5,148 results match your criteria Journal of Trauma Management & Outcomes [Journal]


Management of Closed Incisions Using Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in Orthopedic Surgery.

Authors:
Animesh Agarwal

Plast Reconstr Surg 2019 Jan;143(1S Management of Surgical Incisions Utilizing Closed-Incision Negative-Pressure Therapy):21S-26S

San Antonio, Texas From the Division of Orthopaedic Trauma, Department of Orthopaedics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been a major advance in the management of open wounds, especially in orthopedic trauma surgery. Due to the success of NPWT, surgeons began using NPWT on closed incisions as a way to help prevent surgical wound dehiscence, especially in at-risk patients for wound problems. It has been well established that obesity, diabetes mellitus, and smoking in addition to other comorbidities increase the risk of wound dehiscence and surgical site infections in orthopedic patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000005308DOI Listing
January 2019

Focus issue European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery on "Volume Resuscitation and Coagulation" : Focus on volume resuscitation and coagulation to improve outcomes in acute trauma haemorrhage.

Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg 2017 08 20;43(4):421-422. Epub 2017 Jun 20.

Department of Trauma, Hand, and Reconstructive Surgery, University Hospital Frankfurt/Main, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00068-017-0808-4DOI Listing
August 2017
1 Read

Environmental Neurologic Injuries.

Authors:
Rodolfo Savica

Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2017 Jun;23(3, Neurology of Systemic Disease):862-871

Purpose Of Review: This article discusses neurologic complications resulting from environmental injuries and the treatment modalities for these conditions.

Recent Findings: Recent advances include improved management of altitude sickness. Relatively uncommon conditions, such as keraunoparalysis (lightning-induced paralysis) and high-pressure neurologic syndrome, are areas of ongoing study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/CON.0000000000000470DOI Listing
June 2017
2 Reads

The 100 most cited manuscripts in emergency abdominal surgery: A bibliometric analysis.

Int J Surg 2017 Jan 5;37:29-35. Epub 2016 Dec 5.

Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XW, UK; Cardiff University School of Medicine, University Hospital of Wales, Health Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XN, UK. Electronic address:

Background: The number of citations a scientific article receives provides a good indication of its impact within any given field. This bibliometric analysis aimed to identify the 100 most cited articles in Emergency Abdominal Surgery (EAS), to highlight key areas of interest and identify those that have most significantly shaped contemporary clinical practice in this newly evolving surgical specialty. This is of increasing relevance as concerns grow regarding the variable and suboptimal outcomes in Emergency General Surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsu.2016.12.006DOI Listing
January 2017
4 Reads

Management of Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy with Thrombelastography.

Crit Care Clin 2017 Jan;33(1):119-134

Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, 12700 East 19th Avenue, Denver, CO 80045, USA.

Viscoelastic assays, such as thrombelastography (TEG) and rotational thrombelastometry (ROTEM), have emerged as point-of-care tools that can guide the hemostatic resuscitation of bleeding injured patients. This article describes the role of TEG in contemporary trauma care by explaining this assay's methodology, clinical applications, and result interpretation through description of supporting studies to provide the reader with an evidence-based user's guide. Although TEG and ROTEM are assays based on the same viscoelastic principle, this article is focused on data supporting the use of TEG in trauma, because it is available in trauma centers in North America; ROTEM is mostly available in Europe. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccc.2016.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5142763PMC
January 2017
15 Reads

Professionalism in the Twilight Zone: A Multicenter, Mixed-Methods Study of Shift Transition Dynamics in Surgical Residencies.

