819 results match your criteria Journal of Occupational Health Psychology[Journal]


Why do individuals suffer during unemployment? Analyzing the role of deprived psychological needs in a six-wave longitudinal study.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Apr 4. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Department of Organizational and Social Psychology.

This 6-wave study addresses the psychological meaning of employment by examining the psychological need mechanisms predicting psychological distress during unemployment and reemployment. According to the deprivation model, unemployed people suffer, as unemployment deprives them of the latent functions of employment (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000154DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Emotion regulation in supervisory interactions and marital well-being: A spillover-crossover perspective.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Apr 4. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

School of Psychology.

When interacting with supervisors, employees often engage in emotion regulation (i.e., surface acting and deep acting), and the consequences may extend beyond work boundaries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000150DOI Listing

Inquiry into the correlation between burnout and depression.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Apr 4. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Institute of Work and Organizational Psychology.

The extent to which burnout refers to anything other than a depressive condition remains an object of controversy among occupational health specialists. In three studies conducted in two different countries and two different languages, we investigated the discriminant validity of burnout scales by evaluating the magnitude of the correlation between (latent) burnout and (latent) depression. In Study 1 ( = 911), burnout was assessed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey's Exhaustion subscale and depression with the depression module of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000151DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

When do you face a challenge? How unnecessary tasks block the challenging potential of time pressure and emotional demands.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Apr 4. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Department of Psychology.

Job demands push employees to invest energy in certain behaviors to perform well, which can come with both costs and benefits to employees' well-being and motivation. Previous research presents contradictory results concerning whether specific job demands are a challenge (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000149DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

When are fakers also drinkers? A self-control view of emotional labor and alcohol consumption among U.S. service workers.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Mar 4. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University.

Some employees tend to drink more alcohol than other employees, with costs to personal and organizational well-being. Based on a self-control framework, we propose that emotional labor with customers-effortfully amplifying, faking, and suppressing emotional expressions (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000147DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Fusing character strengths and mindfulness interventions: Benefits for job satisfaction and performance.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Feb;24(1):150-162

Section of Personality and Assessment, Department of Psychology, University of Zurich.

In recent years, both mindfulness and character strengths have started to garner interest in industrial and organizational psychology. The growing research interest in their effects on employee well-being and performance, individually, has strong practical implications for organizations. Given the interconnection of mindfulness and character strengths, the present study examined the effectiveness of training that combined the two practices regarding well-being and work-related outcomes, and it tested the potential mediators of the effects at work. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/ocp0000144
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000144DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

A systematic review and meta-analysis of workplace mindfulness training randomized controlled trials.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Feb;24(1):108-126

School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia.

This meta-analytic review responds to promises in the research literature and public domain about the benefits of workplace mindfulness training. It synthesizes randomized controlled trial evidence from workplace-delivered training for changes in mindfulness, stress, mental health, well-being, and work performance outcomes. Going beyond extant reviews, this article explores the influence of variability in workforce and intervention characteristics for reducing perceived stress. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/ocp0000146
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000146DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Interventions in occupational health psychology.

Authors:
Terry A Beehr

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Feb;24(1):1-3

Department of Psychology.

The set of studies in this issue focus on applied interventions in occupational health psychology (OHP), that is, interventions that are intended to treat employee health and well-being problems or prevent these problems from occurring in the first place. An issue regarding many past evaluations of the effectiveness of these treatments was the relatively weak research methods, especially in regard to obtaining comparable groups to study so that internal validity is enhanced. Many of the studies presented here used the classically recommended approach of random assignment to alleviate this potential problem. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000140DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

When work-family conflict hits home: Parental work-family conflict and child health.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Dec 27. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Department of Management and Leadership.

