15,484 results match your criteria Journal of Trauma & Dissociation [Journal]


What factors are associated with resilient outcomes in children exposed to social adversity? A systematic review.

BMJ Open 2019 Apr 11;9(4):e024870. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Intergenerational Health, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Objectives: Children exposed to social adversity-hardship as a result of social circumstances such as poverty or intergenerational trauma-are at increased risk of poor outcomes across the life course. Understanding what promotes resilient outcomes is essential for the development of evidence informed intervention strategies. We conducted a systematic review to identify how child resilience is measured and what factors are associated with resilient outcomes. Read More

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http://bmjopen.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-02487
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024870DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

"TOGETHER WE ARE UNBEATABLE": young sisters' narration of a sibling's cancer in personal blogs on the internet.

Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being 2019 Dec;14(1):1586625

b Clinical Psychology in Healthcare, Department of Children's and Women's Health , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.

Purpose: Siblings of children and young people diagnosed with cancer are commonly reluctant to talk about their experiences due to the circumstances of the illness situation. This article aims to bring voice to experience and inform practice by investigating what and how three young sisters narrate about their illness experiences in personal blogs on the Internet.

Methods: A narrative methodology for the analysis of life storytelling was applied primarily to investigate the sister's coping strategies and support needs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17482631.2019.1586625DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6442083PMC
December 2019

Achieving Reliable Diagnosis in Late Breast Implant Seromas: From Reactive to Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2019 03;143(3S A Review of Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma):15S-22S

Roma, Italy From the Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University, Pathology Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital.

Late onset of fluid collection surrounding breast implants may represent a serious issue when considering the possibility of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a newly recognized type of T-cell malignancy. However, many other factors, including trauma and infections, may be implicated in the formation of non-neoplastic periprosthetic delayed effusions. An appropriate management of late seromas, consisting of ultrasound-guided fluid drainage, cultures, cytology, and immunocytochemical and T-cell clonality studies, should be performed to achieve a correct and prompt diagnosis of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000005565DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Management of Closed Incisions Using Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in Orthopedic Surgery.

Authors:
Animesh Agarwal

Plast Reconstr Surg 2019 01;143(1S Management of Surgical Incisions Utilizing Closed-Incision Negative-Pressure Therapy):21S-26S

San Antonio, Texas From the Division of Orthopaedic Trauma, Department of Orthopaedics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been a major advance in the management of open wounds, especially in orthopedic trauma surgery. Due to the success of NPWT, surgeons began using NPWT on closed incisions as a way to help prevent surgical wound dehiscence, especially in at-risk patients for wound problems. It has been well established that obesity, diabetes mellitus, and smoking in addition to other comorbidities increase the risk of wound dehiscence and surgical site infections in orthopedic patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0000000000005308DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

WalkSafe Keeps Walking for 15 Years: A Program Review.

Am J Public Health 2018 Nov 29:e1-e3. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

All of the authors are with the KiDZ Neuroscience Center at the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL.

Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death among children aged 5 to 14 years. The WalkSafe program was developed in response to the number of children admitted to Miami-Dade County, Florida, level-1 trauma centers. WalkSafe was piloted in an initially high-risk neighborhood, which now exhibits a low density of pedestrian crashes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2018.304786DOI Listing
November 2018

Tissue-resident MAIT cell populations in human oral mucosa exhibit an activated profile and produce IL-17.

Eur J Immunol 2019 Jan 14;49(1):133-143. Epub 2018 Nov 14.

Center for Infection Medicine, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are unconventional T lymphocytes defined by their innate-like characteristics and broad antimicrobial responsiveness. Whether MAIT cells are part of the tissue-resident defense in the oral mucosal barrier is unknown. Here, we found MAIT cells present in the buccal mucosa, with a tendency to cluster near the basement membrane, and located in both epithelium and the underlying connective tissue. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eji.201847759
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eji.201847759DOI Listing
January 2019
25 Reads

The new reckoning: The Combat Casualty Care Research Program responds to real and present challenges in military operational projections.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2018 Jul;85(1S Suppl 2):S1-S3

From the US Combat Casualty Care Research Program (M.R.D.); US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick (M.R.D., B.R.H.); Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (M.R.D., T.E.R.), Bethesda; and US Army Nurse Corps (B.R.H.), Fort Detrick, Maryland.

