513 results match your criteria Journal of speech language and hearing research : JSLHR[Journal]


Vocal Development in Infants and Toddlers With Bilateral Cochlear Implants and Infants With Normal Hearing.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Apr 22:1-13. Epub 2019 Apr 22.

Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.

Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the time course of vocal development in infants and toddlers with bilateral cochlear implants (CIs; bilateral CI group) who are acquiring Finnish and to compare their progress to that of infants with normal hearing and typical development (TD group). Method Five thousand nine hundred sixty-four spontaneous utterances of 30 infants and toddlers (15 in both groups) were classified as either precanonical (PC) vocalizations, basic canonical syllables (BCS), or advanced forms (AF) levels. Time course of development and group differences were analyzed in a prospective longitudinal study during a time course of 1 year: before implantation and 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after CI activation for the bilateral CI group and at 6, 9, and 12 months of age for the TD group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-18-0260DOI Listing

Verbal Learning and Memory in Early-Implanted, Prelingually Deaf Adolescent and Adult Cochlear Implant Users.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Apr;62(4):1033-1050

Speech Research Laboratory, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington.

Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the information-processing strategies of early-implanted, prelingually deaf cochlear implant (CI) users with the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II; Delis, Kramer, Kaplan, & Ober, 2000 ), a well-established normed measure of verbal learning and memory used in neuropsychological assessments of memory loss. Method Verbal learning and memory skills were compared in 20 older adolescent and young adult prelingually deaf long-term early-implanted CI users and their 24 normal hearing (NH) peers using the CVLT-II, a widely used multitrial free recall test of verbal learning and memory. Results On average, CI users recalled fewer words than their NH peers across the immediate, delayed, and cued recall trials of the CVLT-II but were comparable to their NH peers on yes/no recognition memory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-18-0125DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Principles and Ethics of Authorship.

Authors:
Terry L Wiley

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Jan;62(1):206-209

Communication Sciences & Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Purpose Rules and ethics of authorship for scientific papers are reviewed. Those authorship criteria specific to American Speech-Language-Hearing Association journals are reviewed as well as those required by journals in related fields. Conclusions The importance of first author status for students publishing their doctoral dissertation research is stressed as well as the need to discuss and resolve authorship status for all investigators early in the research process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-18-0181DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Essential Statistical Concepts for Research in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Mar;62(3):489-497

Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE.

Purpose Clinicians depend on the accuracy of research in the speech, language, and hearing sciences to improve assessment and treatment of patients with communication disorders. Although this work has contributed to great advances in clinical care, common statistical misconceptions remain, which deserve closer inspection in the field. Challenges in applying and interpreting traditional statistical methods with behavioral data from humans have led to difficulties with replication and reproducibility in other allied scientific fields, including psychology and medicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-ASTM-18-0239DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

Massed Versus Spaced Practice in Vocology: Effect of a Short-Term Intensive Voice Therapy Versus a Long-Term Traditional Voice Therapy.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Mar;62(3):611-630

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Research group: Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium.

Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a short-term intensive voice therapy (IVT) with a long-term traditional voice therapy (TVT) on the vocal quality, vocal capacities, psychosocial impact, vocal tract discomfort, laryngological anatomy/physiology, and session attendance of patients with dysphonia. An additional comparison was made between an individual IVT (IVT-I) and a group IVT (IVT-G). Method A longitudinal, prospective controlled trial was used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-18-0013DOI Listing

Linear Mixed-Model Analysis to Examine Longitudinal Trajectories in Vocabulary Depth and Breadth in Children Who Are Hard of Hearing.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Mar;62(3):525-542

Department of Biostatistics, The University of Iowa, Iowa City.

Purpose Children who are hard of hearing (CHH) tend to have reduced vocabularies compared to children with normal hearing (CNH). Prior research on vocabulary skills in children with hearing loss has focused primarily on their breadth of knowledge (how many words are known). Depth of vocabulary knowledge (how well words are known) is not well documented for CHH. Read More

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http://pubs.asha.org/doi/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-ASTM-18-0250
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-ASTM-18-0250DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

How Mixed-Effects Modeling Can Advance Our Understanding of Learning and Memory and Improve Clinical and Educational Practice.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Mar;62(3):507-524

Center for Childhood Deafness, Language, and Learning Research, Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE.

