5,414 results match your criteria Journal of School Health [Journal]


Practices That Support and Sustain Health in Schools: An Analysis of SHPPS Data.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb 19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE (Mailstop F-78), Atlanta, GA 30329.

Background: The Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) model provides an organizing framework for schools to develop and implement school health policies, practices, and programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the presence of practices that support school health for each component of the WSCC model in US schools.

Methods: Data from the School Health Policies and Practices Study 2014 were analyzed to determine the percentage of schools with practices in place that support school health for WSCC components. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12742DOI Listing
February 2019

Tobacco 21: Increase Age, Decrease Risk-A Commentary.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

The University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12739DOI Listing
February 2019

Prevalence, Patterns, and Predictors: A Statewide Longitudinal Study of Childhood Obesity.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Director, Arkansas Center for Health Improvement, 1401 West Capitol Avenue Suite 300, Little Rock, AR 72201.

Background: We examined prevalence, incidence, and trajectory of obesity from kindergarten through grade 8 in one of the first states to implement annual surveillance.

Methods: Participants included 16,414 children enrolled in kindergarten in Arkansas in 2004 with complete body mass index (BMI) measurements in kindergarten and eighth grade. Repeated measures of weight status were entered in multiple linear and logistic regression models with demographics and family poverty status. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12741DOI Listing
February 2019

The Implementation of Mental Health Policies and Practices in Schools: An Examination of School and State Factors.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Health and Behavioral Studies, Teachers College, Columbia University, 255 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027.

Background: Poor mental health outcomes persist among adolescent youth. Secondary schools play a critical role in fostering positive mental health by implementing policies and practices grounded in evidence. The factors associated with implementation, however, are unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12738DOI Listing
February 2019

Pono Choices: Lessons for School Leaders From the Evaluation of a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1410 Lower Campus Road #171F, Honolulu, HI 96826.

Background: The US Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) funded studies of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention programs in 2010. The results of a 5-year OAH study conducted in the state of Hawai'i with middle school youth has implications for school leaders in the selection and implementation of comprehensive sex education curricula yielding positive outcomes for youth.

Methods: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted across 34 middle school in the state of Hawai'i with 1783 student participants in pre-, post-, and 1-year follow-up surveys to determine effectiveness of a culturally responsive teen pregnancy prevention curriculum, called Pono Choices, specifically developed for youth in Hawai'i. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12733
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12733DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Educators' Perspectives of Collaboration With Pediatricians to Support Low-Income Children.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Boston University School of Medicine/Boston Medical Center, 88 East Newton St., Vose Hall 3, Boston, MA 02118.

Background: Educational and healthcare systems operate in silos. Few studies explore educators' perspectives of collaboration with pediatricians or cross-system solutions for school-identified concerns. We sought to investigate educators' viewpoints of collaboration with pediatricians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12737DOI Listing
February 2019

Mentoring, Bullying, and Educational Outcomes Among US School-Aged Children 6-17 Years.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Office of Health Equity, Health Resources and Services Administration, US Department of Health and Human Services, 5600 Fishers Lane, Room 13N42, Rockville, MD 20857.

Background: Ensuring the optimum development of all children and their attainment of age-appropriate educational outcomes is of great interest to public health researchers and professionals. Bullying and mentoring have opposite effects on child development and educational attainment. Mentoring exerts protective effects on youths against risky behaviors; however, the protective effects of community-oriented natural or informal mentoring on educational outcomes and bullying are largely underexplored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12735DOI Listing
February 2019
1.659 Impact Factor

Sustainability via Active Garden Education: Translating Policy to Practice in Early Care and Education.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb 5. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Health Disparities Research, The University of Texas, Houston, TX 77030.

Background: We describe the development of sustainability via active garden education (SAGE), an early care and education (ECE) garden-based curriculum developed from a 5-year community partnership to link national health policy guidelines with ECE accreditation standards.

