1,442 results match your criteria Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs [Journal]


Needs-Based Planning for Substance Use Treatment Systems: Progress, Prospects, and the Search for a New Perspective.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:154-160

Département de psychoeducation, UQTR/Centre universitaire de Québec, Québec, QC, Canada.

Abstract: The articles presented in this issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs (Supplement No. 18) describe the rapid improvements over the past decade in methods, theories, and data systems used for needs-based planning of addiction treatment services. In this concluding essay, the editors describe the progress, prospects, and implications of this new wave of research. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
1 Read

System Performance Measurement: Implications for Service Planning.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:152-153

Department of Psychiatry, McGill University Douglas Hospital Research Center, 6875 LaSalle Blvd., Montreal (Québec), Canada, H4H 1R3.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019

The Experience of the Treatment Demand Indicator in Europe: A Common Monitoring Tool Across 30 Countries.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:139-151

European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, Lisbon, Portugal.

Objective: The article describes an epidemiological indicator called Treatment Demand Indicator (TDI). The TDI aims to provide professionals and researchers with a common European methodology for collecting and reporting core data on drug users in contact with treatment services. The article discusses the implementation of the TDI in the European countries and describes the main results, limitations, and future perspectives. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
2 Reads

A Mixed-Methods Evaluation of the Implementation of a Performance Measurement System for South Africa's Substance Use Treatment Services.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:131-138

Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.

Objective: Minimal knowledge exists on the factors that affect implementation of performance measurement systems, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). To address this, we describe the implementation of a performance measurement system for South Africa's substance abuse treatment services known as the Service Quality Measures (SQM) initiative.

Method: We conducted a mixed-methods evaluation of system implementation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
1 Read

Performance Measurement in Mental Health and Addictions Systems: A Scoping Review.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:114-130

Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate how performance is defined, conceptualized, and measured in mental health and addiction service systems around the world.

Method: We conducted a systematic scoping review of English-language scientific and gray literature published from 2005 to 2015. Eligible documents (n = 222) described performance measurement systems and outlined the theory or empirical evidence for indicators. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
2 Reads

The Need for Needs-Based Planning: A Commentary.

Authors:
Jeremy W Bray

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:112-113

Department of Economics, UNC Greensboro, Bryan School of Business and Economics, 462 Bryan Building, P.O. Box 26170, Greensboro NC 27402-6170.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019

Addiction Treatment: Who Needs It?

Authors:
Colin Drummond

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:110-111

Professor of Addiction Psychiatry, National Addiction Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London 4 Windsor Walk, London SE5 8BB, United Kingdom.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
2 Reads

Modeling the Potential Impact of Changing Access Rates to Specialist Treatment for Alcohol Dependence for Local Authorities in England: The Specialist Treatment for Alcohol Model (STreAM).

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:96-109

King's College London Clinical and Evidence Review Team, Addictions Department, National Addiction Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, England.

Objective: We modeled the impact of changing Specialist Treatment Access Rates to different treatment pathways on the future prevalence of alcohol dependence, treatment outcomes, service capacity, costs, and mortality.

Method: Local Authority numbers and the prevalence of people "potentially in need of assessment for and treatment in specialist services for alcohol dependence" (PINASTFAD) are estimated by mild, moderate, severe, and complex needs. Administrative data were used to estimate the Specialist Treatment Access Rate per PINASTFAD person and classify 22 different treatment pathways. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019

Estimating Service Needs for Alcohol and Other Drug Users According to a Tiered Framework: The Case of the São Paulo, Brazil, Metropolitan Area.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:87-95

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to estimate the need for population-level services for alcohol and other drug abuse in support of local planning.

Method: Data were drawn from a subsample of 2,942 interviewees from the São Paulo Megacity Study, which evaluated mental health in the general population (18 years and older) of residents in the São Paulo metropolitan area. This population was classified into five hierarchical categories of severity, making it possible to obtain estimates of need for services, combining evaluation criteria regarding drug and alcohol use and general and mental health comorbidities over the last 12 months. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
1 Read

Estimating the Needs of Substance Problem Use Services: An Exercise in Seven Finnish Municipalities Using Nationally Collected, Municipal-Level Survey and Register Data†.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:76-86

Alcohol, Drugs, and Addictions Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Tampere, Finland.

