16 results match your criteria Journal of Investigational Allergology & Clinical Immunology[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Safety profile of the SQ house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy-tablet in Japanese adult patients with house dust mite-induced allergic asthma: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase I study.

J Asthma 2018 Nov 16:1-9. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

c Department of Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology , School of Medicine, Showa University , Tokyo , Japan.

Objective: The SQ house dust mite (HDM) sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT)-tablet has demonstrated effective treatment of HDM-induced allergic asthma in patients 18 years or older in European trials. This study investigated its safety and immunology profile in Japanese adult patients with mild-to-moderate HDM-induced allergic asthma.

Methods: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 48 Japanese patients were randomly assigned to a daily treatment of SQ HDM SLIT-tablet or placebo (3:1) for 14 d with or without an up-dosing regimen. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02770903.2018.1541353DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Dabigatran after Short Heparin Anticoagulation for Acute Intermediate-Risk Pulmonary Embolism: Rationale and Design of the Single-Arm PEITHO-2 Study.

Thromb Haemost 2017 12 6;117(12):2425-2434. Epub 2017 Dec 6.

Center for Thrombosis and Hemostasis, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany.

Patients with intermediate-risk pulmonary embolism (PE) may, depending on the method and cut-off values used for definition, account for up to 60% of all patients with PE and have an 8% or higher risk of short-term adverse outcome. Although four non-vitamin K-dependent direct oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been approved for the treatment of venous thromboembolism, their safety and efficacy as well as the optimal anticoagulation regimen using these drugs have not been systematically investigated in intermediate-risk PE. Moreover, it remains unknown how many patients with intermediate-high-risk and intermediate-low-risk PE were included in most of the phase III NOAC trials. Read More

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http://www.thieme-connect.de/DOI/DOI?10.1160/TH17-06-0434
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1160/TH17-06-0434DOI Listing
December 2017
41 Reads

Effects of respiratory muscle training (RMT) in patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

Sleep Breath 2018 05 28;22(2):323-328. Epub 2017 Oct 28.

Institute of Pneumology at the University of Cologne, Clinic for Pneumology and Allergology, Center of Sleep Medicine and Respiratory Care, Bethanien Hospital, Aufderhoeherstraße 169-175, 42699, Solingen, Germany.

Purpose: Different forms of training focusing on the muscles of the upper airways showed limited effects on obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and/or snoring. We investigated the effect of generalized respiratory muscle training (RMT) in lean patients with mild to moderate OSA.

Methods: Nine male subjects (52. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11325-017-1582-6DOI Listing
May 2018
17 Reads

National clinical practice guidelines for allergen immunotherapy: An international assessment applying AGREE-II.

Allergy 2018 03 17;73(3):664-672. Epub 2017 Oct 17.

Center for Rhinology and Allergology, Wiesbaden, Germany.

Background: Since 1988, numerous allergen immunotherapy guidelines (AIT-GLs) have been developed by national and international organizations to guide physicians in AIT. Even so, AIT is still severely underused.

Objective: To evaluate AIT-GLs with AGREE-II, developed in 2010 by McMaster University methodologists to comprehensively evaluate GL quality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/all.13316DOI Listing
March 2018
10 Reads
6.030 Impact Factor

EAACI guidelines on allergen immunotherapy: Prevention of allergy.

Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017 Dec 27;28(8):728-745. Epub 2017 Oct 27.

Food Allergy Referral Centre Veneto Region, Department of Woman and Child Health, Padua University Hospital.

Allergic diseases are common and frequently coexist. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is a disease-modifying treatment for IgE-mediated allergic disease with effects beyond cessation of AIT that may include important preventive effects. The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) has developed a clinical practice guideline to provide evidence-based recommendations for AIT for the prevention of (i) development of allergic comorbidities in those with established allergic diseases, (ii) development of first allergic condition, and (iii) allergic sensitization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pai.12807DOI Listing
December 2017
75 Reads

Drug Repurposing by Simulating Flow Through Protein-Protein Interaction Networks.

Clin Pharmacol Ther 2018 03 29;103(3):511-520. Epub 2017 Jul 29.

Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University of Szeged, Hungary.

As drug development is extremely expensive, the identification of novel indications for in-market drugs is financially attractive. Multiple algorithms are used to support such drug repurposing, but highly reliable methods combining simulation of intracellular networks and machine learning are currently not available. We developed an algorithm that simulates drug effects on the flow of information through protein-protein interaction networks, and used support vector machine to identify potentially effective drugs in our model disease, psoriasis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cpt.769DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5836852PMC
March 2018
1 Read

Anti-acne drugs in phase 1 and 2 clinical trials.