Methods: National health guidelines and ECE accreditation standards were reviewed, and community advisory board members, ECE staff, and parents provided feedback and support throughout the development of the curriculum. The SAGE curriculum components were guided by the Ecologic Model of Physical Activity and Social Cognitive Theory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12734DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

School Climate and Academic Achievement in Middle and High School Students.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar;89(3):173-180

West Virginia University School of Public Health, 1 Medical Center Drive, P.O. Box 9190, Morgantown, W V 26506-9190.

Background: Emergent evidence suggests a positive school climate may be a promising population-level intervention to promote academic achievement and student well-being. However, researchers have called for expanding the school climate evidence-base to better describe how the construct is associated with student outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between 10 school climate domains and academic achievement among middle and high school students. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12726DOI Listing

Effectiveness of the Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP) on Depression Literacy and Mental Health Treatment.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 15;89(3):165-172. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 550 N Broadway, Suite 201, Baltimore, MD 21287.

Background: Analysis of data from a NIMH-supported study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP) in promoting depression literacy and help-seeking behavior.

Methods: Eighteen Pennsylvania schools were matched on size, sex, race, test scores, median income, and free/reduced lunch status. Schools randomized to the intervention implemented ADAP as a compulsory part of the schools health curriculum, while control schools collected study measures. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12725
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12725DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6370293PMC
March 2019
6 Reads

Association of Education Outside the Classroom and Pupils' Psychosocial Well-Being: Results From a School Year Implementation.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 13;89(3):210-218. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports (NEXS), University of Copenhagen, Nørre Allé 51, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark.

Background: Education Outside the Classroom (EOtC) is a teaching method that is gaining traction, aiming to promote learning and well-being. However, research on the association between EOtC and well-being is limited.

Methods: This quasi-experimental trial involved pupils (9-13 years) from 16 Danish public schools which implemented EOtC in some classes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12730DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Integration of Onsite Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Services Into School-Based Health Centers.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 13;89(3):226-231. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Family and Social Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, NY 10461.

Background: With recent recommendations from professional organizations, long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods are considered appropriate first-line contraception for adolescents. Many school-based health centers (SBHCs) in New York City (NYC) have recently added onsite LARC insertion and management to their contraceptive options. We aimed to explore key elements needed to implement LARC training and services into the SBHC setting and to identify successful factors for program implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12732DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Ecological Factors Affecting Obesity Among Middle School Students in South Korea.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 13;89(3):181-190. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Mo-Im Kim Nursing Research Institute, College of Nursing, Yonsei University, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 03722, South Korea.

Background: Despite the environment being recognized as playing an important role in health, little is known about the influence of school and community factors on student health. This study aimed to identify the ecological factors influencing obesity among middle school students, including intrapersonal, interpersonal, school, and community factors.

Methods: The study sample consisted of 2069 students from 50 middle schools, with individual-level data. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12727
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12727DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Substance Use and School Characteristics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Heterosexual High School Students.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 13;89(3):219-225. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

University of Florida, College of Pharmacy, 1225 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Background: Tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) high school students as well as related environment and school-level risk and protective factors were examined.

Methods: Data was acquired from the 2015 CDC's Youth Behavior Risk Survey for Kentucky (N = 2577). Prevalence of substance use was calculated for all high school respondents by reported sexual orientation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12731DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

A Case Study of a New State Model for Assessing Local Wellness Policies.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 13;89(3):191-199. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Arizona Department of Health Services, 150 North 18th Ave, Suite 310, Phoenix, AZ 85007.

Background: In 2016, the United States Department of Agriculture issued a final rule to strengthen local wellness policies (LWPs). As school districts pursue compliance, states can provide critical guidance by leveraging support from intermediary programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed). After Arizona SNAP-Ed piloted a statewide model for assessing LWPs, we evaluated that model by exploring local SNAP-Ed agency experiences with the pilot. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12728
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12728DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

School Food Environment, Food Consumption, and Indicators of Adiposity Among Students 7-14 Years in Bogotá, Colombia.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 13;89(3):200-209. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, La Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.

Background: In Colombia, the prevalence of overweight/obesity in children has increased by 26% in the past 5 years. School food environment may be an important contributor and offers opportunities for effective intervention.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 7- to 14-year-old schoolchildren from 10 schools in Bogotá, Colombia. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12729
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12729DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Based Physical Activity Recommendations Do Not Improve Fitness in Real-World Settings.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 10;89(3):159-164. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, CSC H4/407, Madison, WI 53792.

