1,225 results match your criteria Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation JNER [Journal]


Correction to: Boosting robot-assisted rehabilitation of stroke hemiparesis by individualized selection of upper limb movements - a pilot study.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Apr 15;16(1):51. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK.

The original article [1] contained a minor error in the following sentence in the Discussion. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0521-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6466732PMC

Effects of repeated waist-pull perturbations on gait stability in subjects with cerebellar ataxia.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Apr 11;16(1):50. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

Background: Damage to the cerebellum can affect neural structures involved in locomotion, causing gait and balance disorders. However, the integrity of cerebellum does not seem to be critical in managing sudden and unexpected environmental changes such as disturbances during walking. The cerebellum also plays a functional role in motor learning. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://jneuroengrehab.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0522-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6460671PMC
April 2019
1 Read

A suite of automated tools to quantify hand and wrist motor function after cervical spinal cord injury.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Apr 11;16(1):48. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

The University of Texas at Dallas, Texas Biomedical Device Center800 West Campbell Road, Richardson, TX, 75080-3021, USA.

Background: Cervical spinal cord injury (cSCI) often causes chronic upper extremity disability. Reliable measurement of arm function is critical for development of therapies to improve recovery after cSCI. In this study, we report a suite of automated rehabilitative tools to allow simple, quantitative assessment of hand and wrist motor function. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0518-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458684PMC

Grip control and motor coordination with implanted and surface electrodes while grasping with an osseointegrated prosthetic hand.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Apr 11;16(1):49. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Background: Replacement of a lost limb by an artificial substitute is not yet ideal. Resolution and coordination of motor control approximating that of a biological limb could dramatically improve the functionality of prosthetic devices, and thus reduce the gap towards a suitable limb replacement.

Methods: In this study, we investigated the control resolution and coordination exhibited by subjects with transhumeral amputation who were implanted with epimysial electrodes and an osseointegrated interface that provides bidirectional communication in addition to skeletal attachment (e-OPRA Implant System). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0511-2DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Predicting wrist kinematics from motor unit discharge timings for the control of active prostheses.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Apr 5;16(1):47. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Background: Current myoelectric control algorithms for active prostheses map time- and frequency-domain features of the interference EMG signal into prosthesis commands. With this approach, only a fraction of the available information content of the EMG is used and the resulting control fails to satisfy the majority of users. In this study, we predict joint angles of the three degrees of freedom of the wrist from motor unit discharge timings identified by decomposition of high-density surface EMG. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0516-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451263PMC

Muscle synergies demonstrate only minimal changes after treatment in cerebral palsy.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 29;16(1):46. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Stevens Way, Box 352600, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA.

Background: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have altered synergies compared to typically-developing peers, reflecting different neuromuscular control strategies used to move. While these children receive a variety of treatments to improve gait, whether synergies change after treatment, or are associated with treatment outcomes, remains unknown.

Methods: We evaluated synergies for 147 children with CP before and after three common treatments: botulinum toxin type-A injection (n = 52), selective dorsal rhizotomy (n = 38), and multi-level orthopaedic surgery (n = 57). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0502-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441188PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Detection of movement onset using EMG signals for upper-limb exoskeletons in reaching tasks.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 29;16(1):45. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

The BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa, Italy.

Background: To assist people with disabilities, exoskeletons must be provided with human-robot interfaces and smart algorithms capable to identify the user's movement intentions. Surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals could be suitable for this purpose, but their applicability in shared control schemes for real-time operation of assistive devices in daily-life activities is limited due to high inter-subject variability, which requires custom calibrations and training. Here, we developed a machine-learning-based algorithm for detecting the user's motion intention based on electromyographic signals, and discussed its applicability for controlling an upper-limb exoskeleton for people with severe arm disabilities. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0512-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440169PMC

Don't forget the trunk in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients: more muscle weakness and compensation than expected.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 27;16(1):44. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Department of Rehabilitation, Radboud University Medical Center, Donders Centre for Neuroscience, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen, HB, 6500, The Netherlands.

Background: Performing daily activities independently becomes more difficult in time for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) due to muscle weakness. When performing seated daily activities, the trunk plays an indispensable role besides the upper extremities. However, knowledge is lacking on the interaction between trunk and upper extremities. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0515-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437973PMC

Does severity of motor impairment affect reactive adaptation and fall-risk in chronic stroke survivors?

