44 results match your criteria Journal of LGBT Health Research [Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Intimate partner violence and HIV sexual risk behavior among Latino gay and bisexual men: the role of situational factors.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(4):75-87

Medical and Health Research Association of New York City, Inc., New York, NY, USA.

Using a probability sample of 912 Latino gay and bisexual men at bars in 3 U.S. cities (Los Angeles, Miami, New York), this study examines how participation in difficult sexual situations with interpersonal (e. Read More

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January 2009
3 Reads

Life beyond depression: the experience of gays and lesbians who self-identify as depressed.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(4):53-73

Clinical Psychology Program, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada.

The purpose of this research was to compare differences in the experiences of gay men and lesbian women who describe experiences of depression or depressed mood. The 2 main research questions were how do descriptions of depression and daily life differ between gay males and lesbian females. To this end, Weblogs containing narratives of 19 gay men and 19 lesbian women were coded, analyzed, and compared using qualitative content analysis methods. Read More

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January 2009
3 Reads

Present but not accounted for: exploring the sexual risk practices and intervention needs of nonheterosexually identified women in a prevention program for women with HIV/AIDS.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(4):37-51

Drexel University School of Public Health, 1505 Race Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102, USA.

Nonheterosexually identified (NHI) women may be present, but not accounted for, in HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention interventions. This study used quantitative and qualitative methods to examine the sexual risk behaviors and intervention needs of NHI women in Protect and Respect, a safer sex intervention for HIV-positive women. Study participants (n=32) were predominantly Black, low income, and between 28 and 51 years old. Read More

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January 2009
11 Reads

Effects of gender identity on experiences of healthcare for sexual minority women.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(4):15-27

The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, USA.

While research examining healthcare experiences of sexual minority individuals is growing, thus far research has been limited on lesbian gender identity and its relationship to physical and mental health. This study explores access to and experiences of healthcare with a sample of 516 butch and femme identified lesbian and bisexual women. In comparison to femme-identified women, it was found that butch women had routine gynecological examinations significantly less frequently, perceived poorer treatment in healthcare settings, were more likely to be out within healthcare settings, placed more importance on securing LGBT-positive healthcare practitioners, and had more difficulty finding LGBT-positive medical doctors. Read More

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January 2009
5 Reads

Effects of perceived discrimination on mental health and mental health services utilization among gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender persons.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(4):1-14

Center for Chronic Disease Outcomes Research, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, One Veterans Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55417, USA.

Objectives: Previous research has found that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals are at risk for a variety of mental health disorders. We examined the extent to which a recent experience of a major discriminatory event may contribute to poor mental health among LGBT persons.

Methods: Data were derived from a cross-sectional strata-cluster survey of adults in Hennepin County, Minnesota, who identified as LGBT (n=472) or heterosexual (n=7,412). Read More

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January 2009
30 Reads

The relationship between early drinking contexts of women "coming out" as lesbian and current alcohol use.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(3):73-90

School of Social Work, University of Connecticut,W. Hartford, CT 06117-2698, USA.

Several decades of research show that lesbians are at risk for hazardous drinking. Compared with heterosexual women, lesbians are less likely to abstain from drinking, less likely to decrease their alcohol consumption as they age, and more likely to report alcohol-related problems. Stress associated with lesbian identity and reliance on lesbian or gay bars for socialization and support are frequently posited--but largely untested--explanations for lesbians' heightened risk. Read More

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January 2009
3 Reads

Gender nonconformity as a target of prejudice, discrimination, and violence against LGB individuals.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(3):55-71

Department of sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, USA.

Research into antigay violence has been limited by a lack of attention to issues of gender presentation. Understanding gender nonconformity is important for addressing antigay prejudice and hate crimes. We assessed experiences of gender-nonconformity-related prejudice among 396 Black, Latino, and White lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals recruited from diverse community venues in New York City. Read More

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January 2009
4 Reads

Sexual behaviors and sexually transmitted infections among self-identified lesbian and bisexual college women.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(3):41-54

Department of Health Promotion, Education and behavior, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina , Columbia SC 29208, USA.