Work-family conflict affects employee performance and well-being. However, despite the underlying focus of work-family research on family health and well-being, we have limited knowledge about the impact of role-based stressors, such as work-family conflict, on child health. In this study, we propose and test the stressor-self-regulatory resources-crossover framework. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/ocp0000145
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000145DOI Listing
December 2018
10 Reads

No pain, no gain? Recovery and strenuousness of physical activity.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Dec 17. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University.

The present study aimed to advance insight in the role of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) in the recovery process, by focusing on the strenuousness of LTPA. It was proposed that-compared with less strenuous LTPA-more strenuous LTPA would show stronger positive relationships with recovery through higher levels of mental disengagement from stressors resulting from more strenuous LTPA. This hypothesis was examined in two studies, in which participants' positive and negative affective states were included as indicators of recovery. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/ocp0000141
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000141DOI Listing
December 2018
41 Reads

A longitudinal study of the relationships between four differentially motivated forms of employee silence and burnout.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Dec 17. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Oliver Weigelt, Institut für Psychologie, FernUniversität in Hagen.

Although previous research has established that employee silence can weaken organizational performance and development, less is known about potential detrimental effects of silence on individual employees, who may believe that they have plausible reasons for remaining silent. We propose negative effects of silence on employee well-being, focusing on relationships of four differentially motivated forms of silence (i.e. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/ocp0000143
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000143DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Patterns of positive and negative work reflection during leisure time: A latent profile analysis.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Dec 17. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of Psychology, University of Mannheim.

This study examined positive and negative work reflection during leisure time from a person-centered perspective using latent profile analysis. First, we examined whether quantitatively and qualitatively different work reflection profiles exist. Second, we investigated whether persons with different work reflection profiles differ in energetic well-being (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000142DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

The effects of sleep on workplace cognitive failure and safety.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Nov 29. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Department of Psychology, Portland State University.

Healthy employee sleep is important for occupational safety, but the mechanisms that explain the relationships among sleep and safety-related behaviors remain unknown. We draw from Crain, Brossoit, and Fisher's (in press) work, nonwork, and sleep (WNS) framework and Barnes' (2012) model of sleep and self-regulation in organizations to investigate the influence of construction workers' self-reported sleep quantity (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000139DOI Listing
November 2018
22 Reads

Witnessing workplace bullying and employee well-being: A two-wave field study.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Apr 29;24(2):286-296. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Division of Psychology and Mental Health.

This article aims to (a) explore the impact of witnessing workplace bullying on emotional exhaustion, work-related anxiety, and work-related depression and (b) determine whether the resources of trait optimism, coworker support, and supportive supervisory style buffer the effects of witnessed bullying. In a two-wave study involving 194 employees, we found that witnessing bullying undermined employees' well-being (work-related depression and anxiety) 6 months later, but only if the employees were low in optimism (personal resource) and lacked supervisor support (contextual resource). Strong coworker support weakened the relationship between witnessing bullying and well-being (emotional exhaustion and work-related depression). Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/ocp0000137
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000137DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

Challenge and hindrance stressors and metabolic risk factors.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Nov 1. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Department of Psychology, University of South Florida.

The current study investigates differential relationships between challenge and hindrance stressors and metabolic risk factors using data from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS II). Guided by the challenge-hindrance stressor model and the allostatic load model, we test two theoretically driven paths: a direct physiological path and an indirect path via health behaviors (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000138DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Meta-analytic and multiwave comparison of emotional support and instrumental support in the workplace.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Oct 18. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley.

Two complementary studies were conducted to compare emotional support and instrumental support in the workplace. Study 1 included meta-analyses with 142 independent samples containing 68,354 participants and tested the moderation effects of source of support (supervisor vs. coworker) and support scale type (received vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000135DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Mindfulness training improves employee well-being: A randomized controlled trial.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Feb 18;24(1):139-149. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University.