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 22;16(1):43. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Department of Physical Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1919, W Taylor St, (M/C 898), Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.

Background: A single-session of slip-perturbation training has shown to induce long-term fall risk reduction in older adults. Considering the spectrum of motor impairments and deficits in reactive balance after a cortical stroke, we aimed to determine if chronic stroke survivors could acquire and retain reactive adaptations to large slip-like perturbations and if these adaptations were dependent on severity of motor impairment.

Methods: Twenty-six chronic stroke participants were categorized into high and low-functioning groups based on their Chedoke-McMaster-Assessment scores. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0510-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6429795PMC
March 2019
6 Reads

Boosting robot-assisted rehabilitation of stroke hemiparesis by individualized selection of upper limb movements - a pilot study.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 20;16(1):42. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, B15 2TT, Birmingham, UK.

Background: Intensive robot-assisted training of the upper limb after stroke can reduce motor impairment, even at the chronic stage. However, the effectiveness of practice for recovery depends on the selection of the practised movements. We hypothesized that rehabilitation can be optimized by selecting the movements to be practiced based on the trainee's performance profile. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0513-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425657PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Long term at-home treatment with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) improves symptoms of cerebellar ataxia: a case report.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 19;16(1):41. Epub 2019 Mar 19.

Department of Neurology, New York University Langone Health, 10th floor, 222 East 41st Street, New York, NY, 10017, USA.

Background: Progressive cerebellar ataxia is a neurodegenerative disorder without effective treatment options that seriously hinders quality of life. Previously, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been demonstrated to benefit cerebellar functions (including improved motor control, learning and emotional processing) in healthy individuals and patients with neurological disorders. While tDCS is an emerging therapy, multiple daily sessions are needed for optimal clinical benefit. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0514-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425598PMC

Immediate after-effects of robot-assisted gait with pelvic support or pelvic constraint on overground walking in healthy subjects.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 15;16(1):40. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Sint Maartenskliniek Research, PO BOX 9011, 6500, GM, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Background: Recovery of walking is a primary rehabilitation goal of most stroke survivors. Control of pelvic movements is one of the essential determinants of gait, yet surprisingly, conventional robot-assisted gait trainers constrain pelvic movements. Novel robot-assisted gait trainers, such as LOPES II, are able to support pelvic movements during gait. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0506-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6420738PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Energy cost of ambulation in trans-tibial amputees using a dynamic-response foot with hydraulic versus rigid 'ankle': insights from body centre of mass dynamics.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 14;16(1):39. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Bradford, Bradford, BD7 1DP, UK.

Background: Previous research has shown that use of a dynamic-response prosthetic foot (DRF) that incorporates a small passive hydraulic ankle device (hyA-F), provides certain biomechanical benefits over using a DRF that has no ankle mechanism (rigA-F). This study investigated whether use of a hyA-F in unilateral trans-tibial amputees (UTA) additionally provides metabolic energy expenditure savings and increases the symmetry in walking kinematics, compared to rigA-F.

Methods: Nine active UTA completed treadmill walking trials at zero gradient (at 0. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0508-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417010PMC

Evaluation of tremor interference with control of voluntary reaching movements in patients with Parkinson's disease.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 13;16(1):38. Epub 2019 Mar 13.

Laboratory of Neurorehabilitation Engineering, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai, 200030, China.

Background: A large population of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) displays the symptom of resting tremor. However, the extent that resting tremor may affect the performance of movement control has not been evaluated specifically. This study aims at establishing methods to quantitatively evaluate motor performance in PD patients with tremor, and at analyzing the interfering effects of tremor on control of reaching movements. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0505-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417201PMC

The effect of surface inclination and limb on knee loading measures in transtibial prosthesis users.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 12;16(1):37. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 505 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, K1H8M2, Canada.

Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease caused by the wearing of joint cartilage and bone. Literature has established that a prosthesis user's intact limb is at greater risk of developing OA. This study analyzed the effect of commonly encountered surface inclinations on knee joint loading measures in able-bodied and transtibial prosthesis users. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0509-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417113PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Development of a battery-free ultrasonically powered functional electrical stimulator for movement restoration after paralyzing spinal cord injury.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 8;16(1):36. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, China.

