788 results match your criteria Journal of Infusion Nursing[Journal]


Unforeseen Dangers: Drugs That Are Hazardous to Health Care Personnel.

J Infus Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;42(1):44-48

Cardinal Health Innovative Delivery Solutions, Laflin, Pennsylvania. Patricia C. Kienle, BScPharm, RPh, MPA, FASHP, is the director of accreditation and medication safety for Cardinal Health Innovative Delivery Solutions. She received a pharmacy degree from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science and a master's degree in public administration from Marywood University in Scranton, Pennsylvania. She is a current member of the USP Compounding Expert Committee and chairs its subcommittee on hazardous drugs.

Antineoplastic and other hazardous drugs present a risk to health care personnel if they are not contained by appropriate facility design, personal protective equipment, and work practices that support safety. These drugs pose the risk of carcinogenicity and reproductive risks to personnel, which can be mitigated by using the proper containment practices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000309DOI Listing
February 2019

Pulsatile Flushing: A Review of the Literature.

Authors:
Christina Boord

J Infus Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;42(1):37-43

University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland. Christina Boord, BSN, RN, OCN®, is a clinical practice and education specialist at the University of Maryland Medical Center, where she sits on several hospital- and system-wide committees, working to improve patient-centered care. She is passionate about supporting staff in both education and process improvement initiatives.

Flushing is an essential strategy in maintaining patency of a central vascular access device. However, there is no standard practice regarding flushing techniques. Pulsatile flushing has been discussed in the past based on the principles of fluid dynamics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000311DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Quality Improvement Initiative Reduces the Occurrence of Complications in Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters.

J Infus Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;42(1):29-36

Hutchinson Regional Medical Center, Hutchison, Kansas (Mss Walters and Price). Beth Walters, BSN, RN, is a charge nurse in the outpatient infusion department at Hutchison Regional Medical Center. She specializes in all types of intravenous (IV) infusions as well as PICC insertion and maintenance. She has been a nurse for 12 years, 5 of those in the infusion department. Chelsey Price, BSN, RN, is a relief charge nurse in the outpatient infusion department at Hutchinson Regional Medical Center. She specializes in all types of IV infusions, as well as PICC insertion and maintenance. She has been a nurse for 11 years, 4 of those in the infusion department.

Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are commonly used to access the central venous system. However, central vascular access devices are associated with a risk of complications, which may include infection, thrombosis, occlusion, or malposition. The vascular access team of 1 midwestern hospital used a quality improvement initiative to reduce the occurrence of complications associated with PICCs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000310DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Improving Aseptic Technique During the Treatment of Pediatric Septic Shock: A Comparison of 2 Rapid Fluid Delivery Methods.

J Infus Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;42(1):23-28

Departments of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, University of North Carolina (UNC) Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (Dr Spangler); 410 Medical, Inc, Durham, North Carolina (Dr Piehl, Mr Lane, and Mr Robertson); University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (Dr Piehl); and WakeMed Health and Hospitals, Raleigh, North Carolina (Dr Piehl). Hillary Spangler, MD, is a resident physician in the Departments of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at University of North Carolina (UNC) Health Care. She received her medical training at UNC Chapel Hill. A pediatric sepsis survivor, Dr Spangler's clinical and research interests involve sepsis and quality improvement. She is also an active participant in UNC's Code Sepsis Initiative. Mark Piehl, MD, MPH, is a pediatric intensivist at WakeMed in Raleigh, North Carolina, and is a clinical associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the UNC School of Medicine. He received his MD and MPH degrees from UNC and is now chief medical officer of 410 Medical, Inc. Andrew Lane, MS, BS, is a mechanical engineer at 410 Medical, Inc. He has done research in ergonomics and human factors of medical devices, critical care, and robotics. He obtained a BS in biomedical engineering from UNC Chapel Hill and an MS in mechanical engineering from North Carolina State University. Galen Robertson, MSME, BSME, is a mechanical engineer and the chief operating officer at 410 Medical, Inc. He has been involved in research involving ergonomics and human factors of medical devices in critical care, general surgery, and robotics. He earned his BSME and MSME degrees from Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta.

Rapid fluid resuscitation is used to treat pediatric septic shock. However, achieving fluid delivery goals while maintaining aseptic technique can be challenging. Two methods of fluid resuscitation-the commonly used push-pull technique (PPT) and a new fluid infusion technique using the LifeFlow device (410 Medical, Inc; Durham, NC)-were compared in a simulated patient model. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00129804-201901000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000307DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6314506PMC
February 2019
4 Reads

Trends in Infusion Administrative Practices in US Health Care Organizations: An Exploratory Analysis.

J Infus Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;42(1):13-22

Purdue University Krannert School of Management, West Lafayette, Indiana (Mr Pratt, Dr Dunford); Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation, Norwood, Massachusetts (Ms Alexander); Infusion Nurses Society, Norwood, Massachusetts (Ms Alexander); Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (Dr Morgeson); and Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management, Nashville, Tennessee (Dr Vogus). Benjamin R. Pratt, MS, MSW, is a doctoral candidate in the organizational behavior and human resource management program in the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University. He studies talent management, particularly in the areas of work design, employee engagement, and employee retention. Benjamin B. Dunford, PhD, is an associate professor at the Krannert Graduate School of Management at Purdue University. Professor Dunford conducts research and teaches in the areas of change management, leadership, compensation, and organizational development. He earned his PhD from Cornell University in 2004. Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN, is chief executive officer of the Infusion Nurses Society and the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation. She has presented nationally and internationally on the specialty practice of infusion nursing, and her areas of expertise include standards development, patient safety, and leadership. Frederick P. Morgeson, PhD, is the Eli Broad Professor of Management at Michigan State University. He studies how organizations can optimally identify, select, develop, manage, and retain talent. His considerable health care-related experience includes staff hiring processes, connecting workforce competencies to the patient experience, and retention in acute and long-term care settings. Timothy J. Vogus, PhD, is the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr, Professor of Management at the Owen Graduate School of Management of Vanderbilt University. His research focuses on the cognitive (ie, mindful organizing), cultural, emotional, and organizational practices and processes through which individuals, workgroups, and organizations enact highly reliable, nearly error-free patient care delivery.