This issue of the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery features topics from the 2017 Military Health System Research Symposium and starts a second decade of partnership between the Combat Casualty Care Research Program (CCCRP) and the journal. This publication comes at a time of significant change for the CCCRP, as it responds to military planning for the future multidomain battlefield (MDB). The projected MDB portends markedly different operational scenarios than those conducted over the past 17 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001981DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

Polyvictimization in childhood and its adverse impacts across the lifespan: Introduction to the special issue.

J Trauma Dissociation 2018 May-Jun;19(3):275-288

b Department of Psychology, Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington, USA.

Although much empirical work has focused on the adverse impact of specific types of childhood victimization (e.g., sexual, physical, or emotional abuse), researchers and clinicians increasingly are recognizing the prevalence of polyvictimization, or exposure to multiple types of victimization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2018.1440479DOI Listing
October 2018

Focus issue European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery on "Volume Resuscitation and Coagulation" : Focus on volume resuscitation and coagulation to improve outcomes in acute trauma haemorrhage.

Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg 2017 08 20;43(4):421-422. Epub 2017 Jun 20.

Department of Trauma, Hand, and Reconstructive Surgery, University Hospital Frankfurt/Main, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00068-017-0808-4DOI Listing
August 2017
1 Read

Environmental Neurologic Injuries.

Authors:
Rodolfo Savica

Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2017 Jun;23(3, Neurology of Systemic Disease):862-871

Purpose Of Review: This article discusses neurologic complications resulting from environmental injuries and the treatment modalities for these conditions.

Recent Findings: Recent advances include improved management of altitude sickness. Relatively uncommon conditions, such as keraunoparalysis (lightning-induced paralysis) and high-pressure neurologic syndrome, are areas of ongoing study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/CON.0000000000000470DOI Listing
June 2017
2 Reads

The anatomy of an article: Methods and results.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2017 09;83(3):543-550

From the University of Colorado Denver (A.S., E.E.M.); Denver Health Medical Center (E.E.M.); Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery Editorial Office (E.E.M.), Denver, Colorado; University of Washington (R.M.), Seattle, Washington; American College of Surgeons (D.B.H.), Chicago, Illinois; and Scripps Mercy Medical Center (S.R.S.), San Diego, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001536DOI Listing
September 2017

How Well Do We Understand the Long-Term Health Implications of Childhood Bullying?

Harv Rev Psychiatry 2017 Mar/Apr;25(2):89-95

From the Department of Psychiatry, Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon (Mexico) (Drs. Zarate-Garza and Cuellar-Barboza); Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology (Drs. Zarate-Garza, Biggs, Croarkin, Leffler, and Tye, and Ms. Morath), and of Molecular Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (Dr. Tye), Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota (Dr. Tye).

Once dismissed as an innocuous experience of childhood, bullying is now recognized as having significant psychological effects, particularly with chronic exposure. Victims of bullying are at risk for a number of psychiatric disturbances, and growing evidence suggests that the pathophysiological effects of bullying, as with other forms of trauma and chronic stress, create additional health risks. We review the literature on the known sequelae of bullying, including psychiatric and physiological health effects, with a focus on implications for the victim. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HRP.0000000000000137DOI Listing
February 2018
8 Reads

The 100 most cited manuscripts in emergency abdominal surgery: A bibliometric analysis.

Int J Surg 2017 Jan 5;37:29-35. Epub 2016 Dec 5.

Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XW, UK; Cardiff University School of Medicine, University Hospital of Wales, Health Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XN, UK. Electronic address:

Background: The number of citations a scientific article receives provides a good indication of its impact within any given field. This bibliometric analysis aimed to identify the 100 most cited articles in Emergency Abdominal Surgery (EAS), to highlight key areas of interest and identify those that have most significantly shaped contemporary clinical practice in this newly evolving surgical specialty. This is of increasing relevance as concerns grow regarding the variable and suboptimal outcomes in Emergency General Surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsu.2016.12.006DOI Listing
January 2017
4 Reads

Management of Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy with Thrombelastography.

