1,953 results match your criteria Journal of Hospital Medicine[Journal]


Frequently Hospitalized Patients' Perceptions of Factors Contributing to High Hospital Use.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar 20;14:E1-E6. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

Background: A small proportion of patients accounts for a large proportion of hospitalizations.

Objective: To obtain patients' perspectives of factors associated with the onset and continuation of high hospital use.

Design: Qualitative research study where a research coordinator conducted one-on-one semi-structured interviews. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3175DOI Listing

Things We Do For No Reason: Use of Antipsychotic Medications in Patients with Delirium.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar 20;14:E1-E3. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3166DOI Listing

Every Nook and Cranny.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar 20;14:E1-E5. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3163DOI Listing

Condom Catheters versus Indwelling Urethral Catheters in Men: A Prospective, Observational Study.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar 20;14:E1-E4. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine.

To assess complications of condom catheters compared with indwelling urethral catheters, we conducted a prospective cohort study in two Veterans Affairs hospitals. Male patients who used a condom catheter or indwelling urethral catheter during their hospital stay were followed for one month by interview and medical record review. Participants included 36 men who used condom catheters and 44 who used indwelling urethral catheters. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3180DOI Listing

Do Hospitals Participating in Accountable Care Organizations Discharge Patients to Higher Quality Nursing Homes?

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar 20;14:E1-E2. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

We examined whether hospitals participating in Medicare's Shared Saving Program increased the use of highly rated skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) or decreased the use of low-rated SNFs hospital-wide after initiation of their accountable care organization (ACO) contracts compared with non-ACO hospitals. Using a difference-in-differences design, we estimated the change in the probability of discharge to 5-star and 1-star SNFs among all beneficiaries discharged from ACO-participating hospitals after the hospital initiated ACO participation. After joining an ACO, the percentage of hospital discharges going to a high-quality SNF increased by 3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3147DOI Listing

Impact of Pharmacist-led Discharge Counseling on Hospital Readmission and Emergency Department Visits: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar 20;14:E1-E8. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of Pharmacy, Federal University of ParanĂ¡, Curitiba, Brazil.

Background: Transitions of care can contribute to medication errors and other adverse drug events.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of pharmacist-led discharge counseling on hospital readmission and emergency department visits through a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Edata Sources: Lectronic searches were performed in PubMed, Scopus, and DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals), along with a manual search (July 2017). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3182DOI Listing

Hospital at Home and Emergence of the Home Hospitalist.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar 20;14:E1-E3. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3162DOI Listing

Prevalence and Postdischarge Outcomes Associated with Frailty in Medical Inpatients: Impact of Different Frailty Definitions.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar 20;14:E1-E4. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Alberta SPOR Support Unit Data Platform, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

We compared prevalence estimates and prognostication if frailty were defined using the face-to-face Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) or the administrative-data-derived Hospital Frailty Risk Score (HFRS). We evaluated 489 adults from a prospective cohort study of medical patients being discharged back to the community; 276 (56%) were deemed frail (214 [44%] on the HFRS and 161 [33%] on the CFS), but only 99 (20%) met both frailty definitions (kappa 0.24, 95% CI 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3174DOI Listing

Frequency of Ethical Issues on a Hospitalist Teaching Service at an Urban, Tertiary Care Center.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar 20;14:E1-E4. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Division of Medical Ethics, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York.

Little is known about the daily ethical conflicts encountered by hospitalists that do not prompt a formal clinical ethics consultation. We describe the frequencies of ethical issues identified during daily rounds on hospitalist teaching services at a metropolitan, tertiary-care, teaching hospital. Data were collected from September 2017 through May 2018 by two attending hospitalists from the ethics committee who were embedded on rounds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3179DOI Listing

Things We Do for No Reason: Neuroimaging for Hospitalized Patients with Delirium.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar 20;14:E1-E4. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Division of Hospital Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3167DOI Listing

An Advanced Practice Provider Clinical Fellowship as a Pipeline to Staffing a Hospitalist Program.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar 20;14:E1-E4. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Division of Hospital Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland.

Background: Approximately 83% of hospitalist groups around the country utilize advanced practice providers; however, the demand for hospitalists continues to exceed the supply, and this has led to increased utilization of advanced practice providers in hospital medicine. Advanced practice providers receive very limited inpatient training, and there is wide variation in their clinical abilities after graduation.