Background: Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is used to restore movements in paretic limbs after severe paralyses resulting from neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Most chronic FES systems utilize an implantable electrical stimulator to deliver a small electric current to the targeted muscle or nerve to stimulate muscle contractions. These implanted stimulators are generally bulky, mainly due to the size of the batteries. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0501-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6408863PMC
March 2019
1 Read
2.740 Impact Factor

Applying LDA-based pattern recognition to predict isometric shoulder and elbow torque generation in individuals with chronic stroke with moderate to severe motor impairment.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 5;16(1):35. Epub 2019 Mar 5.

Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Northwestern University, 645 N Michigan Ave, Suite 1100, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA.

Background: Abnormal synergy is a major stroke-related movement impairment that presents as an unintentional contraction of muscles throughout a limb. The flexion synergy, consisting of involuntary flexion coupling of the paretic elbow, wrist, and fingers, is caused by and proportional to the amount of shoulder abduction effort and limits reaching function. A wearable exoskeleton capable of predicting movement intent could augment abduction effort and therefore reduce the negative effects of distal joint flexion synergy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0504-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6399836PMC
March 2019
7 Reads

Introducing the thematic series on transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for motor rehabilitation: on the way to optimal clinical use.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Mar 4;16(1):34. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Department of Computer and Information Science, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0507-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6399883PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Novel gait training alters functional brain connectivity during walking in chronic stroke patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Feb 28;16(1):33. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Department of Physical Therapy and Assistive Technology, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec 2, Li Nong St., Shih-Pai, Taipei, 112, Taiwan.

Background: A recent study has demonstrated that a turning-based treadmill program yields greater improvements in gait speed and temporal symmetry than regular treadmill training in chronic stroke patients. However, it remains unknown how this novel and challenging gait training shapes the cortico-cortical network and cortico-spinal network during walking in chronic stroke patients. The purpose of this study was to examine how a novel type of gait training, which is an unfamiliar but effective task for people with chronic stroke, enhances brain reorganization. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0503-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6396471PMC
February 2019

Effect of the Wii Sports Resort on the improvement in attention, processing speed and working memory in moderate stroke.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Feb 28;16(1):32. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Faculty of Psychology at University of Deusto (Office DARC 1 BIS), 24 Avda. Universidades, 48007, Bilbao, Basque Country, Spain.

Background: Stroke is the most common neurological disease in the world. After the stroke, some people suffer a cognitive disability. Commercial videogames have been used after stroke for physical rehabilitation; however, their use in cognitive rehabilitation has hardly been studied. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0500-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6394083PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Quantitative assessment of cerebellar ataxia, through automated limb functional tests.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Feb 27;16(1):31. Epub 2019 Feb 27.

Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville, 3052, Australia.

Background: Cerebellar damage can often result in disabilities affecting the peripheral regions of the body. These include poor and inaccurate coordination, tremors and irregular movements that often manifest as disorders associated with balance, gait and speech. The severity assessment of Cerebellar ataxia (CA) is determined by expert opinion and is likely to be subjective in nature. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0490-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6391824PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Actigraph assessment for measuring upper limb activity in unilateral cerebral palsy.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Feb 22;16(1):30. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Department of Developmental Neuroscience, IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris, Viale del Tirreno 331, 56128 Calambrone, Pisa, Italy.

Background: Detecting differences in upper limb use in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP) is challenging and highly dependent on examiner experience. The recent introduction of technologies in the clinical environment, and in particular the use of wearable sensors, can provide quantitative measurement to overcome this issue. This study aims to evaluate ActiGraph GT3X+ as a tool for measuring asymmetry in the use of the two upper limbs (ULs) during the assessment with a standardized clinical tool, the Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) in UCP patients aged 3-25 years compared to age-matched typically developing (TD) subjects. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0499-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6387534PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Physiological and kinematic effects of a soft exosuit on arm movements.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Feb 22;16(1):29. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Institut für Technische Informatik (ZITI), Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Heidelberg Universit, Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: Soft wearable robots (exosuits), being lightweight, ergonomic and low power-demanding, are attractive for a variety of applications, ranging from strength augmentation in industrial scenarios, to medical assistance for people with motor impairments. Understanding how these devices affect the physiology and mechanics of human movements is fundamental for quantifying their benefits and drawbacks, assessing their suitability for different applications and guiding a continuous design refinement.