Purpose A key goal of researchers, clinicians, and educators within the fields of speech, language, and hearing sciences is to support the learning and memory of others. To do so, they consider factors relevant to the individual, the material to be learned, and the training strategy that can maximize learning and retention. Statistical methods typically used within these fields are inadequate for identifying the complex relationships between these factors and are ill equipped to account for variability across individuals when identifying these relationships. Read More

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http://pubs.asha.org/doi/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-ASTM-18-0240
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-ASTM-18-0240DOI Listing
March 2019
13 Reads

Using Propensity Score Matching to Address Clinical Questions: The Impact of Remote Microphone Systems on Language Outcomes in Children Who Are Hard of Hearing.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Mar;62(3):564-576

Audibility, Perception, and Cognition Laboratory, Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE.

Purpose Children who are hard of hearing (CHH) have restricted access to acoustic and linguistic information. Increased audibility provided by hearing aids influences language outcomes, but the benefits of hearing aids are often limited by acoustic factors and distance. Remote microphone (RM) systems further increase auditory access by reducing the negative consequences of these factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-ASTM-18-0238DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

The Evolution of Statistical Methods in Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Mar;62(3):498-506

Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE.

Purpose Scientists in the speech, language, and hearing sciences rely on statistical analyses to help reveal complex relationships and patterns in the data collected from their research studies. However, data from studies in the fields of communication sciences and disorders rarely conform to the underlying assumptions of many traditional statistical methods. Fortunately, the field of statistics provides many mature statistical techniques that can be used to meet today's challenges involving complex studies of behavioral data from humans. Read More

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http://pubs.asha.org/doi/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-ASTM-18-0378
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-ASTM-18-0378DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Secondary Voice Outcomes of a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Two Head/Neck Strengthening Exercises in Healthy Older Adults: A Preliminary Report.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Feb;62(2):318-323

Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University,West Lafayette, IN.

Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate secondary voice outcomes and detraining effects of 2 head and neck strengthening exercises, which have been used in swallowing rehabilitation, that is, the head-lift exercise (HLE) and the recline exercise (RE), in healthy older adults. Method Twenty-seven healthy older adults (between 60 and 85 years of age) were randomized to perform either the RE or the HLE for a 6-week period. Isometric and isokinetic portions of the exercise were performed 3 times daily. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-18-0338DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6436891PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Reading Development in Children With Cochlear Implants Who Communicate via Spoken Language: A Psycholinguistic Investigation.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Feb;62(2):456-469

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

Purpose This study sought to comprehensively examine the reading skills and subskills of children with cochlear implants (CIs) and gain insight into the processes underlying their early reading development. Method Fourteen 6- to 9-year-old children with CIs were assessed on a range of reading and spoken language measures. Their performances were compared to a control group of 31 children with normal hearing (NH) of the same chronological and mental age. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0469DOI Listing
February 2019

Common Terminology and Acoustic Measures for Human Voice and Birdsong.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Jan;62(1):60-69

Department of Neuroscience, University of Arizona, Tucson.

Purpose The zebra finch is used as a model to study the neural circuitry of auditory-guided human vocal production. The terminology of birdsong production and acoustic analysis, however, differs from human voice production, making it difficult for voice researchers of either species to navigate the literature from the other. The purpose of this research note is to identify common terminology and measures to better compare information across species. Read More

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http://jslhr.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1044/2018_JSL
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-18-0218DOI Listing
January 2019
27 Reads

Parent-Implemented Communication Treatment for Infants and Toddlers With Hearing Loss: A Randomized Pilot Trial.

Authors:
Megan Y Roberts

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 Jan;62(1):143-152

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.