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a significant health issue for lesbian and bisexual women. Older age and having a history of sexual intercourse with males are primary risk factors for STIs among this population. However, little research has been conducted to assess sexual risk among lesbian and bisexual college women exclusively. Read More

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January 2009
5 Reads

Belief in the "free choice" model of homosexuality: a correlate of homophobia in registered nurses.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(3):31-40

UCF College of Nursing, Orlando, FL 32816-12210, USA.

A great amount of social science research has supported the positive correlation between heterosexuals' belief in the free choice model of homosexuality and homophobia. Heterosexuals who believe gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) persons consciously choose their sexual orientation and practice a lifestyle conducive to that choice are much more likely to possess discriminatory, homophobic, homonegative, and heterosexist beliefs. In addition, these individuals are less likely to support gay rights initiatives such as nondiscrimination policies or same-sex partner benefits in the workplace or hate crime enhancement legislation inclusive of GLBT persons. Read More

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January 2009
20 Reads

A study of transgender adults and their non-transgender siblings on demographic characteristics, social support, and experiences of violence.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(3):11-30

Counseling Services, The New School, New York, NY 10003, USA.

A national sample of 295 transgender adults and their nontransgender siblings were surveyed about demographics, perceptions of social support, and violence, harassment, and discrimination. Transwomen were older than the other 4 groups. Transwomen, transmen, and genderqueers were more highly educated than nontransgender sisters and nontransgender brothers, but did not have a corresponding higher income. Read More

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http://rothblum.sdsu.edu/doc_pdf/sexual_orientation/Study_of
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January 2009
12 Reads

Sexual orientation and sexual behavior: results from the Massachusetts Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2002-2006.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(3):1-10

Health Survey Program, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Boston, MA 02108, USA.

Few population-based surveys in the United States include sexual orientation as a demographic variable. As a result, estimating the proportion of the U.S. Read More

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January 2009
11 Reads

Tricks of the trade: sexual health behaviors, the context of HIV risk, and potential prevention intervention strategies for male sex workers.

J LGBT Health Res 2008 ;4(4):195-209

The Fenway Institute, Fenway Health, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

Sex work is a significant risk for HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) among men who have sex with men (MSM); however, there is a dearth of knowledge about how to reduce risk in this group. MSM sex workers (N = 32) completed a semistructured qualitative interview and a close-ended quantitative assessment. Analyses focused on themes relevant to intervention development. Read More

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December 2009
6 Reads

General and minority stress in an LGB population in Flanders.

J LGBT Health Res 2008 ;4(4):181-94

Ghent University, Department of Sociology, Ghent, Belgium.

This article concentrates on the influence of determinants of mental health on a lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) population in Flanders. Our sample is drawn from the Zzzip survey, and contains 2,280 LGBs, of whom 1,565 are men and 715 are women. The traditional social stress model outlines the influence of general stressors on stress (Pearlin, 1989). Read More

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December 2009
6 Reads

Smoking it all away: influences of stress, negative emotions, and stigma on lesbian tobacco use.

J LGBT Health Res 2008 ;4(4):167-79

Kaiser Permanente Division of Research, Oakland, CA 94612, USA.

This study explored the reported processes, conditions, and consequences of lesbian and heterosexual female smoking and relapse to understand the reasons for elevated lesbian smoking rates. Using grounded theory techniques, we conducted semistructured, face-to-face interviews with an ethnically diverse sample of 35 lesbian and 35 heterosexual female participants in Northern California. We found minority stress/sexual stigma to be an additional, unique cause of negative emotions and stress reported by 75% of lesbian participants, leading to smoking and relapse. Read More

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December 2009
5 Reads

The complexities of outness: psychosocial predictors of coming out to others among Black lesbian and bisexual women.

J LGBT Health Res 2008 ;4(4):153-66

Department of Community Health and Prevention, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19102, USA.

This mixed method study investigated the psychosocial predictors of coming out among a predominantly middle-class sample of Black lesbian and bisexual women (LBW; N = 95) between the ages of 18 and 68. Results demonstrated that demographic variables (i.e. Read More

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December 2009
40 Reads

Two means of sampling sexual minority women: how different are the samples of women?

J LGBT Health Res 2008 ;4(4):143-51

Social and Behavior Science Department, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02118, USA.

