194 results match your criteria Journal of the CardioMetabolic Syndrome [Journal]


Evaluation of the appropriate diagnostic threshold of waist circumference for the cardiometabolic syndrome in Chinese Uygur adults.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(2):120-5

Department of Rheumatology, People's Hospital of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00045.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00045.xDOI Listing
September 2009
6 Reads

The obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus pandemic: Part I. Increased cardiovascular disease risk and the importance of atherogenic dyslipidemia in persons with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(2):113-9

Department of Medicine and the Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

Both the metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) confer an increased risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD). As MS and T2DM become more prevalent, there will be an associated rise in the number of individuals with or at risk for CVD and its related disorders. One major underlying cause of CVD in patients with MS or T2DM is a characteristic form of atherogenic dyslipidemia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00044.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2901596PMC
September 2009
6 Reads

Screening guidelines for coronary heart disease in diabetes: current recommendations.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(2):107-12

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Chicago Medical School, Chicago, IL, USA.

Diabetes and cardiovascular disease are so intertwined with one another that the presence of one prompts a search for the other. Diabetes has been considered to be equivalent to coronary heart disease (CHD), and conversely many patients with known CHD have concomitant diabetes or its pre-states. This review has been compiled based on the guidelines of the American Diabetes Association, the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP ATP III), the European Society of Cardiology, and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00040.xDOI Listing
September 2009
4 Reads

Resveratrol: biologic and therapeutic implications.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(2):102-6

Department of Medicine, Chicago Medical School, North Chicago, IL 60064, USA.

Resveratrol (3,4',5 trihydroxystilbene), a naturally-occurring molecule known as a phytoalexin, is synthesized by plants in response to attacks by fungi, bacteria, or other injurious substances; it is also known to possess an array of cardioprotective effects. Recently, studies have shown resveratrol to protect against the metabolic changes associated with hypercaloric diets in mice with induced insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia. Despite impressive gains in diagnosis and treatment, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a serious clinical problem and threat to public health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00039.xDOI Listing
September 2009
5 Reads

Utility of aspirin therapy in patients with the cardiometabolic syndrome and diabetes.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(2):96-101

Diabetes and Cardiovascular Center, University of Missouri School of Medicine and Truman VA Hospital, Columbia, MO 65212, USA.

Paralleling the rise in obesity, the cardiometabolic syndrome is a rapidly growing health problem in the United States. There is a 3-fold increase in the prevalence of coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke due to the coagulation, hemodynamic, and metabolic abnormalities seen in these individuals. The use of aspirin for secondary prevention and, to a lesser degree, primary prevention of cardiovascular events is a well-established standard of care. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00037.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00037.xDOI Listing
September 2009
9 Reads

Obstructive sleep apnea is highly prevalent and correlates with impaired glycemic control in consecutive patients with the metabolic syndrome.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(2):89-95

Hypertension Unit, University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and the metabolic syndrome (MS) are independently associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of OSA among consecutive patients with MS and to determine whether OSA is associated with impaired glycemic control. Fifty consecutive patients with a recent diagnosis of MS and no previous diagnosis of OSA underwent a polysomnography and anthropometric and laboratory measurements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00046.xDOI Listing
September 2009
4 Reads

Left ventricular structural and functional changes in the metabolic syndrome.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(2):81-8

Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Hypertension Clinic, Trinity College and St. James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.

To test the hypothesis that the cardiac structural and functional abnormalities of the metabolic syndrome (MS) are independent of body mass index (BMI), 160 untreated patients (aged 47+/-1 years [mean +/- SEM], 53% male) underwent 2-dimensional echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging and evaluation for MS. Participants with MS and controls were similar in age, BMI, and ejection fraction, but those with MS had greater left ventricular relative wall thickness (RWT) (0.43+/-0. Read More

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http://www.eaglelodge.ie/files/5614/2598/6642/left_ventricul
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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00043.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00043.xDOI Listing
September 2009
8 Reads

Change in hemoglobin A(1c) and C-reactive protein levels in patients with diabetes mellitus.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(2):76-80

Target Research Enhancement Program at the Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Providence, RI 02908, USA.

