811 results match your criteria Journal of Trauma Nursing [Journal]


Evaluation of Functional Outcomes for Adult Patients After Distal Radius Fracture Treated With Volar Plate Fixation Versus Nonsurgical Care.

J Trauma Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;26(1):59-64

University of Florida College of Nursing, Gainesville.

Distal radius fractures are one of the most common fractures patients experience. Although there are a variety of treatments, there is a lack of standardization as it relates to treatment of such fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare treatment outcomes between surgical and nonsurgical care of distal radius fractures to inform evidence-based guidelines for the management of distal radius fractures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000416DOI Listing
January 2019

Increasing Referrals to a Community Paramedicine Fall Prevention Program Through Implementation of a Daily Management System.

J Trauma Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;26(1):50-58

Division of Trauma, Department of Surgery, Maine Medical Center, Portland; and University of Southern Maine, Portland.

This quality improvement project was undertaken to improve trauma service referral compliance to an existing home-based elderly fall prevention program through the implementation of a daily management system (DMS). Operational excellence, a hospital-wide initiative, provided the foundation for improvement efforts. This initiative went through a series of 5 plan, do, study, and act (PDSA) cycles and demonstrated significant improvement in referrals from 0% to 100%. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000415DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

A Psychometric Analysis of CIWA-Ar in Acutely Ill and Injured Hospitalized Patients.

J Trauma Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;26(1):41-49

Departments of Surgery (Messrs Higgins and Church and Drs Oyler, Parli, Fryman, and Bernard) and Nursing Professional Practice and Support (Mr Higgins and Dr Halcomb), University of Kentucky, Lexington; and College of Nursing, University of South Florida, Tampa (Dr Bugajski).

Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) manifests after alcohol-dependent individuals suddenly cease alcohol consumption. Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment-Alcohol, revised (CIWA-Ar) is a widely used tool to assess and guide treatment of AWS. CIWA-Ar was developed in voluntarily detoxification centers, and the reliability and validity of CIWA-Ar have been minimally evaluated in hospitalized patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000414DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Decreasing Trauma Readmission Rates by Implementing a Callback Program.

J Trauma Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;26(1):33-40

Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital, Roanoke, Virginia.

Decreasing hospital lengths of stay increases the burden on trauma patients after discharge. Our hypothesis was that a discharge callback protocol would decrease readmission rates. A retrospective quality improvement study evaluated all trauma patients admitted from 2012 to 2016 at a Level I trauma center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000413DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Using Opioids With Surgical Patients: Nurses' Attitudes and Experiences.

J Trauma Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;26(1):26-32

Faculty of Nursing, Mutah University, Karak, Jordan (Drs Shoqirat, Mahasneh, and Al-Khawaldeh); and Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, Sacramento, California (Dr Singh).

Opioids such as morphine are effective analgesics and have been recognized worldwide for many years; yet, they are underutilized. The study explores the attitudes and experiences relating to opioids, in general, and morphine, in particular, among Jordanian surgical nurses. The Opioids Attitudes Scale was used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000412DOI Listing
January 2019

Cohorting Trauma Patients in a Medical/Surgical Unit at a Level I Pediatric Trauma Center to Enhance Interdisciplinary Collaboration and Documentation.

J Trauma Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;26(1):17-25

St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Mss Meyer, Nanassy, and Lavella and Drs Arthur and Grewal); and Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Drs Arthur and Grewal).

Medical errors are a significant issue in health care that may be avoided through enhanced communication and documentation. This study examines interdisciplinary communication and compliance with trauma standards of care demonstrated through following the implementation of cohorting trauma patients to one medical/surgical unit and instituting daily interdisciplinary trauma patient rounds. Potential benefits include enhanced communication, improved nursing satisfaction, and increased compliance with trauma standards of care demonstrated through documentation, which the literature suggests improves quality of care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000418DOI Listing
January 2019

In-hospital Complications in Trauma Patients According to Injury Severity.

J Trauma Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;26(1):10-16

Escola Paulista de Enfermagem, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (Ms Lopes and Dr Whitaker); and Departamento de Emergência, Hospital Universitário, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (Mr de Aguiar).

