1,582 results match your criteria Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine[Journal]


Re: Impact of Medical Scribes in Primary Care on Productivity, Face-to-Face Time, and Patient Comfort.

Authors:
David H Thom

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):120

Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180283DOI Listing
January 2019

Re: If We Don't Ask, They Won't Tell: Screening for Urinary and Fecal Incontinence by Primary Care Providers.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):119

DY Patil University, Pune, India and Ayobabalola University, Nigeria.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180267DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Re: How Evolving United States Payment Models Influence Primary Care and its Impact on the Quadruple Aim: The Need for Health Equity.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):118

Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180261DOI Listing
January 2019

Los Seres Humanos Matter: A Hispanic Health Story from Texas.

Authors:
John W Davis

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):115-117

From University of Texas, Medical Branch at Galveston, Galveston, TX.

Latino health deserves intense focus in promoting a just health care system. Despite the surprisingly positive health outcomes associated with the "Hispanic Paradox" phenomenon, the trend of Latino immigrants tending to have better health outcomes than other minorities, linguistic issues persist. The following essay is a combination of actual patient encounters through my experiences serving Spanish-speaking patients, as a medical student and Spanish speaker, and a reflection on the clash between impersonal interpretation services and Hispanic cultural values. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180207DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

A Reflective Case Study in Family Medicine Advance Care Planning Conversations.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):108-114

From the Family Medicine Residency Program, Natividad Medical Center, Salinas, CA (MT); Department of Family and Preventive Medicine University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Salinas, CA (WV).

Advance care planning conversations traditionally have been promoted using the Standard of Substituted Judgment and the Standard of Best Interests. In practice, both are often inadequate. Patients frequently avoid these conversations completely, making substituted judgment decisions nearly impossible. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180198DOI Listing

Exercise Is Medicine: Primary Care Counseling on Aerobic Fitness and Muscle Strengthening.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):103-107

From Departments of Family Medicine and Community Health and of Population Health Science and Policy, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (CC, KS, JS); Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden (KS, JS); Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (MAW).

Patient counseling on physical fitness remains underutilized in primary care, despite its clinical and cost effectiveness. Most counseling interventions have focused on aerobic activity and neglected another vital component of physical fitness, muscle strengthening, which has recently been shown to be independently protective against cardiometabolic diseases and premature mortality. This article reviews the latest scientific evidence and makes recommendations toward a more comprehensive approach for promoting physical fitness in primary care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180209DOI Listing

Teaching Benign Skin Lesions as a Strategy to Improve the Triage Amalgamated Dermoscopic Algorithm (TADA).

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):96-102

From Maine Medical Center, Division of Dermatology, Portland, ME (EVS); Department of Family & Community Medicine (HTA) and Department of Dermatology (AG, MB), Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA; Dermatology Department, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain (OY); Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (OY, SWD, AAM).

Introduction: Dermoscopy aids family physicians (FPs) in skin cancer detection. The triage amalgamated dermoscopic algorithm (TADA) was created to simplify the dermoscopic evaluation of a skin growth. The purpose of this image-based study was to evaluate the effect of teaching the clinical and dermoscopic features of benign skin lesions on the diagnostic accuracy of skin cancer identification using TADA. Read More

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http://www.jabfm.org/lookup/doi/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180049
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180049DOI Listing
February 2018
11 Reads

The American Board of Family Medicine's Data Collection Method for Tracking Their Specialty.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):89-95

From the American Board of Family Medicine, Lexington, KY.

Background: Medical certifying boards' core mission is assuring the public that Diplomates have the requisite knowledge, skills, and professional character to provide high-quality medical care. By understanding their Diplomates' workforce and practice environments, Boards ensure that certification is relevant to the profession and accountable to the public. Current and reliable data are key to meeting this function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180138DOI Listing

Physician Opinions about American Board of Family Medicine Self-Assessment Modules (2006-2016).

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):79-88

From the American Board of Family Medicine, Lexington, KY (MD, MH, ARE, LEP); Department of Family Community Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington (MH, LEP).

Introduction: Maintenance of Certification (MOC) was implemented to help physicians remain current with evolving medical standards, but has been criticized for being irrelevant to practice. We assessed family physicians' (FPs') opinions about the content of American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) self-assessment modules (SAMs).