Expert Opin Investig Drugs 2017 Jul 19;26(7):813-823. Epub 2017 Jun 19.

c Department of Venerology and Dermatology , Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg , Magdeburg , Germany.

Introduction: Despite the impressive increase of knowledge on acne etiology accumulated during the last 20 years, few efforts have been overtaken to introduce new therapeutic regiments targeting the ideal treatment of acne. The increasing emergence of microbial resistance associated with antibiotics, teratogenicity, particularly associated with systemic isotretinoin, and the need for an adverse drug profile, which can be tolerated by the patient, make the need of new pathogenesis relevant anti-acne agents an emerging issue. Areas covered: A search for phase 1 and 2 acne treatment trials in the US National Institutes of Health database of clinical trials and the European Medicines Agency database with the key words 'acne' and 'treatment' was carried out, on 6 January 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13543784.2017.1337745DOI Listing
July 2017
21 Reads

More than 5000 patients with metastatic melanoma in Europe per year do not have access to recommended first-line innovative treatments.

Eur J Cancer 2017 04 4;75:313-322. Epub 2017 Mar 4.

Centre for Dermatooncology, Department of Dermatology, Eberhard Karls University, Tuebingen, Germany.

Background: Despite the efficacy of innovative treatments for metastatic melanoma, their high costs has led to disparities in cancer care among different European countries. We analysed the availability of these innovative therapies in Europe and estimated the number of patients without access to first-line recommended treatment per current guidelines of professional entities such as the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), the European Association of Dermato-Oncology (EADO), and European Dermatology Forum (EDF).

Materials And Methods: Web-based online survey was conducted in 30 European countries with questions about the treatment schedules from 1st May 2015 to 1st May 2016: number of metastatic melanoma patients, registration and reimbursement of innovative medicines (updated data, as of 1st October 2016), percentage of patients treated and availability of clinical studies and compassionate-use programmes. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S09598049173006
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2017.01.012DOI Listing
April 2017
6 Reads

Monoclonal Antibodies for the Management of Severe Asthma.

Adv Exp Med Biol 2016 ;935:35-42

Department of Internal Medicine, Pneumology and Allergology, Medical University of Warsaw, 1A Banacha Street, 02-097, Warsaw, Poland.

Asthma is a heterogeneous inflammatory disease. Most patients respond to current standard of care, i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/5584_2016_29DOI Listing
December 2017
3 Reads

Investigational prostaglandin D2 receptor antagonists for airway inflammation.

Expert Opin Investig Drugs 2016 Jun 25;25(6):639-52. Epub 2016 Apr 25.

a Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine , Catholic University of the Sacred Heart , Rome , Italy.

Introduction: By activating DP1 and DP2 receptors on immune and non-immune cells, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), a major metabolic product of cyclo-oxygenase pathway released after IgE-mediated mast cell activation, has pro-inflammatory effects, which are relevant to the pathophysiology of allergic airway disease. At least 15 selective, orally active, DP2 receptor antagonists and one DP1 receptor antagonist (asapiprant) are under development for asthma and/or allergic rhinitis.

Areas Covered: In this review, the authors cover the pharmacology of PGD2 and PGD2 receptor antagonists and look at the preclinical, phase I and phase II studies with selective DP1 and DP2 receptor antagonists. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13543784.2016.1175434DOI Listing
June 2016
5 Reads

The F4/AS01B HIV-1 Vaccine Candidate Is Safe and Immunogenic, But Does Not Show Viral Efficacy in Antiretroviral Therapy-Naive, HIV-1-Infected Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2016 Feb;95(6):e2673

From the Seattle Travel and Preventive Medicine, Seattle Infectious Disease Clinic, Seattle, WA, USA (WD); Service des Maladies Infectieuses, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris; and INSERM, UMR_S 1136, Institut Pierre Louis d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, Paris, France (P-MG); HIV Unit, Infectious Disease Service, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, L'Hospitalet, 08907 Barcelona, Spain (DP); Department of Dermatology, Venerology, and Allergology, St. Josef-Hospital, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum, Germany (NHB); Hospital Clínic, IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain (FG); Department of Internal Medicine 3, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany (TH); Service d'Immunologie Clinique, Hôpital Henri Mondor, Créteil, France (J-DL); University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA (IF); Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Hôpital Saint Louis, University of Paris Diderot Paris 7, Sorbonne Paris Cité and INSERM U941 (NCDV, J-MM); Hôpital Bichat Claude Bernard, Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales A, Paris, France (G-PY); Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, Valencia (EOG); Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital 12 De Octubre, Madrid, Spain (RR); IrsiCaixa AIDS Research Institute, Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Uvic-UCC, Barcelona, Spain (BCS); Orlando Immunology Center, Orlando, FL, USA (EDS); Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Hospital Ramón Y Cajal, IRYCIS Madrid, Spain (MJPE); Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Inserm, CIC 1417 and F-CRIN, Innovative Clinical Research Network in Vaccinology (I-REIVAC); and Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Cochin (OL); Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales Co-infections, Hôpital Tenon, Paris, France (GP, JC); Saint Michael's Medical Center, Newark, NJ, USA (JS); Service d'immunologie Clinique, Hôpital Européen Georges