While specialized infusion clinical services remain the standard of care, widespread curtailing and disbanding of infusion teams as a cost-cutting measure has been documented in health care organizations for nearly 2 decades. Owing to this trend, as well as recent government interventions in medical error control, the authors engaged in an exploratory study of infusion administration practices in the US health care industry. This article presents the authors' exploratory findings, as well as their potential implications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000308DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Choose to Lead.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;42(1):11-12

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000312DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Improving Vascular Access Outcomes and Enhancing Practice.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;41(6):375-382

University of Florida (UF) Health Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida. Valerie Platt, DNP, RN, NE-BC, LSSGB, is the division director of nursing specialty services at UF Health Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida. Seth Osenkarski, MSN, RN, ONC®, CURN, LSSGB, is a clinical quality nurse leader at UF Health Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida.

With most hospitalized patients requiring peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs), PIVC-related process improvement may substantially affect the health, safety, and satisfaction of patients and health care workers, in addition to reducing costs. This study examined PIVC practice-related metrics before and after a comprehensive process improvement program, which included a change to closed catheter technology. Data were obtained from observations, clinician interviews, and patient records. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000304DOI Listing
January 2019
24 Reads

Does the Use of an Infusion Pump for Red Blood Cells Increase Hemolysis?

J Infus Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;41(6):372-374

Holy Name Medical Center, Teaneck, New Jersey (Dr Centrella-Nigro, Mr Scarano, and Mrs Ramraj).

Transfusions of red blood cells (RBCs) are frequently administered for a variety of clinical conditions. The use of an infusion pump has become common practice in nursing. Lack of evidence regarding hemolysis associated with transfusing older RBCs using an infusion pump led one 361-bed acute care suburban medical center to maintain its nursing policy to infuse all blood products by gravity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000305DOI Listing
January 2019
22 Reads

Short Peripheral Catheter Quality and Economics: The Intravenous Quotient.

Authors:
Randall K Jones

J Infus Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;41(6):365-371

BD Medical, Sandy, Utah. Randall K. Jones, MD, is worldwide medical director of infusion therapy at BD Medical in Sandy, Utah. Before joining BD Medical, he was a practicing general/vascular surgeon for 23 years and a chief medical officer/medical director for various medical device companies for 13 years.

Peripheral intravenous therapy is an established therapy with known complications and failures. The burden of the cost of unsuccessful short peripheral catheter (SPC) placement and maintenance is not always clearly identified. This often-obscured cost of poor quality needs to be defined and addressed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000303DOI Listing
January 2019

Standard Short Peripheral Catheters (SPCs) Versus Power Injectable SPCs During Contrast Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Angiography: A Quality Improvement Study.

Authors:
Virginia Pohlod

J Infus Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;41(6):358-364

Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital, Saint Petersburg, Florida (retired). Virginia Pohlod, MS, ARNP, CRNI®, served as the advanced practice nurse for the vascular access team at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital in Saint Petersburg, Florida, until her retirement in 2016, after 30 years on the vascular access team.

To perform high-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging angiographies, contrast typically is rapidly injected through a 20-gauge or larger short peripheral catheter (SPC). Intravenous access in infants and children can be challenging, and the use of large-gauge catheters is not always feasible. An institutional review board-approved quality improvement study was undertaken at a 250-bed pediatric hospital on Florida's Gulf Coast that compared the use and outcomes of standard SPCs (nonfenestrated) versus a power injectable SPC (fenestrated with 3 side holes distal to the catheter tip). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000301DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

Implementation of Smart Pump Technology With Home Infusion Providers: An Assessment of Clinician Workflow and Patient Satisfaction.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;41(6):344-349

Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, Health Ventures, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Dr Brown); Thomas Jefferson Home Infusion, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Ms Michael); and Superior Specialty Pharmacy, LLC, dba Big Sky IV Care, Kalispell, Montana (Dr Grady). Thomas D. Brown, PharmD, MBA, is director of health ventures at Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he oversees the health system's home infusion pharmacy and specialty pharmacy programs. Martha Michael, BSN, RN, CRNI®, is a nurse manager at Thomas Jefferson Home Infusion Service based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. David S. Grady, PharmD, MBA, is president, chief executive officer, and managing member of Superior Specialty Pharmacy, LLC, dba Big Sky Care, in Kalispell, Montana.

While hospitals have adopted smart pump technology (SPT) featuring drug libraries and medication safety software, most home infusion providers (HIPs) continue to use traditional infusion pumps that don't offer drug libraries or medication safety software. As infusion delivery is moving from the hospital to the home, the purpose of this study was to determine whether SPT was a feasible alternative at both a hospital-based and a rural HIP. HIP personnel were trained on an ambulatory infusion pump. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000302DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6237252PMC
January 2019

Let's Take Care of Each Other.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;41(6):341-342

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000306DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads

Continuing Education for Nursing Contact Hours and CRNI® Recertification Units.

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J Infus Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;41(5):326-E5

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000300DOI Listing
September 2018

Best Practices in the Management of Central Vascular Access Devices: An Observational Study in Areas With a High Prevalence of Trained Nurses.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;41(5):319-325

University of Turin, Turin, Italy (Mr Di Fine, Dr Lemma, Dr Cavallo, Ms Garrino, and Mr Dimonte); and Orthopaedic Trauma Center Hospital, Turin, Italy (Ms Centini, Mr Gavetti, and Mr Pici). Giovanni Di Fine, MSN, RN, is an emergency nurse and a tutor at the University of Turin's Center of Training and Research in Turin, Italy. Giuliana Centini, MSN, RN, is the director of the Department of Continuing Education at Turin's Orthopaedic and Trauma Center Hospital. Dario Gavetti, MSN, RN, is a research nurse in the Orthopaedic and Trauma Center Hospital's Department of Continuing Education in Turin. Patrizia Lemma, MD, is a professor of hygiene and preventive medicine in the University of Turin's Department of Public Health and Paediatrics. Franco Cavallo, MD, is a professor of statistics in the Department of Public Health and Paediatrics at the University of Turin. Andrea Pici, RN, is a research nurse at the Orthopaedic and Trauma Center Hospital. Lorenza Garrino, MSN, is an associate professor of nursing in the University of Turin's Department of Public Health and Paediatric Sciences. Valerio Dimonte, MSN, is an associate professor of nursing and the director of undergraduate nursing in the Department of Public Health and Paediatric Sciences at the University of Turin.