Purpose Despite advances in cochlear implant and hearing aid technology, many children with hearing loss continue to exhibit poorer language skills than their hearing peers. This randomized pilot trial tested the effects of a parent-implemented communication treatment targeting prelinguistic communication skills in infants and toddlers with hearing loss. Method Participants included 19 children between 6 and 24 months of age with moderate to profound, bilateral hearing loss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-18-0079DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437700PMC
January 2019
1 Read

A Survey of Clinician Decision Making When Identifying Swallowing Impairments and Determining Treatment.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 Nov;61(11):2735-2756

Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville.

Purpose: Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are the primary providers of dysphagia management; however, this role has been criticized with assertions that SLPs are inadequately trained in swallowing physiology (Campbell-Taylor, 2008). To date, diagnostic acuity and treatment planning for swallowing impairments by practicing SLPs have not been examined. We conducted a survey to examine how clinician demographics and swallowing complexity influence decision making for swallowing impairments in videofluoroscopic images. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0212DOI Listing
November 2018
36 Reads

Prevalence of Publication Bias Tests in Speech, Language, and Hearing Research.

Authors:
Jason C Chow

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 Dec;61(12):3055-3063

Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond.

Purpose: The purpose of this research note is to systematically document the extent that researchers who publish in American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) journals search for and include unpublished literature in their meta-analyses and test for publication bias.

Method: This research note searched all ASHA peer-reviewed journals for published meta-analyses and reviewed all qualifying articles for characteristics related to the acknowledgment and assessment of publication bias.

Results: Of meta-analyses published in ASHA journals, 75% discuss publication in some form; however, less than 50% test for publication bias. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-18-0098DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Lexical Development in Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): How ASD May Affect Intake From the Input.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 Nov;61(11):2659-2672

Communication Sciences & Disorders, Emerson College, Boston, MA.

Purpose: Most children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have below-age lexical knowledge and lexical representation. Our goal is to examine ways in which difficulties with social communication and language processing that are often associated with ASD may constrain these children's abilities to learn new words and to explore whether minimizing the social communication and processing demands of the learning situation can lead to successful learning.

Method: In this narrative review of recent work on lexical development in ASD, we describe key findings on children's acquisition of nouns, pronouns, and verbs and outline our research program currently in progress aimed at further elucidating these issues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-RSAUT-18-0024DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

Hearing Loss Treatment in Older Adults With Cognitive Impairment: A Systematic Review.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 Oct;61(10):2589-2603

Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to assess studies of treating hearing loss in older adults with cognitive impairment. Of interest to this review is identifying clinical adaptations that may be used to tailor hearing loss treatment to older adults with cognitive impairment in order to better serve this vulnerable population.

Method: A systematic search with controlled vocabulary and key word terms was applied to PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. Read More

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http://jslhr.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1044/2018_JSL
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-18-0077DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6428235PMC
October 2018
38 Reads

Preference for Infant-Directed Speech in Infants With Hearing Aids: Effects of Early Auditory Experience.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 Sep;61(9):2431-2439

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus.

Purpose: It is well established that (a) infants prefer listening to infant-directed speech (IDS) over adult-directed speech (ADS), and (b) IDS facilitates speech, language, and cognitive development, compared with ADS. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether infants with hearing aids (HAs), similar to their peers with normal hearing (NH), show a listening preference for IDS over ADS.

Method: A total of 42 infants participated in the study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-18-0086DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195043PMC
September 2018
6 Reads

Mandarin-Speaking, Kindergarten-Aged Children With Cochlear Implants Benefit From Natural F 0 Patterns in the Use of Semantic Context During Speech Recognition.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 Aug;61(8):2146-2152

National Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning & IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, China.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which semantic context and F0 contours affect speech recognition by Mandarin-speaking, kindergarten-aged children with cochlear implants (CIs).

Method: The experimental design manipulated two factors, that is, semantic context, by comparing the intelligibility of normal sentence versus word list, and F0 contours, by comparing the intelligibility of utterances with natural versus flat F0 patterns. Twenty-two children with CIs completed a speech recognition test. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0327DOI Listing
August 2018
6 Reads

Executive Function in Deaf Children: Auditory Access and Language Access.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 Aug;61(8):1970-1988

Department of Linguistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs.