Crit Care Clin 2017 Jan;33(1):119-134

Department of Surgery, University of Colorado, 12700 East 19th Avenue, Denver, CO 80045, USA.

Viscoelastic assays, such as thrombelastography (TEG) and rotational thrombelastometry (ROTEM), have emerged as point-of-care tools that can guide the hemostatic resuscitation of bleeding injured patients. This article describes the role of TEG in contemporary trauma care by explaining this assay's methodology, clinical applications, and result interpretation through description of supporting studies to provide the reader with an evidence-based user's guide. Although TEG and ROTEM are assays based on the same viscoelastic principle, this article is focused on data supporting the use of TEG in trauma, because it is available in trauma centers in North America; ROTEM is mostly available in Europe. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccc.2016.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5142763PMC
January 2017
15 Reads

Professionalism in the Twilight Zone: A Multicenter, Mixed-Methods Study of Shift Transition Dynamics in Surgical Residencies.

Acad Med 2016 11;91(11 Association of American Medical Colleges Learn Serve Lead: Proceedings of the 55th Annual Research in Medical Education Sessions):S31-S36

J.E. Coverdill is associate professor, Department of Sociology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia. A. Alseidi is associate director, General Surgery Residency Program, and director, HPB Fellowship, HPB and Endocrine Surgery, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. D.C. Borgstrom is associate professor, Department of Surgery, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia. D.L. Dent is professor of surgery, Division of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas. R.D. Dumire is general surgery residency program director and medical director of trauma services, Conemaugh Memorial Medical Center, Johnstown, Pennsylvania. J. Fryer is professor of surgery, Department of Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. T.H. Hartranft is clinical professor of surgery, Ohio University, and general surgery residency program director, Mount Carmel Health System, Columbus, Ohio. S.B. Holsten is associate professor and general surgery residency program director, Department of Surgery, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia. T. Nelson is chief of general surgery and executive physician, Health System Surgical Services, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico. M. Shabahang is director, Department of General Surgery, and general surgery residency program director, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pennsylvania. S. Sherman is associate clinical professor and associate director, General Surgery Residency Program, Michigan State University / Grand Rapids Medical Education Partners, Wyoming, Michigan. P.M. Termuhlen is regional campus dean, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth, Minnesota. R.J. Woods is associate professor and general surgery residency program director, Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, Ohio. J.D. Mellinger is professor, chair of general surgery, and general surgery residency program director, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois.

Purpose: Duty hours rules sparked debates about professionalism. This study explores whether and why general surgery residents delay departures at the end of a day shift in ways consistent with shift work, traditional professionalism, or a new professionalism.

Method: Questionnaires were administered to categorical residents in 13 general surgery programs in 2014 and 2015. Read More

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http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/2016/11001/Pro
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001358DOI Listing
November 2016
27 Reads

A novel therapy to promote axonal fusion in human digital nerves.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S177-S183

From the Department of Plastic Surgery (R.B., R.N., D.C.R., R.B.B., K.W.S., R.B.S., W.P.T.), Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; Department of General Surgery (R.B.), Georgetown University, Washington, DC; Department of Orthopaedics (T.W., C.B., S.N.), Thammasat University, Pathumthani, Thailand; Georgetown University School of Medicine (D.C.R.), Washington, DC; Department of General Surgery (K.W.S.), University of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR; Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science (N.D.K., M.D.D., R.D.D.), Nashville, TN; Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences (R.D.D.), Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; and Department of Biomedical Engineering (R.D.D.), Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.

Background: Peripheral nerve injury can have a devastating impact on our military and veteran population. Current strategies for peripheral nerve repair include techniques such as nerve tubes, nerve grafts, tissue matrices, and nerve growth guides to enhance the number of regenerating axons. Even with such advanced techniques, it takes months to regain function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001203DOI Listing
November 2016
21 Reads

Lack of species-specific difference in pulmonary function when using mouse versus human plasma in a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S171-S176

From the Department of Anesthesia, University of Texas, Houston, Texas (Z.P.); Blood Systems Research Institute, San Francisco, California (S.P.); Department of Pathology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (M.J.F.); Mahtomedi, Minnesota (K.H.); Shock Trauma Center, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (A.V.H., R.A.K.).