Acad Med 2016 11;91(11 Association of American Medical Colleges Learn Serve Lead: Proceedings of the 55th Annual Research in Medical Education Sessions):S31-S36

J.E. Coverdill is associate professor, Department of Sociology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. A. Alseidi is associate director, General Surgery Residency Program, and director, HPB Fellowship, HPB and Endocrine Surgery, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. D.C. Borgstrom is associate professor, Department of Surgery, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia. D.L. Dent is professor of surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas. R.D. Dumire is general surgery residency program director and medical director of trauma services, Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center, Johnstown, Pennsylvania. J. Fryer is professor of surgery, Department of Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. T.H. Hartranft is clinical professor of surgery, Ohio University, and general surgery residency program director, Mount Carmel Health System, Columbus, Ohio. S.B. Holsten is associate professor and general surgery residency program director, Department of Surgery, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia. T. Nelson is chief of general surgery and executive physician, Health System Surgical Services, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico. M. Shabahang is director, Department of General Surgery, and general surgery residency program director, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pennsylvania. S. Sherman is associate clinical professor and associate director, General Surgery Residency Program, Michigan State University / Grand Rapids Medical Education Partners, Wyoming, Michigan. P.M. Termuhlen is regional campus dean, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth, Minnesota. R.J. Woods is associate professor and general surgery residency program director, Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, Ohio. J.D. Mellinger is professor, chair of general surgery, and general surgery residency program director, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois.

Purpose: Duty hours rules sparked debates about professionalism. This study explores whether and why general surgery residents delay departures at the end of a day shift in ways consistent with shift work, traditional professionalism, or a new professionalism.

Method: Questionnaires were administered to categorical residents in 13 general surgery programs in 2014 and 2015. Read More

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http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/2016/11001/Pro
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001358DOI Listing
November 2016
17 Reads

Bridging the gap: Hybrid cardiac echo in the critically ill.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S157-S161

From the Division of Trauma and Surgical, Critical Care (J.J.G., T.M.S., S.B.M.), Department of Surgery, and Department of Anesthesiology (S.G.), University of Maryland School of Medicine, R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, Baltimore; and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (C.C.), Bethesda, Maryland.

Background: Point-of-care ultrasound often includes cardiac ultrasound. It is commonly used to evaluate cardiac function in critically ill patients but lacks the specific quantitative anatomic assessment afforded by standard transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). We developed the Focused Rapid Echocardiographic Examination (FREE), a hybrid between a cardiac ultrasound and TTE that places an emphasis on cardiac function rather than anatomy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001020DOI Listing
November 2016
2 Reads

Incidence, risk factors, and mortality associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome in combat casualty care.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S150-S156

From the Division of Acute Care Surgery, Dept of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (P.K.P., L.M.N.); School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (W.Y.); US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, Texas (L.H.B., J.B.H.); Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine, Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland AFB, Texas (W.B.); and Department of Surgery, Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland AFB, Texas and Department of Surgery, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (J.W.C.).

Background: The overall incidence and mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in civilian trauma settings have decreased over the past four decades; however, the epidemiology and impact of ARDS on modern combat casualty care are unknown. We sought to determine the incidence, risk factors, resource utilization, and mortality associated with ARDS in current combat casualty care.

Methods: This was a retrospective review of mechanically ventilated US combat casualties within the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (formerly the Joint Theater Trauma Registry) during Operation Iraqi Freedom/Enduring Freedom (October 2001 to August 2008) for ARDS development, resource utilization, and mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001183DOI Listing
November 2016
16 Reads

Predicting the proportion of full-thickness involvement for any given burn size based on burn resuscitation volumes.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S144-S149

From the US Army Institute of Surgical Research (N.T.L., J.S., C.A.F., M.L.S.-M., I.R.D., L.C.C., K.K.C.), Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Resuscitation Research Laboratory, Department of Anesthesiology (G.C.K.), University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas; Division of Trauma, Critical Care and Acute Care Surgery (M.A.S.), Oregon Health & Science University; and Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (K.K.C.), Bethesda, Maryland.

Introduction: The depth of burn has been an important factor often overlooked when estimating the total resuscitation fluid needed for early burn care. The goal of this study was to determine the degree to which full-thickness (FT) involvement affected overall 24-hour burn resuscitation volumes.

Methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients admitted to our burn intensive care unit from December 2007 to April 2013, with significant burns that required resuscitation using our computerized decision support system for burn fluid resuscitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001166DOI Listing
November 2016
15 Reads

Identifying potential utility of resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta: An autopsy study.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S128-S132

From the Division of Trauma, Critical Care, Emergency Surgery, and Burns, Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona.