Methods: We present a novel wearable exosuit for assistance/augmentation of the elbow and introduce a controller that compensates for gravitational forces acting on the limb while allowing the suit to cooperatively move with its wearer. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0495-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6385456PMC
February 2019

A quantitative taxonomy of human hand grasps.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Feb 15;16(1):28. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Information Systems Institute, University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland (HES-SO), Sierre, Switzerland.

Background: A proper modeling of human grasping and of hand movements is fundamental for robotics, prosthetics, physiology and rehabilitation. The taxonomies of hand grasps that have been proposed in scientific literature so far are based on qualitative analyses of the movements and thus they are usually not quantitatively justified.

Methods: This paper presents to the best of our knowledge the first quantitative taxonomy of hand grasps based on biomedical data measurements. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0488-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6377750PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Correction to: Locomotion and cadence detection using a single trunk-fixed accelerometer: validity for children with cerebral palsy in daily life-like conditions.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Feb 12;16(1):27. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Laboratory of Movement Analysis and Measurement, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 9, CH-1015, Lausanne, Switzerland.

The original article [1] contained a minor error whereby the middle initial of Christopher J. Newman's name was mistakenly omitted. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0498-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6373023PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

The FreeD module for the Lokomat facilitates a physiological movement pattern in healthy people - a proof of concept study.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Feb 6;16(1):26. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Rehabilitation Center Affoltern am Albis, Children's University Hospital Zurich, Mühlebergstrasse 104, CH-8910, Affoltern am Albis, Switzerland.

Background: A contralateral pelvic drop, a transverse rotation and a lateral translation of the pelvis are essential features of normal human gait. These motions are often restricted in robot-assisted gait devices. The optional FreeD module of the driven gait orthosis Lokomat (Hocoma AG, Switzerland) incorporates guided lateral translation and transverse rotation of the pelvis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0496-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6366098PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Locomotion and cadence detection using a single trunk-fixed accelerometer: validity for children with cerebral palsy in daily life-like conditions.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Feb 4;16(1):24. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Laboratory of Movement Analysis and Measurement, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Station 9, CH-1015, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Background: Physical therapy interventions for ambulatory youth with cerebral palsy (CP) often focus on activity-based strategies to promote functional mobility and participation in physical activity. The use of activity monitors validated for this population could help to design effective personalized interventions by providing reliable outcome measures. The objective of this study was to devise a single-sensor based algorithm for locomotion and cadence detection, robust to atypical gait patterns of children with CP in the real-life like monitoring conditions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0494-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6360691PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Uneven terrain exacerbates the deficits of a passive prosthesis in the regulation of whole body angular momentum in individuals with a unilateral transtibial amputation.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Feb 4;16(1):25. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Biomechanics and Center for Research in Human Movement Variability, College of Education, University of Nebraska at Omaha, 6160 University Drive South, Omaha, NE, 68182-0860, USA.

Background: Uneven ground is a frequently encountered, yet little-studied challenge for individuals with amputation. The absence of control at the prosthetic ankle to facilitate correction for surface inconsistencies, and diminished sensory input from the extremity, add unpredictability to an already complex control problem, and leave limited means to produce appropriate corrective responses in a timely manner. Whole body angular momentum, L, and its variability across several strides may provide insight into the extent to which an individual can regulate their movement in such a context. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0497-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6360756PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Controlling a motorized orthosis to follow elbow volitional movement: tests with individuals with pathological tremor.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Feb 1;16(1):23. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Menrva Research Group, Schools of Mechatronic Systems Engineering and Engineering Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada.

Background: There is a need for alternative treatment options for tremor patients who do not respond well to medications or surgery, either due to side effects or poor efficacy, or that are excluded from surgery. The study aims to evaluate feasibility of a voluntary-driven, speed-controlled tremor rejection approach with individuals with pathological tremor. The suppression approach was investigated using a robotic orthosis for suppression of elbow tremor. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0484-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6359763PMC
February 2019
3 Reads

Design, development, and evaluation of a local sensor-based gait phase recognition system using a logistic model decision tree for orthosis-control.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Feb 1;16(1):22. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, K1H8M2, Canada.