Background: Clinical studies have demonstrated that the early and empiric use of plasma improves survival after hemorrhagic shock. We have demonstrated in rodent models of hemorrhagic shock that resuscitation with plasma is protective to the lungs compared with lactated Ringer's solution. As our long-term objective is to determine the molecular mechanisms that modulate plasma's protective effects in injured bleeding patients, we have used human plasma in a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock. Read More

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http://content.wkhealth.com/linkback/openurl?sid=WKPTLP:land
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001221DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5267480PMC
November 2016
2 Reads

Bridging the gap: Hybrid cardiac echo in the critically ill.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S157-S161

From the Division of Trauma and Surgical, Critical Care (J.J.G., T.M.S., S.B.M.), Department of Surgery, and Department of Anesthesiology (S.G.), University of Maryland School of Medicine, R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, Baltimore; and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (C.C.), Bethesda, Maryland.

Background: Point-of-care ultrasound often includes cardiac ultrasound. It is commonly used to evaluate cardiac function in critically ill patients but lacks the specific quantitative anatomic assessment afforded by standard transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). We developed the Focused Rapid Echocardiographic Examination (FREE), a hybrid between a cardiac ultrasound and TTE that places an emphasis on cardiac function rather than anatomy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001020DOI Listing
November 2016
3 Reads

Incidence, risk factors, and mortality associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome in combat casualty care.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S150-S156

From the Division of Acute Care Surgery, Dept of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (P.K.P., L.M.N.); School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (W.Y.); US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, Texas (L.H.B., J.B.H.); Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine, Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland AFB, Texas (W.B.); and Department of Surgery, Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland AFB, Texas and Department of Surgery, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (J.W.C.).

Background: The overall incidence and mortality of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in civilian trauma settings have decreased over the past four decades; however, the epidemiology and impact of ARDS on modern combat casualty care are unknown. We sought to determine the incidence, risk factors, resource utilization, and mortality associated with ARDS in current combat casualty care.

Methods: This was a retrospective review of mechanically ventilated US combat casualties within the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (formerly the Joint Theater Trauma Registry) during Operation Iraqi Freedom/Enduring Freedom (October 2001 to August 2008) for ARDS development, resource utilization, and mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001183DOI Listing
November 2016
20 Reads

Predicting the proportion of full-thickness involvement for any given burn size based on burn resuscitation volumes.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S144-S149

From the US Army Institute of Surgical Research (N.T.L., J.S., C.A.F., M.L.S.-M., I.R.D., L.C.C., K.K.C.), Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Resuscitation Research Laboratory, Department of Anesthesiology (G.C.K.), University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas; Division of Trauma, Critical Care and Acute Care Surgery (M.A.S.), Oregon Health & Science University; and Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (K.K.C.), Bethesda, Maryland.

Introduction: The depth of burn has been an important factor often overlooked when estimating the total resuscitation fluid needed for early burn care. The goal of this study was to determine the degree to which full-thickness (FT) involvement affected overall 24-hour burn resuscitation volumes.

Methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients admitted to our burn intensive care unit from December 2007 to April 2013, with significant burns that required resuscitation using our computerized decision support system for burn fluid resuscitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001166DOI Listing
November 2016
18 Reads

Direct-site endovascular repair (DSER): A novel approach to vascular trauma.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S138-S143

From the Department of Surgery (A.J.D., L.P.N., J.J.D., J.B.S.), UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California; Department of General Surgery (A.J.D., L.P.N.), David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis Air Force Base, California; Department of Surgery (J.J.D., J.B.S.), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (L.P.N., J.J.D., J.B.S., T.K.W.), David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis Air Force Base, California; and Department of Surgery (C.M.A.), Kaiser Permanente South Sacramento Medical Center, Sacramento, California.

