1,322 results match your criteria Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation [Journal]


Prevalence of Medical and Psychiatric Comorbidities Following Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana University School of Medicine and Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana, Indianapolis, Indiana (Drs Hammond and Malec); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (Drs Corrigan and Bogner); Research Department, Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Data and Statistical Center, Craig Hospital, Englewood, Colorado (Drs Ketchum and Whiteneck); Departments of Rehabilitation Medicine and Neurology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (Dr Dams-O'Connor); Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania (Dr Hart); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (Dr Novack); and North Texas TBI Model System, Baylor Scott and White Institute for Rehabilitation, Dallas, Texas and Baylor Scott & White Medical Center - Plano, Plano, Texas (Dr Dahdah).

Objective: To examine the prevalence of selected medical and psychiatric comorbidities that existed prior to or up to 10 years following traumatic brain injury (TBI) requiring acute rehabilitation.

Design: Retrospective cohort.

Setting: Six TBI Model Systems (TBIMS) centers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000465DOI Listing
January 2019
10 Reads

Acceptance of Rehabilitation Technology in Adults With Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury, Their Caregivers, and Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

RECOVER Injury Research Centre, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, University of Queensland, Herston, Brisbane, Australia.

Background: Moderate to severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) commonly result in persistent physical, cognitive, and/or emotional deficits that require long-term rehabilitation. Technology-enabled rehabilitation provides an innovative alternative to traditional intervention models. End-user acceptance of these interventions, however, is a critical factor in determining the effective implementation and acceptance of these technologies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000462DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Factors Influencing Primary Care Follow-Up After Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora (Mr Currie, Ms Pierpoint, and Dr Comstock); University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Nursing, Madison (Dr Snedden); and University of Colorado, School of Medicine Section of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Aurora (Drs Comstock and Grubenhoff).

Objective: To identify socioeconomic, demographic, and caregiver factors associated with children attending primary care provider (PCP) follow-up after emergency department (ED) evaluation for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

Setting: Pediatric trauma center ED.

Participants: Children 8 to 18 years of age sustaining mTBI less than 48 hours prior to an ED visit. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000461DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial of CI Therapy for Rehabilitation of Upper Extremity Motor Deficit: The Bringing Rehabilitation to American Veterans Everywhere Project.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

From the Departments of Psychology (Drs Taub, Mark, and Uswatte, Mss Bishop-McKay, Taylor, Reder, and Adams, and Mr Womble), Physical Therapy (Drs Morris and Uswatte), Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Dr Mark), Neurology (Drs Mark and Szaflarski), Occupational Therapy (Dr Rimmer), and UAB/Lakeshore Research Collaborative (Dr Rimmer and Mr Dew), University of Alabama at Birmingham; Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, Auburn, Alabama (Dr Liu); National Intrepid Center of Excellence, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr Pickett); Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Colorado and Denver Veteran's Medical Center, Denver (Dr Brenner); Rocky Mountain MIRECC, Denver, Colorado (Ms Stearns-Yoder); and Departments of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Dr Stevens) and Psychology (Mr Rothman), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond.

Constraint-induced movement therapy (CI therapy) has been shown to reduce disability for individuals with upper extremity (UE) hemiparesis following different neurologic injuries. This article describes the study design and methodological considerations of the Bringing Rehabilitation to American Veterans Everywhere (BRAVE) Project, a randomized controlled trial of CI therapy to improve the motor deficit of participants with chronic and subacute traumatic brain injury. Our CI therapy protocol comprises 4 major components: (1) intensive training of the more-affected UE for target of 3 hour/day for 10 consecutive weekdays, (2) a behavioral technique termed shaping during training, (3) a "transfer package," 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000460DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Healthcare Utilization and Missed Workdays for Parents of Children With Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Veterans Affairs Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, Utah (Dr Nelson and Mr Ma); Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City (Dr Nelson); Department of Pharmacotherapy, University of Utah College of Pharmacy, Salt Lake City (Mr Ma); George Washington University Informatics Center, Washington, District of Columbia (Dr Cheng); Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center (Dr Ewing-Cobbs); and Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (Ms Clark and Dr Keenan).

Background: We enrolled patients in a prospective study in which we obtained estimates of the direct and indirect burden for families of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) relative to a control group of families of children with orthopedic injury (OI).

Methods: Parents were surveyed at 3 time points following injury: 3, 6, and 12 months. At each follow-up contact, we asked parents to list the number of workdays missed, number of miles traveled, amount of travel-related costs, and whether their child had an emergency department (ED) visit, hospital admission, any over-the-counter (OTC) medications, and any prescription medications during that time period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000458DOI Listing
January 2019

Strengthening the Evidence Base: Recommendations for Future Research Identified Through the Development of CDC's Pediatric Mild TBI Guideline.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2019 Jan 2. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Kennedy Krieger Institute, and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (Dr Suskauer); University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada (Dr Yeates); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia (Ms Sarmiento and Drs Breiding and Haarbauer-Krupa); Cleveland Clinic, Ohio (Dr Benzel); Goodman Campbell Brain & Spine, Indianapolis, Indiana (Dr Turner); Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Weissman); and Stanford University School of Medicine, California (Dr Lumba-Brown). Dr Broomand is retired.