Objective: The needs of substance problem use services (SPUSs) should ideally be assessed locally to support the provision of appropriate, cost-effective services for the population. In this article we present a model for estimating the adult population's potential needs for and actual use of SPUSs. We used Finnish survey and register data as material for a qualitative assessment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
1 Read

Estimation of Needs for Addiction Services: A Youth Model.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:64-75

Département de psychoéducation, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Québec City, Québec, Canada.

Objective: In the field of health care services, resource allocation is increasingly determined based on a population needs model. Although service needs models have been developed for adults with substance use problems, it would seem inappropriate to apply them indiscriminately to young people.

Method: The method used proposes six steps: (1) targeting the population, (2) estimating the proportion of the population affected by substance misuse and (3) the proportion of youths who should receive services, (4) identifying categories of services, (5) estimating the proportions of youths who should have access to each category of services, and (6) applying the model to real use of services by youths to recalibrate it. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
1 Read

Development of a Needs-Based Planning Model to Estimate Required Capacity of a Substance Use Treatment System.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:51-63

Pathways Research, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Objective: Substance use services and supports have traditionally been funded without the benefit of a comprehensive, quantitative planning model closely aligned with population needs. This article describes the methodology used to develop and refine key features of such a model, gives an overview of the resulting Canadian prototype, and offers examples and lessons learned in pilot work.

Method: The need for treatment was defined according to five categories of problem severity derived from national survey data and anticipated levels of help-seeking estimated from a narrative synthesis of international literature. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
1 Read

Measuring Unmet Demand for Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment: The Application of an Australian Population-Based Planning Model.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:42-50

Drug Policy Modelling Program, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Objective: The estimation of demand for treatment is one of the important elements in planning for alcohol and other drug treatment services. This article reports on a demand-projection model used in Australia to estimate the extent of unmet treatment demand by drug type.

Method: The model incorporated the prevalence of substance use disorders (by drug type and age), with the application of a severity distribution, which distributed the substance abuse disorders into three disability categories: mild, moderate, and severe. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
1 Read

Two Polar Considerations in Treatment System Planning: Infrastructure Development and Real-Time Management.

Authors:
Arnie Aldridge

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:40-41

RTI International, 3040 E. Cornwallis Rd., Research Triangle Park, NC 27709.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019

Why Research Should Pay Attention to Effects of Marketization of Addiction Treatment Systems.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:31-39

Department of Public Health Sciences & Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD), Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.

Objective: Researchers generally assume that addiction treatment systems can be viewed as entities and planned with the citizens' best interests in mind. We argue that another steering principle, the market logic, has permeated many Western World treatment systems but is neglected in research. We demonstrate how it may affect system-level planning, service provision, and the service users. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
3 Reads

Key Considerations in Planning for Substance Use Treatment: Estimating Treatment Need and Demand.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:22-30

Drug Policy Modelling Program, National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Randwick, NSW, Australia.

Objective: Estimates of the extent of treatment need (defined by the presence of a diagnosis for which there is an effective treatment available) and treatment demand (defined as treatment seeking) are essential parts of effective treatment planning, service provision, and treatment funding. This article reviews the existing literature on approaches to estimating need and demand and the use of models to inform such estimation, and then considers the implications for health planners.

Method: A thematic review of the literature was undertaken, with a focus on covering the key concepts and research methods that have been used to date. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
1 Read

Seven Core Principles of Substance Use Treatment System Design to Aid in Identifying Strengths, Gaps, and Required Enhancements.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:9-21

Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, and School of Public Health and Social Policy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

Objective: System planners and funders encounter many challenges in taking action toward evidence-informed enhancement of substance use treatment systems. Researchers are increasingly asked to contribute expertise to these processes through comprehensive system reviews. In this role, all parties can benefit from guiding frameworks to help organize key questions and data collection activities, and thereby set the stage for both high-level and on-the-ground strategic directions and recommendations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
1 Read

Needs-Based Planning for Substance Use Treatment Systems: The New Generation of Principles, Methods, and Models.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs Suppl 2019 Jan;Sup 18:5-8

Department of Community Medicine & Health Care, UConn Health, Farmington, Connecticut.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019
2 Reads

Alcohol Use and Risk of Related Problems Among Cannabis Users Is Lower Among Those With Medical Cannabis Recommendations, Though Not Due To Health.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):935-942

Alcohol Research Group, Public Health Institute, Emeryville, California.

