411 results match your criteria Journal of fluency disorders[Journal]


Self-efficacy beliefs: Experiences of adults who stutter.

J Fluency Disord 2019 Mar 29;60:11-25. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work, and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Western Australia, Australia. Electronic address:

Purpose: Childhood-onset stuttering is a complex and multifaceted disorder. Intervention for adults who stutter has historically addressed speech fluency more so than psychosocial aspects of the disorder, including the nature of the individual's self-efficacy beliefs concerning their confidence in their capacity to enact change. Self-efficacy is an important construct related to quality of life, resilience, and maintenance of treatment gains for adults who stutter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2019.03.002DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

An exploratory factor analysis of action responses to stuttering anticipation.

J Fluency Disord 2019 Mar 7;60:1-10. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Department of Teaching & Learning, College of Education, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.

Purpose: We previously introduced theStuttering Anticipation Scale (SAS; Jackson, E. S., Gerlach, H. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2019.03.001DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Disfluency clusters in speakers with and without neurogenic stuttering following traumatic brain injury.

J Fluency Disord 2019 Mar 11;59:33-51. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 53705 Madison WI, United States.

Purpose: Analyze the characteristics and rate of disfluency clusters in adults with and without neurogenic stuttering after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Method: Twenty adults with TBI participated in this study, including 10 with neurogenic stuttering (Group B) and 10 without -stuttering (Group A). Disfluency clusters in speech samples were classified into three types: Stuttering-like (SLD), other (OD), and mixed (MIX). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2019.01.001DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Exposure therapy for social anxiety disorder in people who stutter: An exploratory multiple baseline design.

J Fluency Disord 2019 Mar 13;59:21-32. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Central Florida, 4111 Pictor Lane, Orlando, FL 32816-1390, United States.

Background & Objectives: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a debilitating condition, and approximately half of adults who stutter have SAD. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has shown promise in decreasing social anxiety symptoms among adults who stutter, but exposure, arguably the essential component for successful CBT for SAD, has been understudied and underemphasized. Aims of this study were to develop an exposure therapy protocol designed specifically for people who stutter and have SAD and evaluate its potential efficacy in reducing social anxiety and stuttering severity using a multiple baseline design. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.12.001DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Comparing stuttering attitudes of preschool through 5th grade children and their parents in a predominately rural Appalachian sample.

J Fluency Disord 2019 Mar 15;59:64-79. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

Department of Communication Disorders, 1 John Marshall Drive, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755, United States.

Background: Theories relating to young children's social cognitive maturity and their prevailing social groups play important roles in the acquisition of attitudes. Previous research has shown that preschool and kindergarten children's stuttering attitudes are characterized by stronger negative beliefs and self reactions than those of parents. By contrast, 12 year-old children's stuttering attitudes have been shown to be similar to their parents' attitudes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.11.001DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

The effects of self-disclosure on the communicative interaction between a person who stutters and a normally fluent speaker.

J Fluency Disord 2019 Mar 20;59:1-20. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, School of Nursing and Health Sciences, La Salle University, 1900 W. Olney Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19141, United States. Electronic address:

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of self-disclosure on the self-perception of stuttering severity, comfort, cognitive effort, and anxiety in a structured conversational interaction with a normally fluent speaker. The benefit of self-disclosure from the perspective of the person who stutters in a self-disclosed and in a non-disclosed condition was also studied. The total syllables produced and percent syllables stuttered were measured in both experimental conditions in order to evaluate the effects on the amount of speech produced and verbal fluency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.11.003DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Elevated attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms in children who stutter.

J Fluency Disord 2019 Mar 15;59:80-90. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Western Australia, Australia. Electronic address:

Purpose: This study described the proportion of children who stutter who exhibit Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms, manifesting in inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive behaviours. Children who stutter with these challenging behaviours may not respond as quickly and successfully to stuttering treatment. A preliminary exploration of differences in treatment responsiveness for children with and without ADHD symptoms was undertaken. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.11.002DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Self-acceptance, resilience, coping and satisfaction of life in people who stutter.

J Fluency Disord 2019 Mar 1;59:52-63. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Auburn University, United States.

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate self-acceptance and satisfaction with life with people who stutter and the influence of coping and resilience on the two factors.

