3,243 results match your criteria Journal of Translational Medicine [Journal]


Effect of chemotherapy on cancer stem cells and tumor-associated macrophages in a prospective study of preoperative chemotherapy in soft tissue sarcoma.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 18;17(1):130. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Background: Cancer stem cells (CSC) may respond to chemotherapy differently from other tumor cells.

Methods: This study examined the expression of the putative cancer stem cell markers ALDH1, CD44, and CD133; the angiogenesis marker CD31; and the macrophage marker CD68 in soft tissue sarcomas (STS) before and after 4 cycles of chemotherapy with doxorubicin and ifosfamide in 31 patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcoma in a prospective clinical trial.

Results: None of the markers clearly identified CSCs in STS samples. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1883-6DOI Listing

Bone marrow donor selection and characterization of MSCs is critical for pre-clinical and clinical cell dose production.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 17;17(1):128. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Avenue, HSE 760, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.

Background: Cell based therapies, such as bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs; also known as mesenchymal stromal cells), are currently under investigation for a number of disease applications. The current challenge facing the field is maintaining the consistency and quality of cells especially for cell dose production for pre-clinical testing and clinical trials. Here we determine how BM-donor variability and thus the derived MSCs factor into selection of the optimal primary cell lineage for cell production and testing in a pre-clinical swine model of trauma induced acute respiratory distress syndrome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1877-4DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Joint bioinformatics analysis of underlying potential functions of hsa-let-7b-5p and core genes in human glioma.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 17;17(1):129. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

College of Pharmacy, Nankai University, Tianjin, 300350, People's Republic of China.

Background: Glioma accounts for a large proportion of cancer, and an effective treatment for this disease is still lacking because of the absence of specific driver molecules. Current challenges in the treatment of glioma are the accurate and timely diagnosis of brain glioma and targeted treatment plans. To investigate the diagnostic biomarkers and prospective role of miRNAs in the tumorigenesis and progression of glioma, we analyzed the expression of miRNAs and key genes in glioma based on The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1882-7DOI Listing

Role of MAML1 in targeted therapy against the esophageal cancer stem cells.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 16;17(1):126. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Immunology Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Background: Esophageal cancer is the sixth-leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the main reason for tumor relapse in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The NOTCH pathway is important in preservation of CSCs, therefore it is possible to target such cells by targeting MAML1 as the main component of the NOTCH transcription machinery. Read More

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https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1876-5DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Acute canagliflozin treatment protects against in vivo myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in non-diabetic male rats and enhances endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 16;17(1):127. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Department of Cardiac Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: The sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor canagliflozin has been shown to reduce major cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients, with a pronounced decrease in hospitalization for heart failure (HF) especially in those with HF at baseline. These might indicate a potent direct cardioprotective effect, which is currently incompletely understood. We sought to characterize the cardiovascular effects of acute canagliflozin treatment in healthy and infarcted rat hearts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1881-8DOI Listing

RSPO3 is a prognostic biomarker and mediator of invasiveness in prostate cancer.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 15;17(1):125. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Background: While prostate cancer can often manifest as an indolent disease, the development of locally-advanced or metastatic disease can cause significant morbidity or mortality. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms contributing to disease progression is crucial for more accurate prognostication and effective treatments. R-Spondin 3 (RSPO3) is a protein previously implicated in the progression of colorectal and lung cancers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1878-3DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Contribution of BRCA1 5382insC mutation in triple negative breast cancer in Tunisia.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 11;17(1):123. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Laboratory of Molecular Immuno‑Oncology, Faculty of Medicine of Monastir, Monastir University, 5019, Monastir, Tunisia.

Background: Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) has been classified as a disease subgroup defined by the lack of expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors as well as the absence of the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) overexpression. Germline mutations in the BRCA1 gene have been associated with TNBC. Approximately 70% of breast cancers arising in BRCA1 mutation carriers and up to 23% of breast cancers in BRCA2 carriers display a triple negative phenotype. Read More

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https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1873-8DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

An enrichment method to increase cell-free fetal DNA fraction and significantly reduce false negatives and test failures for non-invasive prenatal screening: a feasibility study.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 11;17(1):124. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Prenatal Diagnosis, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Care Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.

