1,666 results match your criteria Journal of Family Psychology[Journal]


Maternal stress, sleep, and parenting.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Associations between stress, sleep, and functioning have been well-established in the general adult population, but not as well-established in the specific subpopulation of interest here-parents. To advance understanding of how maternal sleep is linked with both mothers' experiences of stress and their parenting, this study used actigraphic and mother-report measures of sleep, observed and mother reports of parenting, and measures of multiple stressors of relevance. In a community sample of mothers of toddlers (N = 314; child age M = 2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000516DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Anxiety, depression, dyadic adjustment, and attachment to the fetus in pregnancy: Actor-partner interdependence mediation analysis.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Departamento de Psicologia.

Perinatal research has focused essentially on maternal outcomes leaving paternal outcomes unexplored. This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the intrapersonal and interpersonal effects of mothers' and fathers' anxiety and depressive symptoms on their own and their partners' antenatal attachment to the fetus. Additionally, it aimed to explore the mediating role of dyadic adjustment on these associations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000513DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Beyond destructive conflict: Implications of marital tension for marital well-being.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.

The present study expanded upon existing literature to investigate a broader construct of negativity, marital tension, and its implications for marital well-being across the early years of marriage. Marital tension captures feelings of irritation, resentment, and disappointment surrounding the relationship, and is distinct from conflict and specific conflict strategies. Longitudinal data spanning 16 years from the Early Years of Marriage Study (n = 373 couples) were analyzed using actor-partner interdependence models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000512DOI Listing
February 2019

Family-friendly for her, longer hours for him: Actor-partner model linking work-family environment to work-family interference.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Human Development and Family Studies, The Pennsylvania State University.

Supportive work-family environments are associated with lower levels of perceived work-to-family interference (WFI; Kelly et al., 2014), but we know little about the mechanisms underlying this linkage. Nor is much known about the larger family contexts within which these processes take place, including crossover effects of spouses' work on one another's WFI (Westman, 2001). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000506DOI Listing
February 2019

Perceived relationship support moderates the association of contextual stress with inflammation among African Americans.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa.

We followed 402 African American young adults from ages 24 to 29, a period of emerging committed relationships, to examine the association of contextual stress (CS), for example, experiences of financial strain, victimization, and racial discrimination, with inflammation, and to test predictions that greater perceived relationship warmth and support (PRWS) at age 29 would moderate the association between earlier CS and inflammation, using a multiplex assessment of cytokines to construct an index of the ratio between predominantly proinflammatory cytokines versus predominantly anti-inflammatory cytokines. CS experienced at age 24 was associated with greater inflammation at age 29 in the full sample (b = .112, p = . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000509DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

The development of internalizing problems in early childhood: The importance of sibling clustering.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development, University of Toronto.

Within family sibling clustering of internalizing problems is examined during the early childhood period. Sibling clustering, the ongoing sibling similarity in internalizing problems, may be a result of heritability of internalizing problems, as well as shared environmental effects. Clustering may also result from the time-varying influence of sibling socialization, where 1 sibling is teaching or modeling internalizing problems to the other sibling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000501DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Mothers' real-time emotion as a function of attachment and proximity to their children.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Psychological Science, University of California, Irvine.

Building on established links between attachment insecurity and maladaptive emotion regulation, here we examine whether traitlike attachment style predicts individual differences in mothers' emotions in situations with and without their children. Using ecological momentary assessment (EMA), we measured the real-time positive and negative emotions of 145 mothers of young children across a 10-day period, with self-reported attachment and presence of children as predictors of individual differences in emotion. Attachment anxiety was associated with more negative emotion and attachment avoidance was associated with less positive emotion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000515DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Pulling away: Links among disengaged couple communication, relationship distress, and depressive symptoms.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Clinical Psychology, Loyola University of Maryland.