Method: Forty-seven people who stutter (PWS) and 47 people who do not stutter (PWNS) participated in an online survey. Participants completed a survey assessing 6 main areas: (a) background information, (b) satisfaction with life, (c) coping, (d) avoidance, (e) self-acceptance, and resilience. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.10.004DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

The Satisfaction with Communication in Everyday Speaking Situations (SCESS) scale: An overarching outcome measure of treatment effect.

J Fluency Disord 2018 12 15;58:77-85. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

The Children's Hospital Zagreb, Croatia. Electronic address:

Purpose: The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement strongly suggests one primary outcome for clinical trials, yet the outcomes of stuttering treatments span numerous behavioral and psychosocial domains. That presents a roadblock to eventual meta-analysis of clinical trials for adults who stutter.

Method: We propose a simple and convenient outcome measure for clinical trials of stuttering treatment for adults that spans whatever behavioral and psychosocial factors might impel clients to seek treatment: a nine-point scale of Satisfaction with Communication in Everyday Speaking Situations (SCESS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.10.002DOI Listing
December 2018
8 Reads

Disclosure of stuttering and quality of life in people who stutter.

J Fluency Disord 2018 12 15;58:1-10. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Montclair State University, United States.

Purpose: This study investigated the disclosure practices of people who stutter, and the relationship between disclosure of stuttering and quality of life.

Method: Participants were 322 adults who stutter recruited from speech-language pathologists and support group leaders. Participants completed a survey that contained items measuring level of disclosure of stuttering, as well as a global measure of self-rated quality of life. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0094730X183005
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.10.003DOI Listing
December 2018
30 Reads

Genetic epidemiology of stuttering among school children in the state of Tamil Nadu, India.

J Fluency Disord 2018 12 11;58:11-21. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

Department of Genetics, Post Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Madras, Taramani Campus, Chennai, 600 113, India. Electronic address:

Purpose: Stuttering is a fluency disorder with a worldwide prevalence of 1%. Reports on the epidemiology of stuttering in India are limited. Our primary goal was to examine the prevalence of the disorder among school children. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0094730X183002
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.10.001DOI Listing
December 2018
23 Reads

Recovery from stuttering in preschool-age children: 9 year outcomes in a clinical population.

J Fluency Disord 2018 12 24;58:35-46. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Speech and Hearing Centre, Sophia Children's Hospital, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Purpose: The first purpose was to define the recovery rate in children who stutter in a clinical sample, adding self-report to validate recovery status. The second purpose was to explore whether children who were judged to be recovered showed subjective experiences that might be interpreted as coping behaviors used to control speech fluency.

Methods: In this longitudinal study, preschool-age children whose parents consulted a speech-language pathologist about stuttering were followed for 9 years. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0094730X183001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.09.003DOI Listing
December 2018
41 Reads

Self-report of self-disclosure statements for stuttering.

J Fluency Disord 2018 12 28;58:22-34. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon, USA.

Purpose: To (1) analyze verbatim wording used by adults who stutter (AWS) to self-disclose stuttering, (2) determine contexts in which AWS may self-disclose, (3) examine the use of self-disclosure by AWS about other aspects of their identity, and (4) investigate the ways in which speech-language pathologists (SLPs) develop self-disclosure statements with AWS.

Method: Web-based questionnaires were administered to AWS (N = 42) and SLPs (N = 33) who work with AWS. The AWS questionnaire asked about the verbatim wording of self-disclosure statements used by AWS and the contexts in which they utilize them. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0094730X183005
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.09.004DOI Listing
December 2018
8 Reads

Phonological working memory in developmental stuttering: Potential insights from the neurobiology of language and cognition.

J Fluency Disord 2018 12 1;58:94-117. Epub 2018 Sep 1.

Idaho State University, 650 Memorial Dr. Bldg. 68, Pocatello, ID 83201, United States. Electronic address:

The current review examines how neurobiological models of language and cognition could shed light on the role of phonological working memory (PWM) in developmental stuttering (DS). Toward that aim, we review Baddeley's influential multicomponent model of PWM and evidence for load-dependent differences between children and adults who stutter and typically fluent speakers in nonword repetition and dual-task paradigms. We suggest that, while nonword repetition and dual-task findings implicate processes related to PWM, it is unclear from behavioral studies alone what mechanisms are involved. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0094730X173010
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.08.006DOI Listing
December 2018
5 Reads

Envelope modulation spectral (EMS) analyses of solo reading and choral reading conditions suggest changes in speech rhythm in adults who stutter.