Purpose: Deaf children are frequently reported to be at risk for difficulties in executive function (EF); however, the literature is divided over whether these difficulties are the result of deafness itself or of delays/deficits in language that often co-occur with deafness. The purpose of this study is to discriminate these hypotheses by assessing EF in populations where the 2 accounts make contrasting predictions.

Method: We use a between-groups design involving 116 children, ages 5-12 years, across 3 groups: (a) participants with normal hearing (n = 45), (b) deaf native signers who had access to American Sign Language from birth (n = 45), and (c) oral cochlear implant users who did not have full access to language prior to cochlear implantation (n = 26). Read More

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http://jslhr.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1044/2018_JSL
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0281DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6198917PMC
August 2018
11 Reads

Parents' Perception of Health-Related Quality of Life in Children With Cochlear Implants: The Impact of Language Skills and Hearing.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 Aug;61(8):2084-2098

Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Special Needs Education, University of Oslo, Norway.

Purpose: The study compared how parents of children with cochlear implants (CIs) and parents of children with normal hearing perceive their children's health-related quality of life (HR-QOL).

Method: The sample consisted of 186 Norwegian-speaking children in the age span of 5;0-12;11 (years;months): 106 children with CIs (53% boys, 47% girls) and 80 children with normal hearing (44% boys, 56% girls). No children had known additional disabilities affecting language, cognitive development, or HR-QOL. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0278DOI Listing
August 2018
5 Reads

Evaluation of an Explicit Intervention to Teach Novel Grammatical Forms to Children With Developmental Language Disorder.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 Aug;61(8):2062-2075

Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

Purpose: Unlike traditional implicit approaches used to improve grammatical forms used by children with developmental language disorder, explicit instruction aims to make the learner consciously aware of the underlying language pattern. In this study, we compared the efficacy of an explicit approach to an implicit approach when teaching 3 novel grammatical forms varying in linguistic complexity.

Method: The study included twenty-five 5- to 8-year-old children with developmental language disorder, 13 of whom were randomized to receive an implicit-only (I-O) intervention whereas the remaining 12 participants were randomized to receive a combined explicit-implicit (E-I) intervention to learn 3 novel grammatical forms. Read More

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http://pubs.asha.org/doi/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0339
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0339DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6198921PMC
August 2018
6 Reads

Teleaudiology Services for Rehabilitation With Hearing Aids in Adults: A Systematic Review.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 Jul;61(7):1831-1849

Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA.

Purpose: This review examined (a) the current evidence from studies on teleaudiology applications for rehabilitation of adults with hearing impairment with hearing aids and (b) whether it is sufficient to support the translation into routine clinical practice.

Method: A search strategy and eligibility criteria were utilized to include articles specifically related to hearing aid fitting and follow-up procedures that are involved in consultations for the rehabilitation of adults, where the service was provided by the clinician by teleaudiology. A search using key words and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) was conducted on the main electronic databases that index health-related studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-16-0397DOI Listing
July 2018
3 Reads

Infant-Mother Acoustic-Prosodic Alignment and Developmental Risk.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 Jun;61(6):1369-1380

Human Development and Family Studies, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.

Purpose: One promising early marker for autism and other communicative and language disorders is early infant speech production. Here we used daylong recordings of high- and low-risk infant-mother dyads to examine whether acoustic-prosodic alignment as well as two automated measures of infant vocalization are related to developmental risk status indexed via familial risk and developmental progress at 36 months of age.

Method: Automated analyses of the acoustics of daylong real-world interactions were used to examine whether pitch characteristics of one vocalization by the mother or the child predicted those of the vocalization response by the other speaker and whether other features of infants' speech in daylong recordings were associated with developmental risk status or outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0287DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195085PMC
June 2018
3 Reads

Children's Speech Perception in Noise: Evidence for Dissociation From Language and Working Memory.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 05;61(5):1294-1305

Cognition and Language Lab, Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Central Arkansas, Conway.

Purpose: We examined the association between speech perception in noise (SPIN), language abilities, and working memory (WM) capacity in school-age children. Existing studies supporting the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model suggest that WM capacity plays a significant role in adverse listening situations.