The authors studied the effects on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels of an intensive intervention to reduce hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) among 58 veterans with type 2 diabetes. Weekly group sessions of behavioral and pharmacologic intervention were conducted for 4 weeks at Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Change in cardiovascular risk factors and CRP levels were compared at baseline and 3 months postintervention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00042.xDOI Listing
September 2009
4 Reads

Pulse pressure and the metabolic syndrome in patients with hypertension.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(2):72-5

Department of Cardiology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain.

The authors examined the clinical profile of the hypertensive population with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and elevated pulse pressure (PP) in a sample of 5866 patients (3291 women and 2575 men) included in a large hypertension survey performed in primary care setting. Elevated PP was defined as >or=80 mm Hg in women and >or=75 mm Hg in men; 92.7% of women and 87. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00041.xDOI Listing
September 2009
3 Reads

Central obesity and insulin resistance in the cardiometabolic syndrome: pathways to preclinical cardiovascular structure and function.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(2):63-71

Behavioral Medicine Research Center, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33136, USA.

The cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) has been an organizing conceptual framework for subclinical cardiovascular pathophysiology. Using cross-sectional data from 338 healthy men and women aged 18 to 55 years, the study examined the role of central adiposity and insulin sensitivity and assessed potential relationships with other metabolic indices (insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, fibrinolysis, lipidemia, endothelial function, and inflammation) and measures of cardiac structure and function (cardiac mass, compliance and contractility, myocardial oxygen demand, and blood pressure). Structural equation modeling analyses, which controlled for sex, age, and race, demonstrated good fit to the data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00038.xDOI Listing
September 2009
7 Reads

The role of the renin-angiotensin system in the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of renal impairment in patients with the cardiometabolic syndrome or its components.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(1):57-62

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65212, USA.

Chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease share many risk factors, including hypertension, obesity, and insulin resistance. All of these are components of the cardiometabolic syndrome and are associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. One mechanism that links renal injury with the cardiometabolic syndrome is activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00035.xDOI Listing
July 2009
5 Reads

Prevalence and significance of cardiometabolic risk factors in children with type 1 diabetes.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(1):50-6

Section of Diabetes & Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, CMRI Diabetes and Metabolic Research Program, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA.

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a common disease of childhood with a current prevalence of almost 2 cases per 1000 adolescents, according to the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Modern insulin treatment has resulted in improved quality of life for children with this chronic disorder. However, T1D continues to carry a long-term burden of increased microvascular and macrovascular complications and mortality risk. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00034.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00034.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2649740PMC
July 2009
3 Reads

The role of adiponectin in obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(1):44-9

Department of Medicine, Chicago Medical School, North Chicago, IL 60064, USA.

Nearly 1 in 4 adults in the United States is obese. The connection between obesity and insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease is a well researched one. The increasing prevalence of each of these diseases has become a growing concern for the medical community. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00030.xDOI Listing
July 2009
11 Reads

Insulin Resistance and the cardiometabolic syndrome in HIV infection.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(1):40-3

Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Department of Medicine, Luigi Sacco Hospital (Vialba), University of Milan, Milan, Italy.

Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has dramatically improved the prognosis of HIV-positive patients. However, long-term adverse effects of this therapy include dyslipidemia, insulin resistance (IR), changes in body fat distribution (lipodystrophy), and cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS). IR in HIV-positive patients does not seem to represent a significant independent risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease; nevertheless, the association with other metabolic complications (dyslipidemia, fat redistribution) and CMS may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00027.xDOI Listing
July 2009
4 Reads

Coronary artery calcification and inflammation according to various metabolic syndrome definitions.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(1):33-9

Johns Hopkins University Ciccarone Preventive Cardiology Center, Baltimore, MD, USA.

A number of metabolic syndrome (MS) definitions exist, and one's cardiovascular disease risk may depend on the definition used. The authors compared the association of subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery calcification [CAC] score >0] and inflammation (white blood cell [WBC] count greater than or equal to the highest quartile) with 3 definitions of MS (those of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III [NCEP ATP III], the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute [AHA/NHLBI], and the International Diabetes Federation [IDF]) in 458 asymptomatic men (mean age, 46+/-7 years). MS was present in 28%, 29%, and 34% according to NCEP ATP III, AHA/NHLBI, and IDF criteria, respectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00033.xDOI Listing
July 2009
20 Reads

Comparison between Turkish Cardiovascular Risk Platform and United States National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III definitions of the metabolic syndrome in Turkish adults.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(1):26-32

From the Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul Science University, Istanbul, Turkey.