Background: The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) promotes school-based strategies to increase physical activity (PA). Implementation feasibility and effect of these interventions on cardiovascular fitness (CVF) is unknown.

Methods: Forty-nine low-SES schools were randomly assigned to either (1) continue routine PA programs (N = 24 schools, 2399 students) or (2) implement 4 CDC-based PA strategies (N = 25 schools, 2495 students). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12724DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6347480PMC

Pattern of Sedentary Behavior in Different Periods of School Time of Brazilian Adolescents.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):99-105

Center for Research in Kineanthropometry and Human Performance - Federal University of Santa Catarina.

Background: Sedentary behavior (SB) is related to unhealthy outcomes and is performed in many contexts, including school. The aim of this study was to identify sociodemographic, biological, and psychosocial correlates of SB performed at school in a sample of adolescents.

Methods: Adolescents provided information regarding sex, age, socioeconomic status, and psychosocial variables related to physical activity (self-efficacy, attitudes, perception of school environment, peer and parental support). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12716
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12716DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

Substance Use, Academic Performance, and Academic Engagement Among High School Seniors.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):145-156

Center for Young Adult Health and Development, Department of Behavioral and Community Health, University of Maryland School of Public Health, 1234 School of Public Health, College Park, MD 20742.

Background: Substance use is prevalent and is associated with academic performance among adolescents. Few studies have examined the association between abstinence from all substances and academic achievement.

Methods: Data from a nationally representative sample of 9578 12th graders from the 2015 Monitoring the Future survey were analyzed to examine relationships between abstinence from substance use and 4 academic variables: skipping school, grades, academic self-efficacy, and emotional academic engagement. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12723
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12723DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6373775PMC
February 2019
6 Reads
1.659 Impact Factor

The Patterns of Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity and Physical Education Enjoyment Through a 2-Year School-Based Program.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):88-98

Department of Kinesiology, University of Georgia, 330 River Road, Athens, GA 30602.

Background: In this study, we examined the development of children's moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and physical education (PE) enjoyment through the Physical Activity as Civil Skill Program 2012-2014.

Methods: Participants were 661 (265 intervention, 396 control) elementary school children in central and northeast Finland. The program was implemented across 2 years with 3 measurement phases using self-reported MVPA and PE enjoyment, and accelerometer-determined MVPA of a random subsample (N = 76). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12717DOI Listing
February 2019

Who Suffers Most From Being Involved in Bullying-Bully, Victim, or Bully-Victim?

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):136-144

Estonian-Swedish Mental Health and Suicidology Institute (ERSI), Õie 39 Tallinn 11615, Estonia.

Background: Bullying has been associated with many mental health problems. The effect of bullying has been found to be affected by the way students are involved in bullying. The purpose of the study was to explore the association between mental well-being, hopelessness, and being involved in bullying (as a bully, victim, or bully-victim), and to detect more harmful bullying types to students' mental well-being. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12720DOI Listing
February 2019

Identifying the Inclusion of National Sexuality Education Standards Utilizing a Systematic Analysis of Teen Dating Violence Prevention Curriculum.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):106-114

Department of Health and Human Performance, Texas State University, 601 University Drive, San Marcos, TX 78666.

Background: Violent behaviors have devastating impacts on youth and adolescents. National standards offer a framework for age and developmentally appropriate health education expectations. This study provides findings from a systematic review and analysis of teen dating violence (TDV) prevention curricula using National Sexuality Education Standards (NSES) and National Health Education Standards (NHES). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12718DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Barriers to Human Sexuality Education Survey Research Among Vermont Public School Administrators.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):124-128

A.T. Still University College of Graduate Health Studies, Mesa, AZ.

Background: Health educators in public high schools can provide educational interventions to reduce teen unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Characteristics of teachers and schools influence their decision to provide condom education. Studies to determine characteristics must be conducted so HIV/sex education can be improved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12721DOI Listing
February 2019

Retailer Compliance as a Predictor of Youth Smoking Participant and Consumption.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):115-123

Pre-Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202.