Peripheral vascular injuries carry significant risk for permanent functional impairment, limb loss, and death. Definitive correction of these injuries requires significant operative time and has traditionally been resource and skill set intensive. In the initial surgical treatment of the physiologically depleted trauma patient, faster techniques may prove more appropriate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001241DOI Listing
November 2016
9 Reads

Identifying potential utility of resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta: An autopsy study.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S128-S132

From the Division of Trauma, Critical Care, Emergency Surgery, and Burns, Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona.

Background: Resuscitative thoracotomy (RT) has been the standard therapy in patients with acute arrest due to hemorrhagic shock. However, with the development of resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA), its role as a potential adjunct to a highly morbid intervention such as RT is being discussed. The aim of this study was to identify patients who most likely would have potentially benefited from REBOA use based on autopsy findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001104DOI Listing
November 2016
18 Reads

Combat MEDEVAC: A comparison of care by provider type for en route trauma care in theater and 30-day patient outcomes.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S104-S110

From the US Air Force En route Care Research Center/59th MDW/ST-US Army Institute of Surgical Research (J.M., A.G.M., S.S., L.K.R., C.A.P.), JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Department of Emergency Medicine (J.M.), San Antonio Military Medical Center, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Department of Emergency Medicine (V.S.B.), University of Colorado School of Medicine (V.S.B.), Aurora, Colorado; Colorado Air National Guard (V.S.B.), Buckley AFB, Colorado.

Background: Medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) is the movement and en route care of injured and medically compromised patients by medical care providers via helicopter. Military MEDEVAC platforms provide lifesaving interventions that improve survival in combat. There is limited evidence to support decision making related to en route care and allocation of resources. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001119DOI Listing
November 2016
28 Reads

The Military Orthopedic Trauma Registry: The potential of a specialty specific process improvement tool.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S100-S103

From the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (J.C.R.), US Army Institute of Surgical Research and San Antonio Military Medical Center, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; US Army Institute of Surgical Research (R.M.G.), JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Joint Trauma System (M.A.S.), JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (A.E.J.), San Antonio Military Medical Center, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

Background: The Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry (MOTR) was designed to replicate the Department of Defense Trauma Registry's (DoDTR's) role as pillar for data-driven management of extremity war wounds. The MOTR continuously undergoes quality assurance checks to optimize the registry data for future quality improvement efforts. We conducted a quality assurance survey of MOTR entrants to determine if a simple MOTR data pull could provide robust orthopedic-specific information toward the question of causes for late amputation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001145DOI Listing
November 2016
30 Reads
1.970 Impact Factor

Genitourinary injuries and extremity amputation in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom: Early findings from the Trauma Outcomes and Urogenital Health (TOUGH) project.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S95-S99

From the US Army Institute of Surgical Research (N.S.N., J.C.J., J.C.R.), JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Urology Service, Department of Surgery (S.J.H.), and Department of Orthopaedics (J.C.R.), San Antonio Military Medical Center, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Technology Office (E.A.L.), Defence Equipment and Support, Ministry of Defence, Bristol, United Kingdom; Surgical Services (D.W.S.), San Antonio Military Medical Center, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Joint Trauma System (J.A.O.), US Army Institute of Surgical Research, JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (J.A.O.), University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas.

Background: In Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF), genitourinary (GU) wounds have occurred in unprecedented numbers. Severe concomitant injuries, including extremity amputations, are common. The epidemiology of GU injury and extremity amputation in OEF/OIF has not been described. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001122DOI Listing
November 2016
17 Reads

Origins and importance of the joint trauma system.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S75-S76

From the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (D.H.J.); and the Department of Surgery at Uniformed Services University and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (J.B.).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001219DOI Listing
November 2016
1 Read

Transitioning trauma research: Navigating the regulatory requirements for medical product development.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S81-S86

From the US Army Medical Materiel Development Activity (C.M.L., W.D., M.L.B.) and the Office of Research Protections (N.M.K.), US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001247DOI Listing
November 2016
20 Reads

Analysis of injury patterns and roles of care in US and Israel militaries during recent conflicts: Two are better than one.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S87-S94

From the US Army Institute of Surgical Research, JBSA, Fort Sam Houston, Texas (B.A., E.A.M.-S., T.D.L., L.C.C., J.C.W., K.R.G.); Department of Surgery "A," Meir Medical Center, Kfar Saba and the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel (A.B., H.P.); Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps (IDF-MC), Ramat Gan, Israel (A.B., A.Y., B.T., D.D., E.G.); Department of Military Medicine, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel (B.T.); The Geneva Foundation, Tacoma, Washington (B.A.).