Since 2009, the Department of Continuing Education at the Orthopedic and Trauma Center Hospital in Turin, Italy, has provided a training course for nurses in the management of central vascular access devices (CVADs). The course focuses on dressing and flushing procedures, as well as compliance with other CVAD guidelines. An observational study was conducted among nurses to determine the level of best practices in areas with a high prevalence of nurses trained in the management of CVADs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000297DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Perceptions of Infusion Pump Alarms: Insights Gained From Critical Care Nurses.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;41(5):309-318

B. Braun Medical, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Rachel R. Vitoux, MBA, MSN, RN, CPHIMS, director of clinical consulting and services at B. Braun Medical, delivers data analytics and research to improve infusion safety and advance clinical practice. She earned an MBA in sustainable business from Marylhurst University in Marylhurst, Oregon, and an MSN as a clinical nurse specialist and a BSN from Indiana University. Catherine Schuster, PhD, MA, BSN, RN, is the manager of nursing research at B. Braun Medical. She earned a PhD and an MA in public health promotion and research from The Ohio State University, a BS in applied behavioral sciences from the University of California, Davis, and a BSN from the University of Oklahoma. Kevin R. Glover, MS, MEd, corporate vice president, clinical education program development, research, and innovation at B. Braun Medical, directs collaborative initiatives between industry, clinical service providers, relevant professional associations, and academia to develop and test educational solutions collectively to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of patient care.

Between 1983 and 2011, equipment-related alarms in critical care have increased from 6 to 40 different alarm types. As nurses become overwhelmed, distracted, or desensitized by alarm noise, they may miss critical alarms that could result in patient harm. The findings of an infusion pump alarm survey indicated that nurses overwhelmingly agree that infusion pump nuisance alarms occur frequently and disrupt patient care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000295DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6125754PMC
December 2018

Evaluation of a Magnetic Tracking and Electrocardiogram-based Tip Confirmation System for Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;41(5):301-308

University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Benioff Children's Hospital, Oakland, California (Ms Rosche and Dr Stehr). Nina Rosche, MSN, RN, PNP, VA-BC, is interested in new technologies in advancing vascular access care delivery for pediatric patients. She has been a pediatric nurse practitioner for 4 years and is currently a vascular access nurse practitioner specializing in the insertion, maintenance, and quality improvement of vascular access devices. Wolfgang Stehr, MD, MBA, FACS, is focused on patient safety, operational improvement, and resource utilization. For the past 6 years Dr Stehr has engaged in the Toyota lean operational improvement process and is physician-champion of the vascular access team.

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a magnetic tracking and electrocardiogram-based tip confirmation system (TCS) (Sherlock 3CG Tip Confirmation System; Bard, Covington, GA) permits safe and correct placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) in the pediatric population. A total of 144 PICCs were placed using the TCS. After excluding participants for various reasons, 112/121 (92. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000293DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Effects of Thermomechanical Stimulation During Intravenous Catheter Insertion in Adults: A Prospective Randomized Study.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;41(5):294-300

ProMedica Toledo Hospital, Toledo, Ohio (Dr Redfern, Ms Micham); ProMedica Metro Hospitals, Toledo, Ohio (Ms Sievert); and Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio (Dr Chen). Roberta E. Redfern, PhD, is a clinical research scientist at ProMedica Toledo Hospital, where she conducts research related to clinical and nursing practice, patient safety, and outcomes. Jennifer Micham, MSN, RN-BC, is the coordinator of the Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders program for ProMedica Toledo Hospital and a doctoral student with a focus on cognitive processing at the University of Toledo. Deana Sievert, MSN, RN, is the metro chief nursing officer for ProMedica Metro Hospitals in Toledo, Ohio. Her focus is on improving patients' experiences. She is a doctoral student at Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. John T. Chen, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio, where he conducts research in statistical methodologies and data analytics in biostatistics.

This was an open-label, randomized clinical trial comparing the effects of thermomechanical stimulation (Buzzy) versus no intervention in 105 adults undergoing intravenous (IV) catheter insertion before elective orthopedic surgical procedures. A visual analog scale was used to measure pain; satisfaction questionnaires were administered after IV catheter insertion. There was no significant difference in the mean pain score between the experimental (n = 49) and control (n = 56) groups (2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000294DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

INS 2018 ePoster Presentations.

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J Infus Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;41(5):280-282

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000298DOI Listing
September 2018

Authors, Beware of Predatory Publishing.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;41(5):277-278

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000299DOI Listing
September 2018

Phlebitis Signs and Symptoms With Peripheral Intravenous Catheters: Incidence and Correlation Study.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;41(4):260-263

School of Medicine, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, Australia (Mr Mihala); School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Nathan, Queensland, Australia (Dr Ray-Barruel, Ms Marsh, Dr Rickard); Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research Group (AVATAR), Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Nathan, Queensland, Australia (Mr Mihala, Dr Ray-Barruel, Ms Webster, Dr Wallis, Ms Marsh, Dr Rickard); Centre for Applied Health Economics, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Nathan, Queensland, Australia (Mr Mihala); Division of Hospital Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States (Dr Chopra); Nursing and Midwifery Research Centre, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Herston, Queensland, Australia (Ms Webster, Ms Marsh, Dr Rickard); School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Queensland, Australia (Dr Wallis); School of Rural Health, Monash University, Churchill, Victoria, Australia (Dr McGrail); and University of Queensland, Rural Clinical School, Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia (Dr McGrail). Gabor Mihala, MEng, GCert (Biostat), is a data manager and biostatistician at the Centre for Applied Health Economics and Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research (AVATAR) Group. Gillian Ray-Barruel, PhD, RN, is a leading nursing and intensive care unit researcher. She coordinated the One Million Global Catheters PIVC Worldwide Prevalence Study, which recruited more than 40 000 patients with short peripheral catheters (SPCs) around the world. She is pursuing a postdoctoral fellowship at Griffith University with the goal of improving assessment and action by bedside clinicians regarding prevention of SPC complications. Vineet Chopra, MD, MSc, is an associate professor of medicine and a research scientist at the University of Michigan and Veterans Administration Ann Arbor, Michigan Health System. His research is focused on improving the safety of infusion device use and outcomes. Joan Webster, BA, RN, is the nursing director for research at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital. One of her primary research interests is intravenous access. She has authored a number of important publications in that area, including the first Cochrane review of routine versus clinically indicated removal of SPCs. Marianne Wallis, PhD, RN, FACN, is the associate dean of health at the University of the Sunshine Coast. She is a director of the AVATAR Group and a board member of the Australian Vascular Access Society. Dr Wallis's focus is on vascular access devices and therapies, specifically peripheral devices. Nicole Marsh, MAdvPrac, BN, RN, is a research fellow specializing in vascular access. She has been a clinical trial coordinator for multicenter vascular access trials since 2007. She is a PhD candidate focusing on improving insertion and maintenance of SPCs. Matthew McGrail, PhD, GradDip (IT), BSc (Hons), is a biostatistician, with expertise in analysis methods associated with clinical trials of intravascular devices. He is also a member of the AVATAR Group. Claire M. Rickard, PhD, RN, founded the AVATAR Group and is an elected Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences and the Australian College of Nursing. She has been inducted into the Sigma Theta Tau International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame.