Interpersonal theories of depression suggest that how couples communicate helps to explain bidirectional links between depressive symptoms and relationship distress. Disengaged and aversive couple communication should help explain these links. However, most research examining associations among couple communication, depressive symptoms and relationship distress have focused on aversive communication behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000507DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

A dyadic mediation study on social support, coping, and stress among couples starting fertility treatment.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Psychology.

This study adopted a dyadic approach to explore the associations between social support and stress as mediated by coping among infertile couples. All these variables were infertility-specific. A total of 201 couples starting their first assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment completed self-reports of infertility-specific support from spouse and from social network, infertility-related coping with four strategies (active-avoidance, active-confronting, passive-avoidance, and meaning-based), and infertility stress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000502DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Personal well-being across the transition to marriage equality: A longitudinal analysis.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Human Development and Family Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

We examined the ways that federal, state, and local marriage recognition influence multiple domains of personal well-being of individuals in same-sex (n = 279) and different-sex (n = 266) relationships. Longitudinal data were collected across the transition to marriage equality (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000504DOI Listing
February 2019

Facilitating autonomy in interdependent relationships: Invisible support facilitates highly avoidant individuals' autonomy.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington.

Maintaining autonomy in interdependent relationships is challenging, particularly for people high in attachment avoidance, who prioritize independence. Invisible support involves indirect, subtle behaviors that minimize the salience of dependence and encourage self-driven problem solving and thus should facilitate autonomy. The current research tested whether partners' invisible support during couples' discussions of personal goals (N = 200 dyadic discussions) facilitated goal-related autonomy immediately and across time for recipients high in attachment avoidance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000488DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Parental autonomy support, grit, and psychological adjustment in Chinese adolescents from divorced families.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Developmental Psychology and Socialization.

A large body of research has shown that parental divorce is linked to youths' psychological adjustment in Western societies, but less is known about how this life event may impact on adolescents living in the Chinese cultural context, which highlights losing face and dignity. The current study aimed to examine the relationship between parental autonomy support and psychological adjustment in middle to late adolescents from divorced and intact families in China, postulating moderation by grit. Participants were 210 adolescents (67. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000514DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Parenting in context: Marital adjustment, parent affect, and child temperament in complex families.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The parent-child relationship impacts many later social and cognitive outcomes. The current study compared correlates of mother versus father dyadic interactions with their twin children in 503 families at 36 months of age. Measures included parent reported child temperament, observed parents' marital quality and affect, and parents' sensitivity, responsivity, and growth fostering with their children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000511DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

The influence of parenting and temperament on empathy development in toddlers.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Psychology.

Empathy is a critical ability in developing relationships, and deficits in empathy have been associated with various maladaptive social outcomes. Although specific parenting styles and behaviors (including warmth and reasoning) are expected to be related to the development of child empathy, these may function differently for children with an inhibited temperament. Children with an inhibited temperament, who are at risk for developing an anxiety disorder, may also struggle with expressing empathic behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000505DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Latent profiles of postdivorce parenting time, conflict, and quality: Children's adjustment associations.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

School of Family Life, Brigham Young University.

Parenting time, interparental conflict, and the quality of parenting a child experiences in the postdivorce family environment have complex relations with child adjustment outcomes. Using person-centered latent profile analyses, the present study examined (a) separate profiles of mothers' (N = 472) and fathers' (N = 353) parenting time, interparental conflict, and quality of parenting following divorce; and (b) associations of mother and father profiles with concurrent child outcomes (48% female, 3- to 18-years-old) as well as child outcomes 3 and 10 months later. Mother and father profiles were primarily differentiated by levels of parenting time and quality of parenting, respectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000484DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Interparental conflict moderates the association between neighborhood stress and adolescent health.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Psychology.