We compared 2 sampling approaches of sexual minority women in 1 limited geographic area to better understand the implications of these 2 sampling approaches. Sexual minority women identified through the Census did not differ on average age or the prevalence of raising children from those sampled using nonrandomized methods. Women in the convenience sample were better educated and lived in smaller households. Read More

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December 2009
2 Reads

Inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in tobacco use-related surveillance and epidemiological research.

J LGBT Health Res 2008 ;4(1):27-42

Drexel University School of Public Health, Department of Community Health and Prevention, 1505 Race Street, MS660, 11th Floor, Room 1117, Bellet Bldg., Philadelphia, PA 19102, USA.

Researchers and public health advocates have long recognized the importance of demographic characteristics such as sex, race, ethnicity, age, and socioeconomic status in their efforts to understand and control the use of tobacco among population groups. Targeting prevention and cessation efforts based upon such characteristics has consistently been demonstrated to be both efficient and effective. In recent years, attention has modestly turned to how two additional demographic variables, sexual orientation and gender identity, can add to our understanding of how to reduce tobacco use. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/155740908026157
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15574090802615703DOI Listing
November 2009
5 Reads

"Everyone has a right to, like, check their box:" findings on a measure of gender identity from a cognitive testing study with adolescents.

J LGBT Health Res 2008 ;4(1):1-9

Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Efforts to monitor the health of transgender youth, a small but high-risk population, are hindered by a lack of knowledge about how to accurately measure gender identity. Adolescents (n = 30) participated in semistructured qualitative interviews after completing a close-ended transgender-inclusive measure of gender. Interviews explored item comprehension and respondent burden. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/155740908024125
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15574090802412572DOI Listing
November 2009
5 Reads

Not to stigmatize but to humanize sexual lives of the transgender (hijra) in Bangladesh: condom chat in the AIDS era.

J LGBT Health Res 2008 ;4(2-3):127-41

Social and Behavioral Sciences Unit, Public Health Sciences Division, ICDDR, B, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Despite condom interventions since year 2000 with the transgender (hijra) population, condom use remains low. Consequently, hijra suffer from higher rates of active syphilis, putting them under threat of HIV transmission. In an ethnographic study, 50 in-depth interviews with diverse groups of hijra along with 20 key-informants interviews with various stakeholders, and 13 focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with comprehensive field observations. Read More

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http://www.informaworld.com/index/911837900.pdf
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November 2009
10 Reads
1 Citation

Sexually transmitted infections treatment and care available to high risk populations in Pakistan.

J LGBT Health Res 2008 ;4(2-3):103-10

InterActive Research and Development, Karachi, Pakistan.

Limited literature exists on the quality and availability of treatment and care of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Pakistan. This article aims to document existing services for the care and treatment of STIs available in Pakistan's public and private sectors to high risk groups (HRG), particularly the transgendered population. We conducted a cross-sectional survey to document STI services in Lahore, Karachi, Rawalpindi, Peshawar, and Quetta. Read More

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November 2009
15 Reads

Exploring context and dynamics of homosexual experiences among rural youth in India.

J LGBT Health Res 2008 ;4(2-3):89-101

International Centre for Research on Women, New Delhi, India.

There is a lack of community-based studies that have examined level and context of homosexual activity in India among male youth. As part of a larger study on sexual behavior and gender attitudes of rural youth in Northern India, this study identified a subgroup of young men who reported homosexual experiences, even though they did not identify themselves as homosexual. This article attempts to examine the levels and range of sexual practices and attitudes of the homosexually active male youth by comparing them with their peers who reported heterosexual experiences. Read More

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November 2009
3 Reads

Multiple risks among male and transgender sex workers in Pakistan.

J LGBT Health Res 2008 ;4(2-3):71-9

Centre for Population Studies, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

Using data from a qualitative study and a subsequent quantitative survey among 918 male and transgender sex workers (MTSW), we explore the context of multiple risks they face. We show that over one-fifth of MTSW have sex with IDU clients. Combined with high levels of risk behavior and very low levels of risk reduction and knowledge, the extent of sexual networking with men who inject drugs contributes further to the sex workers' health risks. Read More

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November 2009
86 Reads

Men who have sex with men in India: a systematic review of the literature.

