40 results match your criteria Journal of experimental psychology. Learning memory and cognition[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Task effects determine whether recognition memory is mediated discretely or continuously.

Mem Cognit 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Psychology, University of Oklahoma, 455 W. Lindsey Street, Norman, OK, 73019, USA.

How recognition memory is mediated has been of interest to researchers for decades. But the apparent consensus implicating continuous mediation has been challenged. McAdoo, Key, and Gronlund (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition,2018. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-019-00894-9DOI Listing
January 2019

Are mnemonic failures and benefits two sides of the same coin?: Investigating the real-world consequences of individual differences in memory integration.

Mem Cognit 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Psychology, Lafayette College, Easton, PA, USA.

Theories of reconstructive memory have long been influenced by investigations of false recognition errors, in which old/new judgements are compromised by spontaneous activation of associated but nonpresented concepts. Recent evidence similarly suggests that reconstructive memory processes (so-called memory integration) also support positive learning behaviors, such as inferential reasoning. Despite prevailing hypotheses, the question of whether a common integration process underlies these seemingly disparate mnemonic outcomes is not well understood. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-018-0887-4DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Dissociating visuo-spatial and verbal working memory: It's all in the features.

Mem Cognit 2018 Dec 17. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Université de Moncton, Moncton, NB, Canada.

Echoing many of the themes of the seminal work of Atkinson and Shiffrin (The Psychology of Learning and Motivation, 2; 89-195, 1968), this paper uses the feature model (Nairne, Memory & Cognition, 16, 343-352, 1988; Nairne, Memory & Cognition, 18; 251-269, 1990; Neath & Nairne, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 2; 429-441, 1995) to account for performance in working-memory tasks. The Brooks verbal and visuo-spatial matrix tasks were performed alone, with articulatory suppression, or with a spatial suppression task; the results produced the expected dissociation. We used approximate Bayesian computation techniques to fit the feature model to the data and showed that the similarity-based interference process implemented in the model accounted for the data patterns well. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-018-0882-9DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Adaptive memory: Animacy, threat, and attention in free recall.

Authors:
Juliana K Leding

Mem Cognit 2018 Oct 24. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Department of Psychology, University of North Florida, 1 UNF Drive, Jacksonville, FL, 32224, USA.

Animate items are better remembered than inanimate items, suggesting that human memory systems evolved in a way to prioritize memory for animacy. The proximate mechanisms responsible for the animacy effect are not yet known, but several possibilities have been suggested in previous research, including attention capture, mortality salience, and mental arousal (Popp & Serra in Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 42, 186-201, 2016). Perceived threat of items could be related to any of these three potential proximate mechanisms. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-018-0873-xDOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Effects of divided attention at encoding and retrieval: Further data.

Mem Cognit 2018 Nov;46(8):1263-1277

Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest, 3560 Bathurst St, Toronto, ON, M6A 2E1, Canada.

Division of attention (DA) at the time of learning has large detrimental effects on subsequent memory performance, but DA at retrieval has much smaller effects (Baddeley, Lewis, Eldridge, & Thomson, 1984, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 113, 518-540; Craik, Govoni, Naveh-Benjamin, & Anderson, 1996, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 125, 159-180). Experiment 1 confirmed the relatively small effects of DA on retrieval and also showed that retrieval operations do consume processing resources. The experiment also found that the effect is not attributable to a trade-off in performance with the concurrent task or to recognition decisions made on the basis of familiarity judgments. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-018-0835-3DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Picture (im)perfect: Illusions of recognition memory produced by photographs at test.

Mem Cognit 2018 10;46(7):1210-1221

Department of Psychology, Binghamton University, State University of New York, PO Box 6000, Binghamton, NY, 13902-6000, USA.

Photographs have been found to affect a variety of psychological judgments. For example, nonprobative but semantically related photographs may increase beliefs in the truth of general knowledge statements (Newman, Garry, Bernstein, Kantner, & Lindsay, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 19(5), 969-974, 2012; Newman et al., Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 41(5), 1337-1348, 2015). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-018-0832-6DOI Listing
October 2018
26 Reads

Individual differences in musical training and executive functions: A latent variable approach.

Mem Cognit 2018 10;46(7):1076-1092

Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA.

Learning and performing music draw on a host of cognitive abilities, and previous research has postulated that musicians might have advantages in related cognitive processes. One such aspect of cognition that may be related to musical training is executive functions (EFs), a set of top-down processes that regulate behavior and cognition according to task demands. Previous studies investigating the link between musical training and EFs have yielded mixed results and are difficult to compare. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-018-0822-8DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Use of the familiarity difference cue in inferential judgments.