The impact of the investigational human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) F4/AS01B vaccine on HIV-1 viral load (VL) was evaluated in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive HIV-1 infected adults.This phase IIb, observer-blind study (NCT01218113), included ART-naive HIV-1 infected adults aged 18 to 55 years. Participants were randomized to receive 2 (F4/AS01B_2 group, N = 64) or 3 (F4/AS01B_3 group, N = 62) doses of F4/AS01B or placebo (control group, N = 64) at weeks 0, 4, and 28. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000002673DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4753889PMC
February 2016
49 Reads
1 Citation
5.723 Impact Factor

Graft-versus-host disease of the skin and adjacent mucous membranes.

Authors:
Mirjana Ziemer

J Dtsch Dermatol Ges 2013 Jun;11(6):477-95

Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. uni-leipzig.de

Graft-versus-host disease is a complex multiorgan disease which mainly occurs in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The skin is the most frequently affected organ. Care and therapy of patients requires an interdisciplinary approach with dermatology in a key position. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ddg.12103DOI Listing
June 2013
3 Reads

Topical vitamin B12--a new therapeutic approach in atopic dermatitis-evaluation of efficacy and tolerability in a randomized placebo-controlled multicentre clinical trial.

Br J Dermatol 2004 May;150(5):977-83

Clinic for Dermatology and Allergology, Ruhr University Bochum, Germany.

Background: Vitamin B(12) is an effective scavenger of nitric oxide (NO). As the experimental application of a NO synthase inhibitor, N omega-nitro-L-arginine, led to a clear decrease in pruritus and erythema in atopic dermatitis, it would be reasonable to assume a comparable effect of vitamin B(12).

Objectives: The efficacy and tolerability of a new vitamin B(12) cream as a possible alternative to current therapies was examined. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2133.2004.05866.xDOI Listing
May 2004
4 Reads

Alternative and/or integrative therapies for pneumonia under development.

Curr Opin Pulm Med 2004 May;10(3):204-10

A. Cardarelli Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Unit of Pneumology and Allergology, Naples, Italy.

Purpose Of Review: Increasing antimicrobial resistance among common respiratory bacteria has created challenges in selecting appropriate therapy for pneumonia. Fortunately, the analysis of genome sequences has allowed us to find novel, nontraditional targets that are involved in disease pathogenesis or in adaptation and growth in infection sites. The advantage of the nonclassical targets is that targeting these sites could ablate infection without inducing resistance. Read More

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May 2004
2 Reads

Investigational and clinical use of the sting challenge.

Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol 2003 Aug;3(4):283-5

Department of Allergology, University Hospital Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Purpose Of Review: The sting challenge has been an important tool in advancing our knowledge about allergy to stings from insects in the order Hymenoptera. While some European centers have advocated its use in the past as a routine diagnostic procedure to select patients requiring venom immunotherapy, this practice has been abandoned because of the poor reproducibility of the test. In this review, the possible use of the sting challenge in clinical practice is discussed in the light of current knowledge of the limitations of the test. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.all.0000083956.99396.feDOI Listing
August 2003
5 Reads

Novel oral cephalosporins.

Authors:
M Cazzola

Expert Opin Investig Drugs 2000 Feb;9(2):237-46

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Division of Pneumology and Allergology and Unit of Respiratory Clinical Pharmacology, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples, Italy.

The therapeutic use of oral cephalosporins to treat infectious diseases continues to challenge clinicians; many attempts have been made over recent years to improve the efficacy and spectrum of these anti-infectives. Many oral cephalosporins are in development and include cefdinir, cefprozil, cefetamet pivoxil, cefcapene pivoxil, cefcanel daloxate hydrochloride in Phase II trials, S-1090 in Phase III trials and the novel compounds E1100, E1101 and BRL-57347. Differences between these drugs are sometimes subtle and the improvement over existing compounds modest, although recent cephalosporins have shown greater activity against Gram-negative bacterial infections. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1517/13543784.9.2.237 DOI Listing
February 2000
3 Reads
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