Background: As new conflicts emerge and enemies evolve, military medical organizations worldwide must adopt the "lessons learned." In this study, we describe roles of care (ROCs) deployed and injuries sustained by both US and Israeli militaries during recent conflicts. The purpose of this collaborative work is facilitate exchange of medical data among allied forces in order to advance military medicine and facilitate strategic readiness for future military engagements that may involve less predictable situations of evacuation and care, such as prolonged field care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001252DOI Listing
November 2016
62 Reads
2 Citations
1.970 Impact Factor

Improving national preparedness for intentional mass casualty events: A seamless system of evidence-based care.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S77-S80

From The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (A.L.E.); the Federal Bureau of Investigation (W.F.); The US Department of Homeland Security (K.B.); and the Hartford Hospital (L.J.).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001254DOI Listing
November 2016
1 Read

Combat casualty care: Partnering for preparedness.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S69-S71

From the United States Combat Casualty Care Research Program, US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001253DOI Listing
November 2016
5 Reads

Combat surgeon readiness: Partnering during war and peace.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S72-S74

From the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences (K.N.R., E.E.), Bethesda, Maryland; and the Department of Defense Combat Casualty Care Research Program (K.N.R.), Fort Detrick, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001255DOI Listing
November 2016
1 Read

Automated control of endotracheal tube cuff pressure during simulated flight.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S116-S120

From the University of Cincinnati (T.B., R.B.), Cincinnati, Ohio; and United States Air Force (D.R., J.W., D.C., J.E.), Defense Health Headquarters, Fall Church, Virginia.

Background: Successful mechanical ventilation requires that the airway be controlled by an endotracheal tube (ETT) with an inflatable cuff to seal the airway. Aeromedical evacuation represents a unique challenge in which to manage ETT cuffs. We evaluated three methods of automatic ETT cuff pressure adjustment during changes in altitude in an altitude chamber. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001234DOI Listing
November 2016
33 Reads

Decellularized extracellular matrix repair of volumetric muscle loss injury impairs adjacent bone healing in a rat model of complex musculoskeletal trauma.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S184-S190

From the Extremity Trauma and Regenerative Medicine Task Area, US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

Background: Traumatic muscle loss (i.e., volumetric muscle loss [VML] injury) impairs adjacent fracture healing but is often left untreated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001212DOI Listing
November 2016
9 Reads

Evaluation of respiratory volume monitoring (RVM) to detect respiratory compromise in advance of pulse oximetry and help minimize false desaturation alarms.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S162-S170

From the Department of Anesthesiology (S.M.G.), University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Anesthesiology (P.G.D.), Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia; Respiratory Motion, Inc. (D.S.E.), Waltham, Massachusetts; and Post Anesthesia Care Units (E.E.G.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: Monitoring respiratory function is important. By continuously monitoring respiratory volumes, respiratory depression could be identified before hypoxemia and drive earlier intervention. Here, we evaluate the temporal relationship of respiratory volume monitoring (providing real-time minute ventilation [MV], tidal volume, and respiratory rate in nonintubated patients) to hypoxemic episodes and its potential to help classify true vs false desaturations (related to patient movement/probe dislodgement). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001152DOI Listing
November 2016
1 Read

Partial resuscitative balloon occlusion of the aorta (P-REBOA): Clinical technique and rationale.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 11;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S133-S137