The Turkish Cardiovascular Risk Platform (TCRP) calls for the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome (MS) if insulin resistance, impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or diabetes mellitus and >or=2 other established criteria are present. TCRP defines insulin resistance as a homeostasis model assessment >2.7. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00032.xDOI Listing
July 2009
5 Reads

Drugs are not enough: the metabolic syndrome--a call for intensive therapeutic lifestyle change.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(1):20-5

Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA.

Whether intensive pharmacologic cardiovascular risk factor management reduces metabolic syndrome (MetS) prevalence is unknown. The authors compared the number of secondary prevention medications and National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III)-defined MetS prevalence in coronary artery disease patients entering cardiac rehabilitation from 1996 to 2001 (period 1, n=516) with those entering from 2002 to 2006 (period 2, n=609). Age, sex, and ethnicity were similar in both periods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00031.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2774888PMC
July 2009
2 Reads

Waist circumference, body mass index, and their association with cardiometabolic and global risk.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(1):12-9

Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

Total body fat and adipose tissue distribution are associated with cardiometabolic risk, yet there are conflicting data as to whether waist circumference (WC) or body mass index (BMI) is a better predictor of cardiovascular risk. To determine whether WC or BMI was more strongly associated with cardiometabolic risk, family members of patients with cardiac disease were studied (N=501; mean age, 48 years; 66% female; 36% nonwhite). Height, weight, WC, BMI, blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) were systematically measured. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00029.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2747723PMC
July 2009
6 Reads

Measures of coronary artery calcification and association with the metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(1):6-11

Division of Cardiology, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA.

The authors compared the metabolic syndrome status and Framingham 10-year coronary heart disease risk score (FRS) with the coronary artery calcification (CAC) in subclinical atherosclerosis. In all, 356 consecutive patients who underwent coronary artery calcium scanning were studied. Participants' metabolic syndrome status (by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III [NCEP ATP III] guidelines) and FRS were measured. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00028.xDOI Listing
July 2009
32 Reads

Statin pleiotropy against renal injury.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(1):E4-9

Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.

Statins may exhibit significant renoprotective effects beyond their lipid-lowering capacity. Herein, the authors review data from human and animal models of renal disease as well as from studies in cultured renal cells with regard to extralipid renoprotective properties of statins. Statins may exert lipid-independent benefits against renal injury in experimental states of chronic or acute renal function impairment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00052.xDOI Listing
July 2009
6 Reads

Antihypertensive pharmacotherapy: adverse effects of medications promote nonadherence.

Authors:
Icilma V Fergus

J Cardiometab Syndr 2009 ;4(1):E1-3

Clinical Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00053.xDOI Listing
July 2009
4 Reads

Strain imaging using speckle tracking in the cardiometabolic syndrome: method and utility.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(4):258-61

Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00025.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2640495PMC
March 2009
4 Reads

Surgical treatment of the cardiometabolic syndrome and obesity.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(4):254-7

Post Graduate Medical Institute, Lahore General Hospital, University of Health Sciences Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan.

Prevalence of overweight and obesity has reached a pandemic proportion worldwide and is increasingly contributing to premature morbidity and mortality. Lifestyle changes including behavioral modification, exercise, different dietary plans, and medications have very poor outcome on long-term weight loss. Bariatric surgery has shown to be very effective for morbidly obese patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00021.xDOI Listing
March 2009
3 Reads

Omega-3 fatty acids and the cardiometabolic syndrome.

Authors:
Vijaya Juturu

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(4):244-53

Nutrition 21, Inc, Purchase, NY 10577, USA.