Mem Cognit 2018 02;46(2):298-314

Department of Psychology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI, USA.

The familiarity difference cue has been regarded as a general cue for making inferential judgments (Honda, Abe, Matsuks, & Yamagishi in Memory and Cognition, 39(5), 851-863, 2011; Schwikert & Curran in Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143(6), 2341-2365, 2014). The current study tests a model of inference based on familiarity differences that encompasses the recognition heuristic (Goldstein & Gigerenzer, 1999, Goldstein & Gigerenzer in Psychological Review, 109(1), 75-90, 2002). In two studies, using a large pool of stimuli, participants rated their familiarity of cities and made choices on a typical city-size task. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-017-0765-5DOI Listing
February 2018
5 Reads

Increasing relational memory in childhood with unitization strategies.

Mem Cognit 2018 01;46(1):100-111

University of Maryland, 1105G Biology-Psychology Building, College Park, MD, 20740, USA.

Young children often experience relational memory failures, which are thought to result from immaturity of the recollection processes presumed to be required for these tasks. However, research in adults has suggested that relational memory tasks can be accomplished using familiarity, a process thought to be mature by the end of early childhood. The goal of the present study was to determine whether relational memory performance could be improved in childhood by teaching young children memory strategies that have been shown to increase the contribution of familiarity in adults (i. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-017-0748-6DOI Listing
January 2018
4 Reads

Task-relevant perceptual features can define categories in visual memory too.

Mem Cognit 2017 11;45(8):1295-1305

Psychology Department, California State University San Marcos, San Marcos, CA, 92096, USA.

Although Konkle, Brady, Alvarez, and Oliva (2010, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 139(3), 558) claim that visual long-term memory (VLTM) is organized on underlying conceptual, not perceptual, information, visual memory results from visual search tasks are not well explained by this theory. We hypothesized that when viewing an object, any task-relevant visual information is critical to the organizational structure of VLTM. In two experiments, we examined the organization of VLTM by measuring the amount of retroactive interference created by objects possessing different combinations of task-relevant features. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-017-0728-xDOI Listing
November 2017
2 Reads

The effects of context in item-based directed forgetting: Evidence for "one-shot" context storage.

Mem Cognit 2017 07;45(5):745-754

Memorial University, St. John's, NL, Canada.

The effects of context on item-based directed forgetting were assessed. Study words were presented against different background pictures and were followed by a cue to remember (R) or forget (F) the target item. The effects of incidental and intentional encoding of context on recognition of the study words were examined in Experiments 1 and 2. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-017-0692-5DOI Listing
July 2017
5 Reads

Modulation of additive and interactive effects by trial history revisited.

Mem Cognit 2017 04;45(3):480-492

Department of Psychology, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476, Potsdam, Germany.

Masson and Kliegl (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39, 898-914, 2013) reported evidence that the nature of the target stimulus on the previous trial of a lexical decision task modulates the effects of independent variables on the current trial, including additive versus interactive effects of word frequency and stimulus quality. In contrast, recent reanalyses of previously published data from experiments that, unlike the Masson and Kliegl experiments, did not include semantic priming as a factor, found no evidence for modulation of additive effects of frequency and stimulus quality by trial history (Balota, Aschenbrenner, & Yap, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 39, 1563-1571, 2013; O'Malley & Besner, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 34, 1400-1411, 2013). We report two experiments that included semantic priming as a factor and that attempted to replicate the modulatory effects found by Masson and Kliegl. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://link.springer.com/10.3758/s13421-016-0666-z
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-016-0666-zDOI Listing
April 2017
13 Reads

Analogous selection processes in declarative and procedural working memory: N-2 list-repetition and task-repetition costs.

Mem Cognit 2017 01;45(1):26-39

Department of General Psychology, Institute of Psychology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Working memory (WM) holds and manipulates representations for ongoing cognition. Oberauer (Psychology of Learning and Motivation, 51, 45-100, 2009) distinguishes between two analogous WM sub-systems: a declarative WM which handles the objects of thought, and a procedural WM which handles the representations of (cognitive) actions. Here, we assessed whether analogous effects are observed when participants switch between memory sets (declarative representations) and when they switch between task sets (procedural representations). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://link.springer.com/10.3758/s13421-016-0645-4
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-016-0645-4DOI Listing
January 2017
10 Reads

The influence of feedback on predictions of future memory performance.