J Fluency Disord 2018 12 8;58:47-60. Epub 2018 Sep 8.

All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, Mysuru, Karnataka, India. Electronic address:

Purpose: A longstanding finding in persons who stutter is that stuttering frequency significantly reduces during choral reading when compared to the solo reading condition. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this decrease in stuttering frequency may be because speech of the normal speaker dictates the speech rhythm of a person who stutters. We used an automated, sensitive acoustic technique-Envelope Modulation Spectral (EMS) analysis- that allowed us to document speech rhythm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.09.002DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Stuttering-like hesitation in speech during acute/post-acute phase of immune-mediated encephalitis.

J Fluency Disord 2018 12 7;58:70-76. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

Department of Medical, Surgical, and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Strada di Fiume 447, 34100, Trieste, Italy. Electronic address:

Purpose: Neurogenic stuttering may be evident after a lesion/dysfunction of wider neural networks. Here we present a case of acquired stuttering as the consequence of immune-mediated encephalitis.

Methods: The case of a 71-year old male who complained about the progressive onset of stuttering and disequilibrium as the consequence of immune-mediated encephalitis, is here reported. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.09.001DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads

Phonological neighborhood effect in spontaneous speech in adults who stutter.

Authors:
Pei-Tzu Tsai

J Fluency Disord 2018 12 30;58:86-93. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences, San José State University, San José, CA 95192-0079, USA. Electronic address:

Purpose: The study examined the relationship between word-form similarity network (phonological neighborhood) and stuttering occurrence in spontaneous speech in adults. The study asked whether neighborhood characteristics, including the number of neighbors (neighborhood density) and the average word frequency among neighbors (neighborhood frequency), differentiate stuttered from fluent words within spontaneous speech samples, and more specifically, whether neighborhood characteristics facilitate speech fluency in adults who stutter.

Method: Spontaneous speech samples were collected from 14 adults who stutter, including 7 with mild stuttering and 7 with severe stuttering. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.08.005DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

A response to reviewers Brow and Walther.

Authors:
Dale F Williams

J Fluency Disord 2018 12 20;58:123-124. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431, United States. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.08.002DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

The Speech Efficiency Score (SES): A time-domain measure of speech fluency.

J Fluency Disord 2018 12 13;58:61-69. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

Department of Communicative Sciences & Disorders, College of Communication Arts and Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, Israel.

Purpose: This study is a preliminary attempt to evaluate a new speech fluency measure, the Speech Efficiency Score (SES), in comparison with subjective stuttering severity rating scales and stuttered syllable counts (%SS).

Methods: 277 listeners (92 naïve, 39 speech-language pathology (SLP) students, 124 practicing SLPs, and 22 SLPs who specialize in stuttering) evaluated short recordings of speech on an 11-point scale. Recordings were obtained from 56 adults, of whom 20 were people who stutter, 16 were people who stutter who were using fluency-shaping techniques, and 20 were speakers who do not stutter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.08.001DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads
1.891 Impact Factor

Examining implicit and explicit attitudes toward stuttering.

J Fluency Disord 2018 09 27;57:22-36. Epub 2018 Jun 27.

Psychology and Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Peabody College #552, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203, United States.

Purpose: This study assessed implicit and explicit attitudes toward people who stutter among typically-fluent young adults.

Method: Participants completed an Implicit Association Test, a measure of implicit attitudes, to assess the strength of association between stuttered vs. fluent speech and positive vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.06.001DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Backward masking of tones and speech in people who do and do not stutter.

J Fluency Disord 2018 09 20;57:11-21. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

Department of Speech -Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, United States.

Purpose: There is evidence of an auditory-perceptual component of stuttering, and backward masking (BM) is a task to explore that role. Prior research reported poorer thresholds for BM tones in a group of children who persisted in stuttering compared to those for a group that did not persist. This study examined BM for adults who stutter for tones and for speech, which tests a phonetic aspect of hearing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.07.001DOI Listing
September 2018
4 Reads

Speech rate adjustment of adults during conversation.