Background: Resuscitative thoracotomy (RT) has been the standard therapy in patients with acute arrest due to hemorrhagic shock. However, with the development of resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA), its role as a potential adjunct to a highly morbid intervention such as RT is being discussed. The aim of this study was to identify patients who most likely would have potentially benefited from REBOA use based on autopsy findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001104DOI Listing
November 2016
16 Reads

Combat MEDEVAC: A comparison of care by provider type for en route trauma care in theater and 30-day patient outcomes.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S104-S110

From the US Air Force En route Care Research Center/59th MDW/ST-US Army Institute of Surgical Research (J.M., A.G.M., S.S., L.K.R., C.A.P.), JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Department of Emergency Medicine (J.M.), San Antonio Military Medical Center, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Department of Emergency Medicine (V.S.B.), University of Colorado School of Medicine (V.S.B.), Aurora, Colorado; Colorado Air National Guard (V.S.B.), Buckley AFB, Colorado.

Background: Medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) is the movement and en route care of injured and medically compromised patients by medical care providers via helicopter. Military MEDEVAC platforms provide lifesaving interventions that improve survival in combat. There is limited evidence to support decision making related to en route care and allocation of resources. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001119DOI Listing
November 2016
27 Reads

The Military Orthopedic Trauma Registry: The potential of a specialty specific process improvement tool.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S100-S103

From the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (J.C.R.), US Army Institute of Surgical Research and San Antonio Military Medical Center, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; US Army Institute of Surgical Research (R.M.G.), JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Joint Trauma System (M.A.S.), JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (A.E.J.), San Antonio Military Medical Center, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

Background: The Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry (MOTR) was designed to replicate the Department of Defense Trauma Registry's (DoDTR's) role as pillar for data-driven management of extremity war wounds. The MOTR continuously undergoes quality assurance checks to optimize the registry data for future quality improvement efforts. We conducted a quality assurance survey of MOTR entrants to determine if a simple MOTR data pull could provide robust orthopedic-specific information toward the question of causes for late amputation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001145DOI Listing
November 2016
27 Reads
1.970 Impact Factor

Genitourinary injuries and extremity amputation in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom: Early findings from the Trauma Outcomes and Urogenital Health (TOUGH) project.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S95-S99

From the US Army Institute of Surgical Research (N.S.N., J.C.J., J.C.R.), JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Urology Service, Department of Surgery (S.J.H.), and Department of Orthopaedics (J.C.R.), San Antonio Military Medical Center, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Technology Office (E.A.L.), Defence Equipment and Support, Ministry of Defence, Bristol, United Kingdom; Surgical Services (D.W.S.), San Antonio Military Medical Center, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Joint Trauma System (J.A.O.), US Army Institute of Surgical Research, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (J.A.O.), University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas.

Background: In Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF), genitourinary (GU) wounds have occurred in unprecedented numbers. Severe concomitant injuries, including extremity amputations, are common. The epidemiology of GU injury and extremity amputation in OEF/OIF has not been described. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001122DOI Listing
November 2016
13 Reads

Origins and importance of the joint trauma system.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S75-S76

From the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (D.H.J.); and the Department of Surgery at Uniformed Services University and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (J.B.).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001219DOI Listing
November 2016
1 Read

Transitioning trauma research: Navigating the regulatory requirements for medical product development.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S81-S86

From the US Army Medical Materiel Development Activity (C.M.L., W.D., M.L.B.) and the Office of Research Protections (N.M.K.), US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001247DOI Listing
November 2016
16 Reads

Analysis of injury patterns and roles of care in US and Israel militaries during recent conflicts: Two are better than one.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S87-S94

From the US Army Institute of Surgical Research, JBSA, Fort Sam Houston, Texas (B.A., E.A.M.-S., T.D.L., L.C.C., J.C.W., K.R.G.); Department of Surgery "A," Meir Medical Center, Kfar Saba and the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel (A.B., H.P.); Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps (IDF-MC), Ramat Gan, Israel (A.B., A.Y., B.T., D.D., E.G.); Department of Military Medicine, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel (B.T.); The Geneva Foundation, Tacoma, Washington (B.A.).