Extensive research has linked neighborhood stress with poorer adolescent physical health, but there are individual differences in this association. There is robust evidence that qualities of family relationships, and particularly interparental conflict, can buffer or exacerbate the effects of neighborhood characteristics on development. The goal of this study was to examine interactions between perceived neighborhood stress and marital conflict in relation to reported adolescent health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000500DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

The longitudinal and bidirectional relationships between cooperative coparenting and child behavioral problems in low-income, unmarried families.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Child, Youth, and Family Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

The coparenting subsystem is important for the psychosocial development of young children. In this article, we used cross-lagged structural equation modeling to assess the bidirectional relations between unmarried parents' cooperative coparenting and their children's behavioral problems. Using a subsample of 788 dyads of poor, unmarried parents and their children from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing data, we examined trends in coparenting and behavioral problems over time (in children ages 1, 3, 5, and 9 years) and the reciprocal effects between these 2 variables. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000498DOI Listing
January 2019

The association of disordered eating and sexual health with relationship satisfaction in female service members/veterans.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

OEF/OIF Integrated Care Clinic, San Francisco VA Medical Center.

Low relationship satisfaction is associated with mental health disorders in service members/veterans (SM/Vs), yet eating disordered behavior (EDB) and sexual function and satisfaction in SM/Vs are understudied. Those with EDB may experience bodily discomfort that may be associated with low relationship satisfaction because of avoidance of physical contact and intimacy, suggesting that sexual satisfaction and function may modify the association of EDB and relationship satisfaction. As the majority of female SM/Vs are partnered, it is imperative to study the association of sexual function and satisfaction with EDB and relationship satisfaction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000493DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Parents' child-related schemas: Associations with children's asthma and mental health.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Jan 17. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Human Development and Family Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

The parent-child relationship, a key dyad of the family, can influence disease-related and psychological processes in children with asthma. Although the critical role of parenting behaviors in asthma outcomes is well established, less is known about the attitudes and beliefs underlying parents' interactions with their children and how those attitudes may relate to asthma outcomes. Thus, this study aimed to identify profiles of parents' schemas pertaining to their children with asthma and examine whether child mental and physical health outcomes differed by profile membership. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000494DOI Listing
January 2019
12 Reads

Intergenerational continuity and stability in early family formation.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Jan 10. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University.

This study examines intergenerational continuity (mean level similarity) and stability (maintenance of rank ordering of individuals) in age and marital status at the time of becoming a young parent using prospective data from 3 generations of 585 families. G2 participants were recruited at the age of 5 years and followed until the age of 28, by which time 227 had become parents themselves. The findings suggest that despite dramatic intergenerational discontinuities with young adults, on average, now being more likely to be unmarried and older at the time of becoming parents than in previous generations, intergenerational stability in age and marital status at the time of becoming a young parent is still substantial. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/fam0000497
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000497DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Objectively assessed prospective memory failures and diurnal cortisol secretion in caregivers of children with ASD.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Psychology.

Caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) self-report more prospective memory (PM) failures compared with controls. Subjective and objective measures of PM, however, tend to be poorly correlated. This study therefore explored the cognitive impact of caring for a child with ASD using the Cambridge Prospective Memory Test (CAMPROMPT), a more objective, performance-based assessment of PM failures. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/fam0000496
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000496DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Understanding how emerging same-sex couples make meaning of minority stress: A narrative approach.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Sociology/Health Equity Institute, San Francisco State University.

Minority stress-in the form of experiences of prejudice and discrimination-can have negative consequences on individuals in same-sex relationships. However, little is known about the ways in which members of same-sex couples make meaning of minority stress, especially in the context of newly formed relationships that may be most vulnerable to minority stressors. The present study draws upon emerging understandings of couple-level minority stress to investigate the ways in which newly formed same-sex couples make meaning of their minority stress experiences jointly as a couple. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000495DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Maternal emotion, motivation, and regulation during real-world parenting challenges.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 7;33(1):109-120. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Human Development & Family Studies, The Pennsylvania State University.

Parenting is emotionally evocative, and parental emotions have implications for parenting behavior. We used experience sampling methodology to capture mothers' experiences and emotions in the context of real-world, day-to-day parenting challenges. Mothers (N = 55) of 14- to 24-month-olds participated in 4 phone interviews per day for 6 days in which they reported on their momentary emotions, motivational states (i. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/fam0000475
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000475DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6355339PMC
February 2019
11 Reads

Predictors of parenting intentions among childless lesbian, gay, and heterosexual adults.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec 27. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Department of Psychology.