J Fluency Disord 2018 09 23;57:1-10. Epub 2018 Jun 23.

Department of Communication Disorders, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.

Purpose: Speech rate convergence has been reported previously as a phenomenon in which one's speech rate is influenced by his/her partner's speech rate. This phenomenon has been demonstrated in artificial settings, and to some extent, in mother-child interactions. The purpose of this study was to explore speech rate adjustment in a quasi-natural adult-adult conversation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.06.002DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads
1.891 Impact Factor

Cortical associates of emotional reactivity and regulation in childhood stuttering.

J Fluency Disord 2018 06 19;56:81-99. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University, 1215 21st Avenue South, Suite 8310 MCE South Tower, Nashville, TN 37232-8242, United States. Electronic address:

Purpose: This study sought to determine the cortical associates of emotional reactivity and emotion regulation (as indexed by the amplitude of evoked response potentials [ERP]) in young children who do and do not stutter during passive viewing of pleasant, unpleasant and neutral pictures.

Method: Participants were 17 young children who stutter and 22 young children who do not stutter (between 4 years 0 months to 6 years 11 months). The dependent measures were (1) mean amplitude of late positive potential (LPP, an ERP sensitive to emotional stimuli) during passive (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.04.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5970082PMC
June 2018
4 Reads

Fluency Bank: A new resource for fluency research and practice.

J Fluency Disord 2018 06 29;56:69-80. Epub 2018 Mar 29.

Department of Psychology, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, United States. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.03.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5986295PMC
June 2018
3 Reads

Comparison of adults who stutter with and without social anxiety disorder.

J Fluency Disord 2018 06 19;56:55-68. Epub 2018 Mar 19.

The University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Science, Australian Stuttering Research Centre, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, Sydney, NSW 1825, Australia. Electronic address:

Purpose: Social anxiety disorder is a debilitating anxiety disorder associated with significant life impairment. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate overall functioning for adults who stutter with and without a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder.

Method: Participants were 275 adults who stuttered (18-80 years), including 219 males (79. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.03.001DOI Listing
June 2018
9 Reads

Children who stutter at 3 years of age: A community-based study.

J Fluency Disord 2018 06 22;56:45-54. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

Minami-Tsukisamu Elementary School, Tsukisamu Nishi 4-8, Toyohira-ku, Sapporo 062-0024, Japan; Japan Stuttering Genyukai Association, Minami-Otsuka 1-30-15, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 170-0005, Japan.

Purpose: Lack of social resources to support children who stutter may be due, in part, to the absence of epidemiological data regarding stuttering. This study investigated the proportion of three-year-old children who stutter in a city located in Hokkaido, a northern island of Japan.

Methods: The speech of individual children was assessed as part of a routine, government-conducted health care examination for 3-year-old children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.02.002DOI Listing
June 2018
4 Reads

Exogenously triggered response inhibition in developmental stuttering.

J Fluency Disord 2018 06 21;56:33-44. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

Dept. of Psychology, Tilburg University, The Netherlands; Dept. of Psychology, University of Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address:

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine relations between children's exogenously triggered response inhibition and stuttering.

Method: Participants were 18 children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 9;01 years) and 18 children who not stutter (CWNS; mean age = 9;01 years). Participants were matched on age (±3 months) and gender. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.02.001DOI Listing
June 2018
7 Reads

Use of a phoneme monitoring task to examine lexical access in adults who do and do not stutter.

J Fluency Disord 2018 09 6;57:65-73. Epub 2018 Feb 6.

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, University of Maryland, 0100 Samuel J. LeFrak Hall, 7251 Preinkert Dr., College Park, MD 20742, United States. Electronic address:

Previous work has postulated that a deficit in lexicalization may be an underlying cause of a stuttering disorder (Prins, Main, & Wampler, 1997; Wingate, 1988). This study investigates the time course of lexicalization of nouns and verbs in adults who stutter. A generalized phoneme monitoring (PM) paradigm was used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2018.01.001DOI Listing
September 2018
11 Reads

Executive function and childhood stuttering: Parent ratings and evidence from a behavioral task.

J Fluency Disord 2018 06 30;56:18-32. Epub 2017 Dec 30.

Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, United States.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the executive function (EF) abilities of preschool children who do (CWS) and do not stutter (CWNS) using a parent-report questionnaire and a behavioral task.

Method: Participants were 75 CWS and 75 CWNS between the ages of 3;0 and 5;11 (years; months). Parents rated their children's EF abilities using the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Preschool Version (BRIEF-P; Gioia, Espy, & Isquith, 2003). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.12.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5970042PMC
June 2018
4 Reads

The effect of emotion on articulation rate in persistence and recovery of childhood stuttering.

J Fluency Disord 2018 06 22;56:1-17. Epub 2017 Nov 22.

Vanderbilt University, United States.

Purpose: This study investigated the possible association of emotional processes and articulation rate in pre-school age children who stutter and persist (persisting), children who stutter and recover (recovered) and children who do not stutter (nonstuttering).

Methods: The participants were ten persisting, ten recovered, and ten nonstuttering children between the ages of 3-5 years; who were classified as persisting, recovered, or nonstuttering approximately 2-2.5 years after the experimental testing took place. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.11.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5963974PMC
June 2018
4 Reads
2 Citations
1.890 Impact Factor

Effect of control samples and listener attributes on speech naturalness ratings of people who stutter.

J Fluency Disord 2018 09 6;57:59-64. Epub 2017 Dec 6.

Discipline of Speech Pathology, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, 3088, Australia.

Purpose: Speech restructuring treatment can effectively reduce stuttering but the resultant speech may sound unnatural. Martin et al. (1984) speech naturalness scale is widely used by clinicians and researchers, yet little is known about whether including normally fluent speech samples alters the judgement of the naturalness of speech samples of people who stutter, and whether attributes of listeners - specifically training and sex - influence ratings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.11.004DOI Listing
September 2018
9 Reads

Effects of emotion on the acoustic parameters in adults who stutter: An exploratory study.

J Fluency Disord 2017 12 18;54:35-49. Epub 2017 Sep 18.

Plattsburgh State University, Department of Psychology, Plattsburgh, NY, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.09.006DOI Listing
December 2017
7 Reads

The experience of stuttering among Ultra-Orthodox and Secular/Traditional Jews.

J Fluency Disord 2017 Dec 2;54:24-34. Epub 2017 Oct 2.

Department of Communication Disorders, Ariel University, Ariel, Israel.

Purpose: This groundbreaking research compares the experience of stuttering among adult male People Who Stutter (PWS) from the ultra-Orthodox (UO) Jewish community in Israel to those from Secular/Traditional (ST) backgrounds.

Methods: Participants were 32 UO and 31 ST PWS, aged 18-67 years. Self-report questionnaires utilized: Perceived Stuttering Severity (PSS); Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering (OASES-A); Students' Life Satisfaction Scale (SLSS); Situation Avoidance Behavior Checklist (SABC). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.09.007DOI Listing
December 2017
10 Reads

Self-efficacy and quality of life in adults who stutter.

J Fluency Disord 2017 Dec 21;54:14-23. Epub 2017 Sep 21.

School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Western Australia, Australia. Electronic address:

Purpose: Self-efficacy has emerged as a potential predictor of quality of life for adults who stutter. Research has focused primarily on the positive relationship self-efficacy has to treatment outcomes, but little is known about the relationship between self-efficacy and quality of life for adults who stutter. The purpose of this mixed- methods study is to determine the predictive value of self-efficacy and its relationship to quality of life for adults who stutter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.09.004DOI Listing
December 2017
6 Reads

Clinical utility of self-disclosure for adults who stutter: Apologetic versus informative statements.

J Fluency Disord 2017 Dec 12;54:1-13. Epub 2017 Sep 12.

The University of Texas, Austin, USA.

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to explore the clinical utility of self-disclosure, particularly, whether disclosing in an informative manner would result in more positive observer ratings of the speaker who stutters than either disclosing in an apologetic manner or choosing not to self-disclose at all.

Method: Observers (N=338) were randomly assigned to view one of six possible videos (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.09.001DOI Listing
December 2017
51 Reads

A case of multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian type with stuttering- and palilalia-like dysfluencies and putaminal atrophy.

J Fluency Disord 2018 09 14;57:51-58. Epub 2017 Nov 14.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.

