429 results match your criteria Journal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA[Journal]


Black Student Participation Rates Also a Concern for Educational Program Assessments.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Dec;28(2):40-43

Chamberlain University, Chicago, IL.

Lower participation rates in the African-American population are not limited to medical research. Extant research reveals African-American students also participate at lower rates than other racial groups on college and university surveys. Students in medical and health professions programs are routinely surveyed to investigate students' perspectives about the educational curriculum, social and cultural environment, quality of faculty and resources, etc. Read More

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December 2017
12 Reads

Exploring Older Adults' Perceptions of the Utility and Ease of Use of Personal Emergency Response Systems.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 12;28(2):32-39

Graduate of the Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York, NY

The aim of this exploratory-descriptive study was to explore and describe perceptions of the utility and ease of use of personal emergency response systems (PERS) among older adults who are aging in place. This study explored the question of "What is the meaning of a PERS use for a functionally-impaired older adult?" Using an exploratory-descriptive qualitative design, 14 subjects were recruited in Queens, NY, who met the study's eligibility through the selection criteria. A 9-question in-person interview guide was used to conduct the face-to-face, audio-taped, semi-structured interviews in an effort to gather information on the participants' experiences with using a PERS. Read More

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December 2017
2 Reads

The Root of Physical Inactivity Among African-American Women: Identifying Exercise Friendly Hairstyles.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Dec;28(2):26-31

Howard University College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences, Washington, DC.

The purpose of this study was to provide information regarding hair maintenance that would increase physical activity among African-American women. A descriptive study design was used, along with Survey Monkey to obtain online responses from African-American female participants over the age of 18 that were associated with four predominately African-American social organizations. Participants were asked to rate the "ease of use" of 8 hairstyles commonly worn by Black or African-American women living in the United States as it related to three physical activity (PA) intensity categories: light to moderate, vigorous, and water-based physical activity. Read More

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December 2017
3 Reads

The Lived Experience of African-American Informal Caregivers of Family Members with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Dec;28(2):19-25

Southeastern Louisiana University School of Nursing, Hammond, LA.

The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the lived experience of African-American informal caregivers of family members with Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD) in a home environment. Using a qualitative, phenomenological approach, a purposive sample of 16 African-American informal caregivers completed an in-depth interview that lasted from 30 to 60 minutes. Four themes emerged: (a) a sense of obligation, (b) an arduous journey, (c) sentinel events, and (d) faith in God. Read More

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December 2017
3 Reads

Being African-American, Obese, Female, and Residing in an Urban Area: The Lived Experience.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Dec;28(2):13-18

College of Nursing, Office of Health Research, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI.

The objective of this qualitative study was to explore the experience of being African-American, obese, female, and residing in an urban area. Critical Social Theory of Black Feminist Thought guided the study framework and study questions. Within this framework, African-American women are multidimensional human beings with attitudes, habits, and personalities influenced by their religious beliefs, family, school, friends, and racial history. Read More

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December 2017
1 Read

Beauty for Ashes: A Church-Based Diabetes Care Program.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Dec;28(2):7-12

College of Nursing, Office of Health Research, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI.

The pilot study described here was a test of interventions designed to enhance long-term disease management of African-Americans with type 2 diabetes in faith-based organizations. A quasi-experimental design based on 46 participants was used comparing three interventions: guided imagery, group counseling, and routine care. Unexpectedly, the number of self-reported hypoglycemic episodes significantly increased in the Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy (REBT) group, depressive symptoms significantly increased in the guided imagery group, and the mean hemoglobin A1c values did not significantly differ for any group. Read More

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December 2017
2 Reads

Screening for Physical Activity and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors Among Rural African-American Women.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Dec;28(2):1-6

College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC.

Physical inactivity can have major implications for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, which are leading causes of morbidity among African-American women. Recruiting in rural populations can present challenges and strategies that work in one community but may not be successful in another community. This study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and implementation of community-based screening using an abbreviated Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) Risk Factor self-report survey in a geographic region where these data were previously unavailable. Read More

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December 2017
5 Reads

Bump-Fire Stocks: Finding a Way to Outlaw Their Usage.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 12;28(2):vi-viii

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December 2017
1 Read

The Growing Impact of Legionella in the Flint Water Crisis.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2018 Jul;29(1):44-50

University of Michigan-Flint School of Nursing, 2180 William S. White Building, 303 E. Kearsley Street, Flint, MI 48502- 1950.