This study was undertaken to calculate the incidence of 8 signs and symptoms used for the diagnosis of phlebitis with peripheral intravenous catheters, or short peripheral catheters, and the level of correlation between them. A total of 22 789 daily observations of 6 signs (swelling, erythema, leakage, palpable venous cord, purulent discharge, and warmth) and 2 symptoms (pain and tenderness) were analyzed of 5907 catheter insertion sites. Most signs and symptoms of phlebitis occurred only occasionally or rarely; the incidence of tenderness was highest (5. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000288DOI Listing
October 2018
15 Reads

Evaluating the Efficacy and Use of Vein Visualization Equipment Among Clinical Nurses in an Intermediate Care Environment.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;41(4):253-258

University of North Carolina Hospitals, Hillsborough, North Carolina (Mr Kanipe); Medical Intensive Care Unit, University of North Carolina Hospitals at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (Ms Kime); University of North Carolina Hospitals Chapel Hill, North Carolina (Dr Smith-Miller); Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (Ms Shobe); and University of Florida School of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida (Dr Li). William Kanipe, BSN, RN, PCCN, was the principal investigator on this study. At the time of the study, Mr Kanipe was the assistant nurse manager on the unit where the research was conducted. He is now a nurse manager at the University of North Carolina Hospitals-Hillsborough campus. Kellie Shobe, MS, BSN, RN, PCCN, was the coprincipal investigator on this study. At the time of this study, Ms Shobe was a clinical nurse on the unit where the research was conducted. Yin Li, PhD, BM, RN, was a PhD candidate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing during the preparation phase of this project. She assisted the research team with data analysis and interpretation. Dr Li is now a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Florida. Mary Kime, MSN, RN, is a clinical nurse in the medicine intensive care unit at the University of North Carolina Hospitals at Chapel Hill and is a PhD student at the University of North Carolina Greensboro School of Nursing. Ms Kime assisted with the development of the manuscript. Cheryl A. Smith-Miller, PhD, RN-BC, is currently serving as nurse scientist at University of North Carolina Hospitals. Her focus is on facilitating clinical nurses' engagement in research. Dr Smith-Miller assisted the research team with study design and manuscript development.

This study compared traditional short peripheral catheter (SPC) insertion methods with 2 vein visualization equipment models among a general patient population on a surgical step-down unit based on first-attempt success rates and the time required to achieve catheter insertion. The experiences of clinical nurses using the ultrasound and vein visualization equipment were also explored. No significant statistical differences were found between the insertion methods, based on 90 unique SPC insertion attempts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000286DOI Listing
October 2018

Peripheral Infiltration and Extravasation Injury Methodology: A Retrospective Study.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;41(4):247-252

Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas (Dr Yates, Mr Odom); Harding University Physical Therapy Program, Searcy, Arkansas (Mr Odom); University of Central Arkansas, Conway, Arkansas (Drs Yates and Lowe, Mr Odom); and Center for Translational Neuroscience, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (Dr Yates). Brian Odom, MS, PT, CWS, is an assistant professor in the physical therapy program at Harding University, where he teaches integumentary, cardiopulmonary, and clinical reasoning. Board certified in wound care, he practices at Arkansas Children's Hospital. His emphasis in wound care focuses on acute trauma, pressure ulcers, and wounds in intensive care units. He is also a PhD student at the University of Central Arkansas. Leah Lowe, PhD, DPT, PT, PCS, is an assistant professor of physical therapy at the University of Central Arkansas. She teaches in the pediatrics course work and is the course director for Physical Therapy Research 1-2. She is a board-certified pediatric clinical specialist and practices at Pediatrics Plus, a specialized pediatric health care provider. Charlotte Yates, PhD, PT, PCS, is an associate professor at the University of Central Arkansas, where she teaches neuroscience, pediatrics, and integumentary. She is a research faculty member at the Center for Translational Neuroscience. A board-certified clinical specialist in pediatrics, Dr Yates practices at Arkansas Children's Hospital. Her emphasis on wound care is acute trauma.

Peripheral infiltration is defined as the inadvertent delivery of nonvesicant fluid or medication into surrounding tissue that has the potential to harm the patient. Vesicant fluid that has leaked into the tissue space is called extravasation. At present, there is no agreement in the literature on the best practice for managing these injuries in pediatric patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000287DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6082416PMC
October 2018
10 Reads

Addressing Administration Challenges Associated With Blinatumomab Infusions: A Multidisciplinary Approach.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;41(4):241-246

University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland. Stephanie Szoch, BSN, RN, OCN®, is a senior clinical nurse II at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC). She chairs the cancer center's Clinical Practice Council and has participated in transitioning vincristine infusions to minibags at UMMC, as well as in other process improvement initiatives to reduce chemotherapy errors. Christina Boord, BSN, RN, OCN®, is a clinical practice and education specialist at UMMC. She sits on several hospital- and system-wide committees working to improve patient-centered care. She is passionate about supporting staff in education and process improvement initiatives to reduce chemotherapy errors. Alison Duffy, PharmD, BCOP, is a clinical specialist in hematology/oncology at UMMC. Dr Duffy is a clinical assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, as well as the medication safety cochair for the Maryland Society of Health-System Pharmacy. Her interests are in clinical outcomes and practice-based research specifically related to immunocompromised hosts and patients with hematologic malignancies, as well as oncology-related medication safety. Ciera Patzke, PharmD, is a pharmacy resident practicing at UMMC, where she is completing a postgraduate year 2 oncology pharmacy residency through the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy.