Methods: We used ABFM administrative data from feedback surveys completed after each of the 16 SAMs from 2006 to 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.170472DOI Listing
December 2017

Physician Burnout and Higher Clinic Capacity to Address Patients' Social Needs.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):69-78

From Department of Family & Community Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco (ED, DH, JNO, LMG), Center for Excellence in Primary Care, Department of Family & Community Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco (MK, RW-G, KG), American Board of Family Medicine, Lexington, KY (LEP).

Background: A recent regional study found lower burnout among primary care clinicians who perceived that their clinic had greater capacity to meet patients' social needs. We aimed to more comprehensively investigate the association between clinic capacity to address social needs and burnout by using national data that included a more representative sample of family physicians and a more comprehensive set of practice-level variables that are potential confounders of an association between clinic social needs capacity and burnout.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 1298 family physicians in ambulatory primary care settings who applied to continue certification with the American Board of Family Medicine in 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180104DOI Listing

Assessing the Quality of the After-Visit Summary (AVS) in a Primary-Care Clinic.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):65-68

From the Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX (THM); Family Medicine Residency Program, Gwinnett Medical Center, Lawrenceville, GA (AO); Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Texas Health Sciences Center-San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (KK); Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Texas-Southwestern Medical School, Dallas (KB, PD).

Background And Objective: As part of Affordable Care Act, the Centers for Medicaid Services (CMS) recommend physicians provide patients with an After-Visit Summary (AVS) following a clinic visit. Information should be relevant and actionable with specific instructions regarding their visit and health. Until recently, this recommendation was included as part of meeting the standard for Stage 1 Meaningful Use for all physicians using electronic-health-record (EHR) technology. Read More

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http://www.jabfm.org/lookup/doi/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180055
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180055DOI Listing
February 2018
17 Reads

Are Patients Frequently Readmitted to the Hospital Different from the Other Admitted Patients?

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):58-64

From the Department of Community Health and Family Medicine (MP, DQ, DFA, LC, KL, LB, and PJC) and Department of Biostatistic (XF and YY), University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

Introduction: Although the characteristics of readmitted patients associated with a family medicine inpatient service have been reported, differing characteristics between groups of patients based on readmission rates have not been studied. The aim of this project was to examine patients with differing rates of readmission.

Methods: Patients admitted to a family medicine inpatient service were classified into 1 of 3 groups based on the number of admission and readmissions in a given year. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180052DOI Listing
February 2018
1.848 Impact Factor

Veterans' Likelihood of Reporting Cardiovascular Disease.

Authors:
Ramon Hinojosa

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):50-57

From Department of Sociology, University of Central Florida, Orlando (RH).

Objective: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common chronic health condition affecting Americans. One important group of Americans that health researchers have noted as key to understanding general population health and wellbeing are veterans of the US military. The healthy soldier effect has been used to explain the health benefits of military service during and for a period of time after service. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180148DOI Listing

Colorado Asthma Toolkit Implementation Improves Some Process Measures of Asthma Care.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):37-49

From the Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (KLC); Adult & Child Consortium for Health Outcomes Research & Delivery Science, Aurora, CO (LH); Department of Pediatrics, National Jewish Health, Denver (BGB); Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora (BMK, LMS); Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora (MRS).

Background: The Colorado Asthma Toolkit Program (CATP) has been shown to improve processes of care with less evidence demonstrating improved outcomes.

Objective: To model the association between pre-and-post-CATP status and asthma-related process and outcome measures among patients ages 5 to 64 years receiving care in safety-net primary care practices.

Methods: This is an implementation study involving secondary prepost analysis of existing structured clinical, administrative, and claims data. Read More

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http://www.jabfm.org/lookup/doi/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180155
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180155DOI Listing
May 2018
6 Reads

#Diversity: Conversations on Twitter about Women and Black Men in Medicine.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):28-36

From the Department of Family Medicine (RM, KWL), Department of Computer Science (LS, YW), Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC.