Method: Eighty-three children between the ages of 7 to 11 years participated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0312DOI Listing
May 2018
3 Reads

Response to the Letter to the Editor From Moncrieff (2017) Regarding de Wit et al. (2016), "Characteristics of Auditory Processing Disorders: A Systematic Review".

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 Jun;61(6):1517-1519

Research Group Healthy Ageing, Allied Health Care and Nursing, Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Purpose: The purpose of this letter is to respond to Moncrieff's (2017) letter to the editor, "Response to de Wit et al., 2016, 'Characteristics of Auditory Processing Disorders: A Systematic Review,'" published in May 2017 by the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research.

Conclusion: We believe that our original conclusions are valid given the limited evidence that is currently available about the etiology of auditory processing disorders (APD). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0412DOI Listing
June 2018
8 Reads

Population Health in Pediatric Speech and Language Disorders: Available Data Sources and a Research Agenda for the Field.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 05;61(5):1279-1291

Department of Public Health, Oregon State University College of Health and Human Sciences, Corvallis.

Purpose: The aim of the study was to provide an overview of population science as applied to speech and language disorders, illustrate data sources, and advance a research agenda on the epidemiology of these conditions.

Method: Computer-aided database searches were performed to identify key national surveys and other sources of data necessary to establish the incidence, prevalence, and course and outcome of speech and language disorders. This article also summarizes a research agenda that could enhance our understanding of the epidemiology of these disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-16-0459DOI Listing
May 2018
6 Reads

Children's Acoustic and Linguistic Adaptations to Peers With Hearing Impairment.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 05;61(5):1055-1069

Language & Cognition, University College London, United Kingdom.

Purpose: This study aims to examine the clear speaking strategies used by older children when interacting with a peer with hearing loss, focusing on both acoustic and linguistic adaptations in speech.

Method: The Grid task, a problem-solving task developed to elicit spontaneous interactive speech, was used to obtain a range of global acoustic and linguistic measures. Eighteen 9- to 14-year-old children with normal hearing (NH) performed the task in pairs, once with a friend with NH and once with a friend with a hearing impairment (HI). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0456DOI Listing
May 2018
9 Reads

The Impact of Individual Differences on a Bilingual Vocabulary Approach for Latino Preschoolers.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 04;61(4):897-909

Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: First, we replicated in a new sample our previous findings that a culturally and linguistically responsive (CLR) bilingual approach for English vocabulary instruction for preschool Latino dual language learners was effective. Subsequently, we investigated whether the positive effect of CLR instruction varies as a function of individual child characteristics, including baseline vocabulary levels and gender.

Method: Using a randomized pretest-posttest follow-up group design, we first replicated our previous study (N = 42) with a new sample by randomly assigning 35 Spanish-speaking Latino preschoolers to a CLR bilingual group or an English-only group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0186DOI Listing

Screening Tests Reveal High Risk Among Adjudicated Adolescents of Auditory Processing and Language Disorders.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 04;61(4):924-935

Shuman Juvenile Detention Center, Pittsburgh, PA.

Purpose: The study investigated the prevalence of risk factors for auditory processing and language disorders among adolescents residing at a local juvenile detention center.

Method: A total of 782 adjudicated adolescents with normal hearing were screened with the Randomized Dichotic Digits Test (Strouse & Wilson, 1999) and the Dichotic Words Test (Moncrieff, 2015). A subset of 420 of those adolescents was also screened with the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals (CELF; Semel, Wiig, & Secord, 2003). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0098DOI Listing
April 2018
2 Reads

Development of Velopharyngeal Closure for Vocalization During the First 2 Years of Life.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 03;61(3):549-560

Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson.

Purpose: The vocalizations of young infants often sound nasalized, suggesting that the velopharynx is open during the 1st few months of life. Whereas acoustic and perceptual studies seemed to support the idea that the velopharynx closes for vocalization by about 4 months of age, an aeromechanical study contradicted this (Thom, Hoit, Hixon, & Smith, 2006). Thus, the current large-scale investigation was undertaken to determine when the velopharynx closes for speech production by following infants during their first 2 years of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0208DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195065PMC

Masked Repetition Priming Treatment for Anomia.