Blinatumomab has shown great potential for patients with chemotherapy-resistant B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Blinatumomab's toxicity profile includes central nervous system toxicities, as well as cytokine release syndrome. Although neurological toxicities associated with blinatumomab are almost always reversible, early detection and intervention of these toxicities is vital to ensure that patients continue their full course of treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000283DOI Listing
October 2018
48 Reads

Cancer and the Broken Heart: Complications and Implications of Therapy-Related Cardiotoxicity.

Authors:
Deborah A Boyle

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;41(4):229-240

Advanced Oncology Nursing Resources, Huntington Beach, California. Deborah A. Boyle, MSN, RN, AOCNS®, FAAN, is an experienced oncology clinical nurse specialist who has practiced in community cancer programs and comprehensive cancer centers. She received a master's degree with a specialty in oncology nursing from Yale University. The recipient of numerous awards from the Oncology Nursing Society, she was most recently named the 2014 Advanced Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist of the Year by the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation. She is the author of more than 300 publications and is a frequent speaker in the United States and abroad.

The growing number of adult long-term cancer survivors has expanded our knowledge of negative physiologic sequelae associated with curative therapies. Of note are the cardiovascular corollaries of chest radiotherapy and some commonly used chemotherapy agents. A contemporary understanding of risk factors has facilitated the development of guidelines for prevention and surveillance of cardiac compromise. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000285DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Presidential Address.

Authors:
Felicia Schaps

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;41(4):226-227

INS President, 2018-2019.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000291DOI Listing

2017 INS Financial Report.

Authors:
Lisa Bruce

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;41(4):223-224

INS Secretary/Treasurer.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000290DOI Listing

State of the Society.

Authors:
Pamela Jacobs

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;41(4):220-221

INS President, 2017-2018.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000289DOI Listing

Compounding Isn't Just for Pharmacists.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;41(4):217-218

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000292DOI Listing

Ketamine Infusions for Outpatient Pain Management: A Policy Development Project.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;41(5):284-292

Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (Ms Allen, Dr Conner); Roper Hospital Ambulatory Surgery and Pain Management-James Island, Charleston, South Carolina (Ms Allen); Anesthesia Associates of Charleston PA, Charleston, South Carolina (Dr Ivester). Cheryl A. Allen, BSN, RN-BC, is a doctoral candidate for a degree in nursing practice at Medical University of South Carolina and a staff nurse at Roper Hospital Ambulatory Surgery and Pain Management-James Island. Ruth Conner, PhD, APRN, FNP-BC, is an assistant professor at Medical University of South Carolina and a family nurse practitioner. Julius R. Ivester, Jr, MD, is president of Anesthesia Associates of Charleston PA and specializes in anesthesia and pain management.

Current literature supports using ketamine for both acute and chronic pain management. It is imperative that the development of evidence-based protocols and policies keep pace with health care delivery to ensure patient safety. This project's objective was to formulate an outpatient ketamine infusion policy that promotes consistent and evidence-based care within a specified hospital system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000284DOI Listing
December 2018

Routine Versus Clinically Indicated Short Peripheral Catheter Replacement: An Evidence-based Practice Project.

J Infus Nurs 2018 May/Jun;41(3):198-204

Hartford Healthcare Corporation, Meriden, Connecticut (Dr Stevens); Sacred Heart University, College of Nursing, Fairfield, Connecticut (Dr Milner); and Sacred Heart University, College of Business, Fairfield, Connecticut (Dr Trudeau). Catherine Stevens, DNP, NEA-BC, RN, is vice president of patient care services at Hartford Healthcare Corporation in Meriden, Connecticut. Kerry A. Milner, DNSc, RN, is an associate professor in the College of Nursing at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Connecticut. Jennifer Trudeau, PhD, is an assistant professor in the College of Business at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Connecticut.

Despite current, high-quality, level 1 evidence that supports clinically indicated short peripheral catheter (SPC) replacement, the current practice in the health care system studied was to change SPCs routinely every 96 hours. A before-and-after design was used to evaluate the impact of SPC replacement when clinically indicated. Following the practice change, there were no SPC-related infections, monthly phlebitis rates ranged from 1. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00129804-201805000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000281DOI Listing
June 2018
6 Reads

A Standard Push-Pull Protocol for Waste-Free Sampling in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

J Infus Nurs 2018 May/Jun;41(3):189-197

Oregon Health and Science University, Doernbecher Children's Hospital, Portland, Oregon (Ms McBride); Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, California (Dr Miller-Hoover); and University of California at San Diego, Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute, San Diego, California (Mr Proudfoot). Clare McBride, BSN, RN, CCRN, is a pediatric intensive care and cardiac nurse at Oregon Health and Science University's Doernbecher Children's Hospital. She previously worked at Rady Children's Hospital in San Diego and presented this evidence-based practice project at the American Association of Critical Care Nurses' annual teaching conference. Suzan Miller-Hoover, DNP, RN, CCNS, CCRN-K, has been in the nursing profession for more than 35 years. An experienced national speaker and peer-reviewed author, Dr Miller-Hoover is passionate about evidence-based best practice and pediatrics. James A. Proudfoot, MSc, is a senior statistician at the University of California at San Diego, Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute. He has consulted on numerous clinical trials and is a coauthor of more than 25 articles.

Blood sampling is a major source of blood loss in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Blood-sparing sampling techniques such as the push-pull method can significantly reduce sampling-related blood loss and protect patients from anemia and blood transfusions. The push-pull method is supported by research evidence for central venous catheter (CVC) sampling, but research protocols differ and not all CVCs and laboratory tests have been studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000279DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6214664PMC
June 2018
2 Reads

Levels of Hemolysis Markers in Erythrocyte Concentrates Administered Using a Syringe Infusion Pump.

J Infus Nurs 2018 May/Jun;41(3):180-188

Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (Ms Figueiredo Gannam and Drs Belela-Anacleto, Kusahara, and Pedreira). Fernanda Figueiredo Gannam, RN, is a postgraduate student at the Federal University of São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil, where she is pursuing a master's degree in nursing and is a member of the research group on nursing in patient safety, pediatric intensive care, and intravenous and drug therapy. Aline Santa Cruz Belela-Anacleto, PhD, RN, is an adjunct professor in the school of nursing at the Federal University of São Paulo and is a researcher in the research group on nursing in patient safety, pediatric intensive care, and intravenous and drug therapy. Denise Miyuki Kusahara, PhD, RN, is an adjunct professor in the school of nursing at the Federal University of São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Enfermagem. She is also a researcher in the research group on nursing in patient safety, pediatric intensive care, and intravenous and drug therapy. Mavilde Gonçalves Pedreira, PhD, RN, is an associate professor in the Federal University of São Paulo's school of nursing. She also coordinates the clinical, surgical, and critical care academic areas in the pediatric nursing department at the university's Escola Paulista de Enfermagem. Dr Pedreira's research experience has been in the areas of nursing interventions, pediatric critical care, intravenous therapy, and patient safety. She also leads the research group on nursing in patient safety, pediatric intensive care, and intravenous and drug therapy.