Background: Noninvasive prenatal screening (NIPS) based on cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) has rapidly been applied into clinic. However, the reliability of this method largely depends on the concentration of cffDNA in the maternal plasma. The chance of test failure results or false negative results would increase when cffDNA fraction is low. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1871-xDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Compound α-keto acid tablet supplementation alleviates chronic kidney disease progression via inhibition of the NF-kB and MAPK pathways.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 11;17(1):122. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department of Nephrology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Ave, Wuhan, 430030, Hubei, China.

Background: Keto-analogues administration plays an important role in clinical chronic kidney disease (CKD) adjunctive therapy, however previous studies on their reno-protective effect mainly focused on kidney pathological changes induced by nephrectomy. This study was designed to explore the currently understudied alternative mechanisms by which compound α-ketoacid tablets (KA) influenced ischemia-reperfusion (IR) induced murine renal injury, and to probe the current status of KA administration on staving CKD progression in Chinese CKD patients at different stages.

Methods: In animal experiment, IR surgery was performed to mimic progressive chronic kidney injury, while KA was administrated orally. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1856-9DOI Listing

Comparison and development of machine learning tools in the prediction of chronic kidney disease progression.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 11;17(1):119. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department of Nephrology, Huadong Hospital Affiliated To Fudan University, Shanghai, 200040, China.

Background: Urinary protein quantification is critical for assessing the severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the current procedure for determining the severity of CKD is completed through evaluating 24-h urinary protein, which is inconvenient during follow-up.

Objective: To quickly predict the severity of CKD using more easily available demographic and blood biochemical features during follow-up, we developed and compared several predictive models using statistical, machine learning and neural network approaches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1860-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458616PMC
April 2019
1 Read
3.930 Impact Factor

Increased CD8+CD28+ T cells independently predict better early response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy in patients with lung metastases from non-small cell lung cancer.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 11;17(1):120. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department of Oncology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430060, China.

Background: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) shows a remarkable local control of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) metastases, partially as a result of host immune status. However, the predictors of immune cells for tumor response after SABR are unknown. To that effect, we investigated the ability of pre-SABR immune cells in peripheral blood to predict early tumor response to SABR in patients with lung metastases from NSCLC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1872-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458628PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

Fibroblast growth factor 23, endothelium biomarkers and acute kidney injury in critically-ill patients.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 11;17(1):121. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Medical Sciences Postgraduate Program, Department of Clinical Medicine, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Avenida Abolição, 4043 Ap 1203, Fortaleza, Ceará, CEP 60165-082, Brazil.

Background: Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) and endothelium-related biomarkers have been related to AKI in critically-ill patients. Also, FGF23 is associated with endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we investigated if elevated FGF23 association with severe AKI is mediated by several endothelial/glycocalyx-related biomarkers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1875-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458699PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Clusterin silencing restores myoblasts viability and down modulates the inflammatory process in osteoporotic disease.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 10;17(1):118. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, 00133, Rome, Italy.

Background: Targeting new molecular pathways leading to Osteoporosis (OP) and Osteoarthritis (OA) is a hot topic for drug discovery. Clusterin (CLU) is a glycoprotein involved in inflammation, proliferation, cell death, neoplastic disease, Alzheimer disease and aging. The present study focuses on the expression and the role of CLU in influencing the decrease of muscle mass and fiber senescence in OP-OA condition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1868-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6457035PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Quantitation of progenitor cell populations and growth factors after bone marrow aspirate concentration.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 8;17(1):115. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 450 Broadway, Redwood City, CA, 94063, USA.

Background: The number of Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSCs) in the human bone marrow (BM) is small compared to other cell types. BM aspirate concentration (BMAC) may be used to increase numbers of MSCs, but the composition of MSC subpopulations and growth factors after processing are unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the enrichment of stem/progenitor cells and growth factors in BM aspirate by two different commercial concentration devices versus standard BM aspiration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1866-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6454687PMC

Pretreatment risk management of a novel nomogram model for prediction of thoracoabdominal extrahepatic metastasis in primary hepatic carcinoma.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 8;17(1):117. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Department of Gastroenterology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, 17 Yongwai Zheng Street, Nanchang, 330006, China.

Background: Extrahepatic metastasis is the independent risk factor of poor survival of primary hepatic carcinoma (PHC), and most occurs in the chest and abdomen. Currently, there is still no available method to predict thoracoabdominal extrahepatic metastasis in PHC. In this study, a novel nomogram model was developed and validated for prediction of thoracoabdominal extrahepatic metastasis in PHC, thereby conducted individualized risk management for pretreatment different risk population. Read More

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https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1861-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6454745PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

Analysis of the role of the Hippo pathway in cancer.

