3,191 results match your criteria Journal of the American Medical Women's Association[Journal]


The development of a primary care curriculum for obstetrics/gynecology residents.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 1998 ;53(3 Suppl):137-9

Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.

In order to develop a primary care curriculum for obstetricians and gynecologists, a needs assessment was performed to determine those topics in which additional training was needed. We used a Likert scale comfort score (0-10) for evaluating or treating 14 primary care areas. The results of the 30 completed surveys showed that topics traditionally emphasized in obstetrics/gynecology training received very high comfort scores, while scores for traditional internal medicine problems were very low. Read More

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July 2007
3 Reads

Women's health curriculum at Stanford.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 1998 ;53(3 Suppl):135-6

Stanford University, USA.

As health care for women receives national attention, medical educators have come under increasing pressure to train physicians to provide optimal care for their female patients. Stanford University has responded by creating a clerkship in women's health. This interdisciplinary clerkship is two or four weeks and explores women's health chronologically from adolescence to old age. Read More

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July 2007
4 Reads

A women's health curriculum for an internal medicine residency.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 1998 ;53(3 Suppl):133-4

Kalamazoo Center for Medical Studies, Michigan State University, USA.

This women's health curriculum was developed as a specialized track within the internal medicine residency at Michigan State University/Kalamazoo Center for Medical Studies. It is designed to provide the knowledge, attitudes, and skills needed to deliver care to women and to foster interest in women's health research. Specific objectives include: 1. Read More

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July 2007
4 Reads

Primary care fellowship in women's health.

Authors:
K M Thomsen

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 1998 ;53(3 Suppl):131-2

Planned Parenthood Federation of America, New York City, USA.

This paper describes the Primary Care Fellowship in Women's Health based in the Family Medicine Department at UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. The major components of the program are detailed and include the clinical, teaching, research, masters in public health, community involvement, and leadership aspects. In addition, the paper discusses how the approach of family medicine lends itself to the study and practice of the women's health concepts of totality, centrality, and diversity. Read More

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July 2007
3 Reads

A cultural diversity curriculum: combining didactic, problem-solving, and simulated experiences.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 1998 ;53(3 Suppl):128-30

Department of Pediatrics, Ohio State University College of Medicine, USA.

The development of a cultural diversity curriculum in undergraduate medical education is timely because of the need to communicate with increasing numbers of patients of diverse racial, ethnic, linguistic, and religious backgrounds. The key goals of the Ohio State University College of Medicine curriculum are to: 1) establish the relevancy of cultural diversity training to clinical practice; 2) contrast the impact of non-Anglo and Anglo world views on health behavior; 3) develop basic cultural competency skills; 4) provide insights into the effects of discrimination on minority patients and professionals; and 5) understand some of the complementary medicine practices that patients use. The curriculum employs a combination of didactic lectures and demonstrations, clinical cases and vignettes for problem solving, and simulated experiences of discrimination through first-person accounts, videotapes, and patient and physician panels. Read More

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July 2007
3 Reads

Development and evaluation of an instrument to assess medical students' cultural attitudes.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 1998 ;53(3 Suppl):124-7

Department of Medical Education, University of Michigan Medical School, USA.

This paper describes the development and psychometric evaluation of an instrument designed to assess medical students' comfort with a range of sociocultural issues and intercultural experiences. Each survey item obliged students to reflect on their own sociocultural identities and academic status in relation to others', and to judge how comfortable they would be interacting across perceived boundaries based on sociocultural identity and academic status. More than 90% of University of Michigan first-year medical students (n=153) completed the survey just before classes began. Read More

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July 2007
2 Reads

Required curricula in diversity and cross-cultural medicine: the time is now.

Authors:
M Welch

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 1998 ;53(3 Suppl):121-3, 130

Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, USA.

Culture affects the health of patients in many ways. The increasing diversity of the US population and of medical students, residents, and faculty underscores the need for training in diversity and crosscultural medicine. Curricula addressing culturally diverse populations are well defined in nursing and psychiatry, but have only recently been introduced in medical school and residency programs. Read More

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July 2007
2 Reads

Curriculum enhancement in medical education: teaching cultural competence and women's health for a changing society.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 1998 ;53(3 Suppl):114-20

Office on Women's Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, USA.

In spite of growing awareness of the need to provide minorities and women with more targeted and appropriate health care, curriculum innovation in the area of cultural competence and women's health in American medical schools has been slow. Fundamental systematic curriculum change has taken place in only a handful of medical schools., In October 1995, leaders from academia, government, and health professional organizations met with medical residents and students to develop strategies for enhancing curriculum in response to social, demographic, and health changes that are now occurring at an accelerating rate. Read More

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July 2007
2 Reads

Impact of partner abuse on women's reproductive lives.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2005 ;60(1):42-5

Division of Public Health Practice, Harvard School of Public Health, MGH/Partners Institute for Health Policy, Boston, USA.