Mem Cognit 2016 10;44(7):1102-13

Department of Psychology, Williams College, Williamstown, MA, USA.

Kornell and Rhodes (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 19, 1-13, 2013) reported that correct answer feedback impairs the accuracy of prospective memory judgments. The current experiments explored the boundaries of this effect. In Experiment 1, participants studied Lithuanian-English word pairs, took an initial test, and were either given correct answer feedback or no feedback at all. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-016-0623-xDOI Listing
October 2016
5 Reads

Working memory load predicts visual search efficiency: Evidence from a novel pupillary response paradigm.

Mem Cognit 2016 10;44(7):1038-49

Department of Computer Science, University of Massachusetts at Boston, Boston, MA, 02125, USA.

An observer's pupil dilates and constricts in response to variables such as ambient and focal luminance, cognitive effort, the emotional stimulus content, and working memory load. The pupil's memory load response is of particular interest, as it might be used for estimating observers' memory load while they are performing a complex task, without adding an interruptive and confounding memory test to the protocol. One important task in which working memory's involvement is still being debated is visual search, and indeed a previous experiment by Porter, Troscianko, and Gilchrist (Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 60, 211-229, 2007) analyzed observers' pupil sizes during search to study this issue. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-016-0617-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5031546PMC
October 2016
8 Reads

Dimension-based attention in visual short-term memory.

Mem Cognit 2016 07;44(5):740-9

Department of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behaviour, University of Leicester, Leicester, LE1 7HB, UK.

We investigated how dimension-based attention influences visual short-term memory (VSTM). This was done through examining the effects of cueing a feature dimension in two perceptual comparison tasks (change detection and sameness detection). In both tasks, a memory array and a test array consisting of a number of colored shapes were presented successively, interleaved by a blank interstimulus interval (ISI). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-016-0599-6DOI Listing
July 2016
5 Reads

Investigating a method for reducing residual switch costs in cued task switching.

Mem Cognit 2016 07;44(5):762-77

Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, 703 Third Street, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA.

Residual switch costs in cued task switching are performance decrements that occur despite a long cue-target interval (CTI) to prepare for a task switch. Verbruggen, Liefooghe, Vandierendonck, and Demanet (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 33; 342-356, 2007) showed that briefly presenting the cue during the CTI and leaving it absent after target onset yielded smaller residual switch costs than those obtained when the cue was available for the full CTI and remained present after target onset. The potential effects of cue availability during the CTI (full or partial) and cue status after target onset (present or absent) on residual switch costs were investigated in the present study. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://link.springer.com/10.3758/s13421-016-0590-2
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-016-0590-2DOI Listing
July 2016
8 Reads

Eyes wide open: Pupil size as a proxy for inhibition in the masked-priming paradigm.

Mem Cognit 2016 May;44(4):554-64

Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA.

A core assumption underlying competitive-network models of word recognition is that in order for a word to be recognized, the representations of competing orthographically similar words must be inhibited. This inhibitory mechanism is revealed in the masked-priming lexical-decision task (LDT) when responses to orthographically similar word prime-target pairs are slower than orthographically different word prime-target pairs (i.e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-015-0577-4DOI Listing
May 2016
11 Reads

The logic-bias effect: The role of effortful processing in the resolution of belief-logic conflict.

Mem Cognit 2016 Feb;44(2):330-49

Department of Psychology, Plymouth University, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon, PL4 8AA, UK.

According to the default interventionist dual-process account of reasoning, belief-based responses to reasoning tasks are based on Type 1 processes generated by default, which must be inhibited in order to produce an effortful, Type 2 output based on the validity of an argument. However, recent research has indicated that reasoning on the basis of beliefs may not be as fast and automatic as this account claims. In three experiments, we presented participants with a reasoning task that was to be completed while they were generating random numbers (RNG). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-015-0555-xDOI Listing
February 2016
10 Reads

Recall is not necessary for verbal sequence learning.

Mem Cognit 2016 Jan;44(1):104-13

MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge, CB2 7EF, UK.