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan raised national awareness about lead- tainted drinking water, particularly its harm to children and pregnant and lactating women. However, according to recent findings, there may be another by-product of this man-made crisis. Failure to use anticorrosive material in the water, a practice mandated by the 1978 Clean Water Act, is being linked to an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease, an illness detrimental primarily to adults over 65 years of age. Read More

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July 2018
3 Reads

How to Create a Telephone Follow-Up Program to Improve Glycemic Control in Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetic African-American Women.

Authors:
Veronica M Deas

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2018 Jul;29(1):38-43

Palmetto Health, 14 Medical Park Drive, Suite 315, Columbia, SC 29203.

Type 2 diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States and this disease disproportionately affects African-Americans and other minorities. Diabetes self-management education has been shown through research to help patients achieve at-goal HgbA1c levels leading to a decrease in complications; however, patients do not attend these classes as much as they should. The creation of a telephone follow-up plan can be an option to improve glycemic control for the primary care clinician caring for uncontrolled Type 2 diabetic African-American females. Read More

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July 2018
1 Read

The Simultaneous Experiences of Being a Nurse Faculty Member and PhD Student: A Phenomenological Inquiry.

Authors:
Lolita McCarthy

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2018 Jul;29(1):30-37

Travel RN, Critical Care, Cerebro Solutions, 800 Ocala Road, Suite 300-117 Tallahassee, FL 32304.

The demand for nursing faculty with doctoral degrees has prompted universities to devise strategies to hasten doctoral preparation. Insufficient preparation of nursing faculty negatively impacted the ability of colleges of nursing to enroll qualified applicants. In 2011, 75,000 applicants were turned away (AACN, 2012). Read More

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July 2018
2 Reads

Using Case Study Methodology to Explore the Role of Discrimination in Workplace Incivility.

Authors:
Cheryl Green

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2018 Jul;29(1):22-29

Southern Connecticut State University, Department of Nursing, Jennings Hall, Office 121, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515.

Exclusionary behaviors can be detrimental to the health and well-being of faculty in the workplace. When colleagues are judged by their peers because of the color of their skin, the language they speak, their gender, or who they choose to love (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, asexual, or questioning), affected faculty are left emotionally and physically vulnerable. Institutions of higher learning must set standards of zero tolerance for faculty-to-faculty incivility. Read More

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July 2018
2 Reads

Evaluating Relevance of Nursing Theories in Cross-Cultural and International Contexts.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2018 Jul;29(1):13-21

The Gambia College School of Nursing and Midwifery, Banjul, Gambia.

Nursing has evolved over the past five decades in propagating the development of theoretical and empirical evidence through the application of nursing theories. The objective of this commentary is to stimulate scholarly debate focused on the development, application, and adaptation of nursing theory by nurse scientists, its relevance in the cross-cultural contexts, and to discuss future directions with a call to action using Leininger's seminal work on Culture Care Theory. The implicit nature of nursing theories preclude the optimal use and application in cross- cultural contexts because of the limitations in achieving conceptual, semantic, and operational equivalence. Read More

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July 2018
1 Read

Promoting Self-Management of Hypertension in the African-American Church.

Authors:
Hazel L White

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2018 07;29(1):6-12

Herzing University Online, Menomonee Falls, WI.