Both developmental and acquired stuttering are related to the function of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical loop, which includes the putamen. Here, we present a case of stuttering- and palilalia-like dysfluencies that manifested as an early symptom of multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian type (MSA-P) and bilateral atrophy of the putamen. The patient was a 72-year-old man with no history of developmental stuttering who presented with a stutter for consultation with our otorhinolaryngology department. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.11.002DOI Listing
September 2018
18 Reads

Cognitive flexibility in preschool children with and without stuttering disorders.

J Fluency Disord 2018 09 13;57:37-50. Epub 2017 Nov 13.

Touro College, Graduate School of Social Work, 27 West 23rd Street, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10010, United States. Electronic address:

Purpose: Multifactorial explanations of developmental stuttering suggest that difficulties in self-regulation and weak attentional flexibility contribute to persisting stuttering. We tested this prediction by examining whether preschool-age children who stutter (CWS) shift their attention less flexibly than children who do not stutter (CWNS) during a modified version of the Dimension Card Change Sort (DCCS), a reliable measure of attention switching for young children.

Methods: Sixteen CWS (12 males) and 30 children CWNS (11 males) participated in the study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.11.001DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

Self-stigma and its associations with stress, physical health, and health care satisfaction in adults who stutter.

J Fluency Disord 2018 06 24;56:112-121. Epub 2017 Oct 24.

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Montclair State University, United States.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify potential relationships between self-stigma (stigma awareness and stigma application) and stress, physical health, and health care satisfaction among a large sample of adults who stutter. It was hypothesized that both stigma awareness and stigma application would be inversely related to measures of physical health and health care satisfaction, and positively related to stress. Furthermore, it was anticipated that stress mediated the relationship between self-stigma and physical health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.10.002DOI Listing
June 2018
15 Reads

Mood state sub-types in adults who stutter: A prospective study.

J Fluency Disord 2018 06 31;56:100-111. Epub 2017 Oct 31.

John Walsh Centre for Rehabilitation Research, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Sydney Medical School-Northern, The University of Sydney, St Leonards, 2065 NSW, Australia. Electronic address:

Purpose: Many adults who stutter have elevated negative mood states like anxiety and depressive mood. Little is known about how mood states change over time. The purpose of this study was to determine the trajectories or sub-types of mood states in adults who stutter over a 6 month period, and establish factors that contribute to these sub-types. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.10.001DOI Listing
June 2018
12 Reads

From locations to networks: Can brain imaging inform treatment of stuttering?

J Fluency Disord 2018 03 5;55:1-5. Epub 2017 Sep 5.

Brain Institute of Louisiana, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 74 Hatcher Hall, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.08.001DOI Listing
March 2018
18 Reads

White matter pathways in persistent developmental stuttering: Lessons from tractography.

J Fluency Disord 2018 03 13;55:68-83. Epub 2017 Sep 13.

The Gonda Multidisciplinary Brain Research Center, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel; The Department of English Literature and Linguistics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel. Electronic address:

Purpose: Fluent speech production relies on the coordinated processing of multiple brain regions. This highlights the role of neural pathways that connect distinct brain regions in producing fluent speech. Here, we aim to investigate the role of the white matter pathways in persistent developmental stuttering (PDS), where speech fluency is disrupted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.09.002DOI Listing
March 2018
14 Reads
1.891 Impact Factor

The effects of actors vocal exercises for relaxation on fluency: A preliminary study.

J Fluency Disord 2017 Dec 18;54:50-57. Epub 2017 Sep 18.

Illinois State University, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Fairchild Hall Room 204, Campus Box 4720, Normal, IL 61790 United States. Electronic address:

Purpose: To determine the efficacy of treatment based on Kristin Linklater's technique for vocal preparation for performance for use with people who stutter.

Method: A protocol for a treatment for stuttering involving breathing exercises, relaxation techniques, and focus on awareness was designed by the first author from Linklater's published exercises in her book Freeing the Natural Voice (2006). Four adults who stutter participated in a 12-week, single-case reversal design study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.09.005DOI Listing
December 2017
29 Reads

Assisted and unassisted recession of functional anomalies associated with dysprosody in adults who stutter.

J Fluency Disord 2018 03 9;55:120-134. Epub 2017 Sep 9.