From the Department of Emergency Medicine (M.A.J.), University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA ; Division of General Surgery (L.P.N.), David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis Air Force Base, California; Department of Surgery (L.P.N., T.K.W., J.J.D.), UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California; Department of Surgery (L.P.N., J.J.D.), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland; and Heart, Lung and Vascular Center (T.K.W. J.J.D.), David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis Air Force Base, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001146DOI Listing
November 2016
7 Reads

Evaluation of role 2 (R2) medical resources in the Afghanistan combat theater: Initial review of the joint trauma system R2 registry.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S121-S127

From the US Army Institute of Surgical Research (E.M., T.D.L., S.A.S., M.A.S., M.W., K.R.G.), San Antonio, TX; The Department of Surgery at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences & the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (J.A.B.), Bethesda, MD; Joint Trauma System (Z.T.S.), San Antonio, TX; Royal Center for Defence Medicine (R.R., T.H.), Birmingham, UK; US Army Medical Department Center and School (I.B.L.), San Antonio, TX; and US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (S.C., K.N.R.), Ft Detrick, MD.

Background: A Role 2 registry (R2R) was developed in 2008 by the US Joint Trauma System (JTS). The purpose of this project was to undertake a preliminary review of the R2R to understand combat trauma epidemiology and related interventions at these facilities to guide training and optimal use of forward surgical capability in the future.

Methods: A retrospective review of available JTS R2R records; the registry is a convenience sample entered voluntarily by members of the R2 units. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001092DOI Listing
November 2016
39 Reads
1.970 Impact Factor

Machine learning and new vital signs monitoring in civilian en route care: A systematic review of the literature and future implications for the military.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 Nov;81(5 Suppl 2 Proceedings of the 2015 Military Health System Research Symposium):S111-S115

From the US Army Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas.

Background: Although air transport medical services are today an integral part of trauma systems in most developed countries, to date, there are no reviews on recent innovations in civilian en route care. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify potential machine learning and new vital signs monitoring technologies in civilian en route care that could help close civilian and military capability gaps in monitoring and the early detection and treatment of various trauma injuries.

Methods: MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and citation review of relevant primary and review articles were searched for studies involving civilian en route care, air medical transport, and technologies from January 2005 to November 2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000000937DOI Listing
November 2016
17 Reads

Volume 17 Reviewers for the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation.

Authors:

J Trauma Dissociation 2016 Oct-Dec;17(5):610

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2016.1229002DOI Listing
December 2017
1 Read

Routine primary care screening for intimate partner violence and other adverse psychosocial exposures: what's the evidence?

BMC Fam Pract 2016 08 3;17:103. Epub 2016 Aug 3.

Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioural Neurosciences, and of Pediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.

Background: Family physicians and other primary care practitioners are encouraged or expected to screen for an expanding array of concerns and problems including intimate partner violence (IPV). While there is no debate about the deleterious impact of violence and other adverse psychosocial exposures on health status, the key question raised here is about the value of routine screening in primary care for such exposures.

Discussion: Several characteristics of IPV have led to consideration for routine IPV screening in primary care and during other healthcare encounters (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12875-016-0500-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4972945PMC
August 2016
12 Reads

A brief report on the status of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation.

Authors:
Jennifer J Freyd

J Trauma Dissociation 2016 Oct-Dec;17(5):523-526

a Department of Psychology , University of Oregon , Eugene , Oregon , USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299732.2016.1215126DOI Listing
December 2017

A brief history of Forging New Frontiers, the annual conference of the Injury Free Coalition for Kids.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2016 10;81(4 Suppl 1):S67-8

From the Injury Free Coalition for Kids, Kansas City, Missouri.

The Injury Free Coalition for Kids Annual Conference has contributed to the dissemination of information pertaining to the development of the field of injury prevention. A content analysis was completed using conference agendas used during the span of 2005-2015, finding that more than 398 presentations covering a wide variety of injuries have taken place. Published work has appeared in the Journal of Trauma and there has been recognition of people who have contributed to the development of the field. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000001174DOI Listing
October 2016
3 Reads

The top 100 articles in the radiology of trauma: a bibliometric analysis.