Organizations are turning toward behavioral interventions with the aim of improving employee well-being and job performance. Mindfulness training has been suggested as one type of intervention that can achieve these goals, but few active treatment randomized controlled trials have been conducted. We conducted a randomized controlled trial among employees of a midwestern marketing firm (n = 60) that compared the effects of 6-week mindfulness training program with that of a half-day mindfulness training seminar comparison program on employee well-being outcomes. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/ocp0000132
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000132DOI Listing
February 2019
8 Reads

Prevention through job design: Identifying high-risk job characteristics associated with workplace bullying.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Apr 4;24(2):297-306. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Asia Pacific Centre for Work Health and Safety.

Work environment hypothesis, a predominant theoretical framework in workplace bullying literature, postulates that job characteristics may trigger workplace bullying. Yet, these characteristics are often assessed by employees based on their experience of the job. This study aims to assess how job characteristics, independently assessed via Occupational Information Network (O*NET), are related to perceived job characteristics reported by employees, which, in turn, are associated with self-reported workplace bullying. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/ocp0000133
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000133DOI Listing
April 2019
23 Reads

The consequences of self- and other-focused emotional intelligence: Not all sunshine and roses.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Oct 4. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Center of Excellence for Positive Organizational Psychology.

Emotional intelligence (EI) contributes to good performance and well-being in jobs that involve frequent interpersonal contact. However, as EI is composed of self- and other-focused dimensions, it remains unclear which dimensions are responsible for better performance and well-being. We hypothesized that other-focused EI dimensions in particular relate to task performance, whereas self-focused EI dimensions relate to employees' subjective stress and physiological responses to emotional job demands. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000134DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Worksite physical activity intervention and somatic symptoms burden: The role of coworker support for basic psychological needs and autonomous motivation.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Feb 16;24(1):55-65. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

School of Business, University College of Southeast Norway.

Suffering from somatic symptoms can seriously hamper one's quality of life and ability to function, causing lost work productivity, sickness absence, and extensive medical utilization. Physical activity (PA) has demonstrated promising results related to mild to moderate cases of somatic symptoms. The present study explored whether a worksite health promotion intervention was able to increase PA and cardiorespiratory fitness, and to reduce somatic symptoms and sickness absence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000131DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Ostracism, attributions, and their relationships with international students' and employees' outcomes: The moderating effect of perceived harming intent.

Authors:
Cong Liu

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Aug 16. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Psychology.

The two studies reported in this article tested the relationships among ostracism, attributions of ostracism, and the victims' outcomes. I examined the moderating effect of perceived harming intent on these mediational relationships. Study 1 used online survey design and was based on a group of 150 international students who studied in the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000130DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

What to do and what works? Exploring how work groups cope with understaffing.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Jul 30. Epub 2018 Jul 30.

Department of Psychology.

Complaints regarding understaffing are common in the workplace, and research has begun to document some of the potential ill effects that can result from understaffing conditions. Despite evidence that understaffing is a relatively prevalent and consequential stressor, research has yet to explore how work groups cope with this stressor and the efficacy of their coping strategies in mitigating poor group performance and burnout. The present study examines these questions by exploring both potential mediating and moderating coping effects using a sample of 96 work groups from four technology organizations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000129DOI Listing
July 2018
17 Reads

Safety training transfer: The roles of coworkers, supervisors, safety professionals, and felt responsibility.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Feb 19;24(1):92-107. Epub 2018 Jul 19.

School of Business and Economics.

The aim of this study is to identify the influence of social dimensions of the work environment and the employees' felt responsibility on the transfer of safety training. We tested a model in which responses and reactions from safety players such as coworkers, supervisors, and safety professionals are positively related to the transfer of training (TT), through the mediating effect of the employees' felt responsibility and the moderating influence of supervisor support and sanctions. A two-time data collection was implemented among blue-collar employees, all low qualified, from four city councils who attended a fundamental safety training program delivered by in-house safety trainers, all safety professionals ( = 203). Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/ocp0000125
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000125DOI Listing
February 2019
7 Reads

