5,436 results match your criteria Journal of School Health [Journal]


Influence of School-Level Socioeconomic Status on Children's Physical Activity, Fitness, and Fundamental Movement Skill Levels.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr 4. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

Background: Authorities recommend that youth undertake at least 60 minutes of daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), with young people having the opportunity to undertake at least half of this MVPA during school hours.

Methods: In this study, we examined the influence of school-level socioeconomic status (SES) on children's PA, fitness and fundamental movement skill (FMS) levels, and the barriers and enablers of children's PA in 86 Australian schools (41 primary, 45 secondary). School-level SES was based on an Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12761DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Association of Teacher-Level Factors With Implementation of Classroom-Based Physical Activity Breaks.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr 1. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Oregon State University, 247 Hallie E. Ford Center, Corvallis, OR 97331.

Background: Classroom-based physical activity (CBPA) breaks are a common strategy to increase elementary school children's physical activity (PA) levels. There is limited research examining how teacher-level factors impact teacher implementation of CBPA breaks. In this study, we assessed the relationship of teacher-level factors with teacher use of a CBPA resource. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12754DOI Listing

Teachers' Perspectives on Creating an Inclusive Climate in Middle School Physical Education for Overweight Students.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr 1. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

Department of Health and Sport Sciences, Health Studies, Physical Education, and Sport Management, Adelphi University, Woodruff Hall Room 171, 1 South Ave, Garden City, NY 11530.

Background: Establishing and maintaining a positive, inclusive social climate in school is essential, especially given the many potential social pressures that make school a toxic environment for vulnerable students. We explored middle school physical education (PE) teachers' perceptions of the factors that influence the implementation of social-oriented approaches to include overweight and obese students.

Methods: We used a qualitative multicase study design guided by the Social Ecological Constraints model to study 9 PE teachers' perspectives and actions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12760DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Identifying Indicators of Readiness and Capacity for Implementing Farm-to-School Interventions.

J Sch Health 2019 May;89(5):373-381

Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, 11000 Cedar Avenue, Room 443, Cleveland, OH 44106.

Background: Farm-to-school interventions are recommended strategies to improve dietary behaviors among school-aged children. Tools are needed to assess community readiness and capacity to optimize farm-to-school implementation. The objective of this study was to identify and prioritize factors to inform tailored farm-to-school implementation by practitioners working in diverse contexts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12747DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

A Nurse-Led Model of Care to Address Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health at a School-Based Health Center.

J Sch Health 2019 May;89(5):423-426

UT Health San Antonio, School Of Nursing, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12748DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

An Economic Analysis of Updating and Expanding School Breakfast Program Offerings in High Schools.

J Sch Health 2019 May;89(5):417-422

Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Minnesota, 717 Delaware St. SE, Suite 166, Minneapolis, MN 55414.

Background: School breakfast is an important nutritional component of a student's day. Many schools operate a school breakfast program, but high schools have low rates of participation. This study aimed to investigate the economic impact on school food service, of expanding the school breakfast program to increase participation in high schools. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12749DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Using Process Evaluation for Implementation Success of Preschool-Based Programs for Obesity Prevention: The TX Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study.

J Sch Health 2019 May;89(5):382-392

Health Promotion & Behavioral Sciences, Chair, Michael & Susan Dell Center for Healthy Living, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health in Austin, 1616 Guadalupe, UTA 6.310, Austin, Texas 78701.

Background: Through the Texas Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration study, we implemented and evaluated a system-oriented model of primary and secondary prevention approaches to mitigate obesity among low-income Texas children aged 2 to 12 years. Primary prevention included implementing the Coordinated Approach To Child Health Early Childhood (CATCH EC) program in Head Start preschools. In this paper, we describe the methods and results of CATCH EC program process evaluation over 2 years of implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12745DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

School Wellness in Wisconsin: Evaluating Policies for Practices to Prevent Pediatric Obesity.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Population Health Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 610 Walnut Street, Madison, WI 53726.