Objective: A small body of work has started developing cannabis use "typologies" for use in treatment and prevention. Two potentially relevant dimensions for classifying cannabis use typologies are medical versus recreational cannabis use and the co-use of cannabis and alcohol. Here we compare alcohol use and related problems between cannabis users with and without medical cannabis recommendations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308166PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Elevated Behavioral Economic Demand for Alcohol in Co-Users of Alcohol and Cannabis.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):929-934

Peter Boris Centre for Addictions Research, McMaster University & St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: Co-use of cannabis and alcohol is associated with increased drinking and other negative consequences relative to use of alcohol alone. One potential explanation for these differences is overvaluation of alcohol (e.g. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308178PMC
November 2018
5 Reads

Distress Tolerance and Craving for Cigarettes Among Heavy Drinking Smokers.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):918-928

Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

Objective: Heavy drinking smokers experience significant difficulties with smoking cessation. Craving is closely tied to relapses during cessation attempts, and alcohol consumption increases cigarette craving among heavy drinking smokers. To date, however, few moderators of the relationship between craving and relapse have been identified. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308171PMC
November 2018

Barriers and Facilitators to Implementation of Pharmacotherapy for Opioid Use Disorders in VHA Residential Treatment Programs.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):909-917

Center for Innovation to Implementation, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Palo Alto Health Care System, Menlo Park, California.

Objective: Despite evidence of effectiveness, pharmacotherapy-methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone-is prescribed to less than 35% of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patients diagnosed with opioid use disorder (OUD). Among veterans whose OUD treatment is provided in VHA residential programs, factors influencing pharmacotherapy implementation are unknown. We examined barriers to and facilitators of pharmacotherapy for OUD among patients diagnosed with OUD in VHA residential programs to inform the development of implementation strategies to improve medication receipt. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308173PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Investigating the Social Ecological Contexts of Opioid Use Disorder and Poisoning Hospitalizations in Pennsylvania.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):899-908

Prevention Research Center, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Berkeley, California.

Objective: Opioid use disorder (OUD) and overdose rates have been sharply on the rise in the United States. Although systematic patterns of geographic variation in OUD and opioid overdose have been identified, the factors that explain why opioid-related hospitalizations increase in certain areas are not well understood.

Method: We examined Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council (PHC4) hospital inpatient discharge data at the ZIP code level to measure the geographic growth and spread of OUD as measured by 44 quarters of inpatient hospitalization data (from 2004 through 2014) for the entire state of Pennsylvania (n = 16,275 ZIP codes). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308174PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Prescription-, Illicit-, and Self-Harm Opioid Overdose Cases Treated in Hospital.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):893-898

Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York.

Objective: Research suggests unintentional overdose on prescription drugs and intentional self-harm cases differ fundamentally from unintentional illicit drug overdoses, but there are few data on opioid overdose per se.

Method: We analyzed consecutive opioid overdose patients age 13 and over (N = 435) treated by a toxicology consult service to compare three poisoning groups: unintentional illicit drug (illicit, n = 128), unintentional prescription drug (prescription, n = 217), and intentional self-harm (self-harm, n = 90). The groups were compared on key characteristics of the poisoning events (severity, co-ingestion of non-opioid) and the hospital-based treatments required to manage the poisonings (use of antidote, provision of pharmacological support). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2018

Television and Magazine Alcohol Advertising: Exposure and Trends by Sex and Age.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):881-892

University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Honolulu, Hawaii.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to document exposure to alcohol advertising by sex, age, and the level and type of alcohol people consume.

Method: We use unique marketing survey data that link the media individuals consume and advertising appearing in those media. Our sample of 306,451 men and women represents the population age 18 and older living in the 48 contiguous United States between 1996 and 2009. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308172PMC
November 2018

Risk of Alcohol-Related Injury: Does Societal Drinking Context Make a Difference?

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):876-880

Alcohol Research Group, Emeryville, California.