Authors:
Yanyan Han

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 8;17(1):116. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Department of Pathology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama, 700-8558, Japan.

Cancer is a serious health issue in the world due to a large body of cancer-related human deaths, and there is no current treatment available to efficiently treat the disease as the tumor is often diagnosed at a serious stage. Moreover, Cancer cells are often resistant to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and molecular-targeted therapy. Upon further knowledge of mechanisms of tumorigenesis, aggressiveness, metastasis, and resistance to treatments, it is necessary to detect the disease at an earlier stage and for a better response to therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1869-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6454697PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Monoallelic expression in melanoma.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 5;17(1):112. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Sidra Medicine, Research Branch, Doha, PO, 26999, Qatar.

Background: Monoallelic expression (MAE) is a frequent genomic phenomenon in normal tissues, however its role in cancer is yet to be fully understood. MAE is defined as the expression of a gene that is restricted to one allele in the presence of a diploid heterozygous genome. Constitutive MAE occurs for imprinted genes, odorant receptors and random X inactivation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1863-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6449950PMC

Interleukin 32 expression in human melanoma.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 5;17(1):113. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Department of Surgery, University of California, Los Angeles, 10833 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.

Background: Various proinflammatory cytokines can be detected within the melanoma tumor microenvironment. Interleukin 32 (IL32) is produced by T cells, NK cells and monocytes/macrophages, but also by a subset of melanoma cells. We sought to better understand the biology of IL32 in human melanoma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1862-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6449995PMC

Are innovation and new technologies in precision medicine paving a new era in patients centric care?

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 5;17(1):114. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

School of Cancer and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, King's College London, London, SE1 8WA, UK.

Healthcare is undergoing a transformation, and it is imperative to leverage new technologies to generate new data and support the advent of precision medicine (PM). Recent scientific breakthroughs and technological advancements have improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis and changed the way we diagnose and treat disease leading to more precise, predictable and powerful health care that is customized for the individual patient. Genetic, genomics, and epigenetic alterations appear to be contributing to different diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1864-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451233PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Promoting therapeutic angiogenesis of focal cerebral ischemia using thrombospondin-4 (TSP4) gene-modified bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in a rat model.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 4;17(1):111. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Department of Biotherapy and Oncology, Shenzhen Luohu People's Hospital, Shenzhen, 518001, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.

Background: A stroke caused by angiostenosis always has a poor prognosis. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) are widely applied in vascular regeneration. Recently, thrombospondin-4 (TSP4) was reported to promote the regeneration of blood vessels and enhance the function of endothelial cells in angiogenesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1845-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6449913PMC
April 2019
2 Reads
3.930 Impact Factor

Somatic mutation of DNAH genes implicated higher chemotherapy response rate in gastric adenocarcinoma patients.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 3;17(1):109. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 160 Pujian Road, Shanghai, 200127, People's Republic of China.

Background: The dynein axonemal heavy chain (DNAH) family of genes encode the dynein axonemal heavy chain, which is involved in cell motility. Genomic variations of DNAH family members have been frequently reported in diverse kinds of malignant tumors. In this study, we analyzed the genomic database to evaluate the mutation status of DNAH genes in gastric adenocarcinoma and further identified the significance of mutant DNAH genes as effective molecular biomarkers for predicting chemotherapy response in gastric cancer patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1867-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448266PMC
April 2019
3 Reads

Experimental non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in Göttingen Minipigs: consequences of high fat-fructose-cholesterol diet and diabetes.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 3;17(1):110. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Ridebanevej 9, 2., 1870, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease in humans, and ranges from steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the latter with risk of progression to cirrhosis. The Göttingen Minipig has been used in studies of obesity and diabetes, but liver changes have not been described. The aim of this study was to characterize hepatic changes in Göttingen Minipigs with or without diabetes, fed a diet high in fat, fructose, and cholesterol to see if liver alterations resemble features of human NAFLD/NASH. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1854-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448276PMC
April 2019
3 Reads

ZCCHC13-mediated induction of human liver cancer is associated with the modulation of DNA methylation and the AKT/ERK signaling pathway.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 2;17(1):108. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Department of Urology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361003, Fujian, China.