Background: Discussions about racism, ethnicity, sexism, discrimination, and diversity have increased within medicine, and their impact on the physician workforce, advancement, hiring, wage inequities, mistreatment, and scholarly output, to name a few. Most medical organizations have created policies and initiatives on diversity and inclusion, focusing on supporting underrepresented minorities. Similar discussions are taking place online, including on Twitter, via specific hashtags, such as #BlackMenInMedicine, #ILookLikeASurgeon. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180175DOI Listing

Awareness of Prediabetes Status and Subsequent Health Behavior, Body Weight, and Blood Glucose Levels.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):20-27

From Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN.

Background: Lifestyle intervention decreases diabetes risk in prediabetic subjects, but the impact of passive notification of prediabetes status on glycemia or health behavior is unclear.

Methods: The Pathobiology of Prediabetes in a Biracial Cohort (POP-ABC) study followed normoglycemic African American (AA) and European American (EA) offspring of parents with type 2 diabetes mellitus for incident prediabetes. During 5. Read More

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http://www.jabfm.org/lookup/doi/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180242
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180242DOI Listing
August 2018
7 Reads

Better Doctor-Patient Relationships Are Associated with Men Choosing More Active Depression Treatment.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):13-19

From the Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada (DK, JSO); The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia (SMR); School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (OF, JLO).

Background: Men tend to have low rates of treatment uptake for depression. The quality of the relationship with their family physician may be a factor influencing attitudes toward treatment. The present study was developed to explore this issue in a nationally representative sample of Canadian men. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.170430DOI Listing
November 2017
2 Reads

Long-acting Reversible Contraception (LARC) Provision by Family Physicians: Low But on the Rise.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):10-12

From the VA Health Services Research and Development Fellow, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, VA HSR&D Center for Innovation to Implementation, Palo Alto, CA (MC); Division of Primary Care and Population Health, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (JGS); Robert Graham Center, Washington, DC (YJ, MC, AJ).

Although the fraction of family physicians (FPs) providing Long Acting Reversible Contraceptive (LARC) services increased between 2014 and 2017, the most recent estimates show that less than a quarter of family physicians include provision of LARC in their practice. Increasing the number of FPs providing LARC will help increase patients' access to the most effective forms of birth control currently available. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180215DOI Listing

No Magic Pill: A Prescription for Enhanced Shared Decision-Making for Depression Treatment.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):6-9

From Department of Counseling and School Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (LC); Department of Family Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston (DE); Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts University Family Medicine Residency at Cambridge Health Alliance, Boston, MA (AFS).

For over 2 decades, there have been debates, sometimes contentious, about the efficacy and safety of antidepressants. Growing awareness of the difficulty some patients have when discontinuing these medications has intensified these debates. Recently, Cipriani and colleagues published the largest meta-analysis to date that assessed the efficacy and tolerability of antidepressants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180182DOI Listing
June 2018
8 Reads

Commentary Response for "LARC Provision by Family Physicians: Low But on the Rise".

Authors:
Marji Gold

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):4-5

From the Department of Family and Social Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein School of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180347DOI Listing
January 2019

Conversations, Communication and Counseling Are Key Family Medicine Tactics to Improve Patient Health.

J Am Board Fam Med 2019 Jan-Feb;32(1):1-3

This issue includes research on conversations, communication and counseling regarding depression treatment, the diagnosis of prediabetes, the topics of diversity and inclusion in medicine on Twitter, asthma treatment outcomes, muscle strengthening as an important form of exercise, multiple hospital readmissions, as well as after-visit summaries and advance care planning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.01.180320DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Author Index to Volume 31, 2018.

Authors:

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):964-969

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November 2018

Re: Doctor-Patient Trust Among Chronic Pain Patients on Chronic Opioid Therapy after Opioid Risk Reduction Initiatives: A Survey.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):957

Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions and College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

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http://www.jabfm.org/lookup/doi/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180199
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180199DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

Practice Rurality of Family Physicians Enrolled in a Practice Transformation Network.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):952-956

From the American Board of Family Medicine, Lexington, KY.