Syringe infusion pumps (SIPs) led to major advances in infusion therapy and were gradually applied to the transfusion of packed red blood cells (RBCs), raising questions about possible cell damage. The objectives of this study were to determine levels of hematocrit (%), total hemoglobin (g/dL), free hemoglobin (g/dL), lactate dehydrogenase (units/L), potassium (mmol/L), the degree of hemolysis (%) of RBCs infused by an SIP, and to investigate the influence of the infusion rate. The experimental study comprised 14 RBCs, 3 SIPs, and infusion rates of 5, 10, and 20 mL/h. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000280DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Does Hyperglycemia Affect Risk of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter-Related Upper Extremity Venous Thrombosis?

J Infus Nurs 2018 May/Jun;41(3):176-179

Christus Health/Texas A&M College of Medicine-Spohn Hospital Program/Family Medicine, Corpus Christi, Texas (Dr Wilson); Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, Texas (Dr Guardiola); Fossil Creek Family Medicine Center, Fort Worth, Texas (Dr Simonak); Fossil Creek Family Medicine Center, Fort Worth, Texas (Dr Wenhold); and Christus Spohn Hospital, Beeville, Texas (Dr Wenhold). James D. Wilson, MD, FAAFP, is a faculty physician at the Christus Health/Texas A&M College of Medicine-Spohn Hospital Program/Family Medicine. He is also a medical officer in the US Army Reserve. José H. Guardiola, PhD, is an associate professor of mathematics and statistics at Texas A&M University. Brady Simonak, DO, is a family medicine physician at Fossil Creek Family Medicine Center. John Wenhold, DO, is a family physician at Christus Spohn Beeville.

It is not clear whether blood glucose (BG) affects the risk of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related upper extremity venous thrombosis (PRUEVT). A case-control study was conducted comparing patients with PRUEVT versus patients with PICCs who did not develop PRUEVT. BG on admission was significantly higher among cases with PRUEVT than controls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000277DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Transitioning Patients With Iron Overload From Exjade to Jadenu.

J Infus Nurs 2018 May/Jun;41(3):171-175

H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (Dr Tinsley); and University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Benioff Children's Hospital, Oakland, California (Ms Hoehner-Cooper). Sara M. Tinsley, PhD, ARNP, AOCN®, is a malignant hematology nurse practitioner at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute in Tampa, Florida. Dr Tinsley is also a member of the Oncology Nursing Society's Oncology Nurse Expert Panel and the Myelodysplastic Syndrome Foundation's International Nurse Leadership Board. Christine M. Hoehner-Cooper, MSN, RN, NP-C, is a nurse practitioner in the Adult Sickle Cell Center at UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital in Oakland, California. She has participated in a number of national sickle cell disease meetings and presented abstracts related to the disease.

Iron overload is a concern for patients who require chronic transfusions as a result of inherited or acquired anemias, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, and myelodysplastic syndromes. Iron chelation therapy (ICT) is the primary treatment for iron overload in these patients. The ICT deferasirox, which has been available as an oral dispersible tablet for liquid suspension, is now also available as a once-daily, film-coated tablet (FCT). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000278DOI Listing
June 2018
4 Reads

Maintaining Short Peripheral Catheter Patency: A Comparison of Saline Lock Versus Continuous Infusion in the Acute Care Setting.

J Infus Nurs 2018 May/Jun;41(3):165-169

University of North Carolina Healthcare System, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (Drs Roszell and Smith-Miller, and Ms Rabinovich). Sheila Serr Roszell, PhD, MSN, RN-BC, is the owner of Improvement Thinking Metrics, LLC, and is a quality data analyst for the University of North Carolina Healthcare System. She holds a BSN from the University of Missouri and an MSN and PhD in nursing, health care systems from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Holly Barlowe Rabinovich, BSN, RN, is a clinical nurse on an orthopedic trauma surgical unit at the University of North Carolina Healthcare System. She earned a BSN from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This project is her first foray into research. Cheryl A. Smith-Miller, PhD, RN-BC, is a nurse researcher at the University of North Carolina Healthcare System. She is currently serving as a nurse scientist, facilitating clinical nurses' engagement in research. Her research interests include nurses' work, culture, diabetes, and health disparities.

Sparse evidence exists about how short peripheral catheter (SPC) duration is affected by the presence of a saline lock versus continually infusing fluids. Often the choice to lock an SPC with saline is based on provider preference, rather than available evidence or patient-centered factors. This study compared the duration of 85 SPCs: locked with saline versus continuously running fluids. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000276DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Making an Infusion Error: The Second Victims of Infusion Therapy-Related Medication Errors.

J Infus Nurs 2018 May/Jun;41(3):156-163

Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Georgia (Drs Treiber and Jones). Linda A. Treiber, PhD, MSN, RN, is a professor of sociology at Kennesaw State University. She earned an MSN in nursing from Ohio State University and a PhD in sociology from North Carolina State University. As a medical sociologist, she studies medication errors and the meanings of illness. Jackie H. Jones, EdD, MSN, RN, is a professor of nursing at Kennesaw State University. She holds her MSN from Vanderbilt University and earned an EdD in higher education from the University of Georgia. A nurse educator for 18 years, she has extensive experience as a clinician, primarily in acute and critical care. Her primary research focuses on medication errors.

Infusion therapy-related adverse events can result in distress and professional suffering for the nurse involved with the event, with long-lasting consequences. This article discusses the second victim syndrome and its impacts on nurses. Original research on 168 recent nursing graduates and their experiences with second victim syndrome after making an infusion-related error is also presented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000273DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

The Year of Advocacy.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2018 May/Jun;41(3):153

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000282DOI Listing
April 2018
1 Read

Continuing Education for Nursing Contact Hours and CRNI® Recertification Units.