Customer mistreatment harms nightly sleep and next-morning recovery: Job control and recovery self-efficacy as cross-level moderators.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Apr 28;24(2):256-269. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

School of Labor and Employment Relations, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Customer mistreatment is becoming an important topic for work stress researchers and practitioners given the rise of service industry. Taking stressor-emotion-control perspectives, the authors examine day-level relationships between call center workers' customer mistreatment experiences and their impaired recovery outcomes mediated by end-of-work negative affect. Furthermore, control concepts in the job and personal domains are tested as cross-level moderators. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000128DOI Listing
April 2019
33 Reads

With a little help from my boss: The impact of workplace mental health training on leader behaviors and employee resource utilization.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Feb 25;24(1):4-19. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Department of Psychology.

Mental health problems are among the costliest issues facing organizations in the developed world. In response to the mounting burdens surrounding poor employee mental health, many organizations have introduced mental health promotion programs and resources (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000126DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

Modeling intraindividual variation in unsafe driving in a naturalistic commuting environment.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Jun 25. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

School of Psychology.

Commuting to work by car is a frequently occurring activity that poses a salient risk to worker safety. Although general stress perceptions have been linked to indicators of unsafe commuting in cross-sectional studies, little is known about whether and how day-to-day variability in stressor exposure and subjective and affective strain reactions covary with intraindividual variability in unsafe driving while commuting over time. A major contributor to this knowledge gap is the lack of a validated methodology to link subjective self-report variables to objective driving performance criteria in a naturalistic commuting environment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000127DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6309765PMC
June 2018
2 Reads

It hurts me too: Examining the relationship between male gender harassment and observers' well-being, attitudes, and behaviors.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Jul;23(3):303-319

Smith School of Business, Queen's University.

The goal of this study was to examine the costs associated with witnessing the sexual harassment of a male colleague. More specifically, we investigate (a) whether observed male gender harassment is related to psychological and physical health, and negative and positive job-related behaviors and attitudes, and (b) the mediating roles of discrete negative emotions (anger, fear) and identity-based evaluations (collective self-esteem). We explore these questions in a sample of men and women employed in "blue collar" professions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000124DOI Listing
July 2018
17 Reads

Applying adaptation theory to understand experienced incivility processes: Testing the repeated exposure hypothesis.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Apr 11;24(2):270-285. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Department of Psychology, Bowling Green State University.

Experienced workplace incivility has consistently been linked to a host of negative outcomes, but as a low-intensity behavior, most working adults should be able to adapt and move on from these experiences of incivility over time. On the basis of repeated measures data from a heterogeneous sample of 625 respondents across three waves, with a 1-month lag between assessments, and framed within adaptation theory, we propose and find strong empirical evidence that although incivility is concurrently related to 5 indices related to both positive and negative employee well-being (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000123DOI Listing
April 2019
7 Reads

Sustaining sleep: Results from the randomized controlled work, family, and health study.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Feb 28;24(1):180-197. Epub 2018 May 28.

Department of Biobehavioral Health, The Pennsylvania State University.

Although calls for intervention designs are numerous within the organizational literature and increasing efforts are being made to conduct rigorous randomized controlled trials, existing studies have rarely evaluated the long-term sustainability of workplace health intervention outcomes, or mechanisms of this process. This is especially the case with regard to objective and subjective sleep outcomes. We hypothesized that a work-family intervention would increase both self-reported and objective actigraphic measures of sleep quantity and sleep quality at 6 and 18 months post-baseline in a sample of information technology workers from a U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000122DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6261705PMC
February 2019
4 Reads

"Some days won't end ever": Working faster and longer as a boundary condition for challenge versus hindrance effects of time pressure.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 May 28. Epub 2018 May 28.

Department of Work, Organizational and Business Psychology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz.