The question of whether overt recall of to-be-remembered material accelerates learning is important in a wide range of real-world learning settings. In the case of verbal sequence learning, previous research has proposed that recall either is necessary for verbal sequence learning (Cohen & Johansson Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 6, 139-143, 1967; Cunningham, Healy, & Williams Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 10, 575-597, 1984), or at least contributes significantly to it (Glass, Krejci, & Goldman Journal of Memory and Language, 28, 189-199, 1989; Oberauer & Meyer Memory, 17, 774-781, 2009). In contrast, here we show that the amount of previous spoken recall does not predict learning and is not necessary for it. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://link.springer.com/10.3758/s13421-015-0544-0
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-015-0544-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4722071PMC
January 2016
12 Reads

Why is working memory capacity related to matrix reasoning tasks?

Mem Cognit 2015 Apr;43(3):389-96

School of Psychology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 654 Cherry Street, Atlanta, GA, 30332, USA,

One of the reasons why working memory capacity is so widely researched is its substantial relationship with fluid intelligence. Although this relationship has been found in numerous studies, researchers have been unable to provide a conclusive answer as to why the two constructs are related. In a recent study, researchers examined which attributes of Raven's Progressive Matrices were most strongly linked with working memory capacity (Wiley, Jarosz, Cushen, & Colflesh, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 37, 256-263, 2011). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-014-0473-3DOI Listing
April 2015
12 Reads

Order recall in verbal short-term memory: The role of semantic networks.

Mem Cognit 2015 Apr;43(3):489-99

Department of Psychology, City University London, Northampton Square, London, UK, EC1V 0HB,

In their recent article, Acheson, MacDonald, and Postle (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 37:44-59, 2011) made an important but controversial suggestion: They hypothesized that (a) semantic information has an effect on order information in short-term memory (STM) and (b) order recall in STM is based on the level of activation of items within the relevant lexico-semantic long-term memory (LTM) network. However, verbal STM research has typically led to the conclusion that factors such as semantic category have a large effect on the number of correctly recalled items, but little or no impact on order recall (Poirier & Saint-Aubin, Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 48A:384-404, 1995; Saint-Aubin, Ouellette, & Poirier, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 12:171-177, 2005; Tse, Memory 17:874-891, 2009). Moreover, most formal models of short-term order memory currently suggest a separate mechanism for order coding-that is, one that is separate from item representation and not associated with LTM lexico-semantic networks. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://link.springer.com/10.3758/s13421-014-0470-6
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-014-0470-6DOI Listing
April 2015
11 Reads

Shifting the criterion is not the difficult part of trial-by-trial criterion shifts in recognition memory.

Mem Cognit 2015 Jan;43(1):49-59

Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts - Amherst, 441 Tobin Hall, Amherst, MA, 01003, USA,

In recognition memory, participants often fail to shift their response criterion within a test even when they see cues signaling whether they should expect weak or strong memory (e.g., Stretch & Wixted Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 24, 1397-1410, 1998b). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://link.springer.com/10.3758/s13421-014-0433-y
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-014-0433-yDOI Listing
January 2015
12 Reads

Generality of a congruity effect in judgements of relative order.

Mem Cognit 2014 Oct;42(7):1086-105

Department of Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada,

The judgement of relative order (JOR) procedure is used to investigate serial-order memory. Measuring response times, the wording of the instructions (whether the earlier or the later item was designated as the target) reversed the direction of search in subspan lists (Chan, Ross, Earle, & Caplan Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16(5), 945-951, 2009). If a similar congruity effect applied to above-span lists and, furthermore, with error rate as the measure, this could suggest how to model order memory across scales. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-014-0426-xDOI Listing
October 2014
8 Reads

Not enough familiarity for fluency: definitional encoding increases familiarity but does not lead to fluency attribution in associative recognition.

Mem Cognit 2015 Jan;43(1):39-48

Department of Psychology, Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Avenue, South Orange, NJ, 07079, USA,

Five experiments were conducted to test whether encoding manipulations thought to encourage unitization would affect fluency attribution in associative recognition memory. Experiments 1a and 1b, which utilized a speeded recognition memory test, demonstrated that definitional encoding increased reliance on familiarity during the recognition memory test. Experiments 2a, 2b, and 3, however, replicated previous research that had shown that fluency is unlikely to be attributed as evidence of previous occurrence in associative recognition (Westerman, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 27:723-732, 2001). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-014-0449-3DOI Listing
January 2015
33 Reads

The specificity of learned parallelism in dual-memory retrieval.

Mem Cognit 2014 May;42(4):552-69

Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany,

Retrieval of two responses from one visually presented cue occurs sequentially at the outset of dual-retrieval practice. Exclusively for subjects who adopt a mode of grouping (i.e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-013-0382-xDOI Listing
May 2014
5 Reads

Visual working memory declines when more features must be remembered for each object.