Disparities in the intention to parent have been found for lesbian and gay individuals compared with heterosexual individuals, but little is known about what social contexts predict these differences. Qualities of family relationships, friendships, and romantic relationships may all play a role, but these have not been studied as a function of sexual orientation. Using a large national sample of adults in the United States, this study explored intentions for parenthood, ideal family size, and predictors of parenting intentions as a function of gender and sexual orientation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000499DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Coparenting and parenting pathways from the couple relationship to children's behavior problems.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec 27. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences, University of Glasgow.

Although an extensive literature has linked couple conflict with the development of children's externalizing behavior problems, longer term protective effects of positive dimensions of couple relationships on children's externalizing behavior remain understudied, particularly in relation to underlying mechanisms. Supportiveness in the dyadic couple relationship may enhance mothers' and fathers' individual parenting skills and protect against children's behavior problems, but the contribution of coparenting (couples' support for one another's individual parenting) remains unclear. This observational study investigated associations between couple supportiveness in children's infancy and middle childhood externalizing problems, exploring pathways involving coparenting and/or mothers' and fathers' individual parenting using data from the U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000492DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Adolescent sleep quality mediates family chaos and adolescent mental health: A daily diary-based study.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec 27. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Department of Psychiatry.

The aim of the current study was to examine adolescents' sleep duration and quality as potential mediators of the association between chaotic and disorganized family environments and adolescent anxiety and depressive symptoms. A total of 193 adolescent (ages 14-17; = 15.7 years old, = . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000491DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Cross-day influences between couple closeness and coparenting support among new parents.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec 20. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Prevention Research Center.

The couple and coparenting relationships are demonstrated to be prospectively and bidirectionally associated over months to years during the early parenting years. However, little is known about these associations at the daily level within the first year of parenthood, when coparenting first emerges. The goal of the current study was to examine the association between couples' daily feelings of relationship closeness and coparenting support in first-time parents and determine directionality of these effects using a dyadic daily diary design. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000489DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Relationship quality from pre- to postplacement in adoptive couples.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 20;33(1):64-76. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

School of Nursing.

Although there is an extensive research literature examining the change in relationship quality of birth parents during the transition to parenthood, there is comparatively less work on how the relationship of adoptive parents fares from pre- to postplacement of the adopted child. In the current study, we examine the relationship quality (global satisfaction, feelings of love, feelings of ambivalence) of 127 adoptive parents across the transition from preplacement to approximately 6 months postplacement of the adopted child. Following the vulnerability-stress-adaptation (VSA) model of marital quality and stability, we examined various intrapersonal vulnerability factors, couple adaptive processes, and stressful factors primarily related to the adoption process as predictors of relationship quality across 3 waves (4 to 6 weeks prior to placement of the adopted child, 4 to 6 weeks postplacement of the adopted child in the home, and 5 to 6 months post-postplacement). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000456DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

"Marriage improves neuroticism in Chinese newlyweds: Communication and marital affect as mediators": Correction to Tong et al. (2018).

Authors:

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 13;33(1):22. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Reports an error in "Marriage improves neuroticism in Chinese newlyweds: Communication and marital affect as mediators" by Wei Tong, Ping Li, Nan Zhou, Qiong He, Xiaoyan Ju, Jing Lan, Xiaomin Li and Xiaoyi Fang (, 2018[Oct], Vol 32[7], 986-991). In the original article, a funding source was unintentionally omitted from the author note. The omitted acknowledgement should have read "This research was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 31571157 to Xiaoyi Fang. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000503DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Making meaning from money: Subjective social status and young children's behavior problems.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec 13. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Psychology.