Background: We examined written language in Wisconsin school wellness policies (SWPs) for federal mandate compliance, quality related to obesity prevention, and school characteristics associated with variations in quality. This is the first near census of Wisconsin SWPs and examines whether adhering to federal mandates results in strong policies aimed at preventing pediatric obesity.

Methods: Policies were coded using the WellSAT 2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12759DOI Listing

State Physical Education Policy Changes From 2001 to 2016.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

The University of Texas at Austin, 1912 Speedway Stop, D5000, Austin, TX 78712.

Background: State policies influence the quantity and quality of educational programs delivered in schools. This study examined state physical education policy changes from 2001 to 2016 by analyzing data reported in The Shape of the Nation Report.

Methods: Policies related to state mandates for physical education, time/credit requirements, assessment and fitness testing requirements, adoption of state standards, and allowance of substitutions were analyzed over 5 editions of the report using repeated measures statistics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12757DOI Listing

Physical Education Policies in US Schools: Differences by School Characteristics.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Children's Physical Activity Research Group, Children's Physical Activity Research Group, Department of Exercise Science, Division of Health Aspects of Physical Activity, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208.

Background: We assessed the extent to which schools in the United States implement physical education policies identified in SHAPE America's Essential Components of Physical Education document and how implementation of these policies varies by school characteristics.

Methods: School policy data were collected as part of the 2014 School Health Policies and Practices Study via computer-assisted personal interviews in a nationally representative sample of K-12 schools and were linked to extant data on school characteristics. Bivariate analyses and Poisson regression model were used to examine how physical education policies differed by school characteristics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12762DOI Listing

The Relationship of Physical Activity From Physical Education with Perceived Peer Acceptance Across Childhood and Adolescence.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 27. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Michigan State University, 134 IM Sports Circle Building, 308 W. Circle Drive, East Lansing, MI 48824.

Background: Although physical activity can play a positive role in psychosocial development, few studies have longitudinally examined the relationship between physical activity from physical education (PA from PE) and perceived peer acceptance (PPA).

Methods: Data from the Korean Children and Youth Panel Survey were used with 1908 elementary students from the first (age 10 years) to the 4-year panel (age 13 years), and 1954 middle-school students from the first (age 14 years) to the 4-year panel (age 17 years). We analyzed the data using latent curve modeling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12756DOI Listing

School Health Program: Impacting Physical Activity Behaviors Among Disadvantaged Students.

Authors:
Chia-Liang Dai

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 27. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154.

Background: Children from disadvantaged backgrounds are more apt to experience lower availability of nutritious foods, lack opportunities to exercise, and lack access to recreational facilities, and thus, are more likely to be obese and at greater risk for developing chronic diseases. We review school health education programs' impact on physical activity behaviors among disadvantaged students.

Methods: The inclusion criteria of the study were articles: published in English with full text between 2011 and 2017; focused on school health education programs for disadvantaged school-aged students; assessed programs including a physical activity component; examined school-aged children and adolescents' physical activity behaviors; and assessed programs with comparison groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12758DOI Listing

Factors Associated With Leisure Time Physical Activity Among Schoolchildren in a Predominantly Latino Community.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 25. Epub 2019 Mar 25.

Professor of Pediatrics, Keck Medicine of University of Southern California, and Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Affiliated Senior Scientist, RAND Corporation, Los Angeles, CA 90027.

Background: School initiatives aimed at increasing physical activity (PA) may improve the health of children in low-income communities.

Methods: Assessors completed 5909 observations of students' PA during leisure periods using a validated instrument in 19 schools in low-income Latino communities. We examined relationships between school environment factors (eg, presence of playground equipment) and levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12755DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Implementing Multilevel School-Based Physical Activity Interventions Using Core Implementation Components Model.

J Sch Health 2019 May 20;89(5):427-431. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Kentucky, 900 S. Limestone St., CTW 204L, Lexington, KY 40536-0200.

Background: Evidence-based comprehensive physical activity programs developed for public schools are abundant yet a theoretical framework for implementation of these programs is lacking. Implementation science in public service organizations is an emerging area of research, but has not been widely successful in the area of physical activity implementation in public schools.