Mem Cognit 2013 Nov;41(8):1212-27

Department of Psychology - Cognitive Psychology, University of Zurich, Binzmühlestrasse 14/22, 8050, Zürich, Switzerland,

The article reports three experiments investigating the limits of visual working memory capacity with a single-item probe change detection paradigm. Contrary to previous reports (e.g. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-013-0333-6DOI Listing
November 2013
6 Reads

The effects of list composition and perceptual fluency on judgments of learning (JOLs).

Mem Cognit 2013 Oct;41(7):1000-11

Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Davie Hall 346, CB#3270, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599-3270, USA,

The perceptual fluency hypothesis proposes that items that are easier to perceive at study will be given higher memorability ratings, as compared with less fluent items. However, prior research has examined this metamemorial cue primarily using mixed-list designs. Furthermore, certain memory effects are moderated by the design (mixed list vs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-013-0323-8DOI Listing
October 2013
10 Reads

Interactive effects in transfer-appropriate processing for event-based prospective memory: the roles of effort, ongoing task, and PM cue properties.

Mem Cognit 2013 Oct;41(7):1032-45

Illinois State University, Normal, IL, USA.

Past studies (e.g., Marsh, Hicks, & Cook Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 31:68-75, 2005; Meiser & Schult European Journal of Cognitive Psychology 20:290-311, 2008) have shown that transfer-appropriate processing (TAP) effects in event-based prospective memory (PM) depend on the effort directed toward the ongoing task. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-013-0324-7DOI Listing
October 2013
12 Reads

Easily perceived, easily remembered? Perceptual interference produces a double dissociation between metamemory and memory performance.

Mem Cognit 2013 Aug;41(6):897-903

Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Davie Hall CB#3270, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3270, USA.

A recent candidate for explaining metamemory judgments is the perceptual fluency hypothesis, which proposes that easily perceived items are predicted to be remembered better, regardless of actual memory performance (Rhodes & Castel Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 137:615-625, 2008). In two experiments, we used the perceptual interference manipulation to test this hypothesis. In Experiment 1, participants were presented with intact and backward-masked words during encoding, followed by a metamemory prediction (a list-wide judgment of learning, JOL) and then a free recall test. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-013-0307-8DOI Listing
August 2013
11 Reads

A test of the survival processing advantage in implicit and explicit memory tests.

Mem Cognit 2013 Aug;41(6):862-71

Department of Psychology, Illinois State University, Campus Box 4620, Normal, IL 61790-4620, USA.

The present study was designed to investigate the survival processing effect (Nairne, Thompson, & Pandeirada, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 33, 263-273, 2007) in cued implicit and explicit memory tests. The survival effect has been well established in explicit free recall and recognition tests, but has not been evident in implicit memory tests or in cued explicit tests. In Experiment 1 of the present study, we tested implicit and explicit memory for words studied in survival, moving, or pleasantness contexts in stem completion tests. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-013-0304-yDOI Listing
August 2013
11 Reads

When disfluency is--and is not--a desirable difficulty: the influence of typeface clarity on metacognitive judgments and memory.

Mem Cognit 2013 Feb;41(2):229-41

Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

There are many instances in which perceptual disfluency leads to improved memory performance, a phenomenon often referred to as the perceptual-interference effect (e.g., Diemand-Yauman, Oppenheimer, & Vaughn (Cognition 118:111-115, 2010); Nairne (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 14:248-255, 1988)). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-012-0255-8DOI Listing
February 2013
14 Reads

A progress report on the inhibitory account of retrieval-induced forgetting.

Mem Cognit 2012 Aug;40(6):827-43

Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1007 W. Harrison Street (MC 285), Chicago, IL 60607, USA.

Remembering and forgetting reflect fundamentally interdependent processes in human memory (Bjork, 2011). This interdependency is particularly apparent in research on retrieval-induced forgetting, which has shown that retrieving a subset of information can cause the forgetting of other information (Anderson et al. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition 20:1063-1087, 1994). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-012-0211-7DOI Listing
August 2012
14 Reads

Widening the boundaries of the production effect.

Mem Cognit 2012 Oct;40(7):1046-55

Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada.