Objective: To determine if an advanced practice provider fellowship is a cost-effective pipeline for filling vacancies within a hospitalist program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3183DOI Listing

Things We Do For No Reason: Failing to Question a Penicillin Allergy History.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar 20;14:E1-E3. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center. Durham, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3170DOI Listing

Things We Do For Good Reasons: Contact Precautions for Multidrug-resistant Organisms, Including MRSA and VRE.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):194-196

Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3169DOI Listing

The Critical Role of Hospitalists for Successful Hospital-SNF Integration Hospitalists and Hospital/SNF Integration.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):192-193

Department of Population Health, Geisinger Medical Institute, Danville, Pennsylvania.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3161DOI Listing

Treatment of Inpatient Asymptomatic Hypertension: Not a Call to Act but to Think.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):190-191

Medicine Service, White River Junction VA Medical Center, White River Junction, Vermont.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3160DOI Listing

Leadership & Professional Development: Know Your TLR.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):189

VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3184DOI Listing

The Complex Problem of Women Trainees in Academic Medicine.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):186-188

Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3131DOI Listing

Egad!

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):181-185

Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3103DOI Listing

Things We Do For No Reason: Contact Precautions for MRSA and VRE.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):178-180

Department of Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, Arizona.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3126DOI Listing

Clinical Guideline Highlights for the Hospitalist: The Use of Intravenous Fluids in the Hospitalized Adult.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):172-173

Division of Hospital Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Denver, Colorado.

Guideline Title: Intravenous Fluid Therapy in Adults in Hospital RELEASE DATE: December, 2013 PRIOR VERSION: Not Applicable DEVELOPER: Multidisciplinary Guideline Development Group within the United Kingdom's National Clinical Guideline Centre FUNDING SOURCE: National Institute for Health and Care Excellence TARGET POPULATION: Hospitalized adult patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3178DOI Listing

Clinical Guideline Highlights for the Hospitalist: Maintenance Intravenous Fluids in Infants and Children.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):170-171

Division of Hospital Medicine, Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona.

Guideline Title: 2018 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Clinical Practice Guideline: Maintenance Intravenous Fluids in Children RELEASE DATE: November 26, 2018 PRIOR VERSION: Not Applicable DEVELOPER: Multidisciplinary subcommittee of experts assembled by the AAP FUNDING SOURCE: AAP TARGET POPULATION: Patients 28 days to 18 years of age requiring maintenance intravenous fluids (IVFs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3177DOI Listing

Statistical Modeling and Aggregate-Weighted Scoring Systems in Prediction of Mortality and ICU Transfer: A Systematic Review.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):161-169

University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing, Department of Community Health Systems, San Francisco, California.

Background: The clinical deterioration of patientsin general hospital wards is an important safety issue. Aggregate-weighted early warning systems (EWSs) may not detect risk until patients present with acute decline.

Purpose: We aimed to compare the prognostic test accuracy and clinical workloads generated by EWSs using statistical modeling (multivariable regression or machine learning) versus aggregate-weighted tools. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3151DOI Listing

Adherence to Recommended Inpatient Hepatic Encephalopathy Workup.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):157-160

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.

Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is characterized by altered sensorium and is the most common indication for hospitalization among patients with cirrhosis. Liver societal guidelines for inpatient HE revolve around identification of potential precipitants. In this retrospective study, we aimed to determine adherence to societal guidelines for evaluation of HE in 78 inpatients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3152DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Assess Before Rx: Reducing the Overtreatment of Asymptomatic Blood Pressure Elevation in the Inpatient Setting.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):151-156

Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.

Background: Asymptomatic blood pressure elevation is common in the inpatient setting. National guidelines recommend treating with oral agents to slowly decrease blood pressure; however, many clinicians use intravenous antihypertensive medications, which can lead to unpredictable changes in blood pressure.

Objective: To decrease the number of inappropriate orders (without symptoms of hypertensive emergency or order for NPO) of intravenous antihypertensives and adverse events associated with intravenous orders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3190DOI Listing

Reducing Unnecessary Treatment of Asymptomatic Elevated Blood Pressure with Intravenous Medications on the General Internal Medicine Wards: A Quality Improvement Initiative.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):144-150

Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Background: Asymptomatic elevated blood pressure (BP) is common in the hospital. There is no evidence supporting the use of intravenous (IV) antihypertensives in this setting.

Objective: To determine the prevalence and effects of treating asymptomatic elevated BP with IV antihypertensives and to investigate the efficacy of a quality improvement (QI) initiative aimed at reducing utilization of these medications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3087DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Beyond Reporting Early Warning Score Sensitivity: The Temporal Relationship and Clinical Relevance of "True Positive" Alerts that Precede Critical Deterioration.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):138-143

Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness, Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Background: Clinical deterioration is difficult to detect in hospitalized children. The pediatric Rothman Index (pRI) is an early warning score that incorporates vital signs, laboratory studies, and nursing assessments to generate deterioration alerts.