Within the workplace, time constraints that create deadline pressure may jeopardize employees' goal attainment. In an attempt to overcome this stressful situation, employees may increase their efforts. We examine two strategies that are assumed to be stress reactions (coping) under conditions of high time pressure: working faster and working longer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000121DOI Listing
May 2018
34 Reads

Finding peace of mind when there still is so much left undone-A diary study on how job stress, competence need satisfaction, and proactive work behavior contribute to work-related rumination during the weekend.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 May 21. Epub 2018 May 21.

Work and Organizational Psychology, University of Potsdam.

Unfinished work tasks have been identified as a significant job-related stressor in recent occupational stress research. Extending this research, we examine how and when not finishing one's tasks by the end of the work week affects work-related rumination at the weekend. Drawing on control theory, we examined competence need satisfaction as a mediating mechanism that links unfinished tasks at the end of the work week to work-related rumination at the weekend. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000117DOI Listing
May 2018
6 Reads

Emotional demands and alcohol use in corrections: A moderated mediation model.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 May 14. Epub 2018 May 14.

Department of Psychology.

This study examined predictors of alcohol use (i.e., drinking quantity and frequency) in a sample of correctional officers (COs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000114DOI Listing
May 2018
3 Reads

Identifying job characteristics related to employed women's breastfeeding behaviors.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Oct 14;23(4):457-470. Epub 2018 May 14.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa.

For employed mothers of infants, reconciliation of work demands and breastfeeding constitutes a significant challenge. The discontinuation of breastfeeding has the potential to result in negative outcomes for the mother (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000119DOI Listing
October 2018
5 Reads

Work stressors and partner social undermining: Comparing negative affect and psychological detachment as mechanisms.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 May 14. Epub 2018 May 14.

School of Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University.

With the mounting evidence that employees' work experiences spill over into the family domain and cross over to family members, it is important to understand the underlying mechanism through which work experiences affect the family domain and what factors may alleviate the adverse impact of work stress. Expanding previous research that mainly focused on the affect-based mechanism (negative affect), the present research investigated a resource-based mechanism (psychological detachment from work) in the relationship linking two work stressors (high workload and workplace incivility) with social undermining toward the partner at home. We also explored the relative strength of the mediating effects of the two mechanisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000120DOI Listing
May 2018
29 Reads

Mindfulness on-the-go: Effects of a mindfulness meditation app on work stress and well-being.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Feb 3;24(1):127-138. Epub 2018 May 3.

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London.

We investigated whether a mindfulness meditation program delivered via a smartphone application could improve psychological well-being, reduce job strain, and reduce ambulatory blood pressure during the workday. Participants were 238 healthy employees from two large United Kingdom companies that were randomized to a mindfulness meditation practice app or a wait-list control condition. The app offered 45 prerecorded 10- to 20-min guided audio meditations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000118DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6215525PMC
February 2019
8 Reads

A systematic review of the safety climate intervention literature: Past trends and future directions.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Feb 26;24(1):66-91. Epub 2018 Apr 26.

Department of Medicine, UConn Health.

Safety climate represents the meaningfulness of safety and how safety is valued in an organization. The contributions of safety climate to organizational safety have been well documented. There is a dearth of empirical research, however, on specific safety climate interventions and their effectiveness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000113DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Workplace incivility and employee sleep: The role of rumination and recovery experiences.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Apr 23;24(2):228-240. Epub 2018 Apr 23.

USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station.

This study examines the role of negative work rumination and recovery experiences in explaining the association between workplace incivility and employee insomnia symptoms. Drawing on the perseverative cognition model of stress and the effort-recovery model, we hypothesize a moderated mediation model in which workplace incivility is associated with insomnia symptoms via negative work rumination. This indirect effect is proposed to be conditional on employees' reported level of recovery experiences (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000116DOI Listing
April 2019
31 Reads

Overloaded and stressed: A case study of women working in the health care sector.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Apr 23. Epub 2018 Apr 23.

Sprott School of Business, Carleton University.