Background: Previous studies have shown that zinc-finger CCHC-type containing 13 (ZCCHC13) is located in an imprinted gene cluster in the X-inactivation centre, but few published studies have provided evidence of its expression in cancers. The CCHC-type zinc finger motif has numerous biological activities (such as DNA binding and RNA binding) and mediates protein-protein interactions. In an effort to examine the clinical utility of ZCCHC13 in oncology, we investigated the expression of the ZCCHC13 mRNA and protein in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1852-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444591PMC

FNDC5 attenuates obesity-induced cardiac hypertrophy by inactivating JAK2/STAT3-associated inflammation and oxidative stress.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 2;17(1):107. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Physiology, Nanjing Medical University, 101 Longmian Avenue, Nanjing, 211166, Jiangsu, China.

Background: Chronic low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress play important roles in the development of obesity-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we investigated the role of Fibronectin type III domain containing 5 (FNDC5) in cardiac inflammation and oxidative stress in obesity-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

Methods: Male wild-type and FNDC5 mice were fed normal chow or high fat diet (HFD) for 20 weeks to induce obesity, and primary cardiomyocytes and H9c2 cells treated with palmitate (PA) were used as in vitro model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1857-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444535PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Key metabolic parameters change significantly in early breast cancer survivors: an explorative PILOT study.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 1;17(1):105. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark.

Background: With increasing number of breast cancer survivors, more attention is drawn to long-term consequences of curative cancer treatment. Adjuvant treatment of breast cancer patients is associated with several unfavorable medical conditions, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and obesity, potentially leading to cardiovascular disease and/or the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this explorative study is to investigate metabolic side effects of adjuvant treatment in breast cancer patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1850-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444586PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

High expression of miR-363 predicts poor prognosis and guides treatment selection in acute myeloid leukemia.

J Transl Med 2019 Apr 1;17(1):106. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Blood Diseases Institute, Xuzhou Medical University, Xuzhou, Jiangsu, China.

Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a highly heterogeneous malignancy with various outcomes, and therefore needs better risk stratification tools to help select optimal therapeutic options.

Methods: In this study, we identify miRNAs that could predict clinical outcome in a heterogeneous AML population using TCGA dataset.

Results: We found that MiR-363 is a novel prognostic factor in AML patients undergoing chemotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1858-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444823PMC

Cartilage progenitor cells combined with PHBV in cartilage tissue engineering.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 29;17(1):104. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shanghai 9th People's Hospital, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 639 Zhi Zao Ju Road, Shanghai, 200011, People's Republic of China.

Background: Bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) and chondrocytes have been reported to present "dedifferentiation" and "phenotypic loss" during the chondrogenic differentiation process in cartilage tissue engineering, and cartilage progenitor cells (CPCs) are novel seeding cells for cartilage tissue engineering. In our previous study, cartilage progenitor cells from different subtypes of cartilage tissue were isolated and identified in vitro, but the study on in vivo chondrogenic characteristics of cartilage progenitor cells remained rarely. In the current study, we explored the feasibility of combining cartilage progenitor cells with poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) to produce tissue-engineered cartilage and compared the proliferation ability and chondrogenic characteristics of cartilage progenitor cells with those of bone marrow-derived stem cells and chondrocytes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1855-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441183PMC

Crosstalk between tumor cells and lymphocytes modulates heparanase expression.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 29;17(1):103. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Biochemistry Department, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Av. Lauro Gomes, 2000, Santo André, SP, 09060-870, Brazil.

Background: Heparanase (HPSE) is an endo-beta-glucuronidase that degrades heparan sulfate (HS) chains on proteoglycans. The oligosaccharides generated by HPSE promote angiogenesis, tumor growth and metastasis. Heparanase-2 (HPSE2), a close homolog of HPSE, does not exhibit catalytic activity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1853-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6439996PMC

Genetic polymorphisms of histone methyltransferase SETD2 predicts prognosis and chemotherapy response in Chinese acute myeloid leukemia patients.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 28;17(1):101. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, 110 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan, 410008, People's Republic of China.

Background: SETD2, the single mediator of trimethylation of histone 3 at position lysine 36, has been reported associated with initiation progression and chemotherapy resistance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Whether polymorphisms of SETD2 affect prognosis and chemotherapy response of AML remains elusive.

Methods: Three tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs) of SETD2 were genotyped in 579 AML patients by using Sequenom Massarray system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1848-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437967PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Reduced protocadherin17 expression in leukemia stem cells: the clinical and biological effect in acute myeloid leukemia.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 29;17(1):102. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Laboratory Center, Affiliated People's Hospital of Jiangsu University, 8 Dianli Rd., Zhenjiang, 212002, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China.