The Transforming Clinical Practice Initiative prioritized the delivery of free practice transformation assistance by Practice Transformation Networks (PTNs) to small and rural practices that may otherwise lack the resources needed to succeed in Medicare's value-based payment (VBP) programs. We assessed the enrollment of rural practices in PTNs using 2016 TCPI enrollment data and American Board of Family Medicine recertification examination registration data from 2013 to 2016. PTNs enrolled a higher proportion of rural family medicine practices than are represented across the general workforce ( < . Read More

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http://www.jabfm.org/lookup/doi/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.170332
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.170332DOI Listing
August 2017
8 Reads

Recruiting Primary Care Practices for Research: Reflections and Reminders.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):947-951

From the Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (DHF, BTJ, RW, LMD, WPD); Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (DMH, LF).

Background: Recruiting primary care practices for research projects has always required carefully tended relationships, a compelling message, and good timing. Recruiting practices to participate in practice transformation research trials may take more and different efforts. We reflect on practice recruitment for a recently-concluded trial of a diabetes self-management support system in 2 states and 36 practices. Read More

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http://www.jabfm.org/lookup/doi/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180025
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180025DOI Listing
January 2018
14 Reads

Academic Detailing for Postpartum Opioid Prescribing.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):944-946

From Department of Medical Education (KAV), and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (CS), Gundersen Health System, La Crosse, WI.

Introduction: Overprescribing opioid pain medications has become a major concern in our society due to the increasing rates of substance use disorders and the rate of accidental overdoses. The widespread availability of opioid medications suggests that patients are being prescribed opioids in amounts larger than they require for pain control. Efforts are now being made on a variety of fronts to decrease overprescribing. Read More

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http://www.jabfm.org/lookup/doi/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180071
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180071DOI Listing
March 2018
10 Reads

The Association of Patient Satisfaction-Based Incentives with Primary Care Physician Opioid Prescribing.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):941-943

From The Department of Anesthesiology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (JAC, KM, KB); Department of Psychiatry, Division of Substance Dependence, University of Colorado, Aurora (KMR, JTS, SKMG, CJH); Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora (LM, PCS); School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics & Informatics, University of Colorado, Aurora (SKMG).

Purpose: The opioid epidemic in the United States is an ongoing public health concern. Health care institutions use standardized patient satisfaction surveys to assess the patient experience and some offer incentives to their providers based on the results. We hypothesized that providers who report being incentivized based on patient satisfaction surveys are more likely to report an impact of such surveys on their opioid prescribing practices. Read More

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http://www.jabfm.org/lookup/doi/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180067
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180067DOI Listing
March 2018
8 Reads

Core Principles to Improve Primary Care Quality Management.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):931-940

From Department of Medicine, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA (JBM); Robert Graham Center, Washington DC (JBM, WL, AB); Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX (WL); Department of Family and Preventative Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (MAM); Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond (RSE); Department of Population Health and Primary Care, Norwich Medical School University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK (AH).

Quality management in American health care is in crisis. Performance measurement in its current form is costly, redundant, and labyrinthine. Increasingly, its contribution to achieving the Quadruple Aim is under close examination, especially in the domain of primary care services, where the burden of measurement is heaviest. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.170172DOI Listing

The Complex Interpretation and Management of Zika Virus Test Results.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):924-930

From the Department of Family Medicine, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC (KWL); Department of Health Systems Administration, Georgetown University, Washington (JDK, MAS); New York University College of Global Public Health, New York, NY (RP-L).

Zika virus disease provides the latest example of a critical nexus between public health and clinical practice. Interpreting Zika virus test results is complicated by the absence of a single testing approach with superior validity across contexts and populations. Molecular tests are highly specific, variably sensitive, and have a short window period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180061DOI Listing
February 2018
11 Reads

Future Directions for Practice-Based Research Networks (PBRNs): A CERA Survey.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):917-923

From Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (JB, AVN); Health Services Management and Policy, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (LSW).

Background: Thought leaders from family medicine and practice-based research networks (PBRNs) have put forth definitions and goals recommending future directions for PBRNs. Evidence demonstrating that PBRNs are acting in accordance with these trends supports future investment in PBRN infrastructure, funding, and training of clinician researchers. Our objective was to explore the alignment of PBRN research efforts with thought leader recommendations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180069DOI Listing
March 2018
10 Reads

The Impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid Expansion on Visit Rates for Diabetes in Safety Net Health Centers.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):905-916

From Department of Family Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland OR (NH, RS, MM, HA, HH, JEDV); Biostatistics Group, Oregon Health & Science University - Portland State University School of Public Health, Portland (MM); Research Department, OCHIN, Inc., Portland (MH).