While early exposure to poverty has been linked to decrements in children's behavior through underlying pathways of parenting stress and depression, extant research has typically relied on the use of objective measures of socioeconomic status (SES) to test these associations. However, children's development may be shaped by the ways that parents perceive social class, which may operate independently and differentially from objective SES. Using structural equation modeling, the present study explores relationships between parents' ratings of subjective social status (SSS), objective indicators of SES (income-to-needs ratio, education, employment status), and young children's (ages 0-3) behavior problems among 173 low-income families living in an urban area in the northeast United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000487DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Longitudinal associations of family stressors, fathers' warmth, and Korean children's externalizing behaviors.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec;32(8):1036-1045

Department of Human Development and Family Studies.

This study examined the indirect mechanisms linking family stressors (i.e., negative family life events, paternal psychological distress, and couple conflict) to children's later externalizing behavior problems through fathers' warm parenting behaviors among Korean families. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000486DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Parental relationship stability and parent-adult child relationships in stepfamilies: A test of alternative models.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Nov 29. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Department of Family Science and Human Development, Montclair State University.

Stepfamily relationships remain important over the life course to both children and parents. Unfortunately, limitations in availability of longitudinal data that include useful measures of stepfamily relations remain, thereby scholars must rely mostly on cross-sectional examinations. As a way to more rigorously test some of the mixed cross-sectional findings related to the links among stepcouple stability and parent-adult child relationships (closeness, involvement) for three parent-child subsystems (mother-child, father-child, stepparent-child), we used an alternative modeling strategy to test three plausible models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000481DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) links to marital quality via social support behavior and perceived partner responsiveness.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 29;33(1):44-53. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Department of Psychology, Binghamton University.

Research exploring the mechanisms by which specific genes contribute to overall marital quality is still in its beginning stages; however, one mechanism may be the link between the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and behavioral deficits relevant to social support-a critical determinant of marital quality. Using 79 different-sex married couples (N = 158), we found that genotypic variation in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on wives' and husbands' OXTR variously associated with husbands' and wives' support provision and receipt behaviors in social support discussions. We also found significant indirect effects of husbands' TT genotype for OXTR SNP rs1042778 on lower marital quality for husbands and wives by way of the husband's more negative evaluation of his wife's responsiveness when he was the target for support. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000474DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Barriers and facilitators of relationship help-seeking among low-income couples.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Nov 29. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles.

Despite being at elevated risk for relationship distress and dissolution, couples living with low incomes are less likely than their middle-class counterparts to participate in couple therapy. To increase treatment use among economically disadvantaged couples, information is needed on how they perceive barriers to treatment and on factors that might facilitate their help-seeking. The first aim of the present study was to identify the prevalence of attitudinal, structural, and relational barriers to seeking therapy for the relationship among individuals who perceived a need for help with their relationship. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000485DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Paternal depression and child externalizing behaviors: A meta-analysis.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 29;33(1):98-108. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba.

Although there is a consensus that maternal depression is strongly related to child externalizing behaviors, research on the association between paternal depression and child externalizing behaviors is mixed. Some research shows that paternal depressive symptoms are positively associated with symptoms of externalizing behaviors, including oppositional-defiant behavior, conduct problems, and overall externalizing behavior, while other studies failed to find an association, or demonstrated a weak or negative association. Given that the most recent meta-analysis on paternal depression and child externalizing behaviors is outdated, an updated meta-analysis is necessary. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000473DOI Listing
February 2019
11 Reads

Parent-adolescent conflict and young adult romantic relationship negativity: Genetic and environmental influences.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 26;33(1):34-43. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University.

Prior work indicates that aspects of interpersonal relationships are heritable, including negativity within parent-adolescent relationships as well as romantic relationships during adulthood. There have not, however, been systematic studies to disentangle genetic and environmental influences on relationship dynamics with parents as they relate to romantic partner relationship dynamics. Thus, the present study examined genetic and environmental influences on associations between parent-adolescent conflict and young adult reports of negativity with a romantic partner using a longitudinal twin/sibling design. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000476DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6355366PMC
February 2019
3 Reads

The longitudinal association between maternal parenting stress and spousal supportiveness.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 26;33(1):121-131. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Department of Human Development and Family Science.