Background: Leukemia stem cell (LSC)-enriched genes have been shown to be highly prognostic in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the prognostic value of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) that are repressed early in LSC remains largely unknown.

Methods: We compared the public available expression/methylation profiling data of LSCs with that of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), in order to identify potential tumor suppressor genes in LSC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1851-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440111PMC
March 2019
1 Read
3.930 Impact Factor

A nomogram to predict survival in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with nivolumab.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 27;17(1):99. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Background: The advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) has considerably expanded the armamentarium against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) contributing to reshaping treatment paradigms in the advanced disease setting. While promising tissue- and plasma-based biomarkers are under investigation, no reliable predictive factor is currently available to aid in treatment selection.

Methods: Patients with stage IIIB-IV NSCLC receiving nivolumab at Sant'Andrea Hospital and Regina Elena National Cancer Institute from June 2016 to July 2017 were enrolled onto this study. Read More

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https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1847-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437908PMC
March 2019
6 Reads

Delivery of oncolytic vaccinia virus by matched allogeneic stem cells overcomes critical innate and adaptive immune barriers.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 27;17(1):100. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Calidi Biotherapeutics, San Diego, CA, 92121, USA.

Background: Previous studies have identified IFNγ as an important early barrier to oncolytic viruses including vaccinia. The existing innate and adaptive immune barriers restricting oncolytic virotherapy, however, can be overcome using autologous or allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells as carrier cells with unique immunosuppressive properties.

Methods: To test the ability of mesenchymal stem cells to overcome innate and adaptive immune barriers and to successfully deliver oncolytic vaccinia virus to tumor cells, we performed flow cytometry and virus plaque assay analysis of ex vivo co-cultures of stem cells infected with vaccinia virus in the presence of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1829-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437877PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Development and validation of a prognostic nomogram in gastric cancer with hepatitis B virus infection.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 25;17(1):98. Epub 2019 Mar 25.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, China.

Background: Patients with HBsAg-positive gastric cancer (GC) are a heterogeneous group, and it is not possible to accurately predict the overall survival (OS) in these patients.

Methods: We developed and validated a nomogram to help improve prediction of OS in patients with HBsAg-positive GC. The nomogram was established by a development cohort (n = 245), and the validation cohort included 84 patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1841-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6434786PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Spray drying OZ439 nanoparticles to form stable, water-dispersible powders for oral malaria therapy.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 22;17(1):97. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 08854, USA.

Background: OZ439 is a new chemical entity which is active against drug-resistant malaria and shows potential as a single-dose cure. However, development of an oral formulation with desired exposure has proved problematic, as OZ439 is poorly soluble (BCS Class II drug). In order to be feasible for low and middle income countries (LMICs), any process to create or formulate such a therapeutic must be inexpensive at scale, and the resulting formulation must survive without refrigeration even in hot, humid climates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1849-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6431012PMC

Longitudinal heterogeneity in glioblastoma: moving targets in recurrent versus primary tumors.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 20;17(1):96. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Division of Clinical Neurooncology, Department of Neurology, University Hospital Bonn, 53127, Bonn, Germany.

Background: Molecularly targeted therapies using receptor inhibitors, small molecules or monoclonal antibodies are routinely applied in oncology. Verification of target expression should be mandatory prior to initiation of therapy, yet, determining the expression status is most challenging in recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) where most patients are not eligible for second-line surgery. Because very little is known on the consistency of expression along the clinical course we here explored common drug targets in paired primary vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1846-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425567PMC
March 2019
3 Reads

Overexpression of scavenger receptor and infiltration of macrophage in epicardial adipose tissue of patients with ischemic heart disease and diabetes.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 20;17(1):95. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Unidad de Gestión Clínica Área del Corazón, Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Málaga (IBIMA), Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Universidad de Málaga (UMA), Campus Universitario de Teatinos, s/n., Malaga, Spain.

Background: Oxidized low-density lipoproteins and scavenger receptors (SRs) play an important role in the formation and development of atherosclerotic plaques. However, little is known about their presence in epicardial adipose tissue (EAT). The objective of the study was to evaluate the mRNA expression of different SRs in EAT of patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD), stratifying by diabetes status and its association with clinical and biochemical variables. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1842-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425581PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Neural-network analysis of socio-medical data to identify predictors of undiagnosed hepatitis C virus infections in Germany (DETECT).