Objective: To (1) compare clinic-level uninsured, Medicaid-insured, and privately insured visit rates within and between expansion and nonexpansion states before and after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion among the 3 cohorts of patient populations; and (2) assess whether there was a change in clinic-level overall, primary care visits, preventive care visits, and diabetes screening rates in expansion versus nonexpansion states from pre-ACA to post-ACA Medicaid expansion.

Methods: Electronic health record data on nonpregnant patients aged 19 to 64 years, with ≥1 ambulatory visit between 01/01/2012 and 12/31/2015 (n = 483,912 in expansion states; n = 388,466 in nonexpansion states) from 198 primary care community health centers were analyzed. Using a difference-in-difference methodology, we assessed changes in visit rates pre-ACA versus post-ACA among a cohort of patients with diabetes, prediabetes, and no diabetes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180075DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6329010PMC
March 2018
3 Reads

Disparities in Hypertension Control Across and Within Three Health Systems Participating in a Data-Sharing Collaborative.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):897-904

From the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, Oakland, CA (KS); Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine, University of Lausanne, Switzerland (KS); Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco (MM, GG, RP, MBP); Division of General Internal Medicine, Multiethnic Health Equity Research Center, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco (LK, VF); UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco (VF).

Introduction: We aimed to standardize data collection from 3 health systems (HS1, HS2, HS3) participating in the San Francisco Bay Collaborative Research Network, and compare rates and predictors of uncontrolled blood pressure among hypertensive adults to identify opportunities for regional collaboration in quality improvement.

Methods: Retrospective cohort study using deidentified electronic health record data from all primary care patients with at least 1 visit in a 2-year period, using standard data definitions in a common data repository. Primary outcome was uncontrolled blood pressure at the most recent primary care visit. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180166DOI Listing
June 2018
6 Reads

Opioid Overdose Hospitalizations among Medicare-Disability Beneficiaries.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):881-896

From Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI.

Introduction: As the opioid epidemic progresses, a better understanding of those at elevated risk of opioid overdose is needed, particularly for populations whose growing risk may be overlooked. Medicare recipients under age 65 (Medicare-disability beneficiaries [MDBs]) are one such population. We sought to analyze characteristics of opioid-overdose hospitalizations among MDBs and quantify the contribution of this population to opioid-overdose hospitalizations overall. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180152DOI Listing
May 2018
2 Reads

Interactive Mobile Doctor (iMD) to Promote Patient-Provider Discussion on Tobacco Use among Asian American Patients in Primary Care: A Pilot Study.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):869-880

From Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (JYT); Asian Health Services, Oakland (TQ, TBD, ESNP, SMH); Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco (CW, TTN); Asian American Research Center on Health, San Francisco (JYT, TQ, CW, TTN).

Introduction: This study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of an interactive "Mobile Doctor" intervention (iMD) for Korean and Vietnamese American men, population groups with high smoking prevalence rates.

Methods: The iMD delivers 5As (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange) via tailored in-language video messages on a mobile tablet to Korean and Vietnamese male daily smokers right before a health care visit. A single-group trial was conducted with Korean- and Vietnamese-speaking patients at a federally qualified health center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180018DOI Listing
January 2018
1.850 Impact Factor

Mailed Letter Versus Phone Call to Increase Uptake of Cancer Screening: A Pragmatic, Randomized Trial.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):857-868

From Centre for Urban Health Solutions, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (TK, AL); Department of Family and Community Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (TK, SD, AL); Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, 500 Toronto, Ontario (TK, RM, AL); Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (TK, RM, AL); Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Toronto, Ontario (RM, AL).