Background: Functionality and versatility of microprocessor-controlled stance-control knee-ankle-foot orthoses (M-SCKAFO) are dictated by their embedded control systems. Proper gait phase recognition (GPR) is required to enable these devices to provide sufficient knee-control at the appropriate time, thereby reducing the incidence of knee-collapse and fall events. Ideally, the M-SCKAFO sensor system would be local to the thigh and knee, to facilitate innovative orthosis designs that allow more flexibility for ankle joint selection and other orthosis components. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0486-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6359850PMC
February 2019

The effect of 8 weeks of treatment with transcranial pulsed electromagnetic fields on hand tremor and inter-hand coherence in persons with Parkinson's disease.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 31;16(1):19. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Neurology, Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) tremor comprises asymmetric rest and postural tremor with unilateral onset. Tremor intensity can be amplified by stress and reduced by attention, and the medical treatment is complex. Mirror movements and unintentional synchronization of bimanual movements, possibly caused by insufficient inhibition of inter-hemispheric crosstalk, have been reported in PD, indicating a lag of lateralization. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0491-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6357382PMC
January 2019

Tele-monitored tDCS rehabilitation: feasibility, challenges and future perspectives in Parkinson's disease.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 31;16(1):20. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

The Marlene and Paolo Fresco Institute for Parkinson's and Movement Disorders, Department of Neurology, NYU School of Medicine, 222 East 41st Street, New York, NY, 10017, USA.

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a modality of non-invasive brain stimulation involving the application of low amplitude direct current via surface electrodes on the scalp. tDCS has been studied in healthy populations and in multiple brain disorders and has the potential to be a treatment for several neuropsychiatric conditions by virtue of its capability of influencing cognitive, motor and behavioral processes. tDCS is a generally safe technique when performed within standardized protocols in research or clinical settings. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0481-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6357497PMC
January 2019
7 Reads
2.740 Impact Factor

Altered muscle activation patterns (AMAP): an analytical tool to compare muscle activity patterns of hemiparetic gait with a normative profile.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 31;16(1):21. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Health Sciences and Research, College of Health Professions, Medical University of South Carolina, 77 President Street, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA.

Background: Stroke survivors often have lower extremity sensorimotor impairments, resulting in an inability to sufficiently recruit muscle activity at appropriate times in a gait cycle. Currently there is a lack of a standardized method that allows comparison of muscle activation in hemiparetic gait post-stroke to a normative profile.

Methods: We developed a new tool to quantify altered muscle activation patterns (AMAP). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0487-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6357420PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Electroencephalography-based endogenous brain-computer interface for online communication with a completely locked-in patient.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 30;16(1):18. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, 04763, South Korea.

Background: Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have demonstrated the potential to provide paralyzed individuals with new means of communication, but an electroencephalography (EEG)-based endogenous BCI has never been successfully used for communication with a patient in a completely locked-in state (CLIS).

Methods: In this study, we investigated the possibility of using an EEG-based endogenous BCI paradigm for online binary communication by a patient in CLIS. A female patient in CLIS participated in this study. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://jneuroengrehab.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0493-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354345PMC
January 2019
6 Reads
2.740 Impact Factor

Recent advances in rehabilitation for Parkinson's Disease with Exergames: A Systematic Review.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 29;16(1):17. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Medical Psychology | Neuropsychology and Gender Studies & Center for Neuropsychological Diagnostics and Intervention (CeNDI), University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

Objective: The goal of this contribution is to gather and to critically analyze recent evidence regarding the potential of exergaming for Parkinson's disease (PD) rehabilitation and to provide an up-to-date analysis of the current state of studies on exergame-based therapy in PD patients.

Methods: We performed our search based on the conclusions of a previous systematic review published in 2014. Inclusion criteria were articles published in the indexed databases Pubmed, Scopus, Sciencedirect, IEEE and Cochrane published since January 1, 2014. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0492-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6352377PMC
January 2019
12 Reads

Evaluation of biomechanical gait parameters of patients with Cerebral Palsy at three different levels of gait assistance using the CPWalker.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 28;16(1):15. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Neural and Cognitive Engineering Group, CAR of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Arganda del Rey, Madrid, 28500, Spain.