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 19;17(1):94. Epub 2019 Mar 19.

Hirsch Consulting, Steinbacher Str. 10, 65760, Eschborn, Germany.

Background: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection is a slowly debilitating and potentially fatal disease with a high estimated number of undiagnosed cases. Given the major advances in the treatment, detection of unreported infections is a consequential step for eliminating hepatitis C on a population basis. The prevalence of chronic hepatitis C is, however, low in most countries making mass screening neither cost effective nor practicable. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1832-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425680PMC

Altered PGE2-EP2 is associated with an excessive immune response in HBV-related acute-on-chronic liver failure.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 19;17(1):93. Epub 2019 Mar 19.

State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 79 Qingchun Road, Shangcheng District, Hangzhou, 310003, Zhejiang, China.

Background And Aims: Prostaglandin E receptor 2 (EP2) is an immune modulatory molecule that regulates the balance of immunity. Here we investigated the role of EP2 in immune dysregulation in patients with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF).

Methods: Plasma Progstaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels and EP2 expression on immune cells were determined in blood samples collected from patients with chronic hepatitis B related ACLF(HB-ACLF), patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), acute decompensated cirrhosis without ACLF (AD) and healthy controls (HC). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1844-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425563PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Hyperoxia-induced lung structure-function relation, vessel rarefaction, and cardiac hypertrophy in an infant rat model.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 18;17(1):91. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Intensive Care Medicine and Neonatology, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Steinwiesstrasse 75, 8032, Zurich, Switzerland.

Background: Hyperoxia-induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) models are essential for better understanding and impacting on long-term pulmonary, cardiovascular, and neurological sequelae of this chronic disease. Only few experimental studies have systematically compared structural alterations with lung function measurements.

Methods: In three separate and consecutive series, Sprague-Dawley infant rats were exposed from day of life (DOL) 1 to 19 to either room air (0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1843-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6423834PMC

Nuclear shape, architecture and orientation features from H&E images are able to predict recurrence in node-negative gastric adenocarcinoma.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 18;17(1):92. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Gastroenterology, Wuhan University Renmin Hospital, Wuhan, Hubei, China.

Background: Identifying intestinal node-negative gastric adenocarcinoma (INGA) patients with high risk of recurrence could help perceive benefit of adjuvant therapy for INGA patients following surgical resection. This study evaluated whether the computer-extracted image features of nuclear shapes, texture, orientation, and tumor architecture on digital images of hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue, could help to predict recurrence in INGA patients.

Methods: A tissue microarrays cohort of 160 retrospectively INGA cases were digitally scanned, and randomly selected as training cohort (D1 = 60), validation cohort (D2 = 100 and D3 = 100, D2 and D3 are different tumor TMA spots from the same patient), accompanied with immunohistochemistry data cohort (D3' = 100, a duplicate cohort of D3) and negative controls data cohort (D5 = 100, normal adjacent tissues). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1839-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6423755PMC

Design and biomechanical characteristics of porous meniscal implant structures using triply periodic minimal surfaces.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 18;17(1):89. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Department of Sports Medicine and Adult Reconstructive Surgery, Drum Tower Hospital Affiliated to Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, China.

Background: Artificial meniscal implants can be used to replace a severely injured meniscus after meniscectomy and restore the normal functionality of a knee joint. The aim of this paper was to design porous meniscal implants and assess their biomechanical properties.

Methods: Finite element simulations were conducted on eight different cases including intact healthy knees, knee joints with solid meniscal implants, and knee joints with meniscal implants with two types of triply periodic minimal surfaces. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1834-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6423829PMC
March 2019
1 Read
3.930 Impact Factor

Dermal tissue remodeling and non-osmotic sodium storage in kidney patients.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 18;17(1):88. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Background: Excess dietary sodium is not only excreted by the kidneys, but can also be stored by non-osmotic binding with glycosaminoglycans in dermal connective tissue. Such storage has been associated with dermal inflammation and lymphangiogenesis. We aim to investigate if skin storage of sodium is increased in kidney patients and if this storage is associated with clinical parameters of sodium homeostasis and dermal tissue remodeling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1815-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6421653PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Vitamin D and growth hormone in children: a review of the current scientific knowledge.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 18;17(1):87. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Pediatric Clinic, Department of Surgical and Biomedical Sciences, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Piazza Menghini 1, 06129, Perugia, Italy.