Background: There is good evidence that cancer-specific patient outreach improves rates of cervical, breast, and colorectal cancer screening. However, it is unclear how primary care practices should implement integrated outreach for all 3 types of cancer screening. We aimed to understand whether integrated outreach using mailed letters or phone calls were more effective at increasing screening uptake in a primary care organization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.170369DOI Listing
September 2017
1 Read

Practitioner Participation in National Dental Practice-based Research Network (PBRN) Studies: 12-Year Results.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):844-856

From the University of Texas Health-San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (RM, MKBT, SR); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (EF, SKM, GHG); Westat, Rockville, MD (RC); University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (CM); HealthPartners Institute, Minneapolis, MN (DBR); University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (VVG); Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Portland, OR (JLF); Private Practitioner, Jason D McCargar DMD LTD, (DBA) Scottsdale Dental Arts, Scottsdale, AZ (JDM); Private Practitioner, Gold Canyon Dentistry, Gold Canyon (PAM); The National Dental PBRN Collaborative Group comprises practitioner, faculty, and staff investigators who contributed to this network activity. A list of these persons is at http://www.nationaldentalpbrn.org/collaborative-group.php.

Purpose: This study examines practitioner participation over 12 years in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network (PBRN) studies and practitioner meetings, average length of participation, and association of practitioner- and practice-level characteristics with participation. Little information exists about practitioners' long-term participation in PBRNs.

Methods: The network conducted a retrospective analysis of practitioner participation in 3 main network activities during 2005 to 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.06.180019DOI Listing
January 2018
11 Reads

Board Certified Family Physician Workforce: Progress in Racial and Ethnic Diversity.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):842-843

From American Board of Family Medicine, Lexington, KY (MRP, ARE, MD, RLP); Department of Family Medicine, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT (MD).

Diversification of the physician workforce has been a goal of Association of American Medical Colleges for several years and could improve access to primary care for under-served populations and address health disparities. We found that family physicians' demographics have become more diverse over time, but still do not reflect the national demographic composition. Increased collaboration with undergraduate universities to expand pipeline programs may help increase the diversity of students accepted to medical schools, which in turn should help diversify the family medicine workforce. Read More

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April 2018
6 Reads

Slow Progress and Persistent Challenges for the Underrepresented Minority Family Physician.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):840-841

From Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC.

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November 2018
9 Reads

Practice-based Research Network (PBRN) Engagement: 20+ Years and Counting.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Nov-Dec;31(6):833-839

From Research Involving Outpatient Settings Network (RIOS Net), Department of Family & Community Medicine, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (RLR); Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network (ORPRN), Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR (LJF).

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September 2018

Re: Wide Gap between Preparation and Scope of Practice of Early Career Family Physicians.

Authors:
John J Frey

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Sep-Oct;31(5):829

University of Wisconsin-Madison, Santa Fe, NM.

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September 2018
3 Reads

Re: Evaluation of an Ongoing Diabetes Group Medical Visit in a Family Medicine Practice.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Sep-Oct;31(5):828

Associate Professor of Medicine, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University., Medical Director, Urban Health Institute, Division Head, Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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September 2018

Interruption and Reversal of Direct Oral Anticoagulants in Preprocedural and Acute Settings.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Sep-Oct;31(5):817-827

From Division of Cardiology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, IL (AK); Community & Family Medicine, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield (MM).

With increasing physician and patient awareness, the use of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) has been steadily increasing in recent years. Unfortunately, given their recent introduction, the reversal of anticoagulation attained with DOACs is not well studied. Given the diverse mechanisms of action of these newer agents, no universal antidote is available for reversal. Read More

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January 2018
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Effectiveness of Clinical Decision Support Based Intervention in the Improvement of Care for Adult Sickle Cell Disease Patients in Primary Care.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Sep-Oct;31(5):812-816

From the Department of Health Services Research, Management, and Policy (AGM, RJT) and Department of Community Health and Family Medicine, (AGM, PJC, KL), University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; Division of Blood Disorders, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (MMH); Department of Pediatrics and Pathology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (JB, TDC).

Introduction: Although most patients with rare diseases like sickle cell disease (SCD) are treated in the primary care setting, primary care physicians may find it challenging to keep abreast of medication improvements and complications associated with treatment for rare and complex diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinical decision support (CDS) -based intervention system for transfusional iron overload in adults with SCD to improve management in primary care.

Methods: An electronic medical record based clinical decision support system for potential transfusional iron overload in SCD patients in primary care was evaluated. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6153439PMC
April 2018
3 Reads

Edema from Taking Cinnamon for Treatment of Diabetes: Similar Biochemistry and Pathophysiology to Thiazolidinedione Medications.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Sep-Oct;31(5):809-811

From the Nellis Family Medicine Residency, Nellis AFB, NV.