Background: As new conflicts emerge and enemies evolve, military medical organizations worldwide must adopt the "lessons learned." In this study, we describe roles of care (ROCs) deployed and injuries sustained by both US and Israeli militaries during recent conflicts. The purpose of this collaborative work is facilitate exchange of medical data among allied forces in order to advance military medicine and facilitate strategic readiness for future military engagements that may involve less predictable situations of evacuation and care, such as prolonged field care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001252DOI Listing
November 2016
53 Reads
2 Citations
1.970 Impact Factor

Improving national preparedness for intentional mass casualty events: A seamless system of evidence-based care.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S77-S80

From The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (A.L.E.); the Federal Bureau of Investigation (W.F.); The US Department of Homeland Security (K.B.); and the Hartford Hospital (L.J.).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001254DOI Listing
November 2016
1 Read

Combat casualty care: Partnering for preparedness.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S69-S71

From the United States Combat Casualty Care Research Program, US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001253DOI Listing
November 2016
4 Reads

Evaluation of role 2 (R2) medical resources in the Afghanistan combat theater: Initial review of the joint trauma system R2 registry.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S121-S127

From the US Army Institute of Surgical Research (E.M., T.D.L., S.A.S., M.A.S., M.W., K.R.G.), San Antonio, TX; The Department of Surgery at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences & the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (J.A.B.), Bethesda, MD; Joint Trauma System (Z.T.S.), San Antonio, TX; Royal Center for Defence Medicine (R.R., T.H.), Birmingham, UK; US Army Medical Department Center and School (I.B.L.), San Antonio, TX; and US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (S.C., K.N.R.), Ft Detrick, MD.

Background: A Role 2 registry (R2R) was developed in 2008 by the US Joint Trauma System (JTS). The purpose of this project was to undertake a preliminary review of the R2R to understand combat trauma epidemiology and related interventions at these facilities to guide training and optimal use of forward surgical capability in the future.

Methods: A retrospective review of available JTS R2R records; the registry is a convenience sample entered voluntarily by members of the R2 units. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001092DOI Listing
November 2016
30 Reads
1.970 Impact Factor

The modern acute care surgeon: characterization of an evolving surgical niche.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2015 Jan;78(1):120-5

From the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (B.C.P.), Baltimore, Maryland; and Department of Surgery, University of California, Davis Medical Center (J.M.G., D.H. W.), Sacramento, Maryland.

Background: Trauma and emergency surgery continues to evolve as a surgical niche. The simple fact that The Journal of Trauma is now entitled The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery captures this reality. We sought to characterize the niche that trauma and emergency surgeons have occupied during the maturation of the acute care surgery model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000000496DOI Listing
January 2015
3 Reads

Systemic trauma.

J Trauma Dissociation 2014 ;15(2):117-32

a Department of Oncological Sciences , Mount Sinai School of Medicine , New York , New York , USA.

Substantial theoretical, empirical, and clinical work examines trauma as it relates to individual victims and perpetrators. As trauma professionals, it is necessary to acknowledge facets of institutions, cultures, and communities that contribute to trauma and subsequent outcomes. Systemic trauma-contextual features of environments and institutions that give rise to trauma, maintain it, and impact posttraumatic responses-provides a framework for considering the full range of traumatic phenomena. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2014.871666DOI Listing
November 2014
4 Reads

Making the call: a proactive ethics framework.

HEC Forum 2013 Sep;25(3):269-83

University of California Los Angeles School of Nursing, 700 Tiverton Avenue, Factor 4-238, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA,

This manuscript proposes a proactive framework for preventing or mitigating disruptive ethical conflicts that often result from delayed or avoided conversations about the ethics of care. Four components of the framework are explained and illustrated with evidenced-based actions. Clinical implications of adopting a prevention-based, system-wide ethics framework are discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10730-013-9213-5DOI Listing
September 2013
2 Reads

Welcome to a decade of action that can make a change!

J Trauma Manag Outcomes 2013 Jan 28;7(1). Epub 2013 Jan 28.

Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Center for Clinical Research, Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Warener Str, 7, Berlin, 12683, Germany.

The Journal of Trauma Management and Outcomes welcomes the launch of the UN Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020. More than 100 countries around the world will kick off the first global Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020, a decade that we believe can make a change! Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1752-2897-7-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3570340PMC
January 2013

The American Burn Association/Shriners Hospitals for Children Burn Outcomes Program: a progress report at 15 years.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2012 Sep;73(3 Suppl 2):S173-8

Shriners Hospitals for Children-Boston, MA, USA.

The American Burn Association and the Shriners Hospitals for Children Outcomes Program has been in development for more than 15 years. Many of the tools and important findings are described in this special issue of The Journal of Trauma. This unique program in outcomes research introduces a model for outcome assessments from the patient-centered perspective with a cohort of 1,140 children with burn injury after hospitalization for up to 4 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e318265c53eDOI Listing
September 2012
1 Read

Posttraumatic brachial plexitis.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):E136

Department of Neurosurgery, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e31821c33beDOI Listing
December 2011
31 Reads

Incidental findings in focused assessment with sonography for trauma in hemodynamically stable blunt trauma patients: speaking about cost to benefit.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):E123-7

Second Surgical Department and Surgical Oncology Unit, Korgialenio-Benakio, Red Cross Hospital, Athens, Greece.

Background: The purpose of this study was to identify which age-related groups of hemodynamically stable blunt trauma patients will present a positive cost-to-benefit ratio, in regard to the screening of incidental findings on Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST).

Methods: We conducted a prospective study using retrospective data taken from the trauma registry of 6,041 consecutive hemodynamically stable blunt trauma patients who underwent FAST at our Level I urban trauma hospital during the year 2009. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine whether age level is useful in detecting organ-/system-specific incidental findings in trauma patients undergoing FAST and to establish the required diagnostic cutoff value of this selected test. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e3182249eaaDOI Listing
December 2011
11 Reads

Most suitable modality to assess the inferior vena cava in the trauma patient.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1924-5; author reply 1925

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e31823a543dDOI Listing
December 2011
4 Reads

Double vena cavas requiring filtration.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1922

Trauma Program, Lancaster General Hospital, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 17604, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e318232a01dDOI Listing
December 2011
3 Reads

Attraction of magnetic foreign bodies leading to intestinal obstruction and gastro-colon-jejunum fistula.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1921

Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e3182159c78DOI Listing
December 2011
8 Reads

Heating pad for the bleeding: external warming during hemorrhage improves survival.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1915-9

Institute of Transfusion Medicine, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.

Background: Hypothermia is common during hemorrhagic shock. To warm the victims or not has been controversial. This study aims to investigate the effect of warming during the initial time of hemorrhage on body temperature, blood pressure, and survival in rat hemorrhagic shock models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e31823bbfe3DOI Listing
December 2011
6 Reads

Impact of interhospital transfer on outcomes for trauma patients: a systematic review.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1885-900; discussion 1901

Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Evidence suggests that there may be an association between transfer status (direct admission or interhospital transfer) and outcomes in trauma patients. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the current evidence of the association between transfer status and outcomes for patients.

Methods: Systematic search of Medline and EMBASE databases to identify eligible control trials or observational studies that examined the impact of transfer status on trauma patient outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e31823ac642DOI Listing
December 2011
3 Reads

Transplantation for severe hepatic trauma.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1880-4

Department of Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e31822b1035DOI Listing
December 2011
3 Reads

Fixation of sternal fractures: a systematic review.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1875-9

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky 40202, USA.

Background: Traumatic sternal fractures occur in approximately 3% to 8% of all blunt trauma patients. Most of these fractures are treated conservatively, but a small number require operative intervention. Only a few studies have reported operative fixation of sternal fractures, and no investigation to our knowledge has systematically reviewed the literature on this intervention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e31823c46e8DOI Listing
December 2011
3 Reads

Emergent cricothyroidotomy in the morbidly obese: a safe, no-visualization technique.