Although role overload has been shown to be prevalent and consequential, there has been little attempt to develop the associated theory. The fact that the consequences of role overload can be positive or negative implies that the relationship between role overload and perceived stress depends partly on the environment within which role overload is experienced (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000111DOI Listing
April 2018
9 Reads

Get even and feel good? Moderating effects of justice sensitivity and counterproductive work behavior on the relationship between illegitimate tasks and self-esteem.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Apr 23;24(2):241-255. Epub 2018 Apr 23.

Department of Occupational Health Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin.

We proposed that effects of illegitimate tasks, which comprise unreasonable and unnecessary tasks, on self-esteem and counterproductive work behavior (CWB) are enhanced among employees who are highly sensitive to injustice. CWB was further proposed to be a moderating coping strategy, which restores justice and buffers the detrimental effects of illegitimate tasks on self-esteem. In this study, 241 employees participated in a diary study over five workdays and a follow-up questionnaire one week later. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000112DOI Listing
April 2019
7 Reads

Organizational justice and health: Studying mental preoccupation with work and social support as mediators for lagged and reversed relationships.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Oct 5;23(4):553-567. Epub 2018 Mar 5.

Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University.

Organizational justice perceptions are considered a predictor of health and well-being. To date, empirical evidence about whether organizational justice perceptions predict health or health predicts organizational justice perceptions is mixed. Furthermore, the processes underlying these relationships are largely unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000115DOI Listing
October 2018
18 Reads

Effective coping with supervisor conflict depends on control: Implications for work strains.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Oct 11;23(4):537-552. Epub 2018 Jan 11.

Department of Psychology, Michigan State University.

This study examined the interactive effects of interpersonal conflict at work, coping strategy, and perceived control specific to the conflict on employee work strain using multisource and time-lagged data across two samples. In Sample 1, multisource data was collected from 438 employees as well as data from participant-identified secondary sources (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000109DOI Listing
October 2018
10 Reads

Effectiveness and application of an online leadership intervention to promote mental health and reduce depression-related stigma in organizations.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Feb 4;24(1):20-35. Epub 2018 Jan 4.

School of Psychology, Australian Catholic University.

Addressing the stigma of mental illness and its effect in the workplace is a contemporary issue in occupational health. The role of leaders is a vital but relatively unexplored dimension of this phenomenon. This study examined the effectiveness and application of an online intervention to reduce depression-related stigma in organizational leaders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000110DOI Listing
February 2019
20 Reads

Incivility and employee performance, citizenship, and counterproductive behaviors: Implications of the social context.

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Apr 28;24(2):213-227. Epub 2017 Dec 28.

Department of Management and International Business, University of Auckland.

Drawing from the transactional model of stress, we examined how the social context moderates employees' behavioral responses to workplace incivility. On the basis of data from 384 employees nested in 41 groups, we observed a 3-way, cross-level interaction between individually experienced incivility, group incivility differentiation, and group silence predicting supervisor-rated employee performance, citizenship, and counterproductive behaviors. Specifically, employees' own incivility experiences predicted lower performance and citizenship behavior and higher counterproductive behavior in groups where members received highly different incivility treatment and kept silent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000108DOI Listing
April 2019
40 Reads

Personal costs and benefits of employee intrapreneurship: Disentangling the employee intrapreneurship, well-being, and job performance relationship.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Oct 28;23(4):508-519. Epub 2017 Dec 28.

Department of Work and Organizational Psychology, Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Ample studies have confirmed the benefits of intrapreneurship (i.e., employee behaviors that contribute to new venture creation and strategic renewal activities) for firm performance, but research on the personal costs and benefits of engaging in intrapreneurial activities for employees is lacking. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/ocp0000105
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000105DOI Listing
October 2018
13 Reads

The more, the better? Curvilinear effects of job autonomy on well-being from vitamin model and PE-fit theory perspectives.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Oct 28;23(4):520-536. Epub 2017 Dec 28.