Methods: Factors influencing the implementation of physical activity programs in public schools have been explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12750DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Does Stress Mediate the Association Between Emotional Intelligence and Life Satisfaction During Adolescence?

J Sch Health 2019 May 20;89(5):354-364. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of School Pedagogy, Institute of Educational Science, University GreifswaldFranz-Mehring-Str. 47, 17487 Greifswald, Germany.

Background: Based on Mayer and Salovey's model of emotional intelligence, this study examined whether perceived stress mediates the interplay of emotional intelligence and life satisfaction for girls and boys during early and middle adolescence.

Methods: Using multigroup structural equation modeling with questionnaire data from a sample of Spanish adolescent students (N = 800; M T1 = 14.02, M T2 = 15. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12746DOI Listing

A Systematic Review of Tools Measuring Nutrition Knowledge of Pre-Adolescents and Adolescents in a School-Based Setting.

J Sch Health 2019 May 20;89(5):402-416. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of Human Health & Nutritional Science, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.

Background: Measurement of nutrition knowledge is common in interventions targeting dietary modifications in a school-based setting. Previous research has noted a general lack of disclosure regarding the details and psychometric properties of nutrition knowledge tools, which makes uptake of previously used instruments extremely difficult.

Methods: Our systematic literature review sought to identify interventions measuring nutrition knowledge in school settings to students aged 9 to 18. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12752DOI Listing

School Personnel's Bystander Action in Situations of Teen Relationship Abuse and Sexual Assault: Prevalence and Correlates.

J Sch Health 2019 May 19;89(5):345-353. Epub 2019 Mar 19.

Crimes Against Children Research Center, University of New Hampshire, 10 West Edge Drive, Suite 106, Durham, NH 03824.

Background: Relationship abuse (RA) and sexual assault (SA) are major problems among high school students, and school personnel are an important part of preventing RA and SA among youth. Therefore, we examined the rates and correlates of bystander intentions among school personnel in situations of RA and SA.

Methods: School personnel (N = 1150) from 25 high schools in New England completed surveys that assessed their RA and SA knowledge, perceptions of school climate specific to RA and SA, and RA and SA bystander efficacy and bystander intentions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12751DOI Listing

Utilization of Mental Health Services in Educational Setting by Adolescents in the United States.

J Sch Health 2019 May 18;89(5):393-401. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning & Evaluation, Department of Health & Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, Washington, DC.

Background: Schools play an important role as providers of mental health services for adolescents; however, information on the broader picture of utilization of mental health services in educational versus other settings is limited because of the lack of national-level data.

Methods: Using multinomial logistic regression models based on national-level data from the 2012-2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, we explore the characteristics of adolescents who received mental health treatment in educational and other settings. In addition, the study examines the reasons for seeking services in various treatment settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12753DOI Listing

Concussion! Friday Night Lights and Informed Consent-A Commentary.

J Sch Health 2019 May 18;89(5):341-344. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Health Education and Health Promotion, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, 1725 State Street, 207 Mitchell Hall, La Crosse, WI 54601.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12744DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Getting at Mode Share: Comparing 3 Methods of Travel Mode Measurement for School Travel Research.

J Sch Health 2019 May 18;89(5):365-372. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Dr, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada.

Background: Mode share is an important metric for active school travel programs. Common methods for measuring mode share include Hands Up surveys and family surveys, but these require teacher and parental involvement. We used these methods as part of an evaluation of a school-based bicycle training program, and added a novel observational count approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12743DOI Listing

Effect of Sociodemographics, Health-Related Problems, and Family Structure on Chronic Absenteeism Among Children.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr;89(4):308-318

John A Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 651 Ilalo Street, Medical Education Building, Suite 411, Honolulu, HI 96813.