Objective: The aim of this study is to examine whether country-level frequency of drinking in a public context and in a private context is associated with rates of alcohol-related injury in emergency department studies from those same countries.

Method: Emergency department data on 5,104 injured patients in 10 countries from the International Collaborative Alcohol and Injury Study (ICAIS) and aggregate level drinking context data from the Gender, Alcohol and Culture: An International Study (GENACIS) are analyzed. The association of societal drinking context (public and private) with variation in the rate of self-reported drinking before injury is examined using multilevel modeling. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308177PMC
November 2018

Collegiate Binge Drinking and Social Media Use Among Hispanics and Non-Hispanics.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):868-875

School of Journalism and Mass Communication, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas.

Objective: College students' reliance on social media is both a risk factor for alcohol-related problems and a possible avenue for intervention. Greater understanding of students' social media habits in relation to drinking may lead to more effective prevention efforts. This study examined the use of alcohol and social media in Hispanic and non-Hispanic college students with and without a history of binge drinking. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2018
1 Read
2.760 Impact Factor

U.S. College Students' Social Network Characteristics and Perceived Social Exclusion: A Comparison Between Drinkers and Nondrinkers Based on Past-Month Alcohol Use.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):862-867

Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.

Objective: There is a general perception on college campuses that alcohol use is normative. However, nondrinking students account for 40% of the U.S. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308176PMC
November 2018

Substance Use Disorders Among Veterans in a Nationally Representative Sample: Prevalence and Associated Functioning and Treatment Utilization.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):853-861

Center for the Study of Healthcare Innovation, Implementation & Policy, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, California.

Objective: Several epidemiological studies have reported that veterans and nonveterans have comparable substance use disorder (SUD) prevalence and SUD treatment rates for SUD and treatments of several types. No studies have compared functioning among veterans with SUD to veterans without SUD or to nonveterans.

Method: We investigated the prevalence of past-year and lifetime SUD (based on criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition), overall and by substance, and estimated the association with physical and mental health functioning and treatment utilization and need among veterans and nonveterans in a nationally representative sample. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308169PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Benzodiazepine Use Disorder and Cognitive Impairment in Older Patients: A Six-Month-Follow-Up Study in an Outpatient Unit in Barcelona.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):844-852

Psychiatry Service, University of Salamanca Health Care Complex, Institute of Biomedicine, Salamanca, Spain.

Objective: Adverse health effects including cognitive impairment have been described in older adults with benzodiazepine misuse, although the literature about this issue is scarce. The present study aimed to assess cognitive decline in older adults with benzodiazepine use disorder and changes in cognitive state at the 6-month follow-up, as well as whether patients achieved abstinence.

Method: A 6-month follow-up longitudinal study was conducted in an outpatient drug center in Barcelona in a sample of older adults (≥65 years old) who had benzodiazepine use disorder. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2018

Adolescent Brain Surface Area Pre- and Post-Cannabis and Alcohol Initiation.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):835-843

Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California.

Objective: Changes in gray matter volume and thickness are associated with adolescent alcohol and cannabis use, but the impact of these substances on surface area remains unclear. The present study expands on previous findings to examine the impact of alcohol and cannabis on surface area before and after use initiation.

Method: Scans for 69 demographically similar youth were obtained at baseline (ages 12-14 years; before substance use) and at 6-year follow-up (ages 17-21 years). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308167PMC
November 2018
4 Reads

Is Restricting Sales of Malt Liquor Beverages Effective in Reducing Crime in Urban Areas?

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):826-834

School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Objective: We evaluated the effects of outlet and small area level malt liquor policies on crime in 10 U.S. cities and hypothesized that more restrictive malt liquor policies would be associated with greater reductions in crime. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308175PMC
November 2018

Did Legalization of Sunday Alcohol Sales Increase Crime in the United States? Evidence From Seven States.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):816-825

Department of Economics, University at Albany, SUNY, Albany, New York.

Objective: This study investigates the impact of the legalization of Sunday alcohol sales on several different types of criminal activity in the United States.

Method: The 2000-2010 data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) for seven states (n = 1,746,249) and difference-in-differences type models are used to estimate the effect of the legalization of Sunday alcohol sales on different types of criminal activity.