Brain Imaging Center and Department of Neurology, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Purpose: Speech in persons who stutter (PWS) is associated with disturbed prosody (speech melody and intonation), which may impact communication. The neural correlates of PWS' altered prosody during speaking are not known, neither is how a speech-restructuring therapy affects prosody at both a behavioral and a cerebral level.

Methods: In this fMRI study, we explored group differences in brain activation associated with the production of different kinds of prosody in 13 male adults who stutter (AWS) before, directly after, and at least 1 year after an effective intensive fluency-shaping treatment, in 13 typically fluent-speaking control participants (CP), and in 13 males who had spontaneously recovered from stuttering during adulthood (RAWS), while sentences were read aloud with 'neutral', instructed emotional (happy), and linguistically driven (questioning) prosody. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.09.003DOI Listing
March 2018
22 Reads

Stuttering generalization self-measure: Preliminary development of a self-measuring tool.

J Fluency Disord 2017 Sep 29;53:41-51. Epub 2017 May 29.

University of Reading, United Kingdom; Apple House Centre for Stammering, United Kingdom.

Introduction: Generalization of treatment is considered a difficult task for clinicians and people who stutter (PWS), and can constitute a barrier to long-term treatment success. To our knowledge, there are no standardized tests that collect measurement of the behavioral and cognitive aspects alongside the client's self-perception in real-life speaking situations.

Purpose: This paper describes the preliminary development of a Stuttering Generalization Self-Measure (SGSM). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.04.001DOI Listing
September 2017
11 Reads

Rethinking covert stuttering.

J Fluency Disord 2017 Sep 19;53:26-40. Epub 2017 Jun 19.

Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology and Research, College of Education, Health and Human Sciences, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee 38152, United States.

Purpose: The experience of passing as fluent, also called covert stuttering, has been uncritically framed as an inherently negative pursuit. Historically passing has been understood as a repression of one's true, authentic self in response to either psychological distress or social discrimination. The authors of this paper seek a more nuanced understanding of passing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.06.001DOI Listing
September 2017
10 Reads

Atypical non-verbal sensorimotor synchronization in adults who stutter may be modulated by auditory feedback.

J Fluency Disord 2017 Sep 27;53:14-25. Epub 2017 May 27.

Centre for Research on Brain, Language and Music, 3640 rue de la Montagne, Montreal, H3G 2A8, Canada; School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University, 2001 McGill College Avenue, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 1G1, Canada; Haskins Laboratories, 300 George Street, New Haven, CT 06511, USA. Electronic address:

Purpose: To investigate if non-verbal sensorimotor synchronization abilities in adult individuals who stutter (IWS) differ from non-stuttering controls (NS) under various performance conditions (tempo, auditory feedback, use of hands [single/both] and rhythm).

Methods: Participants were 11 IWS (5 males, 6 females, Mean age=25.8, SD=8. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.05.004DOI Listing
September 2017
15 Reads

Evidence-based guidelines for being supportive of people who stutter in North America.

J Fluency Disord 2017 Sep 17;53:1-13. Epub 2017 May 17.

Department of Communication Disorders, Marshall University, Marshall, WV 25755, USA.

Purpose: While many resources, particularly those available on the Internet, provide suggestions for fluent speakers as they interact with people who stutter (PWS), little evidence exists to support these suggestions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to document the supportiveness of common public reactions, behaviors, or interventions to stuttering by PWS.Methods 148 PWS completed the Personal Appraisal of Support for Stuttering-Adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.05.002DOI Listing
September 2017
8 Reads

A systematic literature review of neuroimaging research on developmental stuttering between 1995 and 2016.

J Fluency Disord 2018 03 12;55:6-45. Epub 2017 Mar 12.

Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.

Purpose: Stuttering is a disorder that affects millions of people all over the world. Over the past two decades, there has been a great deal of interest in investigating the neural basis of the disorder. This systematic literature review is intended to provide a comprehensive summary of the neuroimaging literature on developmental stuttering. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.03.007DOI Listing
March 2018
41 Reads

Comments on Brown et al. (2016).

Authors:
Jason H Davidow

J Fluency Disord 2017 09 30;53:52-54. Epub 2017 Jun 30.

Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY, 11549, United States. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfludis.2017.05.001DOI Listing
September 2017
9 Reads