753 results match your criteria Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine [Journal]


Banana and plantain production systems in Benin: ethnobotanical investigation, varietal diversity, pests, and implications for better production.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Dec 14;14(1):78. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Laboratory of Biotechnology, Genetic Resources and Plant and Animal Breeding, National University of Sciences, Technologies, Engineering and Mathematics, BP: 14, Dassa, Benin.

Background: The cultivated banana and plantain (Musa spp.) are valuable for nutritional and socio-economic security for millions of people worldwide. In Benin, banana and plantain are among the most produced, consumed, and traded commodities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0280-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6295045PMC
December 2018

Local knowledge, use, and conservation of wild birds in the semi-arid region of Paraíba state, northeastern Brazil.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Dec 4;14(1):77. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Laboratório de Etnobiologia e Ciências Ambientais, Departamento de Sistemática e Ecologia, da Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Campus I, João Pessoa, Paraíba, CEP: 58.051-900, Brazil.

Background: The use of wild birds, for several purposes, is directly associated with cultural, ecological, and conservation issues. This study aimed to inventory the wild birds known and used in three communities in Paraíba state, northeast Brazil, and to investigate the sociocultural context in which these activities occur.

Methods: A total of 179 people (98 women and 81 men) were interviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0276-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280514PMC
December 2018

Status and factors influencing on-farm conservation of Kam Sweet Rice (Oryza sativa L.) genetic resources in southeast Guizhou Province, China.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 29;14(1):76. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Institute of Crop Sciences, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, 100081, China.

Background: Kam Sweet Rice (KSR) is a special kind of rice landrace that has been cultivated for thousands of years in the borders of Guizhou, Hunan, and Guangxi Provinces of China, and is mainly distributed in southeast Guizhou Province of China currently. KSR has many unique qualities, including strong resistance to diseases, pests, and adverse abiotic conditions, difficulty of threshing, and well glutinous features. KSR germplasm resources are an indispensable material and cultural symbol in the production and daily life and customs of the Dong people. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0256-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6267802PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Groundnut production constraints and farmers' trait preferences: a pre-breeding study in Togo.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 29;14(1):75. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid tropic (ICRISAT-WCA), BP320, Bamako, Mali.

Background: Groundnut is an important legume crop in Togo. However, groundnut yield has been steadily decreasing for decades as a result of lack of organized breeding program to address production constraints. Though, low yielding varieties and late leaf spot have been often reported as the most important constraints, there is no documented evidence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0275-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6267023PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Indigenous knowledge of dye-yielding plants among Bai communities in Dali, Northwest Yunnan, China.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 29;14(1):74. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Southwest Forestry University, Kunming, 650224, Yunnan, China.

Background: Bai people in the Dali Prefecture of Northwest Yunnan, China, have a long history of using plant extracts to dye their traditional costumes and maintain this culture for posterity. However, the development of modern technology, while vastly improving the dyeing efficiency, is also replacing indigenous knowledge which threatens the indigenous practice, causing the latter disappearing gradually. This study sought to examine the indigenous knowledge of plants used for textile dyeing in Bai communities, so as to provide a foundation for their sustainable development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0274-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6262949PMC
November 2018

Traditionally used wild edible plants of district Udhampur, J&K, India.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 29;14(1):73. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Department of Botany, Govt. Degree College for Women, Udhampur, J&K, 182101, India.

Background: Wild edible plants (WEPs) refer to edible species that are not cultivated or domesticated. WEPs have an important role to play in poverty eradication, security of food availability, diversification of agriculture, generation of income resources, and alleviating malnutrition. In the present study, an inventory of traditionally used WEPs from Udhampur district of J&K, India, has been prepared. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0272-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6263044PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Factors affecting the use of medicinal plants by migrants from rural areas of Brazilian Northeast after moving to a metropolitan region in Southeast of Brazil.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 22;14(1):72. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Department of Preventive Medicine, UNIFESP, Rua Botucatu, 740, 4° andar. Bairro Vila Clementino, São Paulo, SP, 04023-900, Brazil.

Background: Ethnopharmacological studies about migrants reveal a dynamic process of knowledge and use of medicinal plants. In this study, we sought to elucidate quantitative and qualitatively the main factors influencing the use of medicinal plants by migrants from rural areas to an urban region in Brazil with traces of remnant natural vegetation.