Authors:
JoAnn P Silkes

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 03;61(3):690-712

Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle.

Purpose: Masked priming has been suggested as a way to directly target implicit lexical retrieval processes in aphasia. This study was designed to investigate repeated use of masked repetition priming to improve picture naming in individuals with anomia due to aphasia.

Method: A single-subject, multiple-baseline design was used across 6 people with aphasia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0192DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195064PMC
March 2018
1 Read

Interpreting Mini-Mental State Examination Performance in Highly Proficient Bilingual Spanish-English and Asian Indian-English Speakers: Demographic Adjustments, Item Analyses, and Supplemental Measures.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 04;61(4):847-856

Department of Communicative Disorders & Deaf Education, Utah State University, Logan.

Purpose: Performance on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), among the most widely used global screens of adult cognitive status, is affected by demographic variables including age, education, and ethnicity. This study extends prior research by examining the specific effects of bilingualism on MMSE performance.

Method: Sixty independent community-dwelling monolingual and bilingual adults were recruited from eastern and western regions of the United States in this cross-sectional group study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0021DOI Listing
April 2018
10 Reads

Poor Speech Perception Is Not a Core Deficit of Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Preliminary Findings.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 03;61(3):583-592

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA.

Purpose: Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is hypothesized to arise from deficits in speech motor planning and programming, but the influence of abnormal speech perception in CAS on these processes is debated. This study examined speech perception abilities among children with CAS with and without language impairment compared to those with language impairment, speech delay, and typically developing peers.

Method: Speech perception was measured by discrimination of synthesized speech syllable continua that varied in frequency (/dɑ/-/ɡɑ/). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0106DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195067PMC

Listeners Experience Linguistic Masking Release in Noise-Vocoded Speech-in-Speech Recognition.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 02;61(2):428-435

Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences and Disorders, University of Kansas, Lawrence.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether listeners with normal hearing perceiving noise-vocoded speech-in-speech demonstrate better intelligibility of target speech when the background speech was mismatched in language (linguistic release from masking [LRM]) and/or location (spatial release from masking [SRM]) relative to the target. We also assessed whether the spectral resolution of the noise-vocoded stimuli affected the presence of LRM and SRM under these conditions.

Method: In Experiment 1, a mixed factorial design was used to simultaneously manipulate the masker language (within-subject, English vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0215DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6105125PMC
February 2018
1 Read

A Narrative Evaluation of Mandarin-Speaking Children With Language Impairment.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 02;61(2):345-359

Bethel Hearing and Speaking Training Center, Farmers Branch, Corinth, TX.

Purpose: We aimed to study narrative skills in Mandarin-speaking children with language impairment (LI) to compare with children with LI speaking Indo-European languages.

Method: Eighteen Mandarin-speaking children with LI (mean age 6;2 [years;months]) and 18 typically developing (TD) age controls told 3 stories elicited using the Mandarin Expressive Narrative Test (de Villiers & Liu, 2014). We compared macrostructure-evaluating descriptions of characters, settings, initiating events, internal responses,plans, actions, and consequences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0367DOI Listing
February 2018
3 Reads

Changing the Subject: The Place of Revisions in Grammatical Development.

Authors:
Matthew Rispoli

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 02;61(2):360-372

Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois, Champaign.

Purpose: This article focuses on toddlers' revisions of the sentence subject and tests the hypothesis that subject diversity (i.e., the number of different subjects produced) increases the probability of subject revision. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0216DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6105126PMC
February 2018

Remote Microphone System Use at Home: Impact on Caregiver Talk.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 02;61(2):399-409

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of home use of a remote microphone system (RMS) on the spoken language production of caregivers with young children who have hearing loss.

Method: Language Environment Analysis recorders were used with 10 families during 2 consecutive weekends (RMS weekend and No-RMS weekend). The amount of talk from a single caregiver that could be made accessible to children with hearing loss when using an RMS was estimated using Language Environment Analysis software. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0168DOI Listing
February 2018
5 Reads

Comment on "Sensitivity of the Speech Intelligibility Index to the Assumed Dynamic Range," by Jin et al. (2017).