Objective: The recently published Centers for Disease Control and Prevention evidence-based guideline on pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) was developed following an extensive review of the scientific literature. Through this review, experts identified limitations in existing pediatric mTBI research related to study setting and generalizability, mechanism of injury and age of cohorts studied, choice of control groups, confounding, measurement issues, reporting of results, and specific study design considerations. This report summarizes those limitations and provides a framework for optimizing the future quality of research conduct and reporting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000455DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Manuscript Clarification.

Authors:

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2019 Jan/Feb;34(1):10

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000483DOI Listing
January 2019

A Comparison of Satisfaction With Life and the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended After Traumatic Brain Injury: An Analysis of the TRACK-TBI Pilot Study.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Department of Emergency Medicine (Drs Kreitzer and Adeoye), Division of Neurocritical Care (Drs Kreitzer and Adeoye), and Department of Neurosurgery (Dr Adeoye), University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio; Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (Ms Hart and Dr Lindsell); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco (Drs Manley and Yue); Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle (Dr Dikmen); Department of Emergency Medicine, and Department of Neurology, Division of Neurocritical Care Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (Dr Ratcliff).

Objective: To evaluate the relationship between satisfaction with life (SWL) and functional outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Setting And Participants: The Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Pilot study (TRACK-TBI Pilot) enrolled patients at 3 US Level I trauma centers within 24 hours of TBI.

Design: Patients were grouped by outcome measure concordance (good-recovery/good-satisfaction, impaired-recovery/impaired-satisfaction) and discordance (good-recovery/impaired-satisfaction, impaired-recovery/good-satisfaction). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000457DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads
2.920 Impact Factor

The Role of Pain Catastrophizing in Cognitive Functioning Among Veterans With a History of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Research Service (Mss Hoffman, DeFord, and Keller and Drs Herbert and Crocker) and Psychology Service (Dr Jak), and Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health (Drs Herbert and Jak), VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California; San Diego State University/University of California San Diego Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology (Ms Jurick and Mr Sanderson-Cimino); Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego (Drs Herbert and Jak); and Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston (Ms Jurick).

Objective: To determine the role of pain catastrophizing (PC) in neuropsychological functioning in veterans with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Participants: Thirty-nine Iraq and Afghanistan combat veterans evaluated in the post-acute phase following mild TBI.

Methods: Participants underwent psychiatric and TBI clinical interviews, neuropsychological tests, and self-report assessments of PC, pain intensity, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000453DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

A Cross-Sectional Study of Treatments for Behavioral Disorders Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Comparison With French Recommendations.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Département de Médecine Physique et de Réadaptation, CHU d'Angers, Université d'Angers (Drs Bourseau, Ali, and Dinomais), Centre de Réadaptation Spécialisée, Les Capucins (Drs Bourseau, Ali, and Dinomais), Laboratoire de Psychologie des Pays de la Loire (LLPL EA 4638), Université d'Angers (Dr Allain), and Mutualité Française Anjou Mayenne, Arceau Anjou (Dr Saoût), Angers, France; and Centre de Médecine Physique et de Réadaptation, Le Confluent, Croix Rouge Française, Nantes, France (Dr Pouliquen-Loriferne).

Objective: To give a cross-sectional overview of ongoing management of behavioral disorders following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a region of France, to compare this with recent recommendations from the French Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (SOFMER), and to evaluate associations between treatments and participant characteristics.

Setting: Outpatients referred to medical or community-based facilities in a region of France.

Participants: One hundred twenty-nine adults with moderate to severe TBI, in the postacute period (over 3 months postinjury). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000452DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Performance Validity in Collegiate Football Athletes at Baseline Neurocognitive Testing.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Department of Psychology, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada (Drs Abeare, Casey, and Erdodi and Mss Messa and Whitfield, and Mr Zuccato); and Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, East Lansing (Mr Rykulski).

Objective: To assess the prevalence of invalid performance on baseline neurocognitive testing using embedded measures within computerized tests and individually administered neuropsychological measures, and to examine the influence of incentive status and performance validity on neuropsychological test scores.

Setting: Sport-related concussion management program at a regionally accredited university.

Participants: A total of 83 collegiate football athletes completing their preseason baseline assessment within the University's concussion management program and a control group of 140 nonathlete students. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000451DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein: Retrospective Study of Potential Blood Biomarker of Inflammation in Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Department of Neurology (Dr Shetty and Ms Cogsil, Kim, and Halvorsen) and Biostatistics Core (Mr Nguyen), Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, New York; New York Medical College, Valhalla (Ms Dalal); and SUNY Downstate Medical School, Brooklyn, New York (Ms Cummings).

Objective: A panel of biomarkers is needed to definitively diagnose mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). There is a clear role for the inclusion of an inflammatory biomarker. This study looked to find a relationship between high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), an inflammatory biomarker, and mTBI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000450DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

A Cerebrovascular Hypothesis of Neurodegeneration in mTBI.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

National Center for PTSD, VA Boston Healthcare System, and Boston University School of Medicine, Massachusetts.

Objectives: Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a major public health concern that has generated considerable scientific interest as a complex brain disorder that is associated with long-term neural consequences. This article reviews the literature on cerebrovascular dysfunction in chronic mTBI, with a focus on the long-term neural implications of such dysfunction.