Background: Ninety percent of smokers report having their first whole cigarette before the age of 19. Policies, such as youth access laws, are essential to prevent youth from becoming future smokers. In Canada, the Tobacco Act prohibits retailers from furnishing tobacco products to individuals under the age of 18. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12719DOI Listing
February 2019

All Things in Moderation? Threshold Effects in Adolescent Extracurricular Participation Intensity and Behavioral Problems.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):79-87

K-12 Associates, 18 Quail Ridge Drive, Madison, WI 53717.

Background: School-based extracurricular activity participation is one of the primary avenues for prosocial activity engagement during adolescence. In this study, we test the "overscheduling hypothesis" or whether the negative relationship between structured activity intensity (ie, hours) and adolescent bullying and fighting levels off or declines at moderate to high intensity (ie, threshold effects).

Methods: This study uses the Dane County Youth Survey (N = 14,124) to investigate the relationship between school-based extracurricular activity participation intensity and bullying perpetration and physical fighting and whether there are threshold effects of activity participation intensity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12715DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6362990PMC
February 2019

Comparing Physical Activity Behavior of Children During School Between Balanced and Traditional School Day Schedules.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):129-135

Human Environments Analysis Laboratory, Department of Geography, School of Health Studies, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, & Department of Paediatrics, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London N6A 3K7, Canada.

Background: Some Canadian schools have modified their daily schedules from the traditional school day (TSD) schedule (two 15-minute breaks and one 60-minute break) to a balanced school day (BSD) schedule (two 40-minute breaks). While this change increases daily planning and instructional time, it also changes the amount of time available for moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

Methods: This study uses a case-control design to examine differences in objectively measured MVPA between children in 3 schools using a BSD schedule and 3 schools using a TSD schedule. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12722DOI Listing
February 2019

A Prospective Cohort Study on Injuries Among Intensely Physically Active High School Students.

J Sch Health 2019 Jan;89(1):31-37

Queen Margaret University Edinburgh, Queen Margaret University Drive, Musselburgh EH21 6UU, UK.

Background: The leading cause of nonfatal injuries in age group 14-19 is sports injuries. Purpose of the study was to determine the association between intense physical activity and injury and to identify the circumstances and environment in which injuries are most likely to occur.

Methods: A prospective cohort study included 698 high school students 15-19 years old, divided into those exposed and those unexposed to intense physical activity. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12708
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12708DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Unintentional Injuries in Primary and Secondary Schools in the United States, 2001-2013.

J Sch Health 2019 Jan;89(1):38-47

Children's Minnesota Research Institute, Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Children's Minnesota, 2525 Chicago Avenue South, MS 40-460, Minneapolis, MN.

Background: Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of youth morbidity. However, limited nationally representative data are available to characterize the occurrence of unintentional injuries at US schools. Given this paucity, we characterized secular trends in unintentional injuries at schools that led to emergency department (ED) visits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12711DOI Listing
January 2019

Long-Term Trends of Participation in Physical Activity During Adolescence With Educational Ambition and Attainment.

J Sch Health 2019 Jan;89(1):20-30

University of Kentucky, 251C Dickey Hall, Lexington, KY 40506.

Background: Insufficient physical activity is a significant concern because a growing body of research demonstrates that physical activity during adolescence has numerous benefits on physical health, mental health, and educational achievement. A less-studied area of physical activity research is how physical activity participation in adolescence relates to educational and career aspirations and attainment.

Methods: Using the Add Health dataset consisting of over 15,000 participants, this study addressed several research questions relating to the long-term benefits of habitual physical activity in adolescence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12709DOI Listing
January 2019

Teachers' Perceived and Desired Roles in Nutrition Education.

J Sch Health 2019 Jan;89(1):68-76

Department of Nutrition and Integrative Physiology, University of Utah, 250 South 1850 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112.

Background: Elementary teachers have the potential to influence children's eating habits. This study examined teacher views and practices regarding nutrition education.

Methods: An online survey was administered to K-6 teachers (N = 628) in 55 public elementary schools in a large city in the western United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12712DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Determinants of Physical Activity for Latino and White Middle School-Aged Children.