Authors:
David R King

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1873-4

Division of Trauma, Emergency Surgery, and Surgical Critical Care, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02141, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e318226fd92DOI Listing
December 2011
9 Reads

Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma practice management guidelines for hemorrhage in pelvic fracture--update and systematic review.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1850-68

Departments of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.

Background: Hemorrhage from pelvic fracture is common in victims of blunt traumatic injury. In 2001, the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST) published practice management guidelines for the management of hemorrhage in pelvic trauma. Since that time there have been new practice patterns and larger experiences with older techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e31823dca9aDOI Listing
December 2011
9 Reads

Using principal component analysis to aid bayesian network development for prediction of critical care patient outcomes.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1841-9

AFrame Digital, Inc., Reston, Virginia, USA.

Background: Predicting an intensive care unit patient's outcome is highly desirable. An end goal is for computational techniques to provide updated, accurate predictions about changing patient condition using a manageable number of physiologic parameters.

Methods: Principal component analysis was used to select input parameters for critical care patient outcome models. Read More

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December 2011
7 Reads

Validation of a modified table to map the 1998 Abbreviated Injury Scale to the 2008 scale and the use of adjusted severities.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1829-34

School of Primary, Aboriginal and Rural Health Care, University of Western Australia, Western Australia, Australia.

Background: The Abbreviated Injury Scale 2008 (AIS 2008) is the most recent injury coding system. A mapping table from a previous AIS 98 to AIS 2008 is available. However, AIS 98 codes that are unmappable to AIS 2008 codes exist in this table. Read More

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December 2011
11 Reads

Shaken baby syndrome and a triple-dose strategy for its prevention.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1801-7

Trauma Program, London Health Sciences Centre and Children's Hospital, London, ON, Canada.

Objectives: Inflicted traumatic brain injury associated with Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) is a leading cause of injury mortality and morbidity in infants. A triple-dose SBS prevention program was implemented with the aim to reduce the incidence of SBS. The objectives of this study were to describe the epidemiology of SBS, the triple-dose prevention program, and its evaluation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e31823c484aDOI Listing
December 2011
24 Reads

Prognostic factors influencing final visual acuity in open globe injuries.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1794-800

Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Süleyman Demirel University, Isparta, Turkey.

Background: To investigate the factors that influence final visual acuity (VA) in open globe injuries.

Methods: The records of patients with open globe injuries who were followed for longer than 6 months between 1998 and 2009 in two different centers were retrospectively reviewed. The data collected included patients' demographics as well as their initial VA, wound location, mechanism and type of injury, clinical findings, and final best-corrected VA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e31822b46afDOI Listing
December 2011
8 Reads

Facial nerve decompression surgery in patients with temporal bone trauma: analysis of 66 cases.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1789-92; discussion 1792-3

Department of Otolaryngology, Ehime University School of Medicine, Ehime, Japan.

Background: In the treatment of facial nerve paralysis after temporal bone trauma, it is important to appropriately determine whether nerve decompression surgery is indicated. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of facial nerve decompression surgery according to fracture location and the ideal time for surgery after trauma by analyzing the therapeutic outcome of traumatic facial nerve paralysis.

Methods: In total, 66 patients with facial nerve paralysis after temporal bone trauma who were treated at our institution between 1979 and 2009 were studied retrospectively. Read More

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December 2011
5 Reads

Thirty consecutive uses of a hemostatic bandage at a US Army combat support hospital and forward surgical team in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Authors:
David R King

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1775-8

Division of Trauma, Emergency Surgery, and Surgical Critical Care, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02141, USA.

Background: Topical hemostatic agents have generated intense research interest in recent years, prompted in part by the demands of wartime medicine. Numerous animal studies demonstrate variable degrees of efficacy of a variety of agents; however, little clinical data are available in severely traumatized patients. This report describes 30 consecutive uses of the modified rapid deployment hemostat (MRDH) during combat operations in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e3182231615DOI Listing
December 2011
18 Reads

Impact of the duration of platelet storage in critically ill trauma patients.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1766-73; discussion 1773-4

Division of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033-4525, USA.