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 01;61(1):186-188

Ear & Hearing, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Purpose: This letter to the editor is in response to a research note by Jin, Kates, and Arehart (2017), "Sensitivity of the Speech Intelligibility Index to the Assumed Dynamic Range," published in June 2017 by the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research.

Conclusion: The authors argue that the approach and line of reasoning in the Jin et al. (2017) research note suggest new findings but do not lead to essentially new insights. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0271DOI Listing
January 2018
42 Reads

Grammar Clinical Marker Yields Substantial Heritability for Language Impairments in 16-Year-Old Twins.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 01;61(1):66-78

Department of Psychology, University of York, United Kingdom.

Purpose: There is a need for well-defined language phenotypes suitable for adolescents in twin studies and other large-scale research projects. Rice, Hoffman, and Wexler (2009) have developed a grammatical judgment measure as a clinical marker of language impairment, which has an extended developmental range to adolescence.

Method: We conducted the first twin analysis, along with associated phenotypic analyses of validity, of an abridged, 20-item version of this grammatical judgment measure (GJ-20), based on telephone administration using prerecorded stimuli to 405 pairs of 16-year-olds (148 monozygotic and 257 dizygotic) drawn from the Twins Early Development Study (Haworth, Davis, & Plomin, 2012). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0364DOI Listing
January 2018
12 Reads

Author's Rebuttal to Smits et al. (2018), "Comment on 'Sensitivity of the Speech Intelligibility Index to the Assumed Dynamic Range' by Jin et al. (2017)".

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2018 01;61(1):189-190

Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder.

Purpose: The purpose of this letter is to refute the comments written by Smits, Goverts, and Versfeld (2018).

Method: Refutations to each issue including the fixed mathematical relationship between dynamic range (DR) and a fitting constant (Q value), deviating results for small DRs, and determination of Speech Intelligibility Index (SII) model parameters are described.

Results: Although Smits et al. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0359DOI Listing
January 2018
11 Reads

Word Processing in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence From Event-Related Potentials.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2017 12;60(12):3441-3455

Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development and Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

Purpose: This investigation was conducted to determine whether young children with autism spectrum disorders exhibited a canonical neural response to word stimuli and whether putative event-related potential (ERP) measures of word processing were correlated with a concurrent measure of receptive language. Additional exploratory analyses were used to examine whether the magnitude of the association between ERP measures of word processing and receptive language varied as a function of the number of word stimuli the participants reportedly understood.

Method: Auditory ERPs were recorded in response to spoken words and nonwords presented with equal probability in 34 children aged 2-5 years with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder who were in the early stages of language acquisition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6111525PMC
December 2017
12 Reads

Accentuate the Negative: Grammatical Errors During Narrative Production as a Clinical Marker of Central Nervous System Abnormality in School-Aged Children With Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

Authors:
John C Thorne

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2017 12;60(12):3523-3537

Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine (a) whether increased grammatical error rates during a standardized narrative task are a more clinically useful marker of central nervous system abnormality in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) than common measures of productivity or grammatical complexity and (b) whether combining the rate of grammatical errors with the rate of cohesive referencing errors can improve utility of a standardized narrative assessment task for FASD diagnosis.

Method: The method used was retrospective analysis of narrative and clinical data from 138 children (aged 7-12 years; 69 with FASD, 69 typically developing). Narrative analysis was conducted blind to diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0128DOI Listing
December 2017
1 Read

False Belief Development in Children Who Are Hard of Hearing Compared With Peers With Normal Hearing.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2017 12;60(12):3487-3506

Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE.

Purpose: This study investigates false belief (FB) understanding in children who are hard of hearing (CHH) compared with children with normal hearing (CNH) at ages 5 and 6 years and at 2nd grade. Research with this population has theoretical significance, given that the early auditory-linguistic experiences of CHH are less restricted compared with children who are deaf but not as complete as those of CNH.