Parenting stress can negatively impact mothers and the family unit. Previous research has identified spousal supportiveness as a critical resource in helping reduce maternal parenting stress, whereas other research demonstrates that parenting stress may reduce supportive behaviors over time. However, it is unclear whether the association between spousal supportiveness and maternal parenting stress is robust over an extended period of children's development, or whether economic hardship impacts change in both constructs. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/fam0000478
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000478DOI Listing
February 2019
13 Reads

Learning helplessness in the family: Maternal agency and the intergenerational transmission of depressive symptoms.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec 26;32(8):1109-1119. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Department of Psychology.

Children of mothers with elevated depressive symptoms may observe and learn a maladaptive cognitive style, including low perceptions of agency, that is, low perceived control over their emotions and circumstances. In turn, children may face increased cognitive vulnerability to depressive symptoms; however, this mediational model has yet to be tested. Using a longitudinal design and testing our hypotheses within a community sample, we investigated the mediating role of maternal agency in the associations between maternal depressive symptoms and child behavioral helplessness and depressive symptoms one and a half years later ( = 18. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000479DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Post-deployment parenting in military couples: Associations with service members' PTSD symptoms.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Nov 19. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Department of Psychology, University of Colorado Denver.

Severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms has been linked to parenting impairments in military service members (SMs), but little is known about how SMs' PTSD is related to their partners' parenting. This study evaluated associations of SMs' PTSD symptoms with parenting indices in SMs and their partners, with additional exploratory analyses of how intrapersonal and interpersonal distress might play a role in such associations. Online self-report measures were completed by 128 SMs who scored >27 on the PTSD Checklist (PCL-M) at baseline and their partners at four timepoints over 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000477DOI Listing
November 2018
13 Reads

Attachment anxiety and trauma history uniquely and interactively predict adjustment during and following deployment among military partners.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Nov 15. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

Department of Psychology, University of Arizona.

The psychological impact of military deployment on nondeploying partners of service members is only recently gaining attention in the literature, with preliminary findings suggesting that partners of military service members experience significant mental health consequences of deployment, but with little work examining factors that could heighten or attenuate risk for maladjustment in response to deployment. The current study uses attachment theory as a guide to explore the unique and interactive effects of two factors likely to increase risk for maladjustment among nondeploying partners: attachment anxiety and trauma history. Participants (N = 86) completed assessments 2 weeks prior to and 2 weeks following their partners' deployment departure, as well as 2 weeks following their partners' return. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/fam0000480
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000480DOI Listing
November 2018
10 Reads

Union stability among mothers and stepfathers: Contributions of stepfathers and biological fathers.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec 8;32(8):1142-1151. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Department of Human Development and Family Science, Auburn University.

A substantial proportion of unmarried mothers with young children live with new partners (stepfathers), and the stability of these unions is important to outcomes for mothers and children. This study examined effects of both step- and biological fathers' co-parenting, parenting, and financial contributions on union stability among mothers and stepfathers. Data were from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 370), and the sample included mothers with 3-year-old children who were mostly unmarried and low-income. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/fam0000482
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000482DOI Listing
December 2018
8 Reads

Maternal perceptions of paternal investment are associated with relationship satisfaction and breastfeeding duration in humans.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec 8;32(8):1025-1035. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Department of Psychology, University of Toronto Mississauga.