Hypertension (HTN) continues to be one of the most preventable diseases that have global impact. The prevalence of HTN in African-Americans is considered to be among the highest in the world. This investigation sought to determine whether a church-based self-management program would aid African-American adults (18 years of age and above) in reducing their blood pressure (BP). Read More

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July 2018
3 Reads

African-American Women's Perceived Risk for Cardiovascular Disease versus Framingham Risk.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2018 Jul;29(1):1-5

Department of Community, Systems, and Mental Health Nursing, Rush University College of Nursing.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among African-American women in the United States. Accurate CVD risk perception may motivate these women to participate in health-promoting behaviors; however, perceived risk may not align with objective CVD risk. Our objective was to examine CVD risk perception, risk factors, and objective estimated risk (based on Framingham scores). Read More

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July 2018
3 Reads

We Ain't No Ways Tired: We Demand a Ban on the AR-15 Rifle Now.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2018 Jul;29(1):vi-viii

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July 2018
1 Read

The Patient-Centered Medical Home Model and Diabetes Outcomes: An Integrative Literature Review.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Jul;28(1):60-63

The purpose of this integrative review was to synthesize the existing evidence on diabetes care within a Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model to evaluate its effectiveness on quality outcomes. Literature published in English between 2005 and 2015 was searched using thefollowing keywords: PCMH and diabetes, comprehensive care, care coordination, patient-centered care, quality and safety, and accessible care. The following databases were searched: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Cochrane Review, Academic Premier (EBSCO), and Psych INFO. Read More

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July 2017
22 Reads

Health Coaching Strategy to Improve Glycemic Control in African- American Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: An Integrative Review.

Authors:
Larider Ruffin

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Jul;28(1):54-59

Diabetes is a complex, chronic illness requiring continuous medical care with multifactorial risk-reduction strategies for appropriate glycemic control. Type 2 diabetes remains a global epidemic secondary to increases in physical inactivity and obesity. While many populations are at risk, African-Americans bear a disproportionate burden from diabetes and its complications. Read More

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July 2017
7 Reads

Views of Obesity in Black Women from a Cultural Perspective.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Jul;28(1):50-53

This article conveys the authors' perspectives and insights gained during the development and implementation of their experience with a community-based intervention designed to address obesity among Black women. The reader gets a look at the authors' personal weight struggles, as the intervention they designed to help others transformed their lives as well as the participants. The authors also shared their perspectives on the impact of religion and spirituality on healthy lifestyles. Read More

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July 2017
7 Reads

The World Health Organization - Community Empowerment Model in Addressing Food Insecurity in Low-Income African-American Women: A Review of the Literature.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Jul;28(1):43-49

Numerous researchers have examined the serious consequences of food insecurity and food deserts affecting the nutritional health of poor or low-income African-American women and their families. Food insecurity is defined as having limited or uncertain capacityfor acquiring sufficient, safe, and nutritious food at all times to meet one's dietary needs, while food deserts refer to economically and socially-deprived inner city areas with inadequate food supply that are often inhabited by low-income groups. Researchers have found that despite the capacity of community-level resources such as SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) and WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) supporting healthy nutrition, food insecurity persists among some recipients of both nutritional resources. Read More

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July 2017
6 Reads

The Community Compass Project: A Community Engagement Model Targeting African-Americans in the Low Country of South Carolina.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Jul;28(1):38-42

Despite cutting edge progress in early detection, risk reduction, and prevention, unique contextual and sociocultural factors contribute to higher mortality rates for selected cancers in African-American men and women. Collaborative community engagement and outreach programming strategies that focus on sustainability and grass-roots organizing can inform health risk disparities, build trust, and allow communities to take ownership of their own health needs. This paper describes a successful evidence-based community engagement intervention woven into the social and interpersonal fabric of the African-American community in Charleston, South Carolina. Read More

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July 2017
14 Reads

A Qualitative Study to Explore the Male Nursing Student's Coping with Experiences in a Maternal-Newborn Nursing Course.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Jul;28(1):31-37

Nursing today is predominantly a female profession; however, men are reentering the profession in record numbers and challenging the perspective that they are inappropriate in caregiver roles, or incapable of providing compassionate and sensitive care. This study investigated the perceptions and experiences of male nursing students in a maternal-newborn nursing course and their coping strategies in dealing with the clinical rotation role stress. A purposive sample included 11 male nursing students who completed a survey, and 6 out of the 11 participated in individual interviews. Read More

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July 2017
2 Reads

Improving Glycemic Control in a Geriatric Population.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Jul;28(1):24-30