Methods And Results: Evidence is presented from human neuroimaging studies to support cerebrovascular involvement in long-term mTBI pathology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000449DOI Listing
November 2018

Preliminary Efficacy of Online Traumatic Brain Injury Professional Development for Educators: An Exploratory Randomized Clinical Trial.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

The Center on Brain Injury Research and Training, University of Oregon, Eugene.

Objective: To examine the efficacy of an online traumatic brain injury (TBI) professional development intervention, In the Classroom After Concussion: Best Practices for Student Success.

Design: A randomized controlled trial with a sample of 100 general educators, who were randomly assigned to the In the Classroom Web site (treatment group) or the LEARNet Web site (control group). Participants completed the pretest, accessed the In the Classroom or LEARNet site and the posttest and completed follow-up assessments 60 days after posttest. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000447DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

A Systematic Review of Sleep-Wake Disturbances in Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury: Relationship with Fatigue, Depression, and Quality of Life.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia (Ms Botchway and Drs Godfrey, Anderson, and Catroppa); The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia (Ms Botchway and Drs Godfrey, Anderson, and Catroppa); and Departments of Paediatrics (Ms Botchway and Drs Anderson and Catroppa) and Psychology (Drs Anderson and Catroppa), The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

Objective: To systematically appraise the literature on the prevalence, types, and predictors of sleep-wake disturbances (SWD), and on the relationship between SWD, fatigue, depression, and quality of life in children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Methods: MEDLINE, PubMed, PsychInfo, Web of Science, and EMBASE databases were searched, reference lists of retrieved articles were also searched for relevant articles, and study methods were evaluated for risk of bias.

Results: Of the 620 articles assessed, 16 met inclusion criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000446DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Quality Appraisal of Systematic Reviews for Behavioral Treatments of Attention Disorders in Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Department of Communication Disorders & Special Education, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia.

Objective: This review appraised the quality of systematic reviews (SRs) and meta-analyses (MAs) to summarize research on behavioral interventions for attention disorders in persons with traumatic brain injury.

Methods: A search of 7 databases revealed 15 MAs/SRs reporting outcomes for attention treatments in traumatic brain injury. Two examiners independently coded the quality of reviews with the Critical Appraisal of Systematic Review or Meta-Analysis and the Evidence in Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systematic Review Scale. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000444DOI Listing
November 2018

A Comparison of 2 Online Parent Skills Training Interventions for Early Childhood Brain Injury: Improvements in Internalizing and Executive Function Behaviors.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Drs Aguilar and Wade and Ms Shultz) and Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (Dr Cassedy), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Ohio; University of Cincinnati, Ohio (Ms Shultz and Dr Wade); Children's Hospital Colorado, Denver (Dr Kirkwood); Metrohealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (Dr Stancin); Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (Drs Stancin and Taylor); Department of Pediatrics and Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Ontario (Dr Yeates); and Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (Dr Taylor).

Objective: To examine the effectiveness of a web-based parenting intervention (Internet-Based Interacting Together Everyday: Recovery After Childhood TBI [I-InTERACT]) and an abbreviated version (Express) in reducing executive dysfunction and internalizing problems among young children following traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Method: Parents of 113 children (ages 3-9 years) who had sustained a TBI were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment groups: I-InTERACT, Express, or an Internet Resource Comparison (IRC) group. Parents who participated in either I-InTERACT or Express completed self-guided web sessions and received live coaching of their parenting skills via videoconferencing with a therapist. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000443DOI Listing
November 2018
12 Reads

A Scoping Review of Predictors of Community Integration Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Search for Meaningful Associations.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Services, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Objective: The purpose of this scoping review was to identify predictors of community integration for adults with traumatic brain injury.

Data Sources: We searched the PubMed and PsycINFO databases and reviewed references of included studies. We selected studies exploring multiple components of community integration, including instrumental activities of daily living, leisure activities, and social activities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000442DOI Listing
November 2018

Excess Mortality Among Adults Hospitalized With Traumatic Brain Injury in Australia: A Population-Based Matched Cohort Study.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov 8. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia (Drs Lystad and Mitchell); And Jamieson Trauma Institute, Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, and School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia (Dr Cameron).

Objective: To quantify and describe excess mortality attributable to traumatic brain injury (TBI) during the 12 months after hospitalization.

Design: Population-based matched cohort study using linked hospital and mortality data.

Setting: Australia. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001199-900000000-9945
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000445DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads

Trends in Pediatric Emergency Department Utilization for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Before and After Legislation.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov/Dec;33(6):E30-E37

Nationwide Children's Hospital, Center for Injury Research and Policy, Columbus, Ohio (Mss Singichetti and Janezic and Drs Leonard, Li, Yi, and Yang); The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus (Drs Leonard and Yang); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou, China (Dr Li); and Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, China (Dr Yi).

Objective: To examine the effect of state youth traumatic brain injury (TBI) legislation on pediatric emergency department (ED) utilization for sports and recreation-related mild TBIs (mTBIs).

Participants: ED visits by children ages 5 to 18 years between 2006 and 2014 in the Pediatric Health Information System database (N = 452 900).