J LGBT Health Res 2008 ;4(2-3):51-70

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

This study systematically reviews the existing literature on sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the men who have sex with men (MSM) in India. After a comprehensive literature search of Medline (1950-June 2008), Embase (1980-June 2008), and the Cochrane Library (1950-June 2008), 12 published studies met the inclusion criteria. The link between sexual identity and sexual behavior is a complex phenomenon strongly embedded in a very specific context in India. Read More

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November 2009
3 Reads

The emotional well-being of Asian-American sexual minority youth in school.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(1):67-78

School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, T201-2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5, Canada.

This study examined family and school correlates of emotional distress among Asian-American sexual minority youth in the Midwestern United States. Responses from 91 predominantly among Asian-American youth who participated in a state-wide, school-based census survey and reported recent same-gender sexual activity were analyzed. Results showed that sexual minority youth who perceived lower levels of family caring and those with negative perceptions of school climate reported lower self-esteem, which in turn was associated with greater emotional distress. Read More

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January 2008
3 Reads

Making sense of sexual orientation measures: findings from a cognitive processing study with adolescents on health survey questions.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(1):55-65

Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Objective: To carry out a study using cognitive processing interview methods to explore ways in which adolescents understand sexual orientation questions currently used on epidemiologic surveys.

Methods: In-depth, individual interviews were conducted to probe cognitive processes involved in answering four self-report survey questions assessing sexual identity, sexual attraction, and sex of sexual partners.A semi-structured interview guide was used to explore variation in question interpretation, information retrieval patterns and problems, item clarity, valence of reactions to items (positive, negative, neutral), respondent burden, and perceived threat associated with the measures. Read More

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January 2008
15 Reads

College major, gender and heterosexism reconsidered under more controlled conditions.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(1):49-53

Department of Psychology, Cleveland State University, 2300 Chester Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44114, USA.

To test the hypothesis that under controlled conditions respondent's gender and college major are related to heterosexism, four groups (n = 40 each)-male psychology majors, female psychology majors, male non-psychology majors, and female non-psychology majors-were formed from an initial sample of convenience (N = 1,947) of urban university students. Respondents were matched for age, race, college level, closeness of relationships to lesbian and gay men, religious affiliation, and religious attendance. Each student was requested to complete the Herek Attitude Scale towards Lesbians and Gay Men and these scores were subjected to a three factor (2x2x2) mixed analysis of variance. Read More

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January 2008
2 Reads

Behavioral patterns, identity, and health characteristics of self-identified barebackers: implications for HIV prevention and intervention.

Authors:
Perry N Halkitis

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(1):37-48

Center for Health, Identity, Behavior & Prevention Studies (CHIBPS), Department of Applied Psychology, New York University, NY, USA.

These analyses are part of a larger study designed to investigate the developmental, behavioral, and sociocultural lives of gay and bisexual men who identify as barebackers. We examined the sexual behaviors of these men, as well as the relation of these behaviors to matters of identity and perceived benefits of barebacking. Of the 102 men who completed the study, about half reported barebacking with main partners and 92% reported barebacking behaviors with casual partners whom they met in a variety of social venues. Read More

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January 2008
3 Reads

Sexual orientation and alcohol use: identity versus behavior measures.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(1):25-35

Alcohol Research Group, Emeryville, CA 94608, USA.

Background: Few population-based national studies include complete measures of alcohol consumption, alcohol-related problems, and sexual orientation. When measures of sexual orientation are included in alcohol surveys, typically only one measure is included. The purpose of this paper is to compare two ways of measuring sexual orientation and to explore the relationship of each measure with alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. Read More

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http://www.informaworld.com/index/903715480.pdf
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January 2008
5 Reads

Exploring the health behavior disparities of gay men in the United States: comparing gay male university students to their heterosexual peers.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(1):15-23

Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1063, USA.

Little is known about the health disparities that affect gay men in the United States. Using data collected from an online Internet-based assessment, we sought to compare health-compromising behaviors of gay male university students to their heterosexual peers. Participants included 1,014 self-reported males. Read More

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January 2008
3 Reads

A positive look at a difficult time: a strength based examination of coming out for lesbian and bisexual women.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(1):7-14

Graduate Center of the City University of New York, NY, USA.