This quality improvement project evaluated whether offering a series of 5 structured interdisciplinary diabetic educational teaching sessions would improve glycemic control as measured by random blood sugars (RBS) in a Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). Five diabetic educational sessions were held over a 4-week period with 50 participants (N = 50). Data were analyzed and displayed using descriptive statistics and figures. Read More

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July 2017
3 Reads

Improving Blood Pressure and Weight in Patients with Diabetes.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Jul;28(1):20-23

The purpose of this study was to improve healthcare outcomes by reducing blood pressure and weight in adult patients with diabetes at afederally qualified health center. NextGen electronic health record was used to review aggregate data of blood pressures and weight pre-intervention and post-intervention for women and men (N = 304) between 20 and 87 years of age with type 2 diabetes and a BMI : 30. Findings from this study showed that blood pressure and weight did not improve as anticipated using a variety of educational approaches and strategies within the study population. Read More

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July 2017
2 Reads

Factors Influencing Participation in the YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program: A DNP Project.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Jul;28(1):14-19

Pre-diabetes is the underlying pathology for type 2 diabetes. The Diabetes Prevention Program is a proven, effective strategy to control or prevent type 2 diabetes; however, there is limited data on what motivates people with pre-diabetes to participate in a Diabetes Prevention Program. Cross-sectional analysis of survey data from adults with pre-diabetes was conducted from October to November 2015. Read More

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July 2017
14 Reads

A Church-Based Diabetes Care Survey in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Jul;28(1):9-13

Forty-eight (N = 48) African-Caribbeans participated in a church-based diabetes care survey in St. Thomas, U.S. Read More

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July 2017
12 Reads

A Multiple Behavior Self-Monitoring Intervention for African- American Veterans with Type 2 Diabetes: A Feasibility Implementation Study.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Jul;28(1):1-8

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of implementing a multiple-behavior self-monitoring intervention within a diabetes education program. This study was a 3-month pre- post-design, conducted with African-Americans (N = 20), who attended diabetes education classes at a large Veteran's Affairs (VA) hospital in Southwest Texas. Participants selfmonitored their blood glucose, diet, exercise, and weight on either a smart phone application or paper diaries. Read More

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July 2017
14 Reads

Diabetes: A Pre-Existing Condition at a Crossroad.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2017 Jul;28(1):vi-viii

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July 2017
3 Reads

Coping Strategies of Nurses in a Palliative Care Unit.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Dec;27(2):50-54

The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the coping strategies of staff nurses working in palliative care. Death and dying are important aspects of nurses' day-to-day work in palliative care and considered stressful, yet satisfying. The sensitive feelings of nurses and delicate emotions may lead to burnout, compassion fatigue, and overall poor clinical judgments, thus resulting in unsafe patient care. Read More

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December 2016
3 Reads

Alerts for Nurse Practitioners: Caring for Pregnant Women with Zika Virus.

Authors:
Hazel L White

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Dec;27(2):46-49

There have been 3,625 cases of Zika virus in the United States and 22,069 cases in the U.S. Territories (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2016a). Read More

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December 2016
3 Reads

Pathway to Weight Maintenance: A-Qualitative Study with Church Health Advisors to Assess Weight Loss Maintenance Program Needs Among African-Americans.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Dec;27(2):39-45

Nearly 50% of African-American adults are obese. Obesity is a known contributor to chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM). Short-term Diabetes Prevention Programs (DPPs) achieve short-term weight loss success, but weight regain is common. Read More

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December 2016
4 Reads

Group Conference Call Diabetes Educational Support Sessions: A Pilot Study.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Dec;27(2):32-38

The aim of this study was to determine the acceptability of group-conference-call diabetes educational support sessions for rural dwelling southern African-American women and to describe the impact on diabetes distress. Pre- post-test design was utilized to determine any change in scores on questionnaires. Qualitative techniques were utilized to determine the acceptability of the conference callformat. Read More

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December 2016
3 Reads

Rethinking Osteoporosis Prevalence Among African and European Ancestry Populations.