Methods: Seven Northeastern individuals who migrated to the Southeastern Region of Brazil (Bororé Peninsula, in the city of São Paulo) were selected to participate in semi-structured interviews regarding the use of medicinal plants throughout their lives, and indicated an inhabitant in their hometown that would be able to accompany the field collections in each area. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0270-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6249753PMC
November 2018

Ethnotaxonomy of sharks from tropical waters of Brazil.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 21;14(1):71. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Department of Oceanography and Limnology, Centre of Biosciences, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte-UFRN, Via Costeira Senador Dinarte Medeiros Mariz, Mãe Luíza, s/n, Natal, RN, CEP 59014-002, Brazil.

Background: Accessing folk knowledge from small-scale fishers is an affordable and reliable approach to understand the dynamic and diversity of shark species worldwide, especially of those eventually caught. In this context, ethnotaxonomy (folk identification and classification) may represent an alternative to support sharks fisheries management, especially in data-poor places. This study aimed to investigate fishing and ethnotaxonomy of the main shark species caught by small-scale fisheries from the coastal waters of the Brazilian Northeast. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0273-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6249882PMC
November 2018

Ethnopharmaceutical knowledge in Samogitia region of Lithuania: where old traditions overlap with modern medicine.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 20;14(1):70. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Department of Drug Technology and Social Pharmacy, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Sukileliu pr. 13, Kaunas, Lithuania.

Background: Modern ethnopharmaceutical studies are still quite unusual in Northern Europe. Data regarding the medicinal use of plants, animals, and fungi and also of spiritual rituals of healing is obtained mostly from ethnographic and folkloric sources in Lithuania. The aim of this study was to assess the ethnopharmaceutical knowledge regarding traditional use of natural substances for medicinal purposes in the Samogitia region and compare with prior research conducted 10 years prior in the same region. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0268-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247776PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Comparing Indigenous and public health infant feeding recommendations in Peru: opportunities for optimizing intercultural health policies.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 20;14(1):69. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Asociación ANDES, Street Ciro Alegria H-13, Urb. Santa Monica-Wanchaq, Postal Nº 567, Cusco, Peru.

Background: The problem of childhood undernutrition in low-income countries persists despite long-standing efforts by local governmental and international development agencies. In order to address this problem, the Peruvian Ministry of Health has focused on improving access to primary healthcare and providing maternal and child health monitoring and education. Current maternal-child health policies in Peru introduce recommendations that are in some respect distinct from those of Indigenous highland communities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0271-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245876PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Cultural, economic, and ecological factors influencing management of wild plants and mushrooms interchanged in Purépecha markets of Mexico.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 20;14(1):68. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Instituto de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas y Sustentabilidad, UNAM, Antigua Carretera a Pátzcuaro 8701, 58190, Morelia, Michoacán, Mexico.

Background: Traditional markets outstandingly contribute to conservation of biocultural diversity, social relations, and cultural values. These markets reflect life strategies and forms people of a region interact with their biodiversity and territories, as well as traditional ecological knowledge and management practices. To understand the factors motivating plant and mushroom management, we analyzed the resources cultural and economic values, their role in people's subsistence, and the relation of these values with the resources spatial and temporal availability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0269-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245724PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Species richness, cultural importance, and prioritization of wild spices for conservation in the Sudano-Guinean zone of Benin (West Africa).

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 15;14(1):67. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

Laboratoire de Biomathématiques et d'Estimations Forestières (LABEF), Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d'Abomey-Calavi, 04, BP 1525, Cotonou, Bénin.

Background: Spices have always been used for their flavor-enhancement characteristics and for their medicinal properties. In Benin, scientific research on spices is scarce, despite their importance in the local population's daily needs. This study investigated the diversity of wild spices and documented the associated traditional knowledge that can be used for their valuation, domestication, and sustainable management in the Sudano-Guinean Zone of Benin. Read More

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https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1300
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0267-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6238395PMC
November 2018
4 Reads

Breeders' knowledge on cattle fodder species preference in rangelands of Benin.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 8;14(1):66. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Laboratory of Botany and Plant Ecology, Faculty of Sciences and Techniques, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 4521, Cotonou, Benin.

Background: We undertook ethnobotanical and ecological studies on fodder plants grazed by cattle across Benin national area. The study aims to ascertain the top priority fodder plants in order to catalogue the indigenous knowledge regarding their use.

Methods: Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and covered 690 breeders and 40 days of pasture walk. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0264-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6225710PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Ethnobotany in a coastal environmental protected area: shifts in plant use in two communities in southern Brazil.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 3;14(1):65. Epub 2018 Nov 3.

