7 results match your criteria Journal of Neurotherapy [Journal]

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EVENT-RELATED POTENTIAL STUDY OF ATTENTION REGULATION DURING ILLUSORY FIGURE CATEGORIZATION TASK IN ADHD, AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER, AND TYPICAL CHILDREN.

J Neurother 2012 2;16(1):12-31. Epub 2012 Mar 2.

Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY ; Bioengineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY.

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are very common developmental disorders which share some similar symptoms of social, emotional, and attentional deficits. This study is aimed to help understand the differences and similarities of these deficits using analysis of dense-array event-related potentials (ERP) during an illusory figure recognition task. Although ADHD and ASD seem very distinct, they have been shown to share some similarities in their symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10874208.2012.650119DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3544080PMC
March 2012
16 Reads

INDUCED EEG GAMMA OSCILLATION ALIGNMENT IMPROVES DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN AUTISM AND ADHD GROUP RESPONSES IN A FACIAL CATEGORIZATION TASK.

J Neurother 2012 Jan 29;16(2):78-91. Epub 2012 May 29.

Department of Bioengineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA.

INTRODUCTION: Children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often lack the ability to recognize and properly respond to emotional stimuli. Emotional deficits also characterize children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), in addition to exhibiting limited attention span. These abnormalities may effect a difference in the induced EEG gamma wave burst (35-45 Hz) peaked approximately 300-400 milliseconds following an emotional stimulus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10874208.2012.677631DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3383059PMC
January 2012
38 Reads

Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Modulates Evoked-Gamma Frequency Oscillations in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

J Neurother 2010 Jul;14(3):179-194

Department of Anatomical Sciences and Neurobiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40202.

INTRODUCTION: It has been reported that individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have abnormal reactions to the sensory environment and visuo-perceptual abnormalities. Electrophysiological research has provided evidence that gamma band activity (30-80 Hz) is a physiological indicator of the co-activation of cortical cells engaged in processing visual stimuli and integrating different features of a stimulus. A number of studies have found augmented and indiscriminative gamma band power at early stages of visual processing in ASD; this may be related to decreased inhibitory processing and an increase in the ratio of cortical excitation to inhibition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10874208.2010.501500DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2992386PMC
July 2010
23 Reads

Neurofeedback Effects on Evoked and Induced EEG Gamma Band Reactivity to Drug-related Cues in Cocaine Addiction.

J Neurother 2010 Jul;14(3):195-216

Department of Bioengineering, Speed School of Engineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.

INTRODUCTION: Preoccupation with drug and drug-related items is a typical characteristic of cocaine addicted individuals. It has been shown in multiple accounts that prolonged drug use has a profound effect on the EEG recordings of drug addicts when compared to controls during cue reactivity tests. Cue reactivity refers to a phenomenon in which individuals with a history of drug abuse exhibit excessive psychophysiological responses to cues associated with their drug of choice. Read More

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http://www.isnr-jnt.org/article/view/16603
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10874208.2010.501498DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2957125PMC
July 2010
17 Reads

Impaired Error Monitoring and Correction Function in Autism.

J Neurother 2010 Apr;14(2):79-95

Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202.

INTRODUCTION: Error monitoring and correction is one of the executive functions and is important for effective goal directed behavior. Deficient executive functioning, including reduced error monitoring ability, is one of the typical features of such neurodevelopmental disorders as autism, probably related to perseverative responding, stereotyped repetitive behaviors, and an inability to accurately monitor ongoing behavior. Our prior studies of behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures during performance on visual oddball tasks in high-functioning autistic (HFA) children showed that despite only minor differences in reaction times HFA children committed significantly more errors. Read More

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http://www.isnr-jnt.org/article/view/16612
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10874201003771561DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2879653PMC
April 2010
12 Reads

Attentional Bias to Drug- and Stress-Related Pictorial Cues in Cocaine Addiction Comorbid with PTSD.

J Neurother 2008 Dec;12(4):205-225

Department of Psychiatry, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292.

Cocaine addiction places a specific burden on mental health services through its comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders. Treatment of patients with cocaine abuse is more complicated when addiction is co-occurring with PTSD. This study used dense-array event-related potential (ERP) technique to investigate whether the patients with this form of dual diagnosis display excessive reactivity to both trauma and drug cues as compared to neutral cues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10874200802502185DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2772167PMC
December 2008
11 Reads

Event-Related Potential Study of Executive Dysfunctions in a Speeded Reaction Task in Cocaine Addiction.

J Neurother 2008 Dec;12(4):185-204

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292.

This study used a flanker task with NoGo elements to investigate frontal executive function deficits in 19 cocaine abusers. The executive functions of interest in this study were cortical inhibition or ability to withhold motor response, the ability to select an appropriate response among several competing ones, the ability to inhibit inappropriate responses, and the ability to detect error and exercise corrective control. These processes were evaluated with specific frontal and parietal event-related potentials (ERP) registered during performance on this speeded reaction time task with conflicting motor response demands. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10874200802502144DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2760844PMC
December 2008
9 Reads
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