This study examined potential pathways in the associations between breastfeeding and mothers' relationship satisfaction, including her satisfaction with father involvement (FI) and parity, among mothers not working outside the home at 6 months. Mothers (n = 222) completed questionnaires at 4 time-points, 3 to 24 months postpartum as part of a longitudinal cohort study. In this study, we were interested in two main outcome variables: mothers' relationship satisfaction with their partner (RS) and continuation of breastfeeding after 3 months. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/fam0000468
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December 2018
5 Reads

Partners' depressive symptoms moderate the effects of expressive suppression.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec 8;32(8):1120-1129. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Suppressing emotional expressions can hide one's needs from relationship partners and thus prevent partners from providing support. Nevertheless, suppressing expressions may help people maintain more favorable evaluations of partners who are ultimately unsupportive because people may attribute a lack of support to partners being unaware of their needs. Thus, given that depressive symptoms reduce provisions of support, people with partners experiencing depressive symptoms may remain more satisfied to the extent that they previously suppressed emotional expressions. Read More

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December 2018
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Pathways linking early socioeconomic adversity to diverging profiles of romantic relationship dissolution in young adulthood.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 5;33(1):23-33. Epub 2018 Nov 5.

Department of Human Development and Family Science, University of Georgia.

Although studies on romantic relationships are abundant, cumulative experiences in intimate relationship dissolution (i.e., dissolution of cohabitation and marriage) during young adulthood is not yet completely understood. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/fam0000465
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February 2019
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Adolescent dating violence perpetration, emotion dysregulation, and parenting styles.

J Fam Psychol 2019 Feb 29;33(1):12-22. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Department of Psychology, Centro di ricerca sulle Dinamiche evolutive ed educative (CRIdee).

A conceptual model was tested, separately for male and female adolescents, in which adolescent dating violence (ADV) perpetration toward a romantic partner is affected by the memories of authoritarian paternal and maternal parenting styles through the mediation of adolescents' emotion dysregulation. The sample consisted of 622 Italian adolescents (35.5% males; 64. Read More

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February 2019
31 Reads

"A well spent day brings happy sleep": A dyadic study of capitalization support in military-connected couples.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Oct;32(7):975-985

Department of Psychology, Portland State University.

Among couples, sleep is theorized to be a dyadic process, within which relationship quality exerts a large influence (Troxel, Robles, Hall, & Buysse, 2007). In turn, research has shown that capitalization, or positive-event disclosure, influences relationship quality. The benefits of capitalization, however, are contingent on the receipt of a supportive response, here referred to as capitalization support (Reis & Gable, 2003). Read More

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October 2018
2 Reads

Autonomy support in toddlerhood: Similarities and contrasts between mothers and fathers.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Oct;32(7):915-925

School of Psychology, University of Birmingham.

Infant exploration often hinges on parental autonomy support (i.e., parental behaviors that support children's goals, interests, and choices), a construct that is widely applied in family studies of school-age children and adolescents but less studied in infants and toddlers. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/fam0000450
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6205245PMC
October 2018
9 Reads

Longitudinal linkages between parenting stress and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms among Chinese children with ODD.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec 15;32(8):1078-1086. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

Shaozheng Qin, State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, Beijing Normal University.

Parents of children with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) experience considerable stress and challenges in parenting. Based on a 2-year, 3-wave longitudinal study of children with ODD (N = 243, mean age = 9.47 years, SD = 1. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/fam0000466
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December 2018
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Associations between father involvement and father-child attachment security: Variations based on timing and type of involvement.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec 8;32(8):1015-1024. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Department of Psychology, Stevenson University.

This study examined associations between father involvement and father-child attachment security, and whether those associations differed as a function of timing (workday and nonworkday) and/or type (accessibility, caregiving, and play) of involvement. Eighty father-child dyads participated when children were approximately 3 years old. Fathers completed a time diary interview assessing the various forms of involvement, and attachment was assessed using the Attachment Q-Set (Waters, 1995) following 90 min of father-child observation in the home. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/fam0000472DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Positive parental engagement: Investigating the role of the mother-father relationship.

J Fam Psychol 2018 Dec 8;32(8):1005-1014. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Department of Psychological Sciences.

Promoting positive parental engagement (e.g., reading to the child, practicing nursery rhymes with the child, playing with the child) is beneficial for children. Read More

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http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/fam0000470
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December 2018
5 Reads