Benefits of fish consumption in patients with the cardiometabolic syndrome relate to the high biologic value of protein, omega-3 fatty acids, as well as certain minerals and vitamins in fish. Recently, the American Heart Association issued new guidelines for the intake of omega-3 oils for the prevention of coronary heart disease. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential health benefits of fish consumption and/or fish oil supplements in reducing cardiometabolic syndrome risk factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00015.xDOI Listing
March 2009
3 Reads

Attenuation of endocrine-exocrine pancreatic communication in type 2 diabetes: pancreatic extracellular matrix ultrastructural abnormalities.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(4):234-43

Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65121-0001, USA.

Ultrastructural observations reveal a continuous interstitial matrix connection between the endocrine and exocrine pancreas, which is lost due to fibrosis in rodent models and humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Widening of the islet-exocrine interface appears to result in loss of desmosomes and adherens junctions between islet and acinar cells and is associated with hypercellularity consisting of pericytes and inflammatory cells in T2DM pancreatic tissue. Organized fibrillar collagen was closely associated with pericytes, which are known to differentiate into myofibroblasts-pancreatic stellate cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00024.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2646502PMC
March 2009
4 Reads

The diabetes subgroup baseline characteristics of the Avoiding Cardiovascular Events Through Combination Therapy in Patients Living With Systolic Hypertension (ACCOMPLISH) trial.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(4):229-33

Hypertensive Diseases Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

The Avoiding Cardiovascular Events Through Combination Therapy in Patients Living With Systolic Hypertension (ACCOMPLISH) trial is the first cardiovascular outcome trial designed to compare initial use of 2 different fixed-dose antihypertensive regimens, benazepril plus hydrochlorothiazide vs benazepril plus amlodipine, on cardiovascular end points in hypertensive patients at high cardiovascular risk secondary to previous major events or presence of diabetes mellitus (DM). Of the 11,464 patients, 60.4% had DM. Read More

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http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/handle/2027.42/73240
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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00023.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00023.xDOI Listing
March 2009
5 Reads

The metabolic syndrome among patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in Jordan.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(4):224-8

Department of Community Medicine, Public Health and Family Medicine, Jordan University of Science & Technology, Irbid, Jordan.

This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MeS) and its associated factors among patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in north Jordan. A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients who underwent cardiac catheterization at King Abdullah University Hospital in north Jordan. Data from 360 patients were collected through personal interview, medical records, and anthropometric measurements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00020.xDOI Listing
March 2009
5 Reads

The insulin gradient phenomenon: a manifestation of the effects of body weight on blood pressure and insulin resistance.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(4):218-23

Department of Preventive Cardiology, Clínica Medellín, Medellín, Colombia.

The relationship between hyperinsulinemia and hypertension is frequently observed in overweight patients; however, population studies have not confirmed an independent association. A population study was conducted to assess whether differences in body mass index and levels of insulinemia modify cardiovascular hemodynamics and arterial pressure. In all, 322 healthy adults underwent a medical evaluation including insulin sensitivity and cardiac performance assessment with echocardiography. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00018.xDOI Listing
March 2009
5 Reads

Demographic analyses of the effects of carvedilol vs metoprolol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) study.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(4):211-7

University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.

In the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) trial, carvedilol added to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers had neutral or beneficial effects on glycemic measures compared with metoprolol tartrate. For the 1235 diabetic hypertensive GEMINI patients, the authors assessed treatment differences by race (white/black/other), age (continuous variable), and sex on hemoglobin A(1c), insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), and blood pressure. Both treatments significantly reduced blood pressure in all subgroups, but the metabolic effects of carvedilol were more beneficial in subgroups of race and sex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00017.xDOI Listing
March 2009
5 Reads

Metabolic syndrome resolution in children and adolescents after 10 weeks of weight loss.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(4):205-10

Lindora Inc., Costa Mesa, CA 92626, USA.

Without aggressive intervention, childhood obesity and the metabolic syndrome may result in lifelong physical consequences. Interventions that emphasize healthy eating and regular exercise are crucial to stop this epidemic and its ramifications. This paper discusses the incidence of the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors before and after a weight loss program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00016.xDOI Listing
March 2009
3 Reads

The effect of pioglitazone on nitric oxide synthase in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(4):200-4

Third Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pioglitazone on nitric oxide in patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. Twenty-seven patients with coronary artery disease and diabetes mellitus who had received coronary stenting were eligible for the study. They were assigned to the no insulin resistance (NIR) group, the insulin resistance (IR) group, and the pioglitazone group (30 mg once a day). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00019.xDOI Listing
March 2009
5 Reads

Characterization of the metabolic syndrome by apolipoproteins in the Oklahoma Cherokee.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(4):193-9

Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK, USA.