Authors:

J Infus Nurs 2018 Mar/Apr;41(2):138-E5

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000275DOI Listing
March 2018
1 Read

A Randomized Controlled Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of 2 Treatment Methods in Reducing Incidence of Short Peripheral Catheter-Related Phlebitis.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Mar/Apr;41(2):131-137

Singapore General Hospital, Singapore (Ms Gunasegaran, Miss See, Ms Leong, Ms Yuan, and Ms Ang). Nanthakumahrie Gunasegaran, MSc, BHS, is currently a nurse clinician. In addition to her master of science degree in clinical leadership, she holds an advanced diploma in medical/surgical nursing, as well as postgraduate certificates in domiciliary nursing and clinical nursing. Min Ting Alicia See, BSc (Hons), is currently a senior staff nurse. Siew Teing Leong, MHSM, BHS, is currently a senior nurse manager. She also holds an advanced diploma in critical care. Long Xia Yuan, BN, is currently a senior nurse manager. She also holds an advanced diploma in gerontology nursing. Shin Yuh Ang, MBA, BSc (Hons), is currently the assistant director of nursing. She also holds an advanced diploma in medical/surgical nursing.

Short peripheral catheter (SPC)-related phlebitis can lead to bloodstream infections and affect patients' quality of life. A randomized trial was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of 2 treatment methods in reducing the incidence of SPC-related phlebitis. The 2 treatment methods differed in terms of the cleansing solution used before insertion and dressing material used after removal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000271DOI Listing
May 2018
6 Reads

Does a Dedicated Lumen for Parenteral Nutrition Administration Reduce the Risk of Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections? A Systematic Literature Review.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Mar/Apr;41(2):122-130

Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Queensland, Brisbane, Australia (RBWH) (Mss Gavin and Button); Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research Group (AVATAR), Menzies Health Institute Queensland (MHIQ), Griffith University (GU), Queensland, Brisbane, Australia (Ms Castillo and Drs Ray-Barruel, Keogh, and Rickard); and University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Sippy Downs, Australia (Dr McMillan). Nicole Clare Gavin, MAP, BSc (Hons), RN, is an acting nurse researcher at the RBWH, Queensland, Australia, and a doctoral candidate at MHIQ, GU, Queensland, Australia. Elise Button, MAP (Hons), BN, RN, is an acting nurse researcher at the RBWH, Queensland, Australia, and doctoral candidate in the School of Nursing at Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia. Maria Isabel Castillo, PhD, RN, is a research fellow with the AVATAR at MHIQ, GU in Australia. Her research interests and publications are currently focused on care and management of vascular access devices and recovery after critical illness. Gillian Ray-Barruel, PhD, RN, coordinated the One Million Global (OMG) study, which recruited more than 40 000 patients with peripheral inserted venous catheters (PIVCs) globally. Her postdoctoral fellowship aims to improve assessment and action by bedside clinicians regarding the prevention of PIVC complications. Samantha Keogh, PhD, RN, has a clinical background in adult and pediatric critical care. Her research focuses on the management of vascular access devices. She is the current principal director at AVATAR and serves as the lead of the flushing and blood sampling platform. David J. McMillan, PhD, BSc, is a senior research fellow at the University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia. He is a molecular microbiologist with a research interest in assessment and prevention of bacterial colonization of medical devices. Claire M. Rickard, PhD, RN, is professor of nursing with GU and director at AVATAR, MHIQ. She is an inducted member of the Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame and an elected Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences and Australian College of Nursing.

Guidelines recommend using single-lumen central vascular access devices (CVADs) for the administration of parenteral nutrition (PN) or lipid-based solutions, or a dedicated lumen on a multilumen CVAD. Publications reviewed by the authors reported comparative rates of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI) in patients with CVADs who received PN through a dedicated lumen compared with those who had PN administered through multilumen CVADs. Two studies included 650 patients with 1349 CVADs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000270DOI Listing
May 2018
8 Reads

Selection of Single- Versus Double-Lumen Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters and the Influence on Alteplase Use.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Mar/Apr;41(2):118-121

St. Luke's Mountain States Tumor Institute, Meridian, Idaho (Ms Byrne); and St. Luke's Mountain States Tumor Institute, Boise, Idaho (Ms Penwarden). Dia Byrne, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC, OCN®, is a clinical nurse specialist in outpatient oncology at St. Luke's Mountain States Tumor Institute in Meridian, Idaho. Linda Penwarden, MN, RN, AOCN®, is an oncology clinical nurse specialist in outpatient oncology at St. Luke's Mountain States Tumor Institute in Boise, Idaho.

The purpose of this article is to share the efforts of one institution in reducing risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). The aim is to review alteplase use as a marker for peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) occlusions, which may increase risk of CLABSIs. The discovery that alteplase use increased with the number of PICC lumens allowed for exploration of ordering and placement practices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000269DOI Listing
May 2018
4 Reads

Optimizing Drug Delivery of Small-Volume Infusions.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Mar/Apr;41(2):113-117

Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, Indiana (Ms Thoele, Dr Ednalino, and Mr Terry); and Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Dr Piddoubny). Kelli Thoele, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC, BMTCN®, OCN®, is a clinical nurse specialist at Indiana University Health in Indianapolis, Indiana. She is interested in evidence-based practice and safe handling of hazardous drugs. Maria Piddoubny, PharmD, BCOP, is a PGY-2 graduate of Indiana University Health in Indianapolis, Indiana, now working as a hematology/oncology patient care pharmacist at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Her interests include chemotherapy medication safety and translational research in oncology genomics. Ryan Ednalino, PharmD, is a medication safety clinical pharmacist for Indiana University Health. He oversees medication safety initiatives across the multifacility hospital system. He serves on pharmacy and therapeutics and multiple system medication safety committees. Colin L. Terry, MS, is a biostatistician and serves as program manager for data services at Indiana University Health in Indianapolis, Indiana. He consults and collaborates on a wide variety of research projects and serves on several institutional boards as a lead statistical reviewer.