Authors:
Helen Cho

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Dec;27(2):26-31

Biomedical literature often cites that populations of African ancestry experience lower incidence and prevalence of osteoporosis compared to White populations. Diverse skeletal tissue physiology and sociocultural factors may exist in sub-Saharan African populations and the diaspora, which confer advantages against age-associated bone loss and osteoporosis through differing mechanisms. Nevertheless, the fallacious and erroneous understandings of race that are frequently applied to explain this reference should be critically re-evaluated, warranting a new framework for rethinking the epidemiology of osteoporosis. Read More

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December 2016
12 Reads

Confusion about HPV and Cervical Cancer Among Black/African-American Women Living with HIV.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Dec;27(2):20-25

Black/African-American women living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are at greater risk for developing cervical cancer. However, little is known about their understanding of the human papilloma virus (HPV), cervical cancer, or Pap testing. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to examine HPV and cervical cancer among Black/African-American women living with HIV This is a secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional descriptive study aimed at assessing perception about cervical cancer and Pap testing among a convenience sample of 300 women living with HIV For this analysis, data from 211 Black/African-American female participants were extracted. Read More

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December 2016
2 Reads

Social Support and Self-Coping of Depressed African-American Cancer Patients.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Dec;27(2):11-19

This study examined the differences among 57 depressed and nondepressed African-American cancer patients and their use of social support and self-coping resources. In-depth interviews were used to elicit narrative responses and Fisher's exact test was used to compare the 2 groups. The depressed patients, as determined by 3 depression scales, more frequently reported having no supportive family, lacking a support system, having sedentary hobbies, or using alcohol or drugs as coping strategies compared to the nondepressed patients. Read More

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December 2016
2 Reads

Results of the Optimizing Outcomes in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Their Infants, a Cluster Randomized, Controlled Pilot Study: Lessons Learned.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Dec;27(2):1-10

The purpose of this pilot study was as follows: Aim I was to determine the feasibility of the intervention, including its acceptability, and tofurther refine intervention materials and study procedures including recruitment, enrollment, intervention, retention, and data collection. Aim 2 was to test the initial effects of the intervention on the primary outcome of fasting blood glucose and secondary outcomes including metabolic, clinical, adiposity, health behavior, and self-efficacy outcomes in women. Aim 3 examined infant feeding. Read More

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December 2016
1 Read

Gaps in Perceptions of Breast Cancer Disparities among Patients, Community Members, and Providers: Educational Intervention Opportunities.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Jul;27(1):45-52

The objective of this study was to explore the reasons for breast cancer disparities among African-Americans in Nebraska., A qualitative study was conducted using interviews with 65 indi- viduals, including healthcare and public health professionals and African-American community members. African-American women, especially younger women, had a low level of awareness of breast cancer and stated that cancer screening was not a priority. Read More

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July 2016
2 Reads

Promoting Mammography with African-American Women in the Emergency Department Using Lay Health Workers.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Jul;27(1):38-44

The objective of this study was to test the efficacy of a pilot intervention to increase mammography utilization among African-American women recruited from those waiting in the emergency department (ED)for non-urgent complaints. In a 3-armed pilot of a randomized controlled trial we compared the effects of a brief motivational interview delivered by a lay health worker with those of a culturally targeted brochure and a usual care control group. The results showed that one quarter (23%) of the sample reported having never had a mammogram prior to the study. Read More

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July 2016
6 Reads

Outcomes of an Immersion Proiect in the Dominican Republic Bateyes.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Jul;27(1):31-37

Faculty and nursing students from a southeastern college participated in a service-learning immersion in an intra-professional collaboration to treat migrant workers living in the bateyes (the name given to those communities that reside inside sugar plantations in the Dominican Republic that are comprised mainly of Haitians and Dominicans of Haitian descent) in the targeted Dominican Republic agricultural plantations. The mission team included physicians, nurse practitioners, registered nurses and nursing students These team members provided health assessment, screenings, and preventive health education to men, women, and children, and their families. The students were provided an in-depth orientation and briefed about what to expect during their visit to a foreign culture. Read More

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July 2016
2 Reads

A Qualitative Understanding of Midlife Sources of Stress and Support in African-American Women.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Jul;27(1):24-30