Department of Ecology and Zoology, Laboratory of Human Ecology and Ethnobotany, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Reitor João David Ferreira Lima, Florianópolis, 88040-900, Brazil.

Background: We investigated local knowledge of plants in terms of plant use shifts and losses, in two coastal communities within a protected area in southern Brazil. Our hypothesis is that people's livelihoods are associated with different ethnobotanical knowledge, and changes in these activities can reflect shifts in ethnobotanical knowledge such as stopping using some plants.

Methods: We interviewed 125 inhabitants after prior informed consent, asking her/him about their socioeconomic profile and to free list the plants they know. Read More

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https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1300
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0265-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6215667PMC
November 2018
3 Reads

Ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants in Ganta Afeshum District, Eastern Zone of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Nov 3;14(1):64. Epub 2018 Nov 3.

Department of Biology, College of Natural and Computational Sciences, Mekelle University, P.O.Box 231, Mekelle, Ethiopia.

Background: Starting from the ancient time, the people of Ethiopia use medicinal plants as traditional medicine to heal different human and livestock ailments. This ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants was carried out in Ganta Afeshum District, Eastern Zone of Tigray, Northern Ethiopia, to identify medicinal plant species used by the local community to treat various human and livestock ailments.

Methods: A total of 78 informants (54 men and 24 women) were selected to collect ethnobotanical information from four study sites. Read More

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https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1300
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0266-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6215673PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

The changing face of farmers' home gardens: a diachronic analysis from Sillian (Eastern Tyrol, Austria).

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Oct 29;14(1):63. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Division of Organic Farming, Department for Sustainable Agricultural Systems, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Gregor-Mendel-Straße 33, 1180, Vienna, Austria.

Background: Home gardens are an integral part of many traditional land use systems around the world. They are subject to various conversion processes and undergo a variety of changes. We were interested if change is an ongoing process in farmers' home gardens of Eastern Tyrol (Austria). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0262-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6205796PMC
October 2018
3 Reads

Investigating criteria for valuation of forage resources by local agro-pastoralists in West Africa: using quantitative ethnoecological approach.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Oct 23;14(1):62. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Center for Development Research (ZEF), University of Bonn, Walter-Flex 3, 53113, Bonn, Germany.

Background: This paper provides an insightful quantitative ethnoecological analysis and affirms that agro-pastoralists have a multiplicity of criteria for valuating their natural forage resources. Rural households in West Africa are not only confronted with water resource scarcity but also have to cope with limited forage resources to feed livestock in both wet and dry seasons based on local knowledge. Local agro-pastoral social-ecological systems (SESs) in the study areas stem from the daily utilization of available forage resources by dominant domestic livestock (cattle, goats, and sheep) over the years. Read More

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https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1300
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0261-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6198451PMC
October 2018
4 Reads

Yao herbal medicinal market during the Dragon Boat Festival in Jianghua County, China.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Oct 17;14(1):61. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Key Laboratory of Ethnomedicine (Minzu University of China), Ministry of Education, Beijing, 100081, China.

Background: The traditional medicinal markets held during the Dragon Boat Festival are common and important in China's countryside. In Jianghua, a Yao autonomous county in Hunan Province in China, the medicinal market also plays an important role for the application, conservation, and communication of traditional Yao medicinal knowledge.

Methods: During the Dragon Boat Festival in 2016 and 2017, ethnobotanical surveys and inventories were conducted in the medicinal market of Jianghua County, and voucher plant specimens were collected, identified, and deposited in a herbarium. Read More

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https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1300
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0260-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6192344PMC
October 2018
5 Reads

Zootherapeutic uses of wildmeat and associated products in the semiarid region of Brazil: general aspects and challenges for conservation.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Sep 17;14(1):60. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Department of Biology, State University of Paraiba (UEPB), Av. Baraúnas n. 351, Campina Grande, Paraiba, CEP 58109-753, Brazil.

Background: Hunting wildlife for medicinal purposes is a widespread practice throughout Brazil; however, studies about the animals used for zootherapeutic practices have been performed almost exclusively with traders (herbalists) and end consumers, and not hunters. This makes it difficult to completely understand the market chain, trade strategies, and drivers of this practice. The present study investigated the species hunted or trapped for traditional medicinal uses by collecting data about the use and trade of the zootheurapeutic species. Read More

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https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1300
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0259-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6142313PMC
September 2018
11 Reads

Traditional knowledge regarding edible insects in Burkina Faso.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Sep 14;14(1):59. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

Département de Biochimie Microbiologie, Université Ouaga I Professeur Joseph KI-Zerbo, 03 BP 7021, Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso.