In-hospital complications in trauma patients are frequent and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between posttraumatic complications and the injured body region, injury and trauma severity, length of stay, and mortality in hospitalized trauma patients. This observational and retrospective study included 147 trauma patients with posttraumatic complications hospitalized in a university hospital located in São Paulo, Brazil. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000411DOI Listing
January 2019

Comfort or Care: Why Do We Have to Choose? Implementing a Geriatric Trauma Palliative Care Program.

J Trauma Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;26(1):2-9

Parkland Health & Hospital System, Dallas (Dr Brown); and School of Nursing, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock (Dr Ashcraft).

The geriatric (≥65 years of age) population is one of the fastest growing age groups in the United States. As this number increases, so does the number of geriatric trauma patients. Because this group has higher mortality rates and requires more resources, a Geriatric Trauma Palliative Care Program was created at a Level 1 Trauma Center in Dallas, TX, to provide concurrent lifesaving therapies and primary palliative care to older adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000410DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

A Resolution to Keep.

Authors:
Sean M Elwell

J Trauma Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;26(1)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000409DOI Listing
January 2019

Mission Zero.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;25(6):389-390

Northwell Health Trauma Institute, Manhasset, New York.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000401DOI Listing
November 2018

A Narrative Inquiry Into the Experience of Being a Victim of Gun Violence.

Authors:
Mary Francis

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;25(6):381-388

Eta Beta Chapter, Indianapolis, Indiana; School of Nursing, Widener University, Chester, Pennsylvania; and Trauma Division, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, New Jersey.

The purpose of this study was to gain a greater understanding of gun violence from the victim's personal story. The design for the study was narrative inquiry. Sixteen victims of gun violence were interviewed and asked to tell their story. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000406DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Collaborative Team Reflective Practice in Trauma Service to Improve Health Care.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;25(6):374-380

School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences (Dr McDermott) and Mental Health Support Team (Ms Brooks-Lewis), Loughborough University, Leicestershire, England; and Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, England (Ms Husbands).

The importance of reflection and reflective practice is repeatedly reported in trauma literature, with the process of reflective practice being noted as invaluable for clinicians working within trauma settings. Although the literature on medical primary response trauma teams has reported clinicians' management of clinical roles and additional stressors, the practical applications and benefits of reflective practice insofar have not been identified in relation to complex trauma within multidisciplinary mental health services. This study aimed to identify the issues influencing the capacity for collaborative team reflective practice in a multidisciplinary child trauma mental health service within a UK National Health Service trust. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000404DOI Listing
November 2018
26 Reads

Targeting Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections in a Trauma Population: A 5-S Bundle Preventive Approach.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;25(6):366-373

Department of Surgery, Kendall Regional Medical Center, Miami, Florida (Drs Elkbuli, Boneva, Puyana, Bernal, Hai, and McKenney and Ms Miller); and Department of Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa (Drs Boneva and McKenney).

Complications from catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) can cause morbidity and mortality. Our institution's Trauma Quality and Improvement Program analysis identified CAUTIs as an outlier complication in our trauma population. This study aimed to determine whether implemented measures would reduce CAUTI rates in trauma population. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00043860-201811000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000403DOI Listing
November 2018
6 Reads

Analgesics Administered for Pain During Hospitalization Following Lower Extremity Fracture: A Review of the Literature.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;25(6):360-365

University of Delaware School of Nursing, Newark.

Effective treatment of acute pain during hospitalization following lower extremity fracture is critical to improve short-term patient outcomes including wound healing, stress response, hospital length of stay, and cost as well as minimizing long-term negative patient outcomes such as delayed return to work, disability, and chronic pain. As many patients report moderate to severe pain during hospitalization, identifying the analgesics that most effectively reduces pain is a priority to improve patient outcomes. The purpose of this review was to examine published studies describing patient response to analgesics administered orally (PO) or intravenously (IV) in the immediate hospitalization following lower extremity fracture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000402DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Factors Affecting Urinary Retention in Critically Ill Trauma Patients.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;25(6):356-359

Orlando Health, Florida (Dr Fowler and Ms Taggart); and formerly at Trauma Intensive Care Unit, Orlando Health Regional Medical Center, Florida (Ms Urban).