J Sch Health 2019 Jan;89(1):3-10

Department of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 135 Mabel Lee Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0236.

Background: Physical activity (PA) has long been acknowledged to contribute health benefits among children. However, research has consistently shown that PA declines as children grow older. Thus, this study examined the factors which are associated to children's PA in order to identify potential barriers to PA. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12706
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12706DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

School-Based Weight Management Program Curbs Summer Weight Gain Among Low-Income Hispanic Middle School Students.

J Sch Health 2019 Jan;89(1):59-67

Department of Health and Human Performance, HEALTH Research Institute, University of Houston, 3875 Holman St., Rm 104 Garrison, Houston, TX 77204-6015.

Background: Research shows that elementary students gain weight over the summer. It is unknown if these findings apply to Hispanic adolescents. We evaluated school and summer standardized body mass index (zBMI) changes in Hispanic middle school students. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12713DOI Listing
January 2019

School-Based Health Centers and School Connectedness.

J Sch Health 2019 Jan;89(1):11-19

Department of Population and Family Health, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 60 Haven Avenue, B-2, New York, NY 10032.

Background: Improvements in health behaviors and academic outcomes have been associated with school-based health centers (SBHCs). However, underlying mechanisms for these associations have been largely unexamined, particularly among lower-income youth. The current study examines the relationship between SBHCs and school connectedness and whether this relationship differs by youths' socioeconomic status (SES). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12707
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12707DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6287272PMC
January 2019
23 Reads

Prevalence and Types of School-Based Out-of-School Time Programs at Elementary Schools and Implications for Student Nutrition and Physical Activity.

J Sch Health 2019 Jan;89(1):48-58

College of Education, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, #1740, Boise, ID 83725-1740.

Background: Out-of-school time (OST) programs are an important setting for supporting student health and academic achievement. This study describes the prevalence and characteristics of school-based OST programs, which can inform efforts to promote healthy behaviors in this setting.

Methods: A nationally representative sample of public elementary schools (N = 640) completed surveys in 2013-2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12710DOI Listing
January 2019

Biking to School: The Role of Bicycle-Sharing Programs in Adolescents.

J Sch Health 2018 Dec;88(12):871-876

AFIPS Research Group, Department of Teaching of Music, Visual and Corporal Expression, University of Valencia, Avenida dels Tarongers, 4, 46022 Valencia, Spain.

Background: The purpose of this study was to: (1) describe modes of transport to school, with a specific focus on the use of public bicycle share programs (PBSP); and (2) assess sociodemographic, psychosocial, and environmental correlates of bike and PBSP use to go to school.

Methods: A group of 465 adolescents from the International Physical Activity and the Environment Network (IPEN) Adolescent Study (Valencia, Spain) participated in the research. Mixed regression analyses were conducted on the data obtained. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12697
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12697DOI Listing
December 2018
10 Reads

School-Level Body Mass Index Shapes Children's Weight Trajectories.

Authors:
Ashley W Kranjac

J Sch Health 2018 Dec;88(12):917-927

Chapman University, One University Drive, Orange, CA 92866.

Background: Embedded within children's weight trajectories are complex environmental contexts that influence obesity risk. As such, the normative environment of body mass index (BMI) within schools may influence children's weight trajectories as they age from kindergarten to fifth grade.

Methods: I use 5 waves of the ECLS-K-Kindergarten Class 1998-1999 data and a series of multilevel growth models to examine whether attending schools with higher overall BMI influences children's weight status over time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12701DOI Listing
December 2018

Peer Victimization and Sexual Risk Taking Among Adolescents.

J Sch Health 2018 Dec;88(12):903-909

Counseling Psychology and Applied Human Development, Boston University School of Education, 2 Silber Way, Boston, MA 02215.

Background: Research indicates that victimization exposures are associated with sexual risk-taking behaviors, but there is a relative lack of research on the relation between peer victimization and sexual risk taking among adolescents. This study fills this gap through examining how bullying, cyberbullying, and dating violence victimization at baseline are related to sexual risk-taking behaviors 1 year later.