Objectives: (1) Evaluate the timing of pRI alerts and clinicians recognizing deterioration or escalating care prior to critical deterioration events (CDEs) and (2) determine whether the parameters triggering alerts were clinically related to deterioration. Read More

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https://www.journalofhospitalmedicine.com/jhospmed/article/1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3066DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads
2.081 Impact Factor

Reviews Reenvisioned: Supporting Enhanced Practice Improvement for Hospitalists.

J Hosp Med 2019 Mar;14(3):137

Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Denver, Colorado.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3172DOI Listing

Serious Choices: A Systematic Environmental Scan of Decision Aids and Their Use for Seriously Ill People Near Death.

J Hosp Med 2019 02 20;14:E1-E9. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Seriously ill people near death face difficult decisions about life-sustaining treatments such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation and mechanical ventilation. Patient decision aids may improve alignment between patients' preferences and the care they receive, but the quantity, quality, and routine use of these tools are unknown. We conducted a systematic environmental scan to identify all decision aids for seriously ill people at high risk of death facing choices about life-sustaining treatments, assess their quality, and explore their use in clinical settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3110DOI Listing
February 2019

Limitation of Life-Sustaining Care in the Critically Ill: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

J Hosp Med 2019 02 20;14:E1-E8. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Indiana University Center for Aging Research, Indianapolis Indiana.

When life-sustaining treatments (LST) are no longer effective or consistent with patient preferences, limitations may be set so that LSTs are withdrawn or withheld from the patient. Many studies have examined the frequency of limitations of LST in intensive care unit (ICU) settings in the past 30 years. This systematic review describes variation and patient characteristics associated with limitations of LST in critically ill patients in all types of ICUs in the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3137DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Inpatient Mobility Technicians: One Step Forward?

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb 20;14:E1-E2. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3148DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Increasing Mobility via In-hospital Ambulation Protocol Delivered by Mobility Technicians: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb 20;14:E1-E6. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Center for Value-Based Care Research, Medicine Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.

Background: Ambulating medical inpatients may improve outcomes, but this practice is often overlooked by nurses who have competing clinical duties.

Objective: This study aimed to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of dedicated mobility technician-assisted ambulation in older inpatients.

Design: This study was a single-blind randomized controlled trial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3153DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Care Transitions Program for High-Risk Frail Older Adults is Most Beneficial for Patients with Cognitive Impairment.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb 20;14:E1-E8. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Background: Although posthospitalization care transitions programs (CTP) are highly diverse, their overall program thoroughness is most predictive of their success.

Objective: To identify components of a successful homebased CTP and patient characteristics that are most predictive of reduced 30-day readmissions.

Design: Retrospective cohort. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3112DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Examining the Utility of 30-day Readmission Rates and Hospital Profiling in the Veterans Health Administration.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb 20;14:E1-E6. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California.

Background: The Veterans Health Administration (VA) reports hospital-specific 30-day risk-standardized readmission rates (RSRRs) using CMS-derived models.

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine and describe the interfacility variability of 30-day RSRRs for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), and pneumonia as a means to assess its utility for VA quality improvement and hospital comparison.

Research Design: A retrospective analysis of VA and Medicare claims data using one-year (2012) and three-year (2010-2012) data given their use for quality improvement or for hospital comparison, respectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3155DOI Listing
February 2019

AHRQ Evidence-based Practice Center Program: Applying the Knowledge to Practice to Data Cycle to Strengthen the Value of Patient Care.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb 20;14:E1-E4. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Center for Evidence and Practice Improvement, Rockville, Maryland.

For more than 20 years, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) Program has been identifying and synthesizing evidence to inform evidence-based healthcare. Recognizing that many healthcare settings continue to face challenges in disseminating and implementing evidence into practice, AHRQ's EPC program has also embarked on initiatives to facilitate the translation of evidence into practice and to measure and monitor how practice changes impact health outcomes. The program has structured its efforts around the three phases of the Learning Healthcare System cycle: knowledge, practice, and data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3157DOI Listing
February 2019

Contemporary Rates of Preoperative Cardiac Testing Prior to Inpatient Hip Fracture Surgery.

J Hosp Med 2019 02 20;14:E1-E5. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Hip fracture is a common reason for urgent inpatient surgery. In the past few years, several professional societies have identified preoperative echocardiography and stress testing for noncardiac surgeries as low-value diagnostics. We utilized data on hospitalizations with a primary diagnosis of hip fracture surgery between 2011 and 2015 from the State Inpatient Databases (SID) of Maryland, New Jersey, and Washington, combined with data on hospital characteristics from the American Hospital Association (AHA). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3142DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Preventing Hypoglycemia Following Treatment of Hyperkalemia in Hospitalized Patients.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb 20;14:E1-E4. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

King's Insulin Safety Group, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.