The objective of this retrospective study was to gain a better understanding of patient and care factors that may contribute to urinary retention in critically ill trauma patients. Fifty trauma patients over a 1-year period with an International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) code for urinary retention were identified and analyzed. Most patients had an indwelling urinary catheter placed on admission, and it was reinserted in 39 patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000400DOI Listing
November 2018
10 Reads

Impacting Delirium in the Trauma ICU Utilizing the ICU Liberation Collaborative Benchmark Report.

Authors:
Jennifer Sweeney

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;25(6):348-355

Sarasota Memorial Health Care System, Sarasota, Florida.

Delirium is a frequent complication of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, manifesting as acute confusion with inattention and disordered thinking. Patients in the ICU who develop acute delirium are more likely to experience long-term disability and mortality. The Society of Critical Care Medicine published guidelines for the management of pain, agitation, and delirium (PAD) in the ICU in 2013. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000405DOI Listing
November 2018
13 Reads

Complications and Mortality Among Correctly Triaged and Undertriaged Severely Injured Older Adults With Traumatic Brain Injuries.

Authors:
Linda J Scheetz

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;25(6):341-347

Department of Nursing, Lehman College and The Graduate Center, CUNY, Bronx, New York.

Determining differences in clinical outcomes of older adults treated at trauma centers (TCs) and nontrauma centers (NTCs) is imperative considering their persistent undertriage and the projected costs of fixing the problem. This study compared the incidence and predictors of complications and mortality among brain-injured older adults treated at TCs and NTCs. This secondary analysis of New York inpatient data included patients aged 55+ years, primary brain injury diagnosis, and acute care hospital admission. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00043860-201811000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000399DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Assessing Hyperbaric Oxygen for Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Trauma Patients: A Call for Representation in Future Studies.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;25(6):339-340

Sarasota Memorial Hospital, Sarasota, Florida.

Although carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning presents infrequently, it is a consequential and serious component of burn-related injuries, especially those injured via structure fire. A multitude of retrospective reviews and prospective trials have attempted to establish evidence demonstrating the ideal modality for oxygen administration in CO-poisoned patients; however, a consensus recommendation has not been reached. Given that half of fire-related patients succumb to CO poisoning, this is an imperative area of research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000398DOI Listing
November 2018

Now Is the Time.

Authors:
Sean M Elwell

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;25(6):337-338

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000397DOI Listing
November 2018

Effects of a Safety-Awareness-Promoting Program Targeting Mothers of Children Aged 0-6 Years to Prevent Pediatric Injuries in the Home Environment: Implications for Nurses.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;25(5):327-335

Faculty of Health Sciences, Departments of Pediatric Nursing (Dr Kahriman) and Public Health Nursing (Ms Karadeniz), Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon, Turkey.

Pediatric injuries pose a significant problem, both in Turkey and worldwide, because they lead to death or disability in a number of children each year. This quasi-experimental study aimed to identify the effects of the training provided to mothers with children aged 0-6 years about the hazards that lead to pediatric injuries. The population of the research comprised mothers with children aged 0-6 years, living in the city center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000384DOI Listing
January 2019
27 Reads

A Diaphragmatic Hernia and Pericardial Rupture Caused by Blunt Injury of the Chest: A Case Review.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;25(5):323-326

Department of Thoracic Surgery, No. 1 Hospital of BaoDing City, HeBei Province, PR China (Ms Gao and Drs Jia and Zhao); and College of Life Science, HeBei Agricultural University, HeBei Province, PR China (Mr WeiWei and Dr Yangming).

Blunt traumatic diaphragmatic hernias are most commonly seen in combination with other injuries. Right diaphragmatic ruptures with serious pericardium ruptures are relatively rare. The diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernias is not difficult; however, prior to surgery, it is difficult to judge whether pericardium damage has occurred, particularly on the right side. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000395DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6170143PMC
January 2019
13 Reads

A Tiered Approach to Trauma Education in the Emergency Department.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;25(5):318-322

Trauma Operations, Northeast Georgia Medical Center, Gainesville, Georgia.