We present a report of cinnamon bark powder 1000 mg daily associated with edema that resolved after stopping the supplement in an adult male. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) cause fluid retention in those with diabetes or prediabetes. Some medications in this class have been implicated in increased cardiac deaths from this side effect. Read More

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January 2018
1 Read

Lack of Communication about Medical Marijuana Use between Doctors and Their Patients.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Sep-Oct;31(5):805-808

From St. Joseph Family Medicine Residency, Denver, CO (ECK); Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (AJR, MJS, DEN).

Introduction: Medical marijuana is now permitted in most states, but it is not clear whether primary care physicians (PCPs) are aware of or recommend its use in their patients.

Methods: We distributed paired surveys to PCPs and their patients to assess the frequency of patient marijuana use and communication with PCPs about use.

Results: Of 242 patients surveyed, 22% reported marijuana use in the past 6 months, and 61% of these identified as medical marijuana users. Read More

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December 2017

Improving Effective Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Application in Soft Tissue Wrist Injury.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Sep-Oct;31(5):795-804

From the Section of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor (APY, HEH); Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University, Chicago, IL (ALM); Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, University of Wisconsin Health System, Madison, WI (BFM); Section of Plastic Surgery, Assistant Dean for Faculty Affairs, The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor (KCC).

Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for soft-tissue wrist injury may be overprescribed, contributing to ineffective health care resource use. We aimed to discern predictive factors that may improve MRI's application in soft-tissue wrist injury.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of adults who underwent MRIs for possible soft-tissue wrist injury between June 2009 and June 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.05.170423DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6341471PMC
October 2017
1 Read

Novel Exercises for Restless Legs Syndrome: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Sep-Oct;31(5):783-794

From the Department of Physiotherapy, Monash University, Frankston, Australia.

Background: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sensorimotor disorder that can have a considerable negative impact on quality of life and sleep. Management is primarily pharmacological; nonpharmacological options are limited. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of tension and trauma release exercises on RLS severity compared with discussion group controls. Read More

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February 2018
4 Reads

If We Don't Ask, They Won't Tell: Screening for Urinary and Fecal Incontinence by Primary Care Providers.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Sep-Oct;31(5):774-782

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (HWB, WG, NBS), and Department of Family Medicine and Community Health (PDS), University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health (UWSMPH), Madison, WI; University of North Carolina Center for Functional GI & Motility Disorders, Chapel Hill, NC (WEW); University of Texas at Austin, Dell Medical School, Austin, TX (RGR).

Background: More than half of older adults experience urinary (UI) or fecal incontinence (FI), but the majority have never discussed symptoms with health care providers. Little is known about primary care providers' (PCPs') screening for UI and FI.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional electronic survey of PCPs within a Midwest academic institution to ascertain and compare PCPs' beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors regarding screening and treatment for UI and FI; determine factors associated with screening for FI; and identify potential barriers to and facilitators of FI screening and treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.05.180045DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6170156PMC
February 2018
2 Reads

Epidural Analgesia and Any Vaginal Laceration.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Sep-Oct;31(5):768-773

From the Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO.

Background: Studies have shown increased incidence of severe vaginal lacerations (third and fourth degree) in women under the influence of epidural analgesia. This increase has been attributed to the increased the use of operative vaginal delivery (OVD), with attendant increased risk of laceration. Although mild and moderate vaginal lacerations requiring suturing are clinically significant, their relationship to epidural analgesia has not been extensively studied. Read More

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October 2017

Opioid and Drug Prevalence in Top 40's Music: A 30 Year Review.

J Am Board Fam Med 2018 Sep-Oct;31(5):761-767

From Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN (CH); Department of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (DH).

Objectives/hypothesis: Our objective was to identify current trends in the prose of popular music and, specifically, to identify if a relationship exists between the mention of opioid narcotics in Top 40's music and a rising prevalence of opioid use disorder in the United States.

Methods: A list of Billboard's top 100 songs for each year of the past 30 years (1986 to 2016) was collected. Lyrics from the 40 most popular songs of each year were queried for reference to drugs and alcohol. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2018.05.180001DOI Listing
January 2018
1 Read