Objective: To increase our understanding of how intimate partner abuse may limit women's reproductive choices.

Methods: Findings were obtained from a larger study involving interviews with 38 women participating in a hospital-based domestic violence program. We asked participants whether and in what ways their abusive partners had limited their ability to choose whether or not to have children. Read More

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July 2006
3 Reads

Immigration policies increase south Asian immigrant women's vulnerability to intimate partner violence.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2005 ;60(1):26-32

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, USA.

Objective: To explore forms of immigration-related partner abuse and examine the association of such abuse and immigration status with physical and sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) among South Asian women residing in greater Boston.

Method: Cross-sectional survey data on demographics,immigration status, immigration-related partner abuse, IPV, and health were collected from immigrant South Asian women currently in relationships with men (n=189). In-depth interviews were conducted with immigrant South Asian women with histories of IPV (n=23). Read More

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July 2006
58 Reads
7 Citations

Gang and multiple rapes during military service: health consequences and health care.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2005 ;60(1):33-41

Psychology Service, Iowa City Veterans' Affairs Medical Center, USA.

Objectives: We aimed to determine whether there were differences in women veteran's health status and use of health care services by type of rape that occurred during military service.

Methods: We conducted a national cross-sectional survey of women veterans who served in Vietnam and subsequent eras and were listed in Department of Veterans Affairs comprehensive women's health care registries. We used structured telephone interviews to gather socioeconomic information, violence history, use of outpatient health care services, and health status for a random sample, stratified by region and era of service. Read More

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July 2006
10 Reads

Batterers' use of guns to threaten intimate partners.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2005 ;60(1):62-8

Boston University School of Public Health, Harvard School of Public Health, USA.

Objectives: To present the prevalence of gun ownership among batterers and describe their self-reported use of guns to threaten intimate partners.

Methods: We used multivariate methods to analyze data from 8529 men enrolled in Massachusetts certified batterer intervention programs between 1999 and 2003.

Results: Seven percent of the sample reported owning guns during the past 3 years. Read More

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July 2006
19 Reads

Physician pattern of patient notification of test results.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2005 ;60(1):58-61

Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Columbia, USA.

Objective: To discover how community-based family physicians notify patients of test results and whether there are differences based on sex, length of time in practice, reimbursement status, employment status,or percentage of practice in managed care.

Methods: We mailed a survey to 500 randomly selected members of the South Carolina chapter of the American Academy of Family Physicians. All analyses were preformed using SASTM version 8. Read More

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July 2006
3 Reads

Increase in obstacles to abortion: the American perspective in 2004.

Authors:
Martin Donohoe

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2005 ;60(1):16-25

Old Town Clinic, Department of Community Health, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon, USA.

This paper summarizes the barriers to abortion in the United States, including the determination of viability, cost and insurance coverage, waiting periods and parental consent laws, restrictions on medical abortion, provider unavailability, harassment, targeted regulation of abortion providers laws, refusal clauses, anti choice laws, and the fetal legal rights movement. Federally subsidized abstinence-only sex education, which has not been shown to decrease the rate of unintended pregnancy (and may increase it), has expanded and access to a full range of contraceptive options has been limited. The policies of the current and past administrations have strengthened barriers to abortion both at home and abroad. Read More

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July 2006
3 Reads

Disparity in maternal mortality in New York City.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2005 ;60(1):52-7

Office of Family Health, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, USA.

Objective: To describe maternal deaths and 10-year trends in maternal mortality in New York City.

Methods: All maternal deaths reported by surveillance of vital records (bearing ICD-9 codes 630-676) in New York City between 1989 and 1998 were studied. Were viewed death certificates and medical and autopsy records to collect age, race/ethnicity, country of birth, marital status, education level, residence at time of death, cause of death, and outcome of pregnancy. Read More

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July 2006
3 Reads

Differential effect of damp housing on respiratory health in women.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2005 ;60(1):46-51

Institute of Agricultural Rural and Environmental Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon.

Objective: To investigate the effect of exposure to damp housing on respiratory symptoms in women and men.

Method: We examined sex differences in the relationship between damp housing and respiratory symptoms in a cross-sectional survey of 1988 adults, 18 to 74 years of age, using a self-administered questionnaire. We used chi (2) and t-tests to test associations between potential risk factors and respiratory symptoms in men and women. Read More

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July 2006
2 Reads

Care practices and quality of life of rural older women with osteoporosis.