Design: Retrospective analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000397DOI Listing
November 2018
13 Reads

Assessment of Covert Consciousness in the Intensive Care Unit: Clinical and Ethical Considerations.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov/Dec;33(6):424-434

Department of Neurology, Center for Neurotechnology and Neurorecovery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, and Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown (Dr Edlow); and Division of Medical Ethics and Consortium for the Advanced Study of Brain Injury, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, and The Rockefeller University, New York, and the Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy, Yale Law School, New Haven, Connecticut (Dr Fins).

Objective: To propose a practical ethical framework for how task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) may be used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to identify covert consciousness in patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Methods: We present 2 clinical scenarios in which investigational task-based fMRI and EEG were performed in critically ill patients with acute severe TBI who appeared unconscious on the bedside behavioral assessment. From these cases, we consider the clinical and ethical challenges that emerge and suggest how to reconcile them. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000448DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6317885PMC
November 2019
9 Reads

Thirty Years of National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Center Research-An Update.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Nov/Dec;33(6):363-374

Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York (Dr Dijkers); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (Ms Marwitz); Research Department, Craig Hospital, Englewood, Colorado (Dr Harrison-Felix); and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Colorado, Denver (Dr Harrison-Felix).

The Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Center (TBIMSC) program was established by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research in 1987, with the goal of conducting research to improve the care and outcomes for individuals with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). This article provides an update on TBIMSC research program activities since 2010 when a similar article was published. It includes (1) discussion of TBIMSC program management and infrastructure; (2) detail on the management, data quality, access, use, and knowledge translation of the TBIMSC National Database, with more than 16 000 participants with follow-up out to 25 years postinjury to date; (3) an overview of the TBIMSC site-specific studies and collaborative module research; (4) highlights of several collaborative initiatives between the TBIMSCs and other federal, advocacy, and research stakeholders; (5) an overview of the vast knowledge translation occurring through the TBIMSC program; and (6) discussion of issues that impact on the data collection methods for and contents of the TBIMSC National Database. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000454DOI Listing
November 2018
7 Reads

Head Impact Burden and Change in Neurocognitive Function During a Season of Youth Football.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Oct 12. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Division of Child Neurology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, and The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (Dr Rose); Department of Psychology, Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, and Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada (Dr Yeates); Wayne State University and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Beaumont, Detroit, Michigan (Dr Fuerst); Sansom Consulting, Phoenix, Arizona (Dr Ercole and Mr Nguyen); and MORE Foundation, Phoenix, Arizona (Ms Pizzimenti).

Objective: To determine the association of repetitive subconcussive head impacts with functional outcomes in primary and high school tackle football players.

Setting: Youth football fields and an outpatient sports neurology clinic.

Participants: A total of 112 primary school (n = 55, age 9-12 years) and high school (n = 57, age 15-18 years) football players. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000441DOI Listing
October 2018
19 Reads

Pharmaco-fMRI in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial With the Monoaminergic Stabilizer (-)-OSU6162.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Sep 18. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine (Mr Berginström and Dr Nordström), Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI) (Drs Ekman, Eriksson, and Nyberg), Physiology Section, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (Drs Ekman, Eriksson, and Nyberg), Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine (Dr Nordström), and Department of Radiation Sciences (Dr Nyberg), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden (Dr Ekman); and School of Sport Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway (Dr Nordström).

Objective: To examine the effects of monoaminergic stabilizer (-)-OSU6162 on brain activity, as measured by blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in patients in the chronic phase of traumatic brain injury suffering from fatigue.

Setting: Neurorehabilitation clinic.

Participants: Patients with traumatic brain injury received either placebo (n = 24) or active treatment (n = 28). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000440DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Using Decision Tree Methodology to Predict Employment After Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Sep 27. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Departments of Biostatistics (Ms Stromberg and Dr Sima) and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Drs Agyemang, Graham, Walker, Kreutzer, and Merchant and Ms Marwitz), Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond; The Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Data and Statistical Center, Craig Hospital, Englewood, Colorado (Dr Harrison-Felix); Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle (Dr Hoffman); and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (Dr Brown).

Objective: To build decision tree prediction models for long-term employment outcomes of individuals after moderate to severe closed traumatic brain injury (TBI) and assess model accuracy in an independent sample.

Setting: TBI Model Systems Centers.

Participants: TBI Model Systems National Database participants injured between January 1997 and January 2017 with moderate to severe closed TBI. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001199-900000000-9945
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000438DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Oculomotor, Vestibular, and Reaction Time Effects of Sports-Related Concussion: Video-Oculography in Assessing Sports-Related Concussion.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Sep 18. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Departments of Neurology (Drs Kelly and Synowiec and Mr Miller), Orthopaedic Surgery (Drs Akhavan and Snell and Ms Bauer), and Ophthalmology (Dr Happ), Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Erie, Pennsylvania (Dr Quigley); and Neuro Kinetics, Inc, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Drs Kiderman and Ashmore, Ms Oakes, and Messrs Eydelman, Gallagher, Dinehart, and Schroeder).

Objective: The purpose of the study was to test the ability of oculomotor, vestibular, and reaction time (OVRT) metrics to serve as a concussion assessment or diagnostic tool for general clinical use.