Results: States that legalized Sunday sales of alcohol experienced up to a 16% to 23% increase in the total number of violent and property crimes committed on Sundays (p < . Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308168PMC
November 2018

Web-Based Research: Strengths, Weaknesses, and JSAD's Guidance for Authors.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Nov;79(6):813-815

Department of Health Science, Johnson and Wales University, Providence, Rhode Island.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308170PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Polysubstance Use by Stimulant Users: Health Outcomes Over Three Years.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):799-807

Center for Mental Healthcare and Outcomes Research, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, North Little Rock, Arkansas.

Objective: Studies show that stimulant users have varied substance use patterns and that polysubstance use is associated with poorer past or concurrent medical, mental health, and substance use outcomes. This study examined outcomes of substance use patterns prospectively.

Method: A latent class analysis was conducted to examine substance use patterns among adults using stimulants (n = 710; 38. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240007PMC
September 2018
8 Reads

Heavy, Problematic College Drinking Predicts Increases in Impulsivity.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):790-798

The University of Kentucky, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology, Lexington, Kentucky.

Objective: Impulsigenic personality traits are among the many factors demonstrated to predict drinking behavior among late adolescents. The current study tested the opposite possibility, that during the emerging adulthood developmental period, problematic drinking behavior predicts increases in impulsigenic traits. This possibility is important because such traits increase risk for multiple forms of dysfunction. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240010PMC
September 2018

Associations Between Past-Month Pain and Distress Intolerance Among Daily Cigarette Smokers.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):781-789

Department of Psychology, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York.

Objective: A growing body of research indicates that pain is associated with the maintenance of tobacco smoking. Distress intolerance (DI) may play an important role in the link between pain and smoking. The goal of this study was to examine the association between past-month pain status and DI among a sample of daily cigarette smokers. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240006PMC
September 2018
6 Reads

Teen Social Networks and Depressive Symptoms-Substance Use Associations: Developmental and Demographic Variation.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):770-780

Department of Sociology, University of California at Davis, Davis, California.

Objective: The current study examined whether an adolescent's standing within a school-bounded social network moderated the association between depressive symptoms and substance use across adolescence as a function of developmental and demographic factors (gender, parental education, and race/ethnicity).

Method: The sample of 6,776 adolescents participated in up to seven waves of data collection spanning 6th to 12th grade.

Results: Results of latent growth models showed that lower integration into the social network exacerbates risk for depression-related substance use in youth, particularly around the high school transition, but social status acted as both a risk factor and a protective factor at different points in development for different youth. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240008PMC
September 2018
8 Reads

Passing on Pot: High School Seniors' Reasons for Not Using Marijuana as Predictors of Future Use.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):761-769

Institute of Child Development & Institute for Translational Research in Children's Mental Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Objective: Marijuana use is relatively common among youth and increases during the transition to adulthood. Yet a substantial number of adolescents and young adults do not use marijuana. The purpose of this study was to examine how high school seniors' reasons for intending not to use marijuana within the next 12 months were prospectively associated with marijuana use reported 1 year later. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240014PMC
September 2018
10 Reads
2.760 Impact Factor

Alcohol Advertising on Facebook and the Desire to Drink Among Young Adults.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):751-760

University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Health Care, Farmington, Connecticut.

Objective: Social networking sites (SNSs) may influence the behavior of SNS users by exposing them to information about the number of other users who engaged with a SNS post (i.e., user engagement) and any comments left in response to a post (i. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2018
12 Reads

Subgroups of Young Sexual Minority Women Based on Drinking Locations and Companions and Links With Alcohol Consequences, Drinking Motives, and LGBTQ-Related Constructs.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):741-750

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

Objective: Sexual minority women (SMW; e.g., lesbians, bisexual women) are at increased risk for alcohol use disorders and related problems compared with heterosexual women. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240013PMC
September 2018
5 Reads

Positive Attitude Toward Alcohol Predicts Actual Consumption in Young Adults: An Ecological Implicit Association Test.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):733-740

Univ. Lille, CNRS, UMR 9193 - SCALab - Sciences Cognitives et Sciences Affectives, Lille, France.