Hypoglycemia is a serious complication following treatment of hyperkalemia with intravenous insulin. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence of hypoglycemia (≤3.9 mmol/l, 70 mg/dL) and severe hypoglycemia (<3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3145DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

In the Hospital: Laura Shea.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb 20;14:E1-E2. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Department of Medicine, Division of Hospital Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3113DOI Listing
February 2019

Aspiration Pneumonia in Older Adults.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb 20;14:E1-E7. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York.

Aspiration pneumonia refers to an infection of the lung parenchyma in an individual that has inhaled a bolus of endogenous flora that overwhelms the natural defenses of the respiratory system. While there are not universally agreed upon criteria, the diagnosis can be made in patients with the appropriate risk factors and clinical scenario, in addition to a radiographic or an ultrasonographic image of pneumonia in the typical dependent lung segment. Treatment options for aspiration pneumonia vary based on the site of acquisition (community-acquired aspiration pneumonia [CAAP] versus healthcare-associated aspiration pneumonia [HCAAP]), the risk for multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms, and severity of illness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3154DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

National Survey of Hospitalists' Experiences with Incidental Pulmonary Nodules.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb 20;14:E1-E4. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Incidental pulmonary nodules (IPNs) are common and often require follow-up. The Fleischner Society guidelines were created to support IPN management. We developed a 14-item survey to examine hospitalists' exposure to and management of IPNs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3115DOI Listing
February 2019

Updates in Management and Timing of Dialysis in Acute Kidney Injury.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb 20;14:E1-E7. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in hospitalized patients and is associated with mortality, prolonged hospital length of stay, and increased healthcare costs. This paper reviews several areas of controversy in the identification and management of AKI. Serum creatinine and urine output are used to identify and stage AKI by severity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3105DOI Listing
February 2019

Follow Up of Incidental High-Risk Pulmonary Nodules on Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiography at Care Transitions.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb 20;14:E1-E4. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Division of General Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) detects incidental findings that require follow-up. In just over 50% of cases, those incidental findings are pulmonary nodules. Fleischner guidelines recommend that patients with nodules that have a high risk of malignancy should undergo CT follow-up within 3-12 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3128DOI Listing
February 2019
17 Reads
2.081 Impact Factor

Things We Do for No Reason: The Use of Thickened Liquids in Treating Hospitalized Adult Patients with Dysphagia.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb 20;14:E1-E3. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hospital Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3141DOI Listing
February 2019

Should the Diagnosis of UTI in Young Febrile Infants Require a Positive Urinalysis?

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb;14(2):131-132

Division of Emergency and Transport Medicine, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3139DOI Listing
February 2019

Admittedly Simple? The Quest for Clarity in Medicare Claims Data.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb;14(2):129-130

Department of Care Coordination/Clinical Resource Management, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3135DOI Listing
February 2019

Optimizing Well-being, Practice Culture, and Professional Thriving in an Era of Turbulence.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb;14(2):126-128

Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3101DOI Listing
February 2019

Things We Do for No Reason: Prescribing Docusate for Constipation in Hospitalized Adults.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb;14(2):110-113

NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3124DOI Listing
February 2019

Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy in Vulnerable Populations-- People Who Inject Drugs and the Homeless.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb;14(2):105-109

Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs can provide high-value care but may be challenging in people who inject drugs (PWID) and homeless individuals. We conducted a single-center, retrospective, cohort study of adults who received OPAT at an urban, public health hospital from January 1, 2015 to April 30, 2016, grouped by PWID and housing status. Outcomes included clinical cure, length of stay, secondary bacteremia, line-tampering, and readmission. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3138DOI Listing
February 2019

Negative Urinalyses in Febrile Infants Age 7 to 60 Days Treated for Urinary Tract Infection.

J Hosp Med 2019 Feb;14(2):101-104

Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

The role of the urinalysis (UA) in the management of young, febrile infants is controversial. To assess how frequently infants are treated for urinary tract infection (UTI) despite having normal UA values and to compare the characteristics of infants treated for UTI who have positive versus negative UAs, we reviewed 20,570 wellappearing febrile infants 7-60 days of age evaluated at 124 hospitals in the United States who were included in a national quality improvement project. Of 19,922 infants without bacteremia and meningitis, 2,407 (12. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3120DOI Listing
February 2019

Patient, Caregiver, and Clinician Perspectives on Expectations for Home Healthcare after Discharge: A Qualitative Case Study.

J Hosp Med 2019 02;14(2):90-95

Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Background: Patients discharged from the hospital with skilled home healthcare (HHC) services have multiple comorbidities, high readmission rates, and multiple care needs. In prior work, HHC nurses described that patients often express expectations for services beyond the scope of skilled HHC.

Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate and compare expectations for HHC from the patient, caregiver, and HHC perspectives after hospital discharge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3140DOI Listing
February 2019
2.081 Impact Factor