This study reports the results of 337 lesbian and 59 bisexual women who completed a survey of sexual and health behaviors collected at gay, lesbian, and bisexual community events in New York City and Los Angeles. The Stress Related Growth Scale was adapted to capture the unique experience of managing a gay or bisexual identity. Stress related growth (SRG)was positively correlated with age, ethnic community attachment, number of female partners, generativity, and number of years out to self. Read More

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January 2008
5 Reads

Why LGBT health research, why now.

Authors:
Seth L Welles

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(1):1-5

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J463v03n01_01DOI Listing
January 2008
15 Reads

Differentiating LGBT individuals in substance abuse treatment: analyses based on sexuality and drug preference.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(2):63-75

Department of Psychology, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA.

In a prior study (Cochran & Cauce, 2006), LGBT individuals seeking treatment demonstrated greater substance use severity, more psychosocial stressors, and increased use of psychiatric services when compared to their heterosexual counterparts. That study, and similar to others in the field of LGBT research, collapsed LGBT individuals into a single category and did not examine individual differences within this category. The present study utilizes the same sample of LGBT clients (N = 610); however, an exploratory cluster analysis was conducted, based on drug preference, to determine which subcategories exist within this unique sample. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J463v03n02_07DOI Listing
November 2009
5 Reads

An evaluation of service utilization among male to female transgender youth: qualitative study of a clinic-based sample.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(2):49-61

Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Children's Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

This qualitative study examined experiences with health and social service institutions and experiences related to education, employment, and other social networks among 18 ethnically diverse, male to female (MTF) transgender youth aged 16 to 24 years. Participants were recruited from a youth health clinic where they were receiving services for their transgender/transsexual identity. In-depth, semi-structured interviews explored youths' patterns of service utilization, reasons for seeking care, beliefs about the usefulness of services received, experiences with service providers, barriers to care, and suggestions for improving services tailored to them. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J463v03n02_06DOI Listing
November 2009
7 Reads

Substance use treatment experiences of transgender/transsexual men and women.

Authors:
Emilia Lombardi

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(2):37-47

Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Substance use treatment programs may not be sensitive to transgender/transsexual (trans) issues: thus, the needs of drug/alcohol involved trans men and women may go unmet. Data for this research was collected from a study examining the substance use issues of trans men and women. Confidential, self-administered questionnaires were distributed to trans men and women with current or previous problem (self-assessed) with drugs or alcohol. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J463v03n02_05DOI Listing
November 2009
1 Read

Relationships between homosexual and heterosexual interest and their implications for bisexuality: an empirical test.

Authors:
Michael W Ross

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(2):21-3

Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, School of Public Health, University of Texas, P.O. Box 20036, Houston, TX 77225, USA.

Conceptualizing heterosexual and homosexual interest as reciprocal constructs can be a source of confusion, and may obstruct understanding of sexual orientation in counseling. We investigated the relationships between homosexual interest, heterosexual interest, and masculinity and femininity. Seventy-eight men attending a homophile organisation completed the Kinsey Scale, and two separate continua measuring degree of homosexual interest and degree of heterosexual interest independently. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J463v03n02_03DOI Listing
November 2009
4 Reads

Intimate partner violence and HIV sexual risk behavior among Latino gay and bisexual men.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(2):9-19

Medical and Health Research Association of New York City, Inc., 71 West 23rd Street, 14th Floor, New York, NY 10010, USA.

This study examined the relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV) and HIV sexual risk behavior using a probability sample of 912 Latino gay and bisexual men from three U.S. cities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J463v03n02_02DOI Listing
November 2009
5 Reads

Substance use and domestic violence among urban gays, lesbians and bisexuals.

J LGBT Health Res 2007 ;3(2):1-7

Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training (CHEST), City University of New York, NY, USA.

Many research studies have identified the co-occurrence of substance use/abuse and domestic violence among heterosexual couples. The present study examined this phenomenon in a large urban sample (N = 1048) of lesbians and gay men attending community events. Nearly one-fourth reported physical domestic violence, and over one-third reported nonphysical domestic violence with a same-gender partner. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J463v03n02_01DOI Listing
November 2009
2 Reads
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