Method: Participants included CHH and CNH who had completed FB tasks as part of a larger multicenter, longitudinal study on outcomes of children with mild-to-severe hearing loss. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0121DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5962924PMC
December 2017
7 Reads

Magnitude of Neck-Surface Vibration as an Estimate of Subglottal Pressure During Modulations of Vocal Effort and Intensity in Healthy Speakers.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2017 12;60(12):3404-3416

Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA.

Purpose: This study examined the relationship between the magnitude of neck-surface vibration (NSVMag; transduced with an accelerometer) and intraoral estimates of subglottal pressure (P'sg) during variations in vocal effort at 3 intensity levels.

Method: Twelve vocally healthy adults produced strings of /pɑ/ syllables in 3 vocal intensity conditions, while increasing vocal effort during each condition. Measures were made of P'sg (estimated during stop-consonant closure), NSVMag (measured during the following vowel), sound pressure level, and respiratory kinematics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0180DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6111520PMC
December 2017
14 Reads

Modeling Speech Level as a Function of Background Noise Level and Talker-to-Listener Distance for Talkers Wearing Hearing Protection Devices.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2017 12;60(12):3393-3403

Department of Mechanical Engineering, École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Purpose: Studying the variations in speech levels with changing background noise level and talker-to-listener distance for talkers wearing hearing protection devices (HPDs) can aid in understanding communication in background noise.

Method: Speech was recorded using an intra-aural HPD from 12 different talkers at 5 different distances in 3 different noise conditions and 2 quiet conditions.

Results: This article proposes models that can predict the difference in speech level as a function of background noise level and talker-to-listener distance for occluded talkers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0052DOI Listing
December 2017
2 Reads

Receptive Vocabulary, Cognitive Flexibility, and Inhibitory Control Differentially Predict Older and Younger Adults' Success Perceiving Speech by Talkers With Dysarthria.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2017 12;60(12):3632-3641

School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee.

Purpose: Previous research has demonstrated equivocal findings related to the effect of listener age on intelligibility ratings of dysarthric speech. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms that support younger and older adults' perception of speech by talkers with dysarthria.

Method: Younger and older adults identified words in phrases produced by talkers with dysarthria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0119DOI Listing
December 2017
8 Reads

Categorical Perception of Mandarin Chinese Tones 1-2 and Tones 1-4: Effects of Aging and Signal Duration.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2017 12;60(12):3667-3677

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Texas at Austin.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the aging effect on the categorical perception of Mandarin Chinese tones with varied fundamental frequency (F0) contours and signal duration.

Method: Both younger and older native Chinese listeners with normal hearing were recruited in 2 experiments: tone identification and tone discrimination on a series of stimuli with the F0 contour systematically varying from the flat tone to the rising-falling tones. Apart from F0 contour, tone duration was manipulated at 3 levels: 100, 200, and 400 ms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0061DOI Listing
December 2017
1 Read

Infant-Directed Speech Enhances Attention to Speech in Deaf Infants With Cochlear Implants.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2017 11;60(11):3321-3333

Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus.

Purpose: Both theoretical models of infant language acquisition and empirical studies posit important roles for attention to speech in early language development. However, deaf infants with cochlear implants (CIs) show reduced attention to speech as compared with their peers with normal hearing (NH; Horn, Davis, Pisoni, & Miyamoto, 2005; Houston, Pisoni, Kirk, Ying, & Miyamoto, 2003), which may affect their acquisition of spoken language. The main purpose of this study was to determine (a) whether infant-directed speech (IDS) enhances attention to speech in infants with CIs, as compared with adult-directed speech (ADS), and (b) whether the degree to which infants with CIs pay attention to IDS is associated with later language outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0149DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5945082PMC
November 2017
2 Reads

A Method to Administer Agents to the Larynx in an Awake Large Animal.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2017 11;60(11):3171-3176

Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN.

Purpose: This research note describes an adapted experimental methodology to administer an exogenous agent to the larynx and upper airway of awake animals. The exogenous agent could be a perturbation. In the current study, the agent was isotonic saline. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0040DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5945077PMC
November 2017
11 Reads