Background: From 5 to 7.5 million schoolchildren are chronically absent, defined as missing ≥15 days of school within a year. Students miss schools due to various reasons such as health, socioeconomic status, and environmental factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12736DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

The Impact of School Bullying on Physical Activity in Overweight Youth: Exploring Race and Ethnic Differences.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr;89(4):319-327

School of Public Health, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

Background: About one third of youth in the United States are overweight or obese and African American youth are at an increased risk for pediatric overweight and obesity as well as their complications. Physical activity has been identified as one determinant of overweight and obesity, and school bullying has been found to be associated with decreased physical activity. Guided by the Transactional Stress and Coping Model, this study examines how school bullying might impact the physical activity of white and African American healthy weight and overweight youth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12740DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Practices That Support and Sustain Health in Schools: An Analysis of SHPPS Data.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr 19;89(4):279-299. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE (Mailstop F-78), Atlanta, GA 30329.

Background: The Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC) model provides an organizing framework for schools to develop and implement school health policies, practices, and programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the presence of practices that support school health for each component of the WSCC model in US schools.

Methods: Data from the School Health Policies and Practices Study 2014 were analyzed to determine the percentage of schools with practices in place that support school health for WSCC components. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12742DOI Listing

Tobacco 21: Increase Age, Decrease Risk-A Commentary.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr 11;89(4):235-236. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

The University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12739DOI Listing

Prevalence, Patterns, and Predictors: A Statewide Longitudinal Study of Childhood Obesity.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr 11;89(4):237-245. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Director, Arkansas Center for Health Improvement, 1401 West Capitol Avenue Suite 300, Little Rock, AR 72201.

Background: We examined prevalence, incidence, and trajectory of obesity from kindergarten through grade 8 in one of the first states to implement annual surveillance.

Methods: Participants included 16,414 children enrolled in kindergarten in Arkansas in 2004 with complete body mass index (BMI) measurements in kindergarten and eighth grade. Repeated measures of weight status were entered in multiple linear and logistic regression models with demographics and family poverty status. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12741DOI Listing

The Implementation of Mental Health Policies and Practices in Schools: An Examination of School and State Factors.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr 11;89(4):328-338. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Health and Behavioral Studies, Teachers College, Columbia University, 255 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027.

Background: Poor mental health outcomes persist among adolescent youth. Secondary schools play a critical role in fostering positive mental health by implementing policies and practices grounded in evidence. The factors associated with implementation, however, are unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12738DOI Listing

Pono Choices: Lessons for School Leaders From the Evaluation of a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr 11;89(4):246-256. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1410 Lower Campus Road #171F, Honolulu, HI 96826.

Background: The US Office of Adolescent Health (OAH) funded studies of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention programs in 2010. The results of a 5-year OAH study conducted in the state of Hawai'i with middle school youth has implications for school leaders in the selection and implementation of comprehensive sex education curricula yielding positive outcomes for youth.

Methods: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted across 34 middle school in the state of Hawai'i with 1783 student participants in pre-, post-, and 1-year follow-up surveys to determine effectiveness of a culturally responsive teen pregnancy prevention curriculum, called Pono Choices, specifically developed for youth in Hawai'i. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12733
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12733DOI Listing
April 2019
10 Reads

Educators' Perspectives of Collaboration With Pediatricians to Support Low-Income Children.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr 7;89(4):300-307. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Boston University School of Medicine/Boston Medical Center, 88 East Newton St., Vose Hall 3, Boston, MA 02118.

Background: Educational and healthcare systems operate in silos. Few studies explore educators' perspectives of collaboration with pediatricians or cross-system solutions for school-identified concerns. We sought to investigate educators' viewpoints of collaboration with pediatricians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12737DOI Listing

Mentoring, Bullying, and Educational Outcomes Among US School-Aged Children 6-17 Years.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr 7;89(4):267-278. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Office of Health Equity, Health Resources and Services Administration, US Department of Health and Human Services, 5600 Fishers Lane, Room 13N42, Rockville, MD 20857.

Background: Ensuring the optimum development of all children and their attainment of age-appropriate educational outcomes is of great interest to public health researchers and professionals. Bullying and mentoring have opposite effects on child development and educational attainment. Mentoring exerts protective effects on youths against risky behaviors; however, the protective effects of community-oriented natural or informal mentoring on educational outcomes and bullying are largely underexplored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12735DOI Listing
April 2019
1.659 Impact Factor

Sustainability via Active Garden Education: Translating Policy to Practice in Early Care and Education.