Background: Human growth is a complex mechanism that depends on genetic, environmental, nutritional and hormonal factors. The main hormone involved in growth at each stage of development is growth hormone (GH) and its mediator, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). In contrast, vitamin D is involved in the processes of bone growth and mineralization through the regulation of calcium and phosphorus metabolism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1840-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6421660PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Emodin regulates neutrophil phenotypes to prevent hypercoagulation and lung carcinogenesis.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 18;17(1):90. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Institute of Pharmacy, Pharmacy College of Henan University, Jinming District, Kaifeng, 475004, Henan, China.

Background: Hypercoagulation and neutrophilia are described in several cancers, however, whether they are involved in lung carcinogenesis is currently unknown. Emodin is the main bioactive component from Rheum palmatum and has many medicinal values, such as anti-inflammation and anticancer. This study is to investigate the contributions of neutrophils to the effects of emodin on hypercoagulation and carcinogenesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1838-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6423780PMC
March 2019
1 Read
3.930 Impact Factor

RIPK1 inhibition attenuates experimental autoimmune arthritis via suppression of osteoclastogenesis.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 15;17(1):84. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Department of Internal Medicine, The Clinical Medicine Research Institute of Bucheon St. Mary's Hospital, Bucheon-si, South Korea.

Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and systemic inflammatory disease characterized by upregulation of inflammatory cell death and osteoclastogenesis. Necrostatin (NST)-1s is a chemical inhibitor of receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase (RIPK)1, which plays a role in necroptosis.

Methods: We investigated whether NST-1s decreases inflammatory cell death and inflammatory responses in a mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1809-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6419814PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Driving the precision medicine highway: community health workers and patient navigators.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 15;17(1):85. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Tucson, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA.

The general public is currently bombarded with direct-to-consumer advertising, real time "medical" guidance through the internet, access to digital devices that capture health information, and science-based adds that promote foods, cosmetics, and dietary supplements. Unfortunately, much of this information relies on terminology and concepts not well-understood by consumers, particularly those with lower levels of health and genomic literacy. Such constraints align with the limitations of the American public to obtain and process the basic medical information needed to make appropriate healthcare decisions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1826-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6419796PMC

Correction to: Recurrent pregnancy loss is associated to leaky gut: a novel pathogenic model of endometrium inflammation?

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 15;17(1):83. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

U.O.C. di Ostetricia e Patologia Ostetrica, Dipartimento di Scienze della Salute della Donna e del Bambino, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Rome, Italy.

Following publication of the original article [1], the authors reported updated affiliations for five of the authors. The updated affiliations are shown below and reflected in the affiliation list of this Correction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1823-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6419413PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and incident end-stage renal disease in Chinese patients with chronic kidney disease: results from the Chinese Cohort Study of Chronic Kidney Disease (C-STRIDE).

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 15;17(1):86. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Department of Nephrology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, 410008, Hunan, China.

Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to end-stage renal failure and cardiovascular events. An attribute to these progressions is abnormalities in inflammation, which can be evaluated using the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). We aimed to investigate the association of NLR with the progression of end stage of renal disease (ESRD), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in Chinese patients with stages 1-4 CKD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1808-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6420746PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Production of a cellular product consisting of monocytes stimulated with Sylatron (Peginterferon alfa-2b) and Actimmune (Interferon gamma-1b) for human use.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 14;17(1):82. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Women's Malignancy Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive RM 3B43C, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA.

Background: Monocytes are myeloid cells that reside in the blood and bone marrow and respond to inflammation. At the site of inflammation, monocytes express cytokines and chemokines. Monocytes have been shown to be cytotoxic to tumor cells in the presence of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interferon Alpha, Interferon Gamma, and IL-6. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1822-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6419352PMC
March 2019
3 Reads

Pediatric sleep disturbances and treatment with melatonin.

J Transl Med 2019 Mar 12;17(1):77. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Pediatric Clinic, Department of Surgical and Biomedical Sciences, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Piazza Menghini 1, 06129, Perugia, Italy.

Background: There are no guidelines concerning the best approach to improving sleep, but it has been shown that it can benefit the affected children and their entire families. The aim of this review is to analyse the efficacy and safety of melatonin in treating pediatric insomnia and sleep disturbances.

Main Body: Sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in children and, without appropriate treatment, can become chronic and last for many years; however, distinguishing sleep disturbances from normal age-related changes can be a challenge for physicians and may delay treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12967-019-1835-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6419450PMC
March 2019
4 Reads