Methods: Participants were a convenience sample of 220 sexually active high school students who were drawn from a larger sample of 2205 adolescents attending 6 high schools in Illinois. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12698
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12698DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

School Food Policies and Student Eating Behaviors in Canada: Examination of the 2015 Cancer Risk Assessment in Youth Survey.

J Sch Health 2018 Dec;88(12):936-944

School of Planning, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1, Canada.

Background: Limited evidence exists on effects of school-based nutrition policies. This study explored the influence of mandatory versus voluntary provincial school nutrition policies on student eating behaviors.

Methods: A cross-sectional, school-based survey assessed student eating behaviors using self-report survey measures in a representative sample of Canadian high school students from 7 provinces (N = 12,110). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12702
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12702DOI Listing
December 2018
7 Reads

Children's Obesogenic Behaviors During Summer Versus School: A Within-Person Comparison.

J Sch Health 2018 Dec;88(12):886-892

Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, 921 Assembly Street, Rm. 130, Columbia, SC 29208.

Background: Evidence consistently shows children in the United States gain 3 to 5 times more weight during summer vacation (∼2.5 months) compared to the 9-month school year. The purpose of this study is to examine within-child differences in 4 obesogenic behaviors (physical activity [PA], sedentary/screen-time, diet, and sleep) during school versus summer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12699DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read
1.660 Impact Factor

Youth Chef Academy: Pilot Results From a Plant-Based Culinary and Nutrition Literacy Program for Sixth and Seventh Graders.

J Sch Health 2018 Dec;88(12):893-902

FoodRight, LLC, P.O. Box 510622, Milwaukee, WI 53203.

Background: National data confirm that youth are not eating recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables (F/V), legumes, and whole grains (WGs). Establishing plant-based eating patterns early in life may positively impact long-term health through tracking of adolescent eating patterns into adulthood and through potential associations between adolescent dietary intake and adult disease risk. The study aim was to examine the effectiveness of Youth Chef Academy (YCA), a classroom-based experiential culinary and nutrition literacy intervention for sixth and seventh graders (11- to 13-year-olds) designed to impact healthy eating. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12703
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12703DOI Listing
December 2018
7 Reads

Mediators of the Effectiveness of an Intervention Promoting Water Consumption in Preschool Children: The ToyBox Study.

J Sch Health 2018 Dec;88(12):877-885

Harokopio University, El. Venizelou 70, Kallithea, 17676, Athens, Greece.

Background: The ToyBox-intervention has increased preschool children's water consumption. This study aimed to examine if family-related determinants mediate the effects of the ToyBox-intervention on preschoolers' water consumption.

Methods: Overall, 6290 preschoolers and their families from 6 European countries participated in the ToyBox-intervention and returned parental questionnaires in May/June 2012 and 2013. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12696
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12696DOI Listing
December 2018
20 Reads

"Even If They're Being Bad, Maybe They Need a Chance to Run Around": What Children Think About Recess.

J Sch Health 2018 Dec;88(12):928-935

Successful Healthy Children, 629 Liddle Lane, Wyoming, OH 45215.

Background: The withholding of recess for disciplinary purposes has been acknowledged but studied on a limited basis. The perspectives of children have not been heard at all on this subject.

Methods: Our paper draws upon semistructured child interviews, which were one activity within a multifaceted study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12704DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

Impact of Parents' Comprehensive Health Literacy on BMI in Children: A Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study in Japan.

J Sch Health 2018 Dec;88(12):910-916

Department of Public Health, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 654-0142, Japan.

Background: Low-functional health literacy (HL) of parents influences poor child health outcomes. This study aimed to assess the relationship between comprehensive HL of parents and body mass index (BMI) of their children.

Methods: We enrolled 3- to 6-year-old preschool-aged children and their parents in this multicenter cross-sectional cohort study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12700DOI Listing
December 2018

Evaluation of the Process of Implementing an Outdoor School Ground Smoking Ban at Secondary Schools.

J Sch Health 2018 Nov;88(11):859-867

Academic Collaborative Centre for Public Health Limburg, Public Health Service South Limburg (GGD ZL), Geleen in Heerlen, the Netherlands.