African-American women suffer from disproportionate adverse health outcomes compared to women of other ethnicities living in the United States. It is suggested in the literature that chron- ic stress can be an antecedent to health disparity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in perceived stress from late pre-menopause to post-menopause and to identify significant life stressors perceived by a cohort of African-American women. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6090538PMC
July 2016
3 Reads

Communication and Bonding Between African-American Middle School Girls and Their Maternal Figures.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Jul;27(1):18-23

The objective of this study was to explore the associations between bonding, communication, and maternal monitoring of daughters' behaviors among a sample of African-Americans girls and their maternal figures. The relationship between the frequency of church attendance and the mother-daughter relationship was also explored. A correlational analysis was conducted on 101 African-American adolescents and their maternalfigures recruitedfrom middle schools. Read More

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July 2016
1 Read

The Role of Social Determinants in Racial/Ethnic Disparities: African-American Outcomes During Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Jul;27(1):11-17

This study examined the social determinants affecting outcomes for African-Americans (AA) during stroke rehabilitation. The study hypothesized that African-Americans experience a greater length of stay than other racial groups, African-American patients receive less home health services following discharge than Whites, African-Americans have a higher rate of discharge to acute care than other racial groups, and, compared with other racial groups, African-Americans are less likely to be discharged to home following.rehabilitation. Read More

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July 2016
5 Reads

The Value of Using a Syndemics Theory Conceptual Model to Understand the Factors Associated with Obesity in a Southern, Urban Community Sample of Disadvantaged African-American Adults.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Jul;27(1):1-10

For this study, a syndemics theory approach was used to examine the factors associated with adulthood obesity in a community-based sample of African-American adults. Interviews were conducted with 1,274 African-American adults residing in Atlanta, Georgia in 80 strategically chosen census tracts, selected on the basis of factors such as low household income, low levels of educational attainment among heads of household, and low levels of labor force participation. Comparisons were made between normal-weight persons (body mass index [BMI] = 18. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6110300PMC
July 2016
2 Reads

Understanding the Second Amendment: The Right to Keep and Bear Assault Weapons.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Jul;27(1):vi-viii

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July 2016
2 Reads

Race-Based Health Disparities and the Digital Divide: Implications for Nursing Practice.

Authors:
Zula Price

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2015 Dec;26(2):79-83

Knowledge of the sources of race-based health disparities could improve nursing practice and education in minority underserved communities. This purpose of this paper was to consider if Black-nonBlack health disparities were at least in part explained by Black-nonBlack disparities in access to Internet-based health information. With data on the U. Read More

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December 2015
8 Reads

Nurses: Leading to Reduce Health Disparities in an Era of Healthcare Reform.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2015 Dec;26(2):73-8

Persistent disparities in health status and outcomes for racial/ethnic minority populations are well documented. African-Americans are disproportionately impacted by a number of conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, and inadequate mental healthcare. The 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) contains provisions to reduce health disparities. Read More

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December 2015
5 Reads

Assessment of the Feasibility of Barber-Led Sexual Education for African-American Adolescent Males.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2015 Dec;26(2):67-72

This study explored the feasibility of a sexual health promotion barbershop program in the African-American urban areas of a large mid-southern city. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used with a random survey. The sample consisted of 56 barbers and adult community patrons of sample barbershops. Read More

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December 2015
22 Reads

A Qualitative Study: African-American Girls' Perceptions of Why Physical Activity Declines in High School.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2015 Dec;26(2):60-6

African-American adolescent girls are less physically active than any other U.S. racial/ethnic group. Read More

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December 2015
7 Reads

Perceptions of Physical Activity and Influences of Participation in Young African-American Adolescent Girls.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2015 Dec;26(2):51-9

The purpose of this study was to explore African-American adolescent girls' perceptions of physical activity participation, examine how physical activity is defined and identify the most preferred forms of physical activity. Qualitative focus group interviews of a convenience sample (N = 30; Mean age = 14.3 years) were used to identifyfactors that influence African-American girls' physical activity participation as well as to explore how physical activity is defined within this population. Read More

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December 2015
5 Reads