When administering intermittent secondary intravenous infusions, commonly referred to as intravenous piggyback (IVPB) infusions, residual medication remains in the administration set and bag. No previous studies exist examining the optimal technique to infuse the residual medication. The aims of this study were to identify various IVPB ancillary techniques used to administer medication residing in the secondary administration set and bag following an infusion, evaluate the potential drug loss associated with each technique, and recommend a standard ancillary technique for administration of select small-volume IVPB infusions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000268DOI Listing
May 2018
2 Reads

Antimicrobial Efficacy of a New Chlorhexidine-based Device Against Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of Venous Catheters.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Mar/Apr;41(2):103-112

Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute and Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada (Dr Fox-Robichaud); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada (Dr Kowalewska); Comparative Medicine, Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada (Dr Petrik); and ATTWILL Medical Solutions, Inc, West Jordan, Utah (Mr Di Fiore). Paulina M. Kowalewska, PhD, was an Ontario Centres of Excellence TalentEdge Postdoctoral Fellow at McMaster University during this study and is currently a postdoctoral associate at the University of Western Ontario. Shawn M. Petrik, DVM, MSc, Dip LAM, is the leader of the Comparative Medicine Group at McMaster University, which supports veterinarians, physicians, and scientists who study animal models of human diseases. Attilio E. Di Fiore, BSc, BScEng, PEng, is a biomedical engineer specializing in medical device design and development, with extensive experience in vascular device manufacturing and infection control. Alison E. Fox-Robichaud, MD, MSc, FRCPC, is a clinician scientist and professor of medicine with research interests in inflammation and sepsis. She is also a collaborator on various multicenter knowledge translation studies through the Canadian Critical Care Translational Biology Group and the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group.

Vascular catheters are a major cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections. ChloraLock (ATTWILL Medical Solutions, Inc, West Jordan, UT, and ICU Medical, Inc, San Clemente, CA) is a novel antimicrobial device containing chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) that is fitted onto a syringe and infuses CHG into the catheter lumen during locking. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of ChloraLock with in vitro tests and its ability to reduce Staphylococcus aureus contamination of catheters in the external jugular veins of Yorkshire swine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000267DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5862007PMC
May 2018
12 Reads

Factors Contributing to Phlebitis Among Adult Patients Admitted in the Medical-Surgical Units of a Central Hospital in Harare, Zimbabwe.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Mar/Apr;41(2):96-102

University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing Science, Harare, Zimbabwe (Mr Livion, Mrs Mukona, and Dr Zvinavashe). Munashe Livion Nyika, BSc (Hons), is a former student at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences who recently graduated with a BSc (Hons) in Nursing Science. Doreen Mukona, MSc, BSc, is a lecturer at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences who is currently pursuing a DPhil in Nursing Science. She holds a BSc and an MSc in Nursing Science from the same university. Mathilda Zvinavashe, PhD, MSc, is a professor in the Department of Nursing Science in the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences. She earned her MSc in Community Nursing as well as her PhD in Nursing from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

This descriptive survey identified factors contributing to phlebitis among 46 adult inpatients using a systematic random sample. The visual infusion phlebitis score was used for assessment. All participants had phlebitis, with stage 4 being most frequent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000265DOI Listing
May 2018
6 Reads

Antibody Formation in Transfusion Therapy.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Mar/Apr;41(2):87-95

Vidant Medical Center, Greenville, North Carolina (Mr Passwater).

The production of antibodies following blood transfusions is a complex process that involves many recipient and donor factors. Inflammation in the recipient is one important factor. As knowledge of the immune system, of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nitric oxide pathways, and of hemostasis grows, more specific therapies will allow precise manipulation of the immune system and safer transfusions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000264DOI Listing
May 2018
1 Read

Be Exceptional. Be a CRNI®.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2018 Mar/Apr;41(2):85-86

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000272DOI Listing
March 2018
1 Read

Difficulties Related to Peripheral Intravenous Access in Children in an Emergency Room.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jan/Feb;41(1):66-72

Escola Paulista de Enfermagem, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (Drs Machado Avelar and Sorgini Peterlini and Ms de Freitas Floriano). Claudia Maria de Freitas Floriano, MSc, is a pediatric emergency nurse at the Escola Paulista de Enfermagem of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo, in São Paulo, Brazil. Ariane Ferreira Machado Avelar, PhD, MSc, RN, is an adjunct professor at the Escola Paulista de Enfermagem of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil. Maria Angélica Sorgini Peterlini, PhD, MSc, RN, is an associate professor at the Escola Paulista de Enfermagem of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil.

This prospective study examined the characteristics of children admitted to a pediatric emergency department and the factors that influenced the successful establishment of peripheral intravenous (IV) access. Descriptive and correlational analysis was completed using a convenience sample of 89 patients. Peripheral IV access was successful in 95. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000262DOI Listing
March 2018
2 Reads

Strategies to Reduce Patient Harm From Infusion-Associated Medication Errors: A Scoping Review.

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jan/Feb;36(1):58-65

La Salle University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Zane Robinson Wolf, PhD, RN, FAAN, is dean emerita, professor in the School of Nursing and Health Sciences of La Salle University in Philadelphia. Her interest in medication errors and nurses' experience with them motivated her to conduct this scoping review. Adverse outcomes of infusion-associated medication errors are often more severe than those involving oral medications. Additional research needs to be conducted on protocols and standardized equipment to determine the impact of such safety strategies on infusion-linked medication errors.

A scoping review of the literature examined strategies to prevent infusion-associated medication errors. Twenty articles were appraised and revealed studies using different research designs and types of literature reviews. Most were rated low quality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000263DOI Listing
February 2018
3 Reads

Catheter Occlusion in Home Infusion: The Influence of Needleless Connector Design on Central Catheter Occlusion.

Authors:
Ann Williams

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jan/Feb;41(1):52-57

Deaconess Health System, Evansville, Indiana.

Thrombotic catheter occlusion is a common complication associated with central venous catheters (CVCs). A wide variety of needleless connectors that differ greatly in design and function are available for use with CVCs; however, there are a limited number of studies comparing the catheter occlusion rate associated with differently designed needleless connectors. This retrospective observational study compared occlusion rates associated with a split-septum neutral-displacement needleless connector versus those of a solid-surface neutral-reflux needleless connector in patients undergoing home infusion therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000259DOI Listing
March 2018
4 Reads

Is This a Blood Transfusion Reaction? Don't Hesitate; Check It Out.

Authors:
Julie DeLisle

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jan/Feb;41(1):43-51

BloodCenter of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Julie DeLisle, MSN, RN, is the transfusion safety and blood management officer for BloodCenter of Wisconsin, where she works with health care organizations on blood management initiatives.

Blood transfusions can be lifesaving. The majority are completed without incident. However, every transfusion recipient runs the risk of developing a transfusion reaction or adverse event. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000261DOI Listing
March 2018
1 Read