Emerg Radiol 2015 Dec 16;22(6):667-75. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

Division of Emergency Radiology, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 550 Peachtree Road, Atlanta, GA, 30308, USA.

The purpose of this study was to identify the 100 top-cited articles in the radiology of trauma, analyze the resulting database to understand factors resulting in highly cited works, and establish trends in trauma imaging. An initial database was created via a Web of Science (WOS) search of all scientific journals using the search terms "trauma" and either "radiology" or a diagnostic modality. Articles were ranked by citation count and screened by two attending radiologists plus a tiebreaker for appropriateness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10140-015-1345-2DOI Listing
December 2015
11 Reads

The modern acute care surgeon: characterization of an evolving surgical niche.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2015 Jan;78(1):120-5

From the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (B.C.P.), Baltimore, Maryland; and Department of Surgery, University of California, Davis Medical Center (J.M.G., D.H. W.), Sacramento, Maryland.

Background: Trauma and emergency surgery continues to evolve as a surgical niche. The simple fact that The Journal of Trauma is now entitled The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery captures this reality. We sought to characterize the niche that trauma and emergency surgeons have occupied during the maturation of the acute care surgery model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000000496DOI Listing
January 2015
5 Reads

Osteopathic emergency medicine programs infrequently publish in high-impact emergency medicine journals.

West J Emerg Med 2014 Nov 10;15(7):908-12. Epub 2014 Oct 10.

Department of Medicine, Division of Emergency Medicine, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Erie, Pennsylvania ; Department of Emergency Medicine, Allegheny Health Network, Erie, Pennsylvania ; Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA.

Introduction: Both the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) require core faculty to engage in scholarly work, including publication in peer-reviewed journals. With the ACGME/AOA merger, we sought to evaluate the frequency of publication in high-impact peer-reviewed EM journals from authors affiliated with osteopathic emergency medicine (EM) programs.

Methods: We performed a retrospective literature review using the Journal Citation Report database and identified the top five journals in the category of 'Emergency Medicine' by their 2011 Impact Factor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5811/westjem.2014.9.22535DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4251253PMC
November 2014
2 Reads

That was then, this is now.

J Trauma Nurs 2014 Jul-Aug;21(4):147-8

Editor, Journal of Trauma Nursing, Froedtert Hospital & Medical College of Wisconsin.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JTN.0000000000000063DOI Listing
September 2016

Neurologic complications of illicit drug abuse.

Authors:
John C M Brust

Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2014 Jun;20(3 Neurology of Systemic Disease):642-56

Purpose Of Review: This review familiarizes clinicians with the symptoms of overdose and withdrawal, as well as neurologic complications, associated with particular illicit drugs.

Recent Findings: Recent arrivals on the recreational drug scene include synthetic cathinone analogs, synthetic cannabinoid agonists, and a variety of novel hallucinogens.

Summary: Clinicians need to be aware of neurologic disorders associated with particular illicit drugs and should consider drug abuse in any patient with unexplained symptoms and signs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/01.CON.0000450971.99322.cdDOI Listing

Acute symptomatic seizures and systemic illness.

Authors:
Steven Karceski

Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2014 Jun;20(3 Neurology of Systemic Disease):614-23

Purpose Of Review: This article addresses the occurrence of acute symptomatic seizures in the setting of many medical illnesses.

Recent Findings: Many medical illnesses can cause seizures. Metabolic derangements, such as disorders of serum glucose metabolism, cause seizures, as well as other neurologic manifestations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/01.CON.0000450969.61204.6fDOI Listing
June 2014
3 Reads

The anatomy of an article: title, abstract, and introduction.

J Trauma Acute Care Surg 2014 May;76(5):1322-7

From the University of Colorado Denver (A.S., E.E.M.); Denver Health Medical Center (E.E.M.); and Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery Editorial Office (A.S., E.E.M., J.C., R.M., D.B.H., S.R.S.), Denver, Colorado; University of Washington (R.M.), Seattle, Washington; American College of Surgeons (D.B.H.), Chicago, Illinois; and Scripps Mercy Medical Center (S.R.S.), San Diego, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TA.0000000000000210DOI Listing