Background: Cerebral Palsy (CP) is the most common cause of permanent serious physical disability in childhood. Although many platforms have been developed, so far there are still not precise guidelines for the rehabilitation of the population with CP. The CPWalker is a robotic platform for the rehabilitation of children with CP, through which they can start experiencing autonomous locomotion in the rehabilitation environment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://jneuroengrehab.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0485-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350321PMC
January 2019
9 Reads

A postural unloading task to assess fast corrective responses in the upper limb following stroke.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 28;16(1):16. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Laboratory of Integrative Motor Behaviour, Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Queen's University, 18 Stuart St, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6, Canada.

Background: Robotic technologies to measure human behavior are emerging as a new approach to assess brain function. Recently, we developed a robot-based postural Load Task to assess corrective responses to mechanical disturbances to the arm and found impairments in many participants with stroke compared to a healthy cohort (Bourke et al, J NeuroEngineering Rehabil 12: 7, 2015). However, a striking feature was the large range and skewed distribution of healthy performance. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://jneuroengrehab.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0483-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350318PMC
January 2019
6 Reads

Transcranial direct current stimulation for the treatment of motor impairment following traumatic brain injury.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 25;16(1):14. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 82, Gumi-ro 173 Beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 13620, Republic of Korea.

After traumatic brain injury (TBI), motor impairment is less common than neurocognitive or behavioral problems. However, about 30% of TBI survivors have reported motor deficits limiting the activities of daily living or participation. After acute primary and secondary injuries, there are subsequent changes including increased GABA-mediated inhibition during the subacute stage and neuroplastic alterations that are adaptive or maladaptive during the chronic stage. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://jneuroengrehab.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0489-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6347832PMC
January 2019
8 Reads

Augmented feedback for powered wheelchair training in a virtual environment.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 18;16(1):12. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Interdisciplinary Research Center in Rehabilitation (CRIR), Montreal, Canada.

Background: Powered wheelchair (PW) driving is a complex activity and requires the acquisition of several skills. Given the risks involved with PW use, safe and effective training methods are needed. Virtual reality training allows users to practice difficult tasks in a safe environment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0482-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6339295PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Safety of long-term electrical peripheral nerve stimulation: review of the state of the art.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 18;16(1):13. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Biomechatronics and Neurorehabilitation Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Background: Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves is used in a variety of applications such as restoring motor function in paralyzed limbs, and more recently, as means to provide intuitive sensory feedback in limb prostheses. However, literature on the safety requirements for stimulation is scarce, particularly for chronic applications. Some aspects of nerve interfacing such as the effect of stimulation parameters on electrochemical processes and charge limitations have been reviewed, but often only for applications in the central nervous system. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-018-0474-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6339286PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Adapting myoelectric control in real-time using a virtual environment.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 16;16(1):11. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Center for Bionic Medicine, Shirley Ryan Ability Lab, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA.

Background: Pattern recognition technology allows for more intuitive control of myoelectric prostheses. However, the need to collect electromyographic data to initially train the pattern recognition system, and to re-train it during prosthesis use, adds complexity that can make using such a system difficult. Although experienced clinicians may be able to guide users to ensure successful data collection methods, they may not always be available when a user needs to (re)train their device. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0480-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6335715PMC
January 2019
1 Read

User activity recognition system to improve the performance of environmental control interfaces: a pilot study with patients.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 16;16(1):10. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Miguel Hernández University of Elche, Av. Universidad w/n, Ed. Innova, Elche, 03202, Spain.

Background: Assistive technologies aim to increase quality of life, reduce dependence on care giver and on the long term care system. Several studies have demonstrated the effectiveness in the use of assistive technology for environment control and communication systems. The progress of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) research together with exoskeleton enable a person with motor impairment to interact with new elements in the environment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-018-0477-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6334466PMC
January 2019
10 Reads
2.740 Impact Factor

Physical activity in wheelchair-using youth with spina bifida: an observational study.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 14;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Research Group Lifestyle and Health, HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: Even though typically developing youth are already at risk for physical inactivity, youth with spina bifida may be even at higher risk as a consequence of their reduced mobility. No objective data is available for youth with spina bifida who use a manual wheelchair, so the seriousness of the problem is unknown. The purpose of this observational study was to quantify physical activity in wheelchair-using youth with spina bifida and evaluate the intensity of activities. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-018-0464-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6332897PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

A modified standardized nine hole peg test for valid and reliable kinematic assessment of dexterity post-stroke.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 14;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation; Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå, Building 15, Umeå University, SE-901 87, Umeå, Sweden.