Department of Education and Psychology.

In organizational psychology research, autonomy is generally seen as a job resource with a monotone positive relationship with desired occupational outcomes such as well-being. However, both Warr's vitamin model and person-environment (PE) fit theory suggest that negative outcomes may result from excesses of some job resources, including autonomy. Thus, the current studies used survey methodology to explore cross-sectional relationships between environmental autonomy, person-environment autonomy (mis)fit, and well-being. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/ocp0000107
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000107DOI Listing
October 2018
14 Reads

Job design for mindful work: The boosting effect of psychosocial safety climate.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Oct 28;23(4):483-495. Epub 2017 Dec 28.

School of Psychology, Social Work, and Social Policy, Asia Pacific Centre for Work Health and Safety, University of South Australia.

Despite a surge in workplace mindfulness research, virtually nothing is known about how organizations can cultivate everyday mindfulness at work. Using the extended job demands-resources model, we explored daily psychological demands and job control as potential antecedents of daily mindfulness, and the moderating effect of psychosocial safety climate (PSC, which relates to the value organizations place on psychological health at work). We also examined the relationship between mindfulness and learning to augment understanding of the benefits of everyday mindfulness at work. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000102DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

Your job is messing with mine! The impact of mobile device use for work during family time on the spouse's work life.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Oct 7;23(4):471-482. Epub 2017 Dec 7.

Department of Information and Operations Management, Mays Business School, Texas A&M University.

The use of mobile technology for work purposes during family time has been found to affect employees' work and family lives. Using a matched sample of 344 job incumbents and their spouses, we examined the role of mobile device (MD) use for work during family time in the job incumbent-spouse relationship and how this MD use crosses over to affect the spouse's work life. Integrating the work-home resources model with family systems theory, we found that as job incumbents engage in MD use for work during family time, work-to-family conflict increases, as does the combined experience of relationship tension between job incumbents and spouses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000103DOI Listing
October 2018
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Caring for the elderly at work and home: Can a randomized organizational intervention improve psychological health?

J Occup Health Psychol 2019 Feb 7;24(1):36-54. Epub 2017 Dec 7.

Department of Economics, University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Although job stress models suggest that changing the work social environment to increase job resources improves psychological health, many intervention studies have weak designs and overlook influences of family caregiving demands. We tested the effects of an organizational intervention designed to increase supervisor social support for work and nonwork roles, and job control in a results-oriented work environment on the stress and psychological distress of health care employees who care for the elderly, while simultaneously considering their own family caregiving responsibilities. Using a group-randomized organizational field trial with an intent-to-treat design, 420 caregivers in 15 intervention extended-care nursing facilities were compared with 511 caregivers in 15 control facilities at 4 measurement times: preintervention and 6, 12, and 18 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000104DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5991990PMC
February 2019
24 Reads

Workflow interruptions and employee work outcomes: The moderating role of polychronicity.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Jul 16;23(3):417-427. Epub 2017 Nov 16.

LMU Center for Leadership and People Management.

Workflow interruptions are one of the most commonly experienced stressors at work. This research expands existing literature on workflow interruptions in a diary field study. We apply a within-person approach and investigate detrimental effects of daily workflow interruptions on both daily satisfaction with performance and daily emotional exhaustion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000094DOI Listing
July 2018
17 Reads

Explaining variations in the findings of presenteeism research: A meta-analytic investigation into the moderating effects of construct operationalizations and chronic health.

J Occup Health Psychol 2018 Oct 5;23(4):584-601. Epub 2017 Oct 5.

Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology.

The purpose of the present study is to theorize and test the moderating effects of two variables-the way presenteeism is operationalized and the presence of a preexisting chronic health condition-on the relationships between presenteeism and its antecedents (i.e., physical health, mental health, work factors, social factors, and personal factors). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ocp0000099DOI Listing
October 2018
12 Reads