J Sch Health 2019 Apr 5;89(4):257-266. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Health Disparities Research, The University of Texas, Houston, TX 77030.

Background: We describe the development of sustainability via active garden education (SAGE), an early care and education (ECE) garden-based curriculum developed from a 5-year community partnership to link national health policy guidelines with ECE accreditation standards.

Methods: National health guidelines and ECE accreditation standards were reviewed, and community advisory board members, ECE staff, and parents provided feedback and support throughout the development of the curriculum. The SAGE curriculum components were guided by the Ecologic Model of Physical Activity and Social Cognitive Theory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12734DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407699PMC
April 2019
1 Read

School Climate and Academic Achievement in Middle and High School Students.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar;89(3):173-180

West Virginia University School of Public Health, 1 Medical Center Drive, P.O. Box 9190, Morgantown, W V 26506-9190.

Background: Emergent evidence suggests a positive school climate may be a promising population-level intervention to promote academic achievement and student well-being. However, researchers have called for expanding the school climate evidence-base to better describe how the construct is associated with student outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between 10 school climate domains and academic achievement among middle and high school students. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12726DOI Listing

Effectiveness of the Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP) on Depression Literacy and Mental Health Treatment.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 15;89(3):165-172. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 550 N Broadway, Suite 201, Baltimore, MD 21287.

Background: Analysis of data from a NIMH-supported study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP) in promoting depression literacy and help-seeking behavior.

Methods: Eighteen Pennsylvania schools were matched on size, sex, race, test scores, median income, and free/reduced lunch status. Schools randomized to the intervention implemented ADAP as a compulsory part of the schools health curriculum, while control schools collected study measures. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12725
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12725DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6370293PMC
March 2019
13 Reads

Association of Education Outside the Classroom and Pupils' Psychosocial Well-Being: Results From a School Year Implementation.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 13;89(3):210-218. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports (NEXS), University of Copenhagen, Nørre Allé 51, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark.

Background: Education Outside the Classroom (EOtC) is a teaching method that is gaining traction, aiming to promote learning and well-being. However, research on the association between EOtC and well-being is limited.

Methods: This quasi-experimental trial involved pupils (9-13 years) from 16 Danish public schools which implemented EOtC in some classes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12730DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

Integration of Onsite Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Services Into School-Based Health Centers.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 13;89(3):226-231. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Family and Social Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, NY 10461.

Background: With recent recommendations from professional organizations, long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods are considered appropriate first-line contraception for adolescents. Many school-based health centers (SBHCs) in New York City (NYC) have recently added onsite LARC insertion and management to their contraceptive options. We aimed to explore key elements needed to implement LARC training and services into the SBHC setting and to identify successful factors for program implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12732DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Ecological Factors Affecting Obesity Among Middle School Students in South Korea.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 13;89(3):181-190. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Mo-Im Kim Nursing Research Institute, College of Nursing, Yonsei University, 50-1 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, 03722, South Korea.

Background: Despite the environment being recognized as playing an important role in health, little is known about the influence of school and community factors on student health. This study aimed to identify the ecological factors influencing obesity among middle school students, including intrapersonal, interpersonal, school, and community factors.

Methods: The study sample consisted of 2069 students from 50 middle schools, with individual-level data. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12727
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12727DOI Listing
March 2019
11 Reads

Substance Use and School Characteristics in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Heterosexual High School Students.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 13;89(3):219-225. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

University of Florida, College of Pharmacy, 1225 Center Drive, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Background: Tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) high school students as well as related environment and school-level risk and protective factors were examined.

Methods: Data was acquired from the 2015 CDC's Youth Behavior Risk Survey for Kentucky (N = 2577). Prevalence of substance use was calculated for all high school respondents by reported sexual orientation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12731DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

A Case Study of a New State Model for Assessing Local Wellness Policies.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 13;89(3):191-199. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Arizona Department of Health Services, 150 North 18th Ave, Suite 310, Phoenix, AZ 85007.