Words that are read aloud are more memorable than words that are read silently. The boundaries of this production effect (MacLeod, Gopie, Hourihan, Neary, & Ozubko, Journal of experimental psychology: learning, memory, and cognition, 36, 671-685, 2010) have been found to extend beyond speech. MacLeod and colleagues demonstrated that mouthing also facilitates memory, leading them to speculate that any distinct, item-specific response should result in a production effect. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-012-0210-8DOI Listing
October 2012
12 Reads

Context change and retrieval difficulty in the list-before-last paradigm.

Mem Cognit 2012 Aug;40(6):844-60

Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 296 Eberhart Building, P.O. Box 26170, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170, USA.

Using the "list-before-last" paradigm (Jang & Huber, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 34, 112-127, 2008; Shiffrin, Science, 168, 1601-1603, 1970), we examined whether the difficulty involved in retrieving a previously studied list affects the recall of the current list. Participants studied three lists (L1, L2, and L3), and between L2 and L3 study they either engaged in retrieval of L1 or solved math problems for the same duration of time. After L3 encoding, all participants recalled L2. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-012-0198-0DOI Listing
August 2012
8 Reads

Centre-surround inhibition is a general aspect of famous-person recognition: evidence from negative semantic priming from clearly visible primes.

Authors:
Anna Stone

Mem Cognit 2012 May;40(4):652-62

School of Psychology, University of East London, Stratford campus, Stratford, London, UK.

A centre-surround attentional mechanism was proposed by Carr and Dagenbach (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 16: 341-350, 1990) to account for their observations of negative semantic priming from hard-to-perceive primes. Their mechanism cannot account for the observation of negative semantic priming when primes are clearly visible. Three experiments (Ns = 30, 46, and 30) used a familiarity decision with names of famous people, preceded by a prime name with the same occupation as the target or with a different occupation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-011-0176-yDOI Listing
May 2012
7 Reads

Contrast class cues and performance facilitation in a hypothesis-testing task: evidence for an iterative counterfactual model.

Mem Cognit 2012 Apr;40(3):408-19

University of Derby, Derby, UK.

Hypothesis-testing performance on Wason's (Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 12:129-140, 1960) 2-4-6 task is typically poor, with only around 20% of participants announcing the to-be-discovered "ascending numbers" rule on their first attempt. Enhanced solution rates can, however, readily be observed with dual-goal (DG) task variants requiring the discovery of two complementary rules, one labeled "DAX" (the standard "ascending numbers" rule) and the other labeled "MED" ("any other number triples"). Two DG experiments are reported in which we manipulated the usefulness of a presented MED exemplar, where usefulness denotes cues that can establish a helpful "contrast class" that can stand in opposition to the presented 2-4-6 DAX exemplar. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-011-0159-zDOI Listing
April 2012
9 Reads

Are two heuristics better than one? The fluency and distinctiveness heuristics in recognition memory.

Mem Cognit 2011 Oct;39(7):1264-74

Department of Psychology, Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Avenue, South Orange, NJ 07079, USA.

Four experiments were conducted to test the impact of having multiple heuristics (distinctiveness and fluency) available during a recognition test. Recent work by Gallo, Perlmutter, Moore, and Schacter (Memory & Cognition 36:461-466, 2008) suggested that fluency effects are reduced when the distinctiveness heuristic can be applied to a recognition decision. In Experiment 1, we used a response reversal paradigm (Van Zandt & Maldonado-Molina Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 30:1147-1166, 2004) to demonstrate that participants transitioned from an early response strategy that was largely reliant on fluency to a later strategy in which the influences of fluency and distinctiveness were both observable. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-011-0093-0DOI Listing
October 2011
5 Reads

The striking similarities between standard, distractor-free, and target-free recognition.

Mem Cognit 2011 Aug;39(6):925-40

Department of Psychology, Washington University,1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA.

It is often assumed that observers seek to maximize correct responding during recognition testing by actively adjusting a decision criterion. However, early research by Wallace (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory 4:441-452, 1978) suggested that recognition rates for studied items remained similar, regardless of whether or not the tests contained distractor items. We extended these findings across three experiments, addressing whether detection rates or observer confidence changed when participants were presented standard tests (targets and distractors) versus "pure-list" tests (lists composed entirely of targets or distractors). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-011-0090-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3402227PMC
August 2011
5 Reads
2 Citations

An auditory analog of the picture superiority effect.

Mem Cognit 2011 Jan;39(1):63-74

Department of Psychology, University of Dayton, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469-1430, USA.

Previous research has found that pictures (e.g., a picture of an elephant) are remembered better than words (e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-010-0015-6DOI Listing
January 2011
7 Reads
  • Page 1 of 1