Background: Impairments in dexterity after stroke are commonly assessed by the Nine Hole Peg Test (NHPT), where the only outcome variable is the time taken to complete the test. We aimed to kinematically quantify and to compare the motor performance of the NHPT in persons post-stroke and controls (discriminant validity), to compare kinematics to clinical assessments of upper extremity function (convergent validity), and to establish the within-session reliability.

Methods: The NHPT was modified and standardized (S-NHPT) by 1) replacing the original peg container with an additional identical nine hole pegboard, 2) adding a specific order of which peg to pick, and 3) specifying to insert the peg taken from the original pegboard into the corresponding hole of the target pegboard. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-019-0479-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6332630PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

Control of cortical oscillatory frequency by a closed-loop system.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 9;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Systems Neuroscience, IDIBAPS, Rosselló 149-153, Barcelona, 08036, Spain.

Background: We present a closed-loop system able to control the frequency of slow oscillations (SO) spontaneously generated by the cortical network in vitro. The frequency of SO can be controlled by direct current (DC) electric fields within a certain range. Here we set out to design a system that would be able to autonomously bring the emergent oscillatory activity to a target frequency determined by the experimenter. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-018-0470-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327406PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Stimulation of paralysed quadriceps muscles with sequentially and spatially distributed electrodes during dynamic knee extension.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 7;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Swiss Paraplegic Centre, Nottwil, 6207, Switzerland.

Background: During functional electrical stimulation (FES) tasks with able-bodied (AB) participants, spatially distributed sequential stimulation (SDSS) has demonstrated substantial improvements in power output and fatigue properties compared to conventional single electrode stimulation (SES). The aim of this study was to compare the properties of SDSS and SES in participants with spinal cord injury (SCI) in a dynamic isokinetic knee extension task simulating knee movement during recumbent cycling.

Method: Using a case-series design, m. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-018-0471-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322281PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

Fixed muscle synergies and their potential to improve the intuitive control of myoelectric assistive technology for upper extremities.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 7;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Center for Human Movement Sciences, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713, AV, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Background: Users of myoelectric controlled assistive technology (AT) for upper extremities experience difficulties in controlling this technology in daily life, partly because the control is non-intuitive. Making the control of myoelectric AT intuitive may resolve the experienced difficulties. The present paper was inspired by the suggestion that intuitive control may be achieved if the control of myoelectric AT is based on neuromotor control principles. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-018-0469-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323752PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Dynamic balance and instrumented gait variables are independent predictors of falls following stroke.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 7;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 7.

School of Health and Sport Sciences, University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Sippy Downs, 4556, Australia.

Background: Falls are common following stroke and are frequently related to deficits in balance and mobility. This study aimed to investigate the predictive strength of gait and balance variables for evaluating post-stroke falls risk over 12 months following rehabilitation discharge.

Methods: A prospective cohort study was undertaken in inpatient rehabilitation centres based in Australia and Singapore. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-018-0478-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322221PMC
January 2019
5 Reads

Gait variability following abrupt removal of external stabilization decreases with practice in incomplete spinal cord injury but increases in non-impaired individuals.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 7;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.

Background: Individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) exhibit considerable lateral center of mass (COM) movement variability during gait transitions from a stabilizing to unassisted environment, while non-impaired individuals do not. To understand how iSCI influences gait adaption, we examined persons with and without iSCI performing repeated locomotor transitions. We hypothesized that, with practice, individuals with iSCI would prioritize COM control performance during the transition as exhibited by a reduction in kinematic variability. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://jneuroengrehab.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-018-0475-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322313PMC
January 2019
13 Reads

Bimanual coordination during a physically coupled task in unilateral spastic cerebral palsy children.

J Neuroeng Rehabil 2019 Jan 3;16(1). Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London, SW7 2AZ, UK.

Background: Single object bimanual manipulation, or physically-coupled bimanual tasks, are ubiquitous in daily lives. However, the predominant focus of previous studies has been on uncoupled bimanual actions, where the two hands act independently to manipulate two disconnected objects. In this paper, we explore interlimb coordination among children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP), by investigating upper limb motor control during a single object bimanual lifting task. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12984-018-0454-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6318978PMC
January 2019