Authors:
Karen A Roberto

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(4):295-301

Center for Gerontology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, USA.

The purpose of this study was to describe the care practices rural older women use to manage their osteoporosis and maintain their quality of life. One hundred and one rural older women, ranging in age from 68 to 92, were interviewed about their medical treatments, personal care practices, and the challenges they face in managing osteoporosis in their daily lives. The majority of women were diagnosed with osteoporosis between 1 and 5 years ago; one-third had experienced an osteoporotic fracture. Read More

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July 2006
2 Reads

Coronary heart disease care in older women: optimizing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(4):286-94

Department of Medicine, Denver Health, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, USA.

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and morbidity among women. The prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and its attendant risk clearly increase with advancing age. Though traditionally underrepresented in CHD trials, the proportion of women participating in these studies has risen in recent years. Read More

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July 2006
5 Reads

Having the talk--and it's not about sex!

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(4):278-85

Center for Gerontology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, USA.

The end of life is a difficult time for individuals and their families; some families find it devastating. Although the majority of Americans express a desire to die at home, only 25% achieve this goal. This finding and others from the landmark Last Acts state-by-state report card suggest we can do more to help ease the end-of-life transition. Read More

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July 2006
3 Reads

Complementary and alternative medicine and physical activity for menopausal symptoms.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(4):270-7

Forty percent of all menopausal women seek medical attention to alleviate symptoms of menopause, a natural physiologic process. Severe symptoms and an overall decrease in quality of life have prompted many women to demand additional information and treatment. Although menopausal hormone therapy has been the standard, increasing evidence suggests that women are looking to complementary and alternative therapies for management and treatment of menopausal symptoms. Read More

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July 2006
3 Reads

Nutrition and aging--practical advice for healthy eating.

Authors:
Mary Ann Johnson

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(4):262-9

Department of Foods and Nutrition, Faculty of Gerontology, University of Georgia, Athens, USA.

This article provides practical advice about foods and dietary supplements that are beneficial for the health of older people. Overweight and obesity are among the most common nutrition-related disorders in older people. A plant-based diet is associated with reduced risk of chronic diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes. Read More

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July 2006
2 Reads

The effect of 15 weeks of exercise on balance, leg strength, and reduction in falls in 40 women aged 65 to 89 years.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(4):255-61

University of Texas at Tyler, Department of Health and Kinesiology, USA.

Objective: Risk of falling increases as people age, and decreased leg strength and poor balance have been implicated as contributors. Our aims were to:1) assess the efficacy of a fall-prevention exercise program on balance and leg strength in women aged 65 to 89 years and 2) conduct a 1-year follow-up to determine the effect of exercise on fall rates.

Methods: Forty women were classified by falling history and fear of falling and assigned to exercise and control groups using stratified randomization. Read More

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July 2006
20 Reads

Reporting elder abuse: a medical, legal, and ethical overview.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(4):248-54

Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications, The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

Elder abuse is a growing public health problem in the United States, with research suggesting that women may be at higher risk of abuse than men are. Laws on elder abuse have emerged over the recent decades, with nearly all states requiring mandatory reporting of suspected elder abuse cases. Physicians play key roles in helping their elder patients; they are often the only accessible individuals outside a frail elderly patient's family circle and are therefore in an ideal position to detect, manage, and prevent elder abuse. Read More

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July 2006
7 Reads

Supporting health-related quality of life for old women.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(4):244-7

Department of Human Development, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, USA.

Mental outlook and physical functioning are intertwined, making it important for health care professionals to address quality of life issues with their older female patients and clients. This essay provides a life span development perspective on possibilities for achieving psychological gains in old age, a review of effective coping resources, and a summary of 4 key elements of health-related quality of life: (1) wisdom and a sense of acceptance of life outcomes, (2) satisfying close relationships, (3) meaningful use of time, and (4) spiritual beliefs and values. Suggestions are offered for contributing to older women's quality of life in the context of delivering health care services. Read More

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July 2006
2 Reads

Physician recruiting under the microscope.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(4):238-40

University of Maryland School of Law, USA.

Although recruiting physicians into existing practices is a time-honored way for hospitals to bolster their staffs, hospitals and physicians may need to rethink this practice in light of increased scrutiny from federal regulators. In June 2003, federal prosecutors filed charges against Alvarado Hospital Medical Center and its former chief executive, Barry Weinbaum, alleging that they had "bribed" doctors with relocation agreements in exchange for the doctors' referral of patients. The charges against Alvarado may not be an isolated event. Read More

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July 2006
2 Reads

The transition from career to retirement: focus on well-being and financial considerations.