Setting And Participants: Patients with concussion were high school-aged athletes clinically diagnosed in a hospital setting with a sports-related concussion (n = 50). Control subjects were previously recruited male and female high school student athletes from 3 local high schools (n = 170). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000437DOI Listing
September 2018
4 Reads

Options for Evaluating and Tracking Pediatric Concussion.

Authors:
William Lynch

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Sep/Oct;33(5):354-361

Independent Practice, Foster City, California.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000436DOI Listing
September 2018

A Survey of Perceived Implementation Gaps for a Clinical Practice Guideline for the Rehabilitation of Adults With Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Sep/Oct;33(5):306-316

Département de réadaptation, Faculté de médecine, Université Laval, and Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et en intégration sociale (CIRRIS), Quebec City, Quebec, Canada (Dr Lamontagne and Ms Marier-Deschênes); Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation, Ontario, Canada (Mss Gargaro and Kagan); Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux (INESSS), Quebec City, Quebec, Canada (Drs Truchon and Brière); Brain and Spinal Cord Rehabilitation Program, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Bayley); Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto (Dr Bayley); Ottawa Hospital Research Institute and University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Dr Marshall); and Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en réadaptation du Montréal métropolitain (CRIR) and Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (Dr Swaine).

Objective: Appraising current practice is an important prerequisite for implementation of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). The study objective was to determine the perceived level of implementation, priority, and feasibility of a subset of key CPG recommendations for the rehabilitation of individuals with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (MSTBI).

Methods: Fifty-one teams at acute care and rehabilitation facilities were invited to complete an electronic survey addressing the perceived level of implementation, priority, and feasibility of 109 fundamental and priority recommendations from the CPG-MSTBI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000430DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Unique Features of the INESSS-ONF Rehabilitation Guidelines for Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Responding to Users' Needs.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Sep/Oct;33(5):296-305

Brain and Spinal Cord Rehabilitation Program, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Bayley); Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Bayley); Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et en intégration sociale (CIRRIS), Department of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, Canada (Dr Lamontagne); Toronto Rehabilitation Institute/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Ms Kua); Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI) and University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Dr Marshall); Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et en intégration sociale (CIRRIS), Department of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, Canada (Ms Marier-Deschênes); Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et en intégration sociale (CIRRIS), Québec, Canada (Ms Allaire); Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation (ONF), Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Ms Kagan); Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux (INESSS), Québec, Canada (Dr Truchon); Lawson Health Research Institute, St Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario, Canada (Ms Janzen); St Joseph's Health Care, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada (Dr Teasell); and Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en réadaptation du Montréal métropolitain (CRIR) and Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada (Dr Swaine).

Objective: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) clinical practice guidelines are a potential solution to rapidly expanding literature. The project objective was to convene experts to develop a unique set of TBI rehabilitation recommendations incorporating users' priorities for format and implementation tools including indicators of adherence.

Methods: The Guidelines Adaptation & Development Cycle informed recommendation development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000428DOI Listing
September 2018
19 Reads

Assessment of Users' Needs and Expectations Toward Clinical Practice Guidelines to Support the Rehabilitation of Adults With Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Sep/Oct;33(5):288-295

Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et en intégration sociale (CIRRIS), Université Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada (Dr Lamontagne and Mss Marier-Deschênes, Allaire, and Schmouth); Brain and Spinal Cord Rehabilitation Program, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Bayley and Ms Kua); Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Bayley); Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI), University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Dr Marshall); Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation (ONF), Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Ms Kagan); Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux (INESSS), Québec, Quebec, Canada (Dr Truchon); Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en réadaptation du Montréal métropolitain (CRIR); and Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (Dr Swaine).

Objective: Stakeholder engagement in clinical practice guideline (CPG) creation is thought to increase relevance of CPGs and facilitate their implementation. The objectives were to survey stakeholders involved in the care of adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) regarding general perceptions of CPGs, key elements to be included, and needs and expectations about format and implementation strategy.

Settings: Hospitals and inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation facilities providing services to persons with TBI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000429DOI Listing
September 2018

Why Do We Need a New Clinical Practice Guideline for Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury?

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Sep/Oct;33(5):285-287

Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en réadaptation du Montréal métropolitain (CRIR) and Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (Dr Swaine); Brain and Spinal Cord Rehabilitation Program, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute/University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Bayley and Ms Kua); Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Bayley); Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI) and University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Dr Marshall); Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et en intégration sociale (CIRRIS), Université Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada (Mss Marier-Deschênes and Allaire and Dr Lamontagne); Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation (ONF), Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Ms Kagan); Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux (INESSS), Québec, Canada, Canada (Dr Truchon); Lawson Health Research Institute, St Joseph's Health Care, London, Ontario, Canada (Ms Janzen); and St Joseph's Health Care, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada (Dr Teasell).

Objective: Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) aim to improve quality and consistency of healthcare services. A Canadian group of researchers, clinicians, and policy makers developed/adapted a CPG for rehabilitation post-moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (MSTBI) to respond to end users' needs in acute care and rehabilitation settings.

