations, to identify potential areas of improvement in this relatively new field of HIV research. Similar considerations apply to other HIV phase I trials, especially those involving ATI, making this trial a model to identify challenges and opportunities in promoting informed choice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25260DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6416664PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Does free schooling affect pathways from adverse childhood experiences via mental health distress to HIV risk among adolescent girls in South Africa: a longitudinal moderated pathway model.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22(3):e25262

Centre for Evidence-Based Intervention, Department of Social Policy and Intervention, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Introduction: Adolescent girls are at high risk of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa. Mental health distress, driven by adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) such as abuse, poverty and family HIV, may be an important driver of HIV risk behaviour among adolescent girls, while education may mitigate these risks. This study aimed to develop an empirically based theoretical model between ACEs, mental health distress and HIV risk behaviour among adolescent girls in South Africa and to investigate the potential moderating effects of free schooling provision. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25262DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6416665PMC

Perspectives of US women participating in a candidate PrEP study: adherence, acceptability and future use intentions.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22(3):e25247

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Introduction: Limited data exist on acceptability of candidate pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) regimens among US women. We evaluated PrEP experiences, attitudes and future use intentions among sexually active women who completed the US-based HIV Prevention Trials Network 069/AIDS Clinical Trials Group 5305 study.

Methods: Women participated in the study between March 2013 and November 2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25247DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6416666PMC
March 2019
4 Reads

Improvements in the HIV care continuum needed to meaningfully reduce HIV incidence among men who have sex with men in Baltimore, US: a modelling study for HPTN 078.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Mar;22(3):e25246

Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College London, HPTN Modelling Centre, London, UK.

Introduction: HIV prevalence is high among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Baltimore, Maryland, United States, and the levels of viral suppression among HIV-positive MSM are relatively low. The HIV Prevention Trials Network 078 trial seeks to increase the levels of viral suppression among US MSM by increasing the rates of diagnosis and linkage to care and treatment. We estimated the increases in viral suppression needed to reach different HIV incidence reduction targets, and the impact of meeting diagnosis and treatment targets. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jia2.25246
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25246DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6416473PMC
March 2019
10 Reads

Acquisition of Sexually Transmitted Infections among Women Using a Variety of Contraceptive Options: A prospective Study among High-risk African Women.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Feb;22(2):e25257

University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Introduction: In many African settings, women concurrently face substantial risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancies. Few studies have evaluated STI risk among users of hormonal implants and copper intrauterine devices (IUDs) although these long-acting reversible contraceptive methods are being promoted widely because of their benefits. Within a prospective study of women at risk for HIV-1, we compared the risk of acquisition of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis among women using different contraceptive methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25257DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6393855PMC
February 2019
4 Reads

The influence of age-associated comorbidities on responses to combination antiretroviral therapy in older people living with HIV.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Feb;22(2):e25228

Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.

Introduction: Multiple comorbidities among HIV-positive individuals may increase the potential for polypharmacy causing drug-to-drug interactions and older individuals with comorbidities, particularly those with cognitive impairment, may have difficulty in adhering to complex medications. However, the effects of age-associated comorbidities on the treatment outcomes of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) are not well known. In this study, we investigated the effects of age-associated comorbidities on therapeutic outcomes of cART in HIV-positive adults in Asian countries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25228DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6389354PMC
February 2019
3 Reads

HIV care cascade and sustainable wellbeing of people living with HIV in context.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Feb;22(2):e25259

Department of Social Policy, London School of Economics and Politics (LSE), London, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25259DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6381287PMC
February 2019

Persistence on HIV preexposure prophylaxis medication over a 2-year period among a national sample of 7148 PrEP users, United States, 2015 to 2017.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Feb;22(2):e25252

Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Introduction: Persistence on preexposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention (PrEP) medication has rarely been reported for periods greater than one year, or in real-world settings. This study used pharmacy fill records for PrEP users from a national chain pharmacy to describe persistence on PrEP medication over a two-year period, and to explore correlates with PrEP medication persistence in a real-world setting.

Methods: We analysed de-identified pharmacy fill records of 7148 eligible individuals who initiated PrEP in 2015 at a national chain pharmacy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25252DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6378757PMC
February 2019
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Pre-exposure prophylaxis initiation and adherence among Black men who have sex with men (MSM) in three US cities: results from the HPTN 073 study.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Feb;22(2):e25223

Department of Human Development, State University of New York at BinghamtonBinghamton, NY, USA.

Introduction: Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in preventing HIV acquisition among men who have sex with men (MSM). However, limited research has examined initiation and adherence to PrEP among Black MSM (BMSM) in the United States (US) who are disproportionately represented among newly HIV infected and late to care individuals. This research reports on the HIV Prevention Trials Network 073 (HPTN 073) study aimed to examine PrEP initiation, utilization and adherence among Black MSM utilizing the theoretically principled, culturally informed and client-centered care coordination (C4) model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25223DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6376611PMC
February 2019
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5.090 Impact Factor

Patterns and clinical consequences of discontinuing HIV preexposure prophylaxis during primary care.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Feb;22(2):e25250

Division of Infectious Disease, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.

Introduction: Discontinuations of HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) by at-risk individuals could decrease the effectiveness of PrEP. Our objective was to characterize patterns of, reasons for, and clinical outcomes associated with PrEP discontinuations in primary care.