Authors:
Adair R Heyl

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(4):235-7

Eastern Virginia Medical School, USA.

A woman's occupation affects her retirement socially, emotionally, and financially. Whereas most women feel "generally positive" toward retirement, women doctors and other high-profile professionals have a tougher time adjusting to retirement than nonprofessional women do. According to Christine Price, on women and retirement, professional women report a sense of loss, while nonprofessional women, such as clerical and hourly employees, feel relieved when they retire. Read More

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July 2006
3 Reads

Do women possess a unique susceptibility to the neurotoxic effects of alcohol?

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):225-7

Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA.

Neurodegeneration and neurological impairment associated with alcohol dependence have been observed predominantly in alcohol-dependent men. Thus little research has examined the neuropathological consequences of alcoholism in women. Recent evidence obtained from both human and animal studies, however, suggests that women may well be at greater risk of alcohol-induced brain injury than men are. Read More

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October 2004
2 Reads

Selected integrative medicine treatments for depression: considerations for women.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):216-24

Women's Mental Health Program, Department of Psychiatry, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, USA.

This review evaluates the research published between 1966 and 2004 on several integrative treatments for depression, including omega-3 fatty acids, Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort), S-adenosyl-methionine, folate, 5-Hydroxytryptophan, acupuncture, exercise, and light therapy, with a particular emphasis on issues pertinent to women. Data from double-blind, placebo-controlled trials support each of these as treatment interventions for depression. Read More

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October 2004
17 Reads
3 Citations

The best is yet to be: preventing, detecting, and treating depression in older women.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):210-5

Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, USA.

To live fully for as long as life lasts is our goal for aging and the challenge we face as we age ourselves and help our patients age. Although we cannot prevent depression, we have information about the correlates of depression or its absence. There are nonmedical interventions that significantly lessen depressive symptoms. Read More

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October 2004
3 Reads

Innovations in adolescent reproductive and sexual health education in Santiago de Chile: effects of physician leadership and direct service.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):207-9

Harvard Medical School, USA.

Reproductive and sexual health (RSH) education is a key component of most family planning programs around the world and is particularly important for adolescents, for whom parenthood is more likely to have difficult or dangerous health outcomes. A lack of comprehensive RSH education targeted at adolescents may augment the poor outcomes associated with early pregnancy by creating barriers to optimal care. This article discusses the creation of the Centro de Medicina Reproductiva y Desarrollo Integral de la Adolescencia clinic, a comprehensive adolescent reproductive health center in Santiago de Chile, and its RSH education programs. Read More

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October 2004
3 Reads

A psychosocial understanding of depression in women: for the primary care physician.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):198-206

University of Pittsburgh, USA.

This paper has two basic purposes. First, it will provide an understanding of the risks of depression in women, with a focus on the psychosocial factors. The lifetime prevalence of major depression in women ranges from 10% to 23%, twice the rate among men; until puberty, however, rates are similar among boys and girls. Read More

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October 2004
4 Reads

Comprehensive care for women veterans: indicators of dual use of VA and non-VA providers.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):192-7

Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, USA.

Objective: To compare women who use Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care providers only with women who use VA and non-VA providers (dual users).

Methods: An anonymous survey was mailed to women veterans randomly sampled from 10 VA medical centers in 3 states. We measured reports of dual use of VA and non-VA providers according to the VA provider's gender, provision of routine gynecological care by VA provider, use of VA women's clinic, and overall satisfaction with VA care. Read More

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October 2004
3 Reads

Antepartum and postpartum depression: healthy mom, healthy baby.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):181-91

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, USA.

This article summarizes the epidemiology, clinical features, and treatment of antepartum and postpartum major depression. This summary will enable primary care clinicians to recognize and screen for perinatal mood disorders and to initiate the risk-benefit decision-making process used in treatment selection. This review will also help identify patient factors that warrant psychiatric consultation. Read More

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October 2004
5 Reads

A multilevel analysis of women's status and self-rated health in the United States.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):172-80

Channing Laboratory of Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA.

Objectives: We investigated associations between various dimensions of women's status and self-rated health. We hypothesized that women living in states with lower levels of women's status would be at greater risk of reporting poor health than women living in states with higher levels of women's status, even when controlling for individual and state characteristics.

Methods: We used individual self-rated health and sociodemographic characteristics for 87 848 female respondents to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) 2000. Read More

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October 2004
2 Reads

Improving breast health education for Hispanic women.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):171, 228-9

National Center of Excellence in Women's Health, Indiana University School of Medicine, USA.