Although trauma centers are required to provide trauma education to nurses caring for trauma patients, there are no clearly defined standards for this education. In an effort to improve emergency department (ED) trauma nursing care, a tiered approach to ED trauma education (basic, intermediate, and advanced) was developed to provide specialized trauma education to a larger number of ED nurses at a Level II trauma center in Georgia. This tiered approach to ED trauma nurse education has resulted in the ability to quickly activate multiple trauma teams that work together competently and efficiently, leading to improved patient care and development of competent ED trauma nurses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000381DOI Listing
January 2019
13 Reads

Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Translated "A Matter of Balance" Fall Prevention Program Materials for Non-English-Speaking Participants.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;25(5):311-317

Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (Drs Wolfe and Bugaev and Arabian); and Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Tufts University, and Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Boston, Massachusetts (Ms Breeze).

A Matter of Balance (MOB) is an evidence-based fall prevention program shown to reduce fear of falling (FOF) in English-speaking participants. The effectiveness of translated (Chinese and Spanish) MOB materials in reducing FOF is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether MOB was associated with reduced FOF in Chinese- and Spanish-speaking participants and included an English-speaking comparison group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000394DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6140339PMC
January 2019
15 Reads

The Role of Trauma Video Review in Optimizing Patient Care.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;25(5):307-310

Reading Hospital, Tower Health, Reading, Pennsylvania.

Trauma video review allows for monitoring of performance improvement initiatives, leadership skills, system process issues, and guideline compliance. Despite the well-documented benefits, there are persistent barriers to its use including patient privacy concerns, cost, and provider anxiety. Optimizing implementation by ensuring that informed consent processes are in place, as well as a structured peer review process, can help trauma centers overcome these hurdles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000393DOI Listing
January 2019

Clinical Signs of Basilar Skull Fracture and Their Predictive Value in Diagnosis of This Injury.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;25(5):301-306

School of Nursing, University of São Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil (Mss Solai and Drs Nogueira and de Sousa); and All Trauma, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil (Dr Domingues).

Although clinical signs for the diagnosis of basilar skull fracture (BSF) are ambiguous, they are widely used to make decisions on initial interventions involving trauma patients. We aimed to assess the performance of early and late (within 48 hr posttrauma) signs for BSF diagnosis and to verify the correlation between the presence of these signs and head injury severity. We conducted a prospectively designed follow-up study at a referral hospital for trauma care in Sao Paulo, Brazil, and performed structured observations for 48 hr post-blunt head injury in patients aged 12 years or older. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000392DOI Listing
January 2019
17 Reads

Automated Postdischarge Trauma Patient Call Program.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;25(5):298-300

University of California Davis, Sacramento.

Postdischarge phone calls have been shown to improve communications between patients and health care providers, potentially reducing readmission rates, medication errors, and emergency department (ED) visits. Given the complexity of social and medical issues associated with trauma, we studied the utility of an automated phone call system as a method of identifying gaps in trauma care. The Trauma Program and the Health Management and Education Department at a Level 1 academic trauma center engaged in a collaborative quality improvement effort using the CipherHealth LLC platform to provide automated phone calls to trauma patients 2-3 days after discharge. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00043860-201809000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000391DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Determining the Education and Research Priorities in Pediatric Trauma Nursing: A Delphi Study.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;25(5):290-297

Egan School of Nursing and Health Studies, Fairfield University, Fairfield, Connecticut (Dr Roney); and Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Ms McKenna).

Trauma has a greater impact on morbidity and mortality than all other disease processes in the pediatric population; yet, there is a gap in the literature related to the scientific basis for educating and researching future practice. The purpose of this research study was to utilize the Delphi technique to identify the current education and research priorities for pediatric trauma nursing as described by the members of the Society of Trauma Nurses. Consensus on the education and research priorities was derived from a sample (n = 25) of trauma nursing experts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000390DOI Listing
January 2019
16 Reads

Human Trafficking: Clinical Assessment Guideline.

Authors:
Jennifer Leslie

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;25(5):282-289

Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Approximately 18,000 people are trafficked into the United States each year and forced into commercial sex work. Up to 80% of victims are seen by a health care provider. In the health care setting, they rarely identify themselves as victims of human trafficking (HT), making it difficult to recognize them. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00043860-201809000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000389DOI Listing
January 2019
12 Reads

The Social Determinants of Trauma: A Trauma Disparities Scoping Review and Framework.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;25(5):266-281

Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Dr Mikhail); College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston (Drs Nemeth, Mueller, and Pope); and Department of Physiological & Technological Nursing, Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia (Dr NeSmith).