Native Americans are susceptible to type 2 diabetes and associated cardiovascular risk that precedes the diabetes. Nondiabetic Cherokee adolescents and young adults were studied for association of apolipoproteins A-I, B, and C-III with the metabolic syndrome, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and body mass index. Apolipoproteins, lipids, selected ratios, and HOMA-IR changed adversely according to the number of metabolic syndrome criteria present (P<. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00022.xDOI Listing
March 2009
3 Reads

The controversy regarding contrast echocardiography and how it affects patients with the cardiometabolic syndrome.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(3):188-91

Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00010.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3810453PMC
January 2009
3 Reads

Insulin resistance and endothelin: another pathway for renal injury in patients with the cardiometabolic syndrome?

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(3):183-7

Section of Nephrology and Hypertension, 1st Department of Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Recent population studies suggest that insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, as well as the presence of the cardiometabolic syndrome, are associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease. A considerable number of background studies support this association, proposing several mechanisms through which insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia can harm the normal kidney. Current knowledge suggests that activation of the endothelin system can be an important factor contributing to the development of renal injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00009.xDOI Listing
January 2009
5 Reads

Challenges to the diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and management of clustered cardiometabolic risk factors.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(3):177-82

A panel was convened on February 18, 2008, to discuss the challenges to the diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and management of clustered cardiometabolic risk factors. Peter W.F. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00005.xDOI Listing
January 2009
6 Reads

Costs of and reasons for obesity.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(3):173-6

Chicago Medical School, Chicago IL, USA.

The purpose of this literature review was to identify and describe the cost of obesity, the contributing factors, and the use of taxation as a possible method of control of this epidemic in a Canadian setting. A review of the current literature found on the PubMed/MEDLINE services of the National Institutes of Health as well as an analysis of Web content was conducted. The PubMed/MEDLINE search identified 677 articles pertaining to Canada and obesity, 323 articles relating to price policy, 26 articles concerning obesity and taxes, and 29 articles about obesity, Canada, and cost (1964-March 2007). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00012.xDOI Listing
January 2009
5 Reads

Obesity, hypertension, and the heart.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(3):168-72

Department of Cardiology, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70121, USA.

Controversy exists regarding the amount of risk caused by obesity, but there is general consensus that it is associated with many serious disorders, mostly cardiovascular and neoplastic. Obesity is clearly associated with hypertension, ventricular remodeling with subsequent congestive heart failure, sleep-disordered breathing, and sudden death. The physiologic alterations associated with establishing and perpetuating the obese state are complex but are becoming clear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00011.xDOI Listing
January 2009
4 Reads

Impact of obesity on the pathogenesis and prognosis of coronary heart disease.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(3):162-7

Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA70121-2483, USA.

Obesity has a significant adverse effect on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and the metabolic syndrome/diabetes. Obesity is an independent risk factor for CHD events; however, obese patients with CHD generally have a more favorable prognosis, with the worst prognosis associated with either underweight or morbidly obese patients. In this manuscript, the authors review the impact of obesity on overall CHD risk as well as the prognosis of obese patients with established CHD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00004.xDOI Listing
January 2009
3 Reads

Impact of obesity on the risk of heart failure and its prognosis.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(3):155-61

Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA 70121-2483, USA.

Obesity is becoming a global epidemic in both children and adults, and it is associated with numerous comorbidities such as coronary heart disease, stroke/cerebrovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, certain cancers, and sleep-disordered breathing. Over the past 2 decades, the incidence of and mortality from coronary heart disease and cardiovascular diseases has been continuously declining. In contrast, the incidence of and mortality from heart failure (HF) have been increasing, with HF diagnosed in approximately 5 million Americans and 550,000 new cases diagnosed each year and a death rate looming at 300,000 per year. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00001.xDOI Listing
January 2009
5 Reads

Obesity and dysrhythmias.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(3):149-54

Department of Cardiology, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70121, USA.