Background: There is increasing evidence that the duration of red blood cell (RBC) storage negatively impacts outcomes. Data regarding prolonged storage of other blood components, however, are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the duration of platelet storage affects trauma patient outcomes. Read More

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December 2011
5 Reads

Use of freeze-dried plasma in French intensive care unit in Afghanistan.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1761-4; discussion 1764-5

Fédération de Biologie Clinique, Hôpital d'Instruction des Armées Percy, Clamart, France.

Background: Modern warfare causes severe injuries, and despite rapid transportation to theater regional trauma centers, casualties frequently arrive coagulopathic and in shock. Massive hemorrhage management includes transfusion of red blood cells and plasma in a 1:1 ratio. Fresh frozen plasma requires thawing and badly fits the emergency criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e31822f1285DOI Listing
December 2011
7 Reads

Hextend and 7.5% hypertonic saline with Dextran are equivalent to Lactated Ringer's in a swine model of initial resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1755-60

Division of Trauma, Critical Care, and Acute Care Surgery, Department of Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA.

Background: The optimal fluid strategy for the early treatment of trauma patients remains highly debated. Our objective was to determine the efficacy of an initial bolus of resuscitative fluids used in military and civilian settings on the physiologic response to uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock in a prospective, randomized, blinded animal study.

Methods: Fifty anesthetized swine underwent central venous and arterial catheterization followed by celiotomy. Read More

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December 2011
10 Reads

Pain as an indication for rib fixation: a bi-institutional pilot study.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1750-4

Division of Trauma, Emergency Surgery, and Surgical Critical Care, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.

Background: In trauma patients, open reduction and internal fixation of rib fractures remain controversial. We hypothesized that patients who have open reduction and internal fixation of rib fractures would experience less pain compared with controls and thus require fewer opiates. Further, we hypothesized that improved pain control would result in fewer pulmonary complications and decreased length of stay. Read More

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December 2011
4 Reads

Reconstruction of severe contracture of the first web space using the reverse posterior interosseous artery flap.

Authors:
Xu Gong Lai-Jin Lu

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1745-9

Department of Hand Surgery, The First Hospital of Ji Lin University, Chang Chun, China.

Background: To evaluate the outcome and highlight the operative tips of using the reverse posterior interosseous artery (PIA) flap in the treatment of severe contractures of the first web space.

Methods: From 1985 to 2008, the reverse PIA flaps, which included fasciocutaneous flaps in 25 patients and composite flaps in 2 patients were used to cover skin defects over the first web space after release of severe contractures of the first web space. The severe contracture of the first web space was defined as the distance of less than 2 cm between the interphalangeal joint of the thumb and the metacarpophalangeal joint of the index. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e3182325e27DOI Listing
December 2011
7 Reads

Minimally invasive polyaxial locking plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures: a prospective study.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1737-44

Department of Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Giessen and Marburg, Marburg, Germany.

Background: The surgical treatment for displaced humeral head fractures overlooks a broad variety of surgical techniques and implant systems. A standard operative procedure has not yet been established. In this article, we report our experience with a second-generation locking plate for the humeral head fracture that is applied in a standardized nine-step minimally invasive surgical technique (MIS). Read More

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December 2011
9 Reads

Racial odds for amputation ratio in traumatic lower extremity fractures.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1732-6

Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

Background: Recent studies have demonstrated that black patients receive substandard care compared with white patients across healthcare settings. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of race on the management (salvage vs. amputation) of traumatic lower extremity open fractures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e31823c5f94DOI Listing
December 2011
4 Reads

Orthopaedic trauma clinical research: is 2-year follow-up necessary? Results from a longitudinal study of severe lower extremity trauma.

J Trauma 2011 Dec;71(6):1726-31

Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.

Background: The ideal length of follow-up for orthopedic trauma research studies is unknown. This study compares 1- and 2-year complications, clinical recovery, and functional outcomes from a large prospective clinical study.

Methods: Patients (n = 336) with limb threatening unilateral lower extremity injuries were followed at the 12, 24, and 84 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0b013e31822c1c33DOI Listing
December 2011
5 Reads