Background: Insects play an important role as a diet supplement in Burkina Faso, but the preferred insect species vary according to the phytogeographical zone, ethnic groups, and gender. The present study aims at documenting indigenous knowledge on edible insects in Burkina Faso.

Methods: A structured ethno-sociological survey was conducted with 360 informants in nine villages located in two phytogeographical zones of Burkina Faso. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0258-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6137937PMC
September 2018
4 Reads

Ethnobotanical survey of plant species for herbal tea in a Yao autonomous county (Jianghua, China): results of a 2-year study of traditional medicinal markets on the Dragon Boat Festival.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Sep 5;14(1):58. Epub 2018 Sep 5.

Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, 650201, China.

Background: Herbal tea is widely consumed in Jianghua, a Yao autonomous county in Hunan Province, China, to prevent and treat diseases. The materials in herbal tea at the traditional medicinal markets at the Dragon Boat Festival remain unknown. The aims of the paper were (1) to specifically investigate the materials of herbal tea used by Yao nationalities in Hunan Province, (2) to record the most common and the culturally important medicinal plant species in the markets, and (3) to compare the medical plant tradition both used for herbal tea between the Jianghua and Lingnan regions. Read More

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https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1300
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0257-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6125875PMC
September 2018
2 Reads

Consumption patterns of wild edibles by the Vasavas: a case study from Gujarat, India.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Aug 29;14(1):57. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

Department of Global Agriculture Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 1138657, Japan.

Background: Wild edibles continue to be a significant contributor to the global food basket in much of the developing world. A consensus has now been formed that information on wild edibles is an important part of ethnobotanical knowledge and hence elucidating region-specific patterns of habitat management and consumption assists policy making with regard to natural conservation, human nutrition, and human health. Using an original data set from Gujarat, India, the present research aims to document the collective knowledge of wild edibles possessed by the local Vasava tribe, as well as the habitat usage and consumption trends of these species. Read More

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https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1300
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0254-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6116503PMC
August 2018
9 Reads

Hierarchies of knowledge: ethnobotanical knowledge, practices and beliefs of the Vhavenda in South Africa for biodiversity conservation.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Aug 23;14(1):56. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

Department of Botany, School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences, University of Venda, Private Bag X5050, Thohoyandou, 0950, South Africa.

Background: Indigenous and local knowledge systems are characterised by a 'knowledge-practice-belief' complex that plays a critical role for biodiversity management and conservation on indigenous lands. However, few studies take into consideration the interconnected relationship between the social processes underpinning knowledge accumulation, generation and transmission. The study draws on ethnobotanical research to explore plant uses, practices and belief systems developed among the indigenous Vhavenda in South Africa for sustaining indigenous plant resources and highlights some of the forces of change influencing the acquisition and transmission of knowledge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0255-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6108143PMC

Ethnomedicinal applications of animal species by the local communities of Punjab, Pakistan.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Aug 15;14(1):55. Epub 2018 Aug 15.

Department of Environment Sciences, COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad Campus, Abbottabad, Pakistan.

Background: Different species of animals are being utilized in traditional therapies by various cultures for a long time and such uses still exist in folk medicine. The present study aimed to document animal-based traditional therapies used by the local communities of Jhelum and Lahore districts of the Punjab province, Pakistan.

Methods: Field surveys were conducted in 2015-2016 in six different sites of the study areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0253-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6094468PMC
August 2018
1 Read
1 Citation
2.000 Impact Factor

Hunters and hunting across indigenous and colonist communities at the forest-agriculture interface: an ethnozoological study from the Peruvian Amazon.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Aug 10;14(1):54. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.

Background: Wildlife has been traditionally used by forest communities as a source of protein, and the Peruvian Amazon is no exception. The articulation of colonist and indigenous communities to urban centers and markets results in changes in livelihood strategies and impacts on wildlife populations. To address the threat of overhunting and forest conversion, we provide a generalized characterization of colonist and indigenous communities and their hunting activities near Pucallpa, Ucayali, Peru. Read More

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https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1300
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0247-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6086032PMC
August 2018
11 Reads

Beetles, ants, wasps, or flies? An ethnobiological study of edible insects among the Awajún Amerindians in Amazonas, Peru.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Aug 9;14(1):53. Epub 2018 Aug 9.

Department of Crop Sciences and Agroforestry, Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 00, Praha 6 - Suchdol, Czech Republic.