Background: Although outdoor smoking bans at school are becoming important, it remains unclear whether successful implementation is feasible and what conditions promote it. Therefore, this study evaluates the implementation process by identifying important factors.

Methods: Interviews were held with directors of 24 secondary schools that had decided to implement an outdoor school ground smoking ban, to identify important factors during implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12692DOI Listing
November 2018

Bullying Victimization in Schools: Why the Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child Model Is Essential.

J Sch Health 2018 Nov;88(11):794-802

Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Health and Physical Education Program, 232 Zink Hall, Indiana, PA 15705.

Background: Bullying is more likely to happen in schools than in any other location. The purpose of this study is to use decision tree analyses to predict specific risk factors for bullying to identify areas of interest for school-based bullying prevention.

Methods: We obtained data from the 2013 National Crime Victimization Study (NCVS) School Crime Supplement. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12686
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12686DOI Listing
November 2018
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Systematic Review: Frameworks Used in School-Based Interventions, the Impact on Hispanic Children's Obesity-Related Outcomes.

J Sch Health 2018 Nov;88(11):847-858

Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801.

Background: Childhood obesity among Hispanic children is a public health concern in the United States and Mexico. Although experiences from school-based intervention programs aimed at influencing obesity-related behaviors have been positive, the understanding of those framework elements that are associated with successful outcomes is limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the frameworks used within school-based intervention programs in the United States and Mexico that showed improvements in obesity-related outcomes among Hispanic children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12693DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Schoolteachers' and Administrators' Perceptions of Concussion Management and Implementation of Return-to-Learn Guideline.

J Sch Health 2018 Nov;88(11):813-820

Sports Medicine Assessment, Research & Testing (SMART) Laboratory. George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard MS 4E5, Manassas, VA 20110.

Background: Concussions are a public health concern and concussion management in school requires a team approach. We examined schoolteachers' and administrators' perceptions of concussions, management, and implementation of return-to-learn (RTL) guidelines.

Methods: We audio-recorded and transcribed semistructured interviews with teachers (N = 16) and administrators (N = 6) from a public school system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12687DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

No Association Between Active Commuting to School, Adiposity, Fitness, and Cognition in Spanish Children: The MOVI-KIDS Study.

J Sch Health 2018 Nov;88(11):839-846

Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Social and Health Care Research Center, c/Santa Teresa Jornet, s/n, 16071 Cuenca, Spain.

Background: Walking and bicycling (active commuting) to school may be a useful strategy to increase the daily amount of physical activity, and, potentially, improve children's health. However, it is unclear whether active commuting to school (ACS) has the potential to improve physical health and cognitive performance in children. Our aim was to examine the relationship between ACS with adiposity indicators, physical fitness, and cognitive performance in 4- to 7-year-old children. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12690
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12690DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Disparities in Health Risk Behaviors and Health Conditions Among Rhode Island Sexual Minority and Unsure High School Students.

J Sch Health 2018 Nov;88(11):803-812

Center for Health Data and Analysis, Rhode Island Department of Health, Three Capitol Hill, Providence, RI 02908.

Background: Sexual minority students have higher risk for health-related behaviors. We examined 5 domains including 34 health risk behaviors and health conditions among sexual minorities and unsure students in Rhode Island. We also included sexual contact of heterosexually identified students to capture heterosexually identified students who may be considered sexual minorities by their behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12688DOI Listing
November 2018

Well-Being and Academic Achievement: Differences Between Schools From 2002 to 2010 in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area.

J Sch Health 2018 Nov;88(11):821-829

School of Health Sciences and Tampere Centre for Childhood, Youth and Family Research, University of Tampere, Tampere 33014, Finland.

Background: We studied school-level differences in academic achievement and well-being from 2002 to 2010 in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area, as well as the connection between academic achievement, well-being, and socioeconomic composition.

Methods: The School Health Promotion Study covered 109 schools and 78% of schoolchildren (N = 100,413; aged 14 to 16 years). Depression was measured with the modified Beck Depression Scale and academic achievement with the grade-point average. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12691DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6220850PMC
November 2018