Background: In 2016, the United States Department of Agriculture issued a final rule to strengthen local wellness policies (LWPs). As school districts pursue compliance, states can provide critical guidance by leveraging support from intermediary programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed). After Arizona SNAP-Ed piloted a statewide model for assessing LWPs, we evaluated that model by exploring local SNAP-Ed agency experiences with the pilot. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12728
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12728DOI Listing
March 2019
25 Reads

School Food Environment, Food Consumption, and Indicators of Adiposity Among Students 7-14 Years in Bogotá, Colombia.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 13;89(3):200-209. Epub 2019 Jan 13.

Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, La Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia.

Background: In Colombia, the prevalence of overweight/obesity in children has increased by 26% in the past 5 years. School food environment may be an important contributor and offers opportunities for effective intervention.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among 7- to 14-year-old schoolchildren from 10 schools in Bogotá, Colombia. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12729
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12729DOI Listing
March 2019
8 Reads

US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Based Physical Activity Recommendations Do Not Improve Fitness in Real-World Settings.

J Sch Health 2019 Mar 10;89(3):159-164. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, CSC H4/407, Madison, WI 53792.

Background: The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) promotes school-based strategies to increase physical activity (PA). Implementation feasibility and effect of these interventions on cardiovascular fitness (CVF) is unknown.

Methods: Forty-nine low-SES schools were randomly assigned to either (1) continue routine PA programs (N = 24 schools, 2399 students) or (2) implement 4 CDC-based PA strategies (N = 25 schools, 2495 students). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12724DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6347480PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Pattern of Sedentary Behavior in Different Periods of School Time of Brazilian Adolescents.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):99-105

Center for Research in Kineanthropometry and Human Performance - Federal University of Santa Catarina.

Background: Sedentary behavior (SB) is related to unhealthy outcomes and is performed in many contexts, including school. The aim of this study was to identify sociodemographic, biological, and psychosocial correlates of SB performed at school in a sample of adolescents.

Methods: Adolescents provided information regarding sex, age, socioeconomic status, and psychosocial variables related to physical activity (self-efficacy, attitudes, perception of school environment, peer and parental support). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12716
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12716DOI Listing
February 2019
18 Reads

Substance Use, Academic Performance, and Academic Engagement Among High School Seniors.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):145-156

Center for Young Adult Health and Development, Department of Behavioral and Community Health, University of Maryland School of Public Health, 1234 School of Public Health, College Park, MD 20742.

Background: Substance use is prevalent and is associated with academic performance among adolescents. Few studies have examined the association between abstinence from all substances and academic achievement.

Methods: Data from a nationally representative sample of 9578 12th graders from the 2015 Monitoring the Future survey were analyzed to examine relationships between abstinence from substance use and 4 academic variables: skipping school, grades, academic self-efficacy, and emotional academic engagement. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12723
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12723DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6373775PMC
February 2019
10 Reads
1.659 Impact Factor

The Patterns of Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity and Physical Education Enjoyment Through a 2-Year School-Based Program.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):88-98

Department of Kinesiology, University of Georgia, 330 River Road, Athens, GA 30602.

Background: In this study, we examined the development of children's moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and physical education (PE) enjoyment through the Physical Activity as Civil Skill Program 2012-2014.

Methods: Participants were 661 (265 intervention, 396 control) elementary school children in central and northeast Finland. The program was implemented across 2 years with 3 measurement phases using self-reported MVPA and PE enjoyment, and accelerometer-determined MVPA of a random subsample (N = 76). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12717DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Who Suffers Most From Being Involved in Bullying-Bully, Victim, or Bully-Victim?

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):136-144

Estonian-Swedish Mental Health and Suicidology Institute (ERSI), Õie 39 Tallinn 11615, Estonia.