The drivers of trauma disparities are multiple and complex; yet, understanding the causes will direct needed interventions. The aims of this article are to (1) explore how the injured patient, his or her social environment, and the health care system interact to contribute to trauma disparities and examine the evidence in support of interventions and (2) develop a conceptual framework that captures the socioecological context of trauma disparities. Using a scoping review methodology, articles were identified through PubMed and CINAHL between 2000 and 2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000388DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

More Than a Season.

Authors:
Sean M Elwell

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;25(5):265

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000387DOI Listing
September 2018

Resuscitative Strategies in the Trauma Patient: The Past, the Present, and the Future.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;25(4):254-263

Emergency Department, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (Mr Eick); and Arizona State University, Tempe (Dr Denke).

Over the last decade, trends in fluid resuscitation have changed dramatically as have our practices. Research is driving trauma centers across the globe to initiate modifications in fluid resuscitation of the hemorrhagic trauma patients both in the prehospital and intrahospital arena. This is being done by combining the theory of permissive hypotension and damage control surgery with hemostatic resuscitation as the preferred methods of resuscitation in patients with hemorrhagic shock. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000383DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

The Effect of Telenursing on Referral Rates of Patients With Head Trauma and Their Family's Satisfaction After Discharge.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;25(4):248-253

Department of Critical Care Nursing (Mss Shahrokhi and Amouzegar), Nursing & Midwifery Faculty (Dr Azimian), and School of Nursing and Midwifery (Dr Oveisi), Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.

We aimed to assess the effect of telenursing on referral rates of patients with head trauma and their family's satisfaction after discharge. Seventy-two patients with head trauma were randomly allocated to equal intervention and control groups. The caregivers in both groups were provided with 1-hr face-to-face training on patients' home care and educational booklets, 2 days before discharge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000382DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

The FRAIL Questionnaire: A Useful Tool for Bedside Screening of Geriatric Trauma Patients.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;25(4):242-247

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee (Drs Maxwell and Dietrich); and Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (Drs Dietrich and Miller).

Frailty screening is a priority in acute care. Using secondary data from our prior study, we derived a 5-item FRAIL Questionnaire (instrument) score for 188 geriatric trauma patients and aimed to examine the influence of preinjury physical frailty (as measured by FRAIL) on 1-year outcomes. The study used a secondary data analysis design. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000379DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Patients' Experiences of Their Recovery Process After Minor Physical Trauma.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;25(4):233-241

Department of Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden (Ms Nasirian and Dr Engström); Department of Gastrosurgical Research and Education, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden (Drs Olsén and Engström); Department of Physical Therapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden (Dr Olsén); and Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden (Dr Engström).

Injuries due to trauma are the leading cause of death in Sweden among people younger than 45 years, and more than 120,000 patients were admitted to hospitals in 2014 as a result of trauma. Patients suffering from less serious physical trauma are often discharged directly from the trauma unit, commonly without any follow-up plans. There is a lack of knowledge about how these patients experience their recovery process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000378DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Scratching Below the Surface: Screening for Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Following Hospitalization With the Pediatric Trauma Service.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;25(4):228-232

Psychology Service, Pediatrics (Drs Cline and Duran), and Division of Pediatric Surgery (Dr Naik-Mathuria), Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children's Hospital, Houston (Dr Rosenfeld); Trauma Service, Pediatric Surgery Department (Ms Ratcliff), Texas Children's Hospital, Houston; and General Surgery and Trauma (Mr. Whitaker), Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego.

Significant progress has occurred medically for children who have experienced traumatic injuries; however, attention to their psychological adjustment has only more recently been a focus in research and clinical practice. These needs do not cease at discharge but, instead, require monitoring to determine whether further assessment and/or intervention are required. Our team, inclusive of the Psychology Service and the Trauma Service, identified 2 established screening measures (based on age) that were completed by patients during their outpatient follow-up visits postdischarge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000377DOI Listing
December 2018

Geriatric Trauma Protocol.

Authors:
Renee Cortez

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;25(4):218-227

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Orlando VA Medical Center, Florida.