Methods: We conducted medical chart reviews for patients prescribed PrEP during 2011 to 2014 at a Boston community health centre specializing in healthcare for sexual and gender minorities. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jia2.25250
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25250DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6376610PMC
February 2019
7 Reads

Longitudinal changes in HIV DNA in HIV controllers: what do they mean?

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Feb;22(2):e25254

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25254DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6376800PMC
February 2019

ART adherence and viral suppression are high among most non-pregnant individuals with early-stage, asymptomatic HIV infection: an observational study from Uganda and South Africa.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Feb;22(2):e25232

Oregon Health & Science University-Portland State University School of Public Health, Portland, OR, USA.

Introduction: The success of universal antiretroviral therapy (ART) access and aspirations for an AIDS-free generation depend on high adherence in individuals initiating ART during early-stage HIV infection; however, adherence may be difficult in the absence of illness and associated support.

Methods: From March 2015 to October 2017, we prospectively observed three groups initiating ART in routine care in Uganda and South Africa: men and non-pregnant women with early-stage HIV infection (CD4 > 350 cells/μL), pregnant women with early-stage HIV infection and men and non-pregnant women with late-stage HIV infection (CD4 < 200 cells/μL). Socio-behavioural questionnaires were administered and viral loads were performed at 0, 6 and 12 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25232DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6371013PMC
February 2019
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A latent class approach to identify multi-risk profiles associated with phylogenetic clustering of recent hepatitis C virus infection in Australia and New Zealand from 2004 to 2015.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Feb;22(2):e25222

Kirby Institute, UNSW, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Introduction: Over the last two decades, the incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV began increasing in post-industrialized countries. Little is known about transmission of acute or recent HCV, in particular among MSM living with HIV co-infection, which creates uncertainty about potential for reinfection after HCV treatment. Using phylogenetic methods, clinical, epidemiological and molecular data can be combined to better understand transmission patterns. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25222DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6371014PMC
February 2019
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Retention on antiretroviral therapy during Universal Test and Treat implementation in Zomba district, Malawi: a retrospective cohort study.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Feb;22(2):e25239

Dignitas International, Zomba, Malawi.

Introduction: Since June 2016, the national HIV programme in Malawi has adopted Universal Test and Treat (UTT) guidelines requiring that all persons who test HIV positive will be referred to start antiretroviral therapy (ART). Although there is strong evidence from clinical trials that early initiation of ART leads to reduced morbidity and mortality, the impact of UTT on retention on ART in real-life programmatic settings in Africa is not yet known.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study in Zomba district, Malawi to compare ART outcomes of patients who initiated ART under 2016 UTT guidelines and those who started ART prior to rollout of UTT (pre-UTT). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25239DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6367572PMC
February 2019
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Current challenges and recent advances in the search for a cure for HIV.

Authors:
R Brad Jones

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Feb;22(2):e25248

Infectious Diseases Division, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25248DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6367571PMC
February 2019

PrEP uptake preferences among men who have sex with men in China: results from a National Internet Survey.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Feb;22(2):e25242

Beijing Ditan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

Introduction: HIV incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM) is high in China. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising mean to prevent HIV transmission but it is not widely available in China. We conducted a large Internet-based online survey to assess the willingness of Chinese MSM to take PrEP and associated factors to their uptake preferences. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jia2.25242
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25242DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364490PMC
February 2019
11 Reads

"Is it making any difference?" A qualitative study examining the treatment-taking experiences of asymptomatic people living with HIV in the context of Treat-all in Eswatini.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Jan;22(1):e25220

Médecins Sans Frontières, Nhlangano, Eswatini.

Introduction: Treat-all is being implemented in several African settings, in accordance with 2015 World Health Organisation guidelines. The factors known to undermine adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) may change in the context of Treat-all, where people living with HIV (PLHIV) increasingly initiate ART at earlier, asymptomatic stages of disease, soon after diagnosis. This paper aimed to examine the asymptomatic PLHIV's experiences engaging with early ART initiation under the Treat-all policy, including how they navigate treatment-taking over the longer term. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25220DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6351702PMC
January 2019
1 Read
5.090 Impact Factor

Trends and predictors of non-communicable disease multimorbidity among adults living with HIV and receiving antiretroviral therapy in Brazil.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Jan;22(1):e25233

National Institute of Infectology - Evandro Chagas, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Introduction: People living with HIV (PLHIV) on antiretroviral therapy (ART) experience high rates of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). These co-morbidities often accumulate and older adults may suffer from multimorbidity. Multimorbidity has been associated with loss of quality of life, polypharmacy, and increased risk of frailty and mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25233DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6351749PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

Diabetes mellitus burden among people living with HIV from the Asia-Pacific region.

J Int AIDS Soc 2019 Jan;22(1):e25236

HIV-NAT/Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre, Bangkok, Thailand.

Introduction: Comorbidities including diabetes mellitus (DM) among people living with HIV (PLHIV) are of increasing clinical concerns in combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) era. We aimed to determine the incidence and risk factors of new-onset DM among PLHIV in Asian settings.

Methods: PLHIV from a regional observational cohort without DM prior to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation were included in the analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25236DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6351701PMC
January 2019
2 Reads