Background: Bullying has been associated with many mental health problems. The effect of bullying has been found to be affected by the way students are involved in bullying. The purpose of the study was to explore the association between mental well-being, hopelessness, and being involved in bullying (as a bully, victim, or bully-victim), and to detect more harmful bullying types to students' mental well-being. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12720DOI Listing
February 2019
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Identifying the Inclusion of National Sexuality Education Standards Utilizing a Systematic Analysis of Teen Dating Violence Prevention Curriculum.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):106-114

Department of Health and Human Performance, Texas State University, 601 University Drive, San Marcos, TX 78666.

Background: Violent behaviors have devastating impacts on youth and adolescents. National standards offer a framework for age and developmentally appropriate health education expectations. This study provides findings from a systematic review and analysis of teen dating violence (TDV) prevention curricula using National Sexuality Education Standards (NSES) and National Health Education Standards (NHES). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12718DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Barriers to Human Sexuality Education Survey Research Among Vermont Public School Administrators.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):124-128

A.T. Still University College of Graduate Health Studies, Mesa, AZ.

Background: Health educators in public high schools can provide educational interventions to reduce teen unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Characteristics of teachers and schools influence their decision to provide condom education. Studies to determine characteristics must be conducted so HIV/sex education can be improved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12721DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Retailer Compliance as a Predictor of Youth Smoking Participant and Consumption.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):115-123

Pre-Medicine, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202.

Background: Ninety percent of smokers report having their first whole cigarette before the age of 19. Policies, such as youth access laws, are essential to prevent youth from becoming future smokers. In Canada, the Tobacco Act prohibits retailers from furnishing tobacco products to individuals under the age of 18. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12719DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

All Things in Moderation? Threshold Effects in Adolescent Extracurricular Participation Intensity and Behavioral Problems.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):79-87

K-12 Associates, 18 Quail Ridge Drive, Madison, WI 53717.

Background: School-based extracurricular activity participation is one of the primary avenues for prosocial activity engagement during adolescence. In this study, we test the "overscheduling hypothesis" or whether the negative relationship between structured activity intensity (ie, hours) and adolescent bullying and fighting levels off or declines at moderate to high intensity (ie, threshold effects).

Methods: This study uses the Dane County Youth Survey (N = 14,124) to investigate the relationship between school-based extracurricular activity participation intensity and bullying perpetration and physical fighting and whether there are threshold effects of activity participation intensity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12715DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6362990PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Comparing Physical Activity Behavior of Children During School Between Balanced and Traditional School Day Schedules.

J Sch Health 2019 Feb;89(2):129-135

Human Environments Analysis Laboratory, Department of Geography, School of Health Studies, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, & Department of Paediatrics, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London N6A 3K7, Canada.

Background: Some Canadian schools have modified their daily schedules from the traditional school day (TSD) schedule (two 15-minute breaks and one 60-minute break) to a balanced school day (BSD) schedule (two 40-minute breaks). While this change increases daily planning and instructional time, it also changes the amount of time available for moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA).

Methods: This study uses a case-control design to examine differences in objectively measured MVPA between children in 3 schools using a BSD schedule and 3 schools using a TSD schedule. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12722DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

A Prospective Cohort Study on Injuries Among Intensely Physically Active High School Students.

J Sch Health 2019 Jan;89(1):31-37

Queen Margaret University Edinburgh, Queen Margaret University Drive, Musselburgh EH21 6UU, UK.

Background: The leading cause of nonfatal injuries in age group 14-19 is sports injuries. Purpose of the study was to determine the association between intense physical activity and injury and to identify the circumstances and environment in which injuries are most likely to occur.

Methods: A prospective cohort study included 698 high school students 15-19 years old, divided into those exposed and those unexposed to intense physical activity. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/josh.12708
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12708DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Unintentional Injuries in Primary and Secondary Schools in the United States, 2001-2013.

J Sch Health 2019 Jan;89(1):38-47

Children's Minnesota Research Institute, Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Children's Minnesota, 2525 Chicago Avenue South, MS 40-460, Minneapolis, MN.

Background: Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of youth morbidity. However, limited nationally representative data are available to characterize the occurrence of unintentional injuries at US schools. Given this paucity, we characterized secular trends in unintentional injuries at schools that led to emergency department (ED) visits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/josh.12711DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read