Objective: Excessive alcohol drinking, particularly among college students, is a major health concern worldwide. The implicit associations between alcohol-related concepts and affective attributes have been repeatedly postulated as a reliable predictor of these drinking behaviors. The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is considered one of the most reliable tasks for measuring these associations and their impact on actual alcohol consumption. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2018
14 Reads

Socioeconomic Status and Adolescent Alcohol Involvement: Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):725-732

Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri.

Objective: Adolescence is an optimal developmental stage for examining the interplay of environmental factors and the genetic risk for alcohol involvement. The current study aimed to examine how socioeconomic status might interact with genetic risk for alcohol involvement among adolescents.

Method: A total of 839 same-sex adolescent twin pairs (509 monozygotic and 330 dizygotic) from the 1962 National Merit Twin Study completed a questionnaire containing items assessing alcohol involvement. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240003PMC
September 2018
10 Reads

Illicit Drug Use, Cigarette Smoking, and Eating Disorder Symptoms: Associations in an Adolescent Twin Sample.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):720-724

Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.

Objective: Twin studies have shown that genetic factors in part explain the established relation between alcohol use (i.e., problematic use or abuse/dependence) and eating disorder symptoms in adolescent and adult females. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240011PMC
September 2018
20 Reads

A Mobile Phone-Based Brief Intervention With Personalized Feedback and Text Messaging Is Associated With Reductions in Driving After Drinking Among College Drinkers.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):710-719

Department of Psychology, The University of Memphis, Memphis Tennessee.

Objective: Driving after drinking (DAD) among college students remains a significant public health concern and is perhaps the single riskiest drinking-related behavior. Counselor-delivered and web-based Brief Alcohol Interventions (BAIs) have been shown to reduce DAD among college students, but to date no study has evaluated the efficacy of a single-session mobile phone-based BAI specific to DAD. The present study examined whether a driving-specific BAI delivered via mobile phone would significantly decrease DAD among college students compared to an informational control. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240004PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Identifying the Population Sources of Alcohol Impaired Driving: An Assessment of Context Specific Drinking Risks.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):702-709

Prevention Research Center, Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Berkeley, California.

Objective: High-risk drinkers who drink in high-risk contexts like bars are recognized as a primary source of alcohol-impaired drivers and motor vehicle crashes within communities. We assess the contributions of drinking in other contexts to these outcomes.

Method: Self-report survey data from 8,553 adults in 50 California cities were used to estimate rates of driving after drinking (DAD; driving within 4 hours of drinking any alcohol) and a measure of alcohol-impaired driving (AID; driving when having had "too much" to safely drive home) associated with drinking in bars, homes, restaurants, parties, and other contexts. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240005PMC
September 2018

Assessing Brief Intervention for Unhealthy Alcohol Use: A Comparison of Electronic Health Record Documentation and Patient Self-Report.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):697-701

RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California.

Objective: Alcohol screening and brief intervention (BI) are recommended preventive health practices. Veterans Health Administration (VA) uses a performance measure to incentivize BI delivery. Concerns have been raised about the validity of the BI performance measure, which relies on electronic health record (EHR) documentation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240012PMC
September 2018
11 Reads

A Meta-Analysis of Computer-Delivered Drinking Interventions for College Students: A Comprehensive Review of Studies From 2010 to 2016.

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):686-696

The University of Kentucky, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology, Lexington, Kentucky.

Objective: Computer-delivered drinking interventions (CDIs) are administered to tens of thousands of college students each year, yet recent evidence for their efficacy has not been summarized. This meta-analysis extends the work of past reviews and investigates the efficacy of CDIs in reducing college students' alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms.

Method: Following the systematic review standards set by PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses), the literature was searched for published and unpublished data available from 2010 to 2016. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2018
1 Read

Responses to Commentaries by Miller (2018) and Buvik and Rossow (2018).

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):684-685

Paula Stanghetta & Associates Inc., Kitchener, Ontario, Canada.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2018
2 Reads

Serving Evidence Warrants Caution: A Commentary on Woodall et al. (2018).

Authors:
Peter G Miller

J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018 Sep;79(5):682-683

Deakin University, School of Psychology, Geelong, Victoria, Australia.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2018