Hispanic women are less likely to receive screening mammograms than are white or African American women, even though breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the population. Between 1990 and 2000, the Hispanic population of Indianapolis, Indiana (Marion County) grew by approximately 300%: from 8450 to 33 290. The present project was undertaken to provide educational outreach in Spanish to the new Hispanic residents of Indianapolis. Read More

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October 2004
3 Reads

What's "normal": female genital mutilation, psychology, and body image.

Authors:
Karen E Adams

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):168-70

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, USA.

Despite international efforts to halt the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM), the number of African girls and women undergoing the procedure is not declining as rapidly as international observers had hoped when the World Health Organization began focusing attention on the practice in the 1960s. This article focuses on the psychological effects of FGM through the example of a patient who had undergone the procedure in childhood and now felt that her closed appearance was "normal" and that to be opened would be "abnormal." Western advocates must educate themselves about the various cultural forces that lead to FGM in order to help women who have undergone the procedure heal psychologically, thereby breaking the pattern of abuse from generation to generation. Read More

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October 2004
2 Reads

Two bites at the apple: holding physician practices directly liable for medical malpractice.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):164-6

McNair Law Firm, PA, Columbia, South Carolina, USA.

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October 2004
2 Reads

Becoming a physician works like this. . . Moving from one life to another.

Authors:
Michon Béchamps

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):162-3

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October 2004
4 Reads

Disability income.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):160-1

Financial Designs of Virginia, USA.

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October 2004
3 Reads

A few tips on writing well.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):157-9

Clark Atlanta University, USA.

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October 2004
5 Reads

America's crushing medical liability crisis is changing the practice of medicine as we know it.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(3):156

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October 2004
2 Reads

Causing panic: anxieties surrounding obstetrical care.

Authors:
Jolanda Turley

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(2):146-7

Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto.

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June 2004
3 Reads

Menopause: neuroendocrine changes and hormone replacement therapy.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(2):135-45

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, USA.

Objective: We evaluated the effects of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) alone and in combination with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor on mood, cognition, and neuroendocrine parameters in peri- and postmenopausal women.

Methods: We measured neuroendocrine variations in peri- and postmenopausal depressed patients (DP) and postmenopausal normal control (NC) women (45 to 72 years old) before and after treatment with HRT alone and HRT combined with antidepressant medication. All subjects were without significant medical illness and off psychoactive or other medication that would interfere with neuroendocrine measures. Read More

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June 2004
6 Reads

Incarcerated women and depression: a primer for the primary care provider.

Authors:
Tracy D Gunter

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(2):107-12

University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.

Although women represent an increasing number of state prison inmates, they are studied less than their male counterparts are. Incarcerated women have higher rates of depression than both community samples and incarcerated men. The diagnosis and treatment of depression in incarcerated women is complicated by the presence of substance abuse, psychosocial stressors, medical problems, and personality disorders. Read More

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June 2004
4 Reads

Depression in adolescent girls: screening and treatment strategies for primary care providers.

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(2):101-6

University of Louisville, USA.

Adolescent girls are at a higher risk of depression than boys are. Depression is of particular concern in pregnant and postpartum adolescents because of the potential impact on the infant. Primary care providers (PCPs) should routinely screen adolescent girls for depression and consider depression in their differential diagnoses of somatic complaints. Read More

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June 2004
2 Reads

Women and bipolar disorder across the life span.

Authors:
Dorothy Sit

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(2):91-100

University of Pittsburgh, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, USA.

Bipolar I disorder occurs in approximately 1% of the adult population, and it affects women and men equally. Women develop bipolar II disorder, bipolar depression, mixed mania, and a rapid-cycling course of illness more commonly than men and are at greater risk of such comorbid conditions as alcohol use problems, thyroid disease, medication-induced obesity, and migraine headaches. The treatment of bipolar disorder remains challenging. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3107596PMC
June 2004
4 Reads

Mandatory parental notification: the importance of confidential health care for adolescents.

Authors:
Karen E Adams

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(2):87-90

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Center for Ethics in Health Care, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, USA.

Studies have shown that lack of confidentiality is a barrier to adolescents use of needed health care services. Professional medical organizations support confidential care for adolescents as a matter of individual and public health. Confidentiality is governed by both state and federal law, and physicians must be aware of both. Read More

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June 2004
2 Reads

When seniors face closed doors: are advance beneficiary notices the answer?

J Am Med Womens Assoc (1972) 2004 ;59(2):84-6

University of South Carolina School of Law, USA.

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June 2004
3 Reads