Methods: The rigorous CPG development process began assessing needs and expectations of end users, then appraised existing CPGs, and, during a consensus conference, produced fundamental and priority recommendations. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001199-201809000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000427DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

The Effect of Antidepressants on Depression After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Meta-analysis.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Aug 30. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Division of Neurocritical Care (Drs Kreitzer, Foreman, and Adeoye), Department of Emergency Medicine (Drs Kreitzer and Adeoye and Ms Ancona), Department of Psychiatry (Dr McCullumsmith), Department of Pediatrics (Dr Kurowski), Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Dr Kurowski), Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine (Drs Foreman and Ngwenya), and Department of Neurosurgery (Dr Ngwenya), University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Objective: Following traumatic brain injury (TBI), depressive symptoms are common and may influence recovery. We performed a meta-analysis to estimate the benefit of antidepressants following TBI and compare the estimated effects between antidepressants and placebo.

Participants: Multiple databases were searched to find prospective pharmacological treatment studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults following TBI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000439DOI Listing
August 2018
5 Reads

Cognitive Rehabilitation With Mobile Technology and Social Support for Veterans With TBI and PTSD: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2019 Jan/Feb;34(1):1-10

Veterans Affairs (VA) Mid-Atlantic Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (MIRECC), Durham, North Carolina (Drs Elbogen, Dennis, Van Voorhees, Wagner, and Beckham); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (Drs Elbogen, Dennis, Van Voorhees, Wagner, and Beckham); Departments of Psychology and Neuroscience (Ms Blakey) and Psychiatry (Drs S. C. Johnson, Hamer, and Belger), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Rho, Inc, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (Dr J. Johnson); and Department of Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom (Dr Manly).

Objective: To investigate effects of cognitive rehabilitation with mobile technology and social support on veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Participants: There were 112 dyads, comprised by a veteran and a family member or friend (224 participants in total).

Design: Dyads were randomized to the following: (1) a novel intervention, Cognitive Applications for Life Management (CALM), involving goal management training plus mobile devices for cueing and training attentional control; or (2) Brain Health Training, involving psychoeducation plus mobile devices to train visual memory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000435DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6314886PMC
January 2020
2 Reads

Comprehension of Legal Language by Adults With and Without Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Aug 30. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Neuroscience & Public Policy Program (Dr Wszalek), Neuroscience Training Program (Drs Wszalek and Turkstra), Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders (Drs Wszalek and Turkstra), and Department of Surgery (Dr Turkstra), University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Objective: To characterize comprehension of written legal language in adults with and without traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Participants: Nineteen adults with moderate-to-severe TBI (11 females) and 21 adults without TBI (13 females), aged 24 to 64 years.

Methods: Participants completed a multiple-choice assessment of legal-language comprehension, with written stimuli either presented in their original legal form or manipulated to simplify syntax or use more frequently occurring words. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000434DOI Listing

Attending Follow-up Appointments After Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: Caregiver-Perceived Barriers and Facilitators.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Aug 30. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Center for Pediatric Trauma Research (Mss Lever, Caupp, and Wheeler and Drs Lundine, Sribnick, and Xiang), Center for Injury Research and Policy (Mss Lever, Caupp, and Wheeler and Dr Xiang), and Research Information Solutions and Innovation (Dr Peng) at The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio; Department of Neurosurgery (Dr Sribnick) at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio; Department of Speech and Hearing Science, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (Dr Lundine); and The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio (Dr Xiang).

Objective: To examine barriers and facilitators for follow-up care of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Setting: Urban children's hospital.

Participants: Caregivers of children (aged 2-18 years) discharged from an inpatient unit with a TBI diagnosis in 2014-2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000433DOI Listing

Benefits of Methylphenidate for Long-Term Attention Problems After Traumatic Brain Injury in Childhood: A Randomized, Double-Masked, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Titration, Crossover Trial.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Aug 30. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Drs Kurowski, Pruitt, and Wade), Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology (Dr Epstein), Division of Neurology (Dr Horn), and Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (Dr Altaye), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio; and Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine (Drs Kurowski and Pruitt) and Department of Pediatrics (Drs Epstein, Horn, Altaye, and Wade), University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Objective: To characterize the benefits and optimal dose of long-acting methylphenidate for management of long-term attention problems after childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Design: Phase 2, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, dose-titration, crossover clinical trial.

Setting: Outpatient, clinical research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000432DOI Listing
August 2018
6 Reads

Self-reported Balance Disturbance and Performance-Based Balance Impairment After Concussion in the General Population.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Aug 30. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Toronto Rehabilitation Institute-University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Drs Inness, Habib Perez, Saverino, Comper, Bayley and Mochizuki, and Mss Sweeny, Danells and Chandra, and Mr Foster); Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Drs Inness and Mochizuki, and Ms Danells); Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Ms Sweeny and Drs Comper and Mochizuki); Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Comper); Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Bayley); and Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Mochizuki).

Objective: To characterize the prevalence of, and relationship between, self-reported balance disturbance and performance-based balance impairment in the general population with concussion.

Setting: Rehabilitation hospital outpatient concussion clinic.

Participants: One hundred six individuals with concussion (49 males, mean age = 32. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000431DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Measuring Dynamic Symptom Response in Concussion: Children's Exertional Effects Rating Scale.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Aug 30. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Division of Pediatric Neuropsychology, Children's National Health System, and Departments of Pediatrics & Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia.

Objective: To introduce and evaluate a measure of momentary symptom response to cognitive activity, a core feature of concussion.

Setting: Concussion clinic at a large regional children's hospital.