In the United States, obesity has reached epidemic proportions. Results from the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey estimated that 66% of US adults are either overweight (body mass index [BMI] 25-30 kg/m(2)) or obese (BMI>30 kg/m(2)) as defined by the BMI cutoffs established by the World Health Organization. In the 1970s, only 15% of the US population between the ages of 20 and 74 years was categorized as obese. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00003.xDOI Listing
January 2009
4 Reads

Obesity: a central risk and cardiovascular target of the cardiometabolic syndrome.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(3):147-8

Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA 70121, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00007.xDOI Listing
January 2009
3 Reads

Chronic low-dose lipid infusion in healthy patients induces markers of endothelial activation independent of its metabolic effects.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(3):141-6

Division of Diabetes, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78284-3900, USA.

Elevated plasma triglyceride/free fatty acid (FFA) levels and insulin resistance may promote atherosclerosis through endothelial activation (ie, increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM-1]/vascular adhesion molecule 1 [VCAM-1], and endothelin-1 [ET-1]) in patients with the metabolic syndrome, but this has never been directly tested. The authors measured endothelial activation and insulin sensitivity (euglycemic insulin clamp with [3-(3)H]-glucose) after a 4-day low-dose lipid infusion that elevated plasma FFA to levels observed in the metabolic syndrome in 20 lean, non-diabetic insulin-resistant subjects with a strong family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (FH(+)) and 10 insulin-sensitive volunteers without a family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (FH(-)). Low-dose lipid infusion reduced insulin sensitivity by approximately 25% in insulin-sensitive FH(-)controls but did not worsen preexisting insulin resistance in FH(+). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00013.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00013.xDOI Listing
January 2009
4 Reads

Impact of cardiac rehabilitation on coronary risk factors, inflammation, and the metabolic syndrome in obese coronary patients.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(3):136-40

Ochsner Heart & Vascular Institute, Ochsner Medical Center, New Orleans, LA 70121-2483, USA.

Obesity is a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factor and is prevalent in patients with CHD. The authors reviewed data in 235 consecutive patients before and after formal cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training (CRET) programs and analyzed data in 72 lean patients (body mass index [BMI] <25 kg/m(2)) vs 73 obese patients (BMI>or=30 kg/m(2)). At baseline, obese patients were significantly younger (P<. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00002.xDOI Listing
January 2009
3 Reads

A 5-year follow-up study of 3 polymorphisms in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene in relation to obesity, hypertension, and diabetes.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(3):132-5

Cardiovascular Institute, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.

Glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are cytoplasmaticreceptors regulating the expression of cortisol and bind to specific sites on chromatin. The glucocorticoid receptor gene (GRL) is located on chromosome 5q31 and encodes for either a 777-amino acid (GRalpha) or a 742-amino acid (GRbeta) polypeptide. The objective of the current study was to examine the prospective association of 3 polymorphisms-a Tth111I restriction fragment in the promoter region, a BclI polymorphism in intron 2, and an A/G polymorphism in exon 2-of the GRL gene on estimates of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes in 163 unrelated Swedish men born in 1944. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-4572.2008.00008.xDOI Listing
January 2009
6 Reads

Obesity and the metabolic syndrome in African American women.

Authors:
Angela L Brown

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(2):126-8

Cardiovascular Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA.

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May 2009
3 Reads

Challenges to the diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and management of clustered cardiometabolic risk factors.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(2):119-25

A panel was convened on January 10, 2007, to discuss the challenges to the diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and management of clustered cardiometabolic risk factors. George Bakris, MD, Professor of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, moderated the panel. Vivian Fonseca, MD, Tulane University Health Science Center, New Orleans, LA, and JoAnne Foody, MD, Harvard School of Medicine, Boston, MA, participated in the discussion. Read More

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May 2009
6 Reads

Magnetic resonance imaging for quantifying regional adipose tissue in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons with the cardiometabolic syndrome.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(2):115-8

Department of Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2413049PMC
May 2009
7 Reads

Severe weight gain, lipodystrophy, dyslipidemia, and obstructive sleep apnea in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient following highly active antiretroviral therapy.

J Cardiometab Syndr 2008 ;3(2):111-4

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2837278PMC
May 2009
2 Reads