Study design for a quality improvement project. Objective was to implement a geriatric trauma protocol (GTP) based on American College of Surgeons recommendations to improve patient outcomes. Geriatric trauma patients comprise a vulnerable and high-risk trauma population, and must be treated with specific protocols that take into account physiological, psychosocial, environmental, and pharmacological needs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000376DOI Listing
December 2018

Use of Plasma-Based Trauma Transfusion Protocols at Level IV Trauma Centers.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;25(4):213-217

Department of Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington (Drs Harris, Davenport, Fryman, and Bernard and Mr Higgins); and US Air Force, Pease Air National Guard Base, New Hampshire (Dr Dudley).

Early initiation of a high ratio massive transfusion can lower trauma patient mortality by 80%. Long transport times from rural Level IV trauma centers therefore require that damage control resuscitation begin before patient transfer. This study evaluates the current use of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) at Level IV trauma centers and the feasibility of implementing trauma transfusion protocols at these centers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000375DOI Listing
December 2018
17 Reads

Oh, the Places You'll Go!

Authors:
Sean M Elwell

J Trauma Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;25(4):211-212

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000374DOI Listing

High-Intensity Bowel Protocol for Trauma Patients.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 May/Jun;25(3):207-210

Trauma Services, Sparrow Hospital, Lansing, Michigan.

Background: Internal performance improvement data showed extended length of stay (LOS) in addition to an increased number of patients with constipation. This study was designed to evaluate the number of hospital days a trauma patient with opioid use had a bowel movement (BM) utilizing a high-intensity bowel protocol compared with the standard hospital bowel protocol.

Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of the trauma registry at a Level I trauma center from 2 different time periods to assess the number of hospital days that patients had a BM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000369DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Malposition of a Central Venous Catheter in Trauma: Confirmation of Placement Prevents Complications.

Authors:
Steven D Hobbs

J Trauma Nurs 2018 May/Jun;25(3):205-206

The Queen's Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; School of Nursing & Dental Hygiene, The University of Hawai'i, Honolulu; and Emergency Nurses Association, Des Plaines, Illinois.

This case study presents the inadvertent catheterization of a traumatic hemopneumothorax. A 22-year-old man sustained multiple stab wounds, including the left chest with a resultant hemopneumothorax. Upon arrival at a Level 1 trauma center, an ipsilateral subclavian central catheter was placed, blood was freely aspirated, and because of the patient's critical status, immediately utilized for resuscitation prior to line verification by radiography. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000366DOI Listing
October 2018

Trauma Simulation in Prehospital Emergency Care.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 May/Jun;25(3):201-204

School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden (Dr Abelsson); and Swedish Armed Forces Centre for Defence Medicine, Göteborg, and PreHospen-Centre for Prehospital Research, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden (Dr Lundberg).

Well-educated ambulance staff is a prerequisite for high-quality prehospital trauma care. The aim of this study was to examine how nurses in the ambulance service experienced participation in trauma simulation. Sixty-one nurses, working in an emergency ambulance service, performed simulated trauma care on four different occasions and afterward rated three statements on a 5-point Likert scale. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000370DOI Listing
October 2018
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Successful Implementation of an Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment Program.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 May/Jun;25(3):196-200

Department of Surgery, NewYork-Presbyterian/Queens, Flushing, New York.

Devastating effects of alcohol are well established in trauma. To address this, thve American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma (ACS-COT) requires ACS-verified Level 1 trauma centers to have an active screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) program. In 2015, NewYork-Presbyterian/Queens successfully implemented an SBIRT program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000368DOI Listing
October 2018
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Nonsurgical Admissions With Traumatic Injury: Medical Patients Are Trauma Patients Too.

J Trauma Nurs 2018 May/Jun;25(3):192-195

Southside Hospital/Northwell Health, Department of ACS/Trauma, Bay Shore, New York; Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra Northwell, Hempstead, New York.

Nontrauma service (NTS) admissions are an increasing problem as ground-level falls in elderly patients become more common. The admission and evaluation of trauma patients to nontrauma services in trauma centers seeking American College of Surgeons (ACS) verification, must follow the ACS mandates for performance improvement requiring some method of evaluating this population when admitted to services other than trauma, orthopedics, and neurosurgery. The purpose of this study and performance improvement project was to improve our process for the definition and evaluation of trauma patients who were being admitted to nontrauma services. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00043860-201805000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000367DOI Listing
October 2018
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