Participants: Individuals aged 5 to 18 years, comprising 3 clinical groups: uninjured (n = 590), recently concussed but clinically recovered (n = 160), and recently concussed but not yet recovered (n = 570). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000424DOI Listing
August 2018
1 Read

Cognitive Communication Impairments in Children With Traumatic Brain Injury: A Scoping Review.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Aug 30. Epub 2018 Aug 30.

Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Bloorview Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Mss Cermak and Quinn de Launay and Drs Scratch, Reed, and Beal); Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Mss Cermak and Quinn de Launay and Drs Scratch, Reed, and Beal); Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Ms Cermak and Dr Beal); Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Scratch); Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Reed); and St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Dr Bradley).

Objective: This scoping review synthesizes the scholarly literature on cognitive communication impairments in traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustained during childhood to identify gaps in research, and make recommendations that will further the field of cognitive communication in pediatric TBI.

Methods: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and EMBASE were searched to identify peer-reviewed studies that examined cognitive communication impairments in children who sustained a TBI between 3 months to 18 years of age.

Results: Twenty-eight studies met inclusion criteria with 3 main categories identified in relation to cognitive communication: (1) impairments according to TBI severity, (2) impairments according to age at injury, and (3) trends in recovery according to TBI severity. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001199-900000000-9946
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000419DOI Listing
August 2018
5 Reads

Multimodal Imaging of Retired Professional Contact Sport Athletes Does Not Provide Evidence of Structural and Functional Brain Damage.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Sep/Oct;33(5):E24-E32

Buffalo Neuroimaging Analysis Center, Department of Neurology (Drs Zivadinov, Polak, Schweser, Bergsland, Hagemeier, Dwyer, and Ramasamy), MR Imaging Clinical and Translational Research Center (Drs Zivadinov and Schweser), Department of Orthopaedics (Drs Baker and Leddy), Department of Nuclear Medicine (Dr Baker), and Department of Psychiatry (Dr Willer), Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo.

Background: Long-term consequences of playing professional football and hockey on brain function and structural neuronal integrity are unknown.

Objectives: To investigate multimodal metabolic and structural brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) differences in retired professional contact sport athletes compared with noncontact sport athletes.

Methods: Twenty-one male contact sport athletes and 21 age-matched noncontact sport athletes were scanned on a 3 tesla (3T) MRI using a multimodal imaging approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000422DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6126951PMC
September 2019

An Exploratory Study of Mild Cognitive Impairment of Retired Professional Contact Sport Athletes.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Sep/Oct;33(5):E16-E23

UBMD Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine (Drs Baker, Leddy, Haider, Shucard and Sharma), Department of Nuclear Medicine (Dr Baker), Department of Psychiatry (Drs Hinds, Hernandez, and Willer), Department of Neurology (Dr Zivadinov), and Department of Internal Medicine (Dr Durinka), School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo.

Objective: To test the hypothesis that mild cognitive impairment (MCI) rates are higher among retired professional contact sport athletes than in noncontact athlete controls and compare history of contact sports with other MCI risk factors.

Setting: University Concussion Management Clinic.

Participants: Twenty-one retired National Football League and National Hockey League players and 21 aged-matched noncontact athlete controls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000420DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6126937PMC
September 2019
4 Reads

Evaluation of Executive Function and Mental Health in Retired Contact Sport Athletes.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Sep/Oct;33(5):E9-E15

Departments of Psychiatry (Drs Willer, Haider, and Hinds), Orthopedics and Sports Medicine (Drs Haider and Leddy), Nuclear Medicine (Dr Baker), and Biostatistics (Dr Miecznikowski), University at Buffalo, SUNY, New York; and Departments of Internal Medicine and Sports Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus (Dr Tiso).

Objective: To compare retired professional contact sport athletes with age-matched noncontact sport athletes on measures of executive function and mental health.

Setting: The University Concussion Management Clinic.

Participants: Twenty-one retired National Football League (NFL) and National Hockey League (NHL) players (mean age 56 years) and 21 age-matched noncontact sport athlete controls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000423DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6126955PMC
September 2019
8 Reads

A Preliminary Study of Early-Onset Dementia of Former Professional Football and Hockey Players.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Sep/Oct;33(5):E1-E8

Departments of Psychiatry (Dr Willer), Neurology (Dr Zivadinov), Orthopedics and Sports Medicine (Drs Haider and Leddy), Biostatistics (Miecznikowski), School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, New York.

Objective: To provide an overview of 3 studies of the same population of retired professional contact sport athletes compared with age-matched noncontact sport athlete controls on cognition, executive function, behavior, and advanced brain imaging.

Setting: University Concussion Management Clinic.

Participants: Twenty-two retired professional hockey and football athletes (average age 56 years) and 21 age-matched noncontact sport athlete controls. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001199-900000000-9946
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000421DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6126972PMC
September 2019
7 Reads

A Review of Smartphone Applications for Persons With Traumatic Brain Injury: What Is Available and What Is the Evidence?

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Jul 24. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada (Mss Kwan and Bihelek and Dr Yeates); and University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (Dr Anderson).

Objectives: To map the number and type of smartphone applications available for persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI), evaluate validity of app content, and investigate evidence for any claims made.

Methods: We searched iTunes and Google Play and also completed a web search. The purpose of each app and any claims were extracted, and a search for best available evidence was performed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000425DOI Listing

Inertial Sensors Reveal Subtle Motor Deficits When Walking With Horizontal Head Turns After Concussion.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Jul 24. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Department of Neurology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland (All Authors); Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, Portland (Drs Fino, Wilhelm, Parrington, Stuart, and King); Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland (Dr. Wilhelm); and Departments of Family Medicine, Orthopedics, and Rehabilitation, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland (Dr. Chesnutt).

Objective: To examine whether horizontal head turns while seated or while walking, when instrumented with inertial sensors, were sensitive to the acute effects of concussion and whether horizontal head turns had utility for concussion management.

Setting: Applied field setting, athletic training room.

Participants: Twenty-four collegiate athletes with sports-related concussion and 25 healthy control athletes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000418DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6345620PMC
July 2018
1 Read

The Effectiveness of Virtual Reality Interventions for Improvement of Neurocognitive Performance After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Jul 24. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Neuroscience and Mental Health Research Institute (NMHRI) (Mr Manivannan, Drs Postans, Gray, and Zaben, and Ms Westacott) and Brain Repair & Intracranial Neurotherapeutics (BRAIN) (Drs Postans and Gray), School of Medicine, and School of Healthcare Sciences, College of Biomedical and Life Sciences (Mr Al-Amri), Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.

Objective: To evaluate current evidence for the effectiveness of virtual reality (VR) interventions in improving neurocognitive performance in individuals who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Methods: A systematic literature search across multiple databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science) for articles of relevance. Studies were evaluated according to study design, patient cohort, VR intervention, neurocognitive parameters assessed, and outcome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000412DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

Traumatic Brain Injury Following Military Deployment: Evaluation of Diagnosis and Cause of Injury.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2019 Jan/Feb;34(1):21-29

Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC), Silver Spring, Maryland (Drs Regasa, Agimi, and Stout); General Dynamics Information Technology (GDIT), Fairfax, Virginia (Dr Regasa); and Information Innovators, Inc, Springfield, Virginia (Dr Agimi).

Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of delayed traumatic brain injury (TBI) diagnosis and cause of injury that resulted in a TBI diagnosis after military deployment.

Design: Medical record notes were reviewed in 2016 from a random sample of 1150 US military service members who had their first-time deployment in 2011 and likely sustained a TBI. Location and cause of the injury were extracted from the progress note for analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000417DOI Listing
July 2018
9 Reads

Cervical Spine Dysfunction Following Pediatric Sports-Related Head Trauma.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Jul 24. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Department of Surgery (Dr Ellis), Pediatrics and Child Health (Drs Ellis and Russell), Diagnostic Radiology (Dr Koenig), and Section of Neurosurgery (Dr Ellis), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; Pan Am Concussion Program, Pan Am Clinic, Winnipeg, Canada (Drs Ellis and Koenig); Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada (Drs Ellis and Russell); Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada (Ms Olson); Canada North Concussion Network, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Drs Ellis, McDonald, and Russell); University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada (Drs Ellis, Koenig, and Russell).

Objective: To examine the prevalence of cervical spine injuries among children and adolescents referred with suspected and diagnosed sports-related concussion (SRC); and evaluate the effect of cervical spine dysfunction (CSD) on physician-documented clinical recovery following SRC.

Setting: A multidisciplinary pediatric concussion program.

Participants: A total of 266 patients (6-19 years) referred with suspected SRC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000411DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

Balance and Mobility Improvements During Inpatient Rehabilitation Are Similar in Young-Old, Mid-Old, and Old-Old Adults With Traumatic Brain Injury.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2018 Jul 24. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Physical Therapy Program, Chatham University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Drs Perry and Woollard); Graduate School of Physical Therapy, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania (Dr Billek-Sawhney); and ReMed, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Szalinski).

Objective: To compare balance, mobility, and functional outcomes across 3 age groups of older adults with traumatic brain injury; to describe differences between those discharged to private residences versus institutional care.

Setting: Acute inpatient rehabilitation facility.

Participants: One hundred adults, mean age of 78. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000415DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

Risk of Motor Vehicle Collision or Driving Impairment After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Collaborative International Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2019 Jan/Feb;34(1):E27-E38

Department of Psychiatry, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, and Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Mr Chee and Dr Rapoport); Mental Health and Wellbeing, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK (Dr Hawley); Monash University Accident Research Centre, Monash University, Clayton, Australia (Drs Charlton and Koppel); Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ontario, Canada (Dr Marshall); Canadian Forces Health Services Centre (Pacific), Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (Dr Gillespie); School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada (Dr Vrkljan); and Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Ms Ayotte).

Objective: To synthesize knowledge of the risk of motor vehicle collision (MVC) following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the associated risk of driving impairment, as measured by on-road tests, computerized simulators, and self-reported or state-recorded driving records.

Methods: Our international team searched 7 databases for studies published between 1990 and 2015 of people with TBI, controls, and data concerning either MVC or driving impairment. The included articles examined the risk of MVC among people with TBI; we excluded studies that examined the risk of having a TBI associated with being involved in an MVC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000400DOI Listing
July 2018
8 Reads