Background: Insects are known to be able to provide valuable nutrients to indigenous populations across the Amazon. However, studies on traditional insect use in the Peruvian Amazon are scarce. This study documents edible insect diversity and characterizes their food and collection patterns in eight Awajún communities in the Peruvian Amazon. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0252-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6085703PMC
August 2018
2 Reads

Folk taxonomy and traditional uses of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces by the sociolinguistic groups in the central region of the Republic of Benin.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jul 31;14(1):52. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Laboratory of Biotechnology, Genetic Resources and Plant and Animal Breeding (BIORAVE), FAST-Dassa, UNSTIM, BP 14, Dassa, Benin.

Background: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important grain legume crop grown in the central region of the Republic of Benin. However, its production declined in recent years to the extent that its diversity is being threatened with extinction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0251-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6066935PMC

First large-scale ethnobotanical survey in the province of Uíge, northern Angola.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jul 25;14(1):51. Epub 2018 Jul 25.

Department of Biology, Institute of Botany, Faculty of Science, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden, Germany.

Background: Angola suffered a long-lasting military conflict. Therefore, traditional knowledge of plant usage is still an important part of cultural heritage, especially concerning the still very poor health care system in the country. Our study documents for the first time traditional knowledge of plant use of local Bakongo communities in the northern province of Uíge on a large scale with a focus on medicinal plants and puts data in context to different parameters of age, gender and distance to the provincial capital. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0238-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6060550PMC

Traditional knowledge about plant, animal, and mineral-based remedies to treat cattle, pigs, horses, and other domestic animals in the Mediterranean island of Sardinia.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jul 20;14(1):50. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

Istituto per il Sistema Produzione Animale in Ambiente Mediterraneo - CNR-ISPAAM, Traversa La Crucca 3, località Baldinca, 07100, Sassari, Italy.

Background: Mediterranean farmers traditionally utilized plants, animals, and minerals sourced locally to treat their animals. Research is needed to understand at what extent such knowledge of domestic animal care still survives and to document such traditions for further developments.

Methods: We carried out our field study to recover ancient ethno-veterinary practices by means of questionnaires and interviews to farmers in rural areas of the Mediterranean island of Sardinia (Italy). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0250-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6054737PMC
July 2018
5 Reads

Local botanical knowledge of native food plants in the semiarid region of Brazil.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jul 20;14(1):49. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

Laboratório de Etnobiologia e Ciências Ambientais, Departamento de Sistemática e Ecologia, da Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Campus I, João Pessoa, Paraíba, 58.051-900, Brazil.

Background: This study aimed to investigate the local botanical knowledge of native food plants in three rural communities, located in the semiarid region of Paraíba State, Brazil, verifying possibilities of differences of knowledge among communities and between men and women.

Methods: Semi-structured interviews about native plant knowledge and use were conducted with all householders in each community, totaling 117 informants. The species similarity among the communities of Pau D'Arco, Várzea Alegre, and Barroquinha was compared with Jaccard index, and the use value index (UV, UV, UV) was used to determine the most important species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0249-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6053708PMC
July 2018
10 Reads

Traditional knowledge of wild edible plants with special emphasis on medicinal uses in Southern Shan State, Myanmar.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jul 17;14(1):48. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, 1866 Kameino, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, 252-0880, Japan.

Background: Myanmar is one of the hotspots of biodiversity and is a rapidly developing country. Performing floristic research in Myanmar is an urgent issue, and ethnobotanical studies of wild edible plants (WEPs) will provide new information on natural plant resources.

Method: Ethnobotanical data were collected in three villages with different historical backgrounds in Southern Shan State, Myanmar. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0248-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6050729PMC

Do emotions influence the motivations and preferences of keepers of stingless bees?

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jul 13;14(1):47. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Departamento de Biologia, Área de Ecologia, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Av. Dom Manoel de Medeiros, s/n - Dois irmãos, Recife, PE, 52171-900, Brazil.

Background: According to the biophilia hypothesis, an emotional affiliation with nature has been inherited during human biocultural evolution. Research on beekeeping can contribute to the scientific understanding of the influence of emotions in the human-nature relationship, since this activity provides concrete experiences of beneficial interaction between the human being and the environment by stimulating conservation-friendly values among practitioners. In this study, we investigated motivations and preferences driving beekeepers' choices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0246-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6045889PMC

Ethnobotanical knowledge of the lay people of Blouberg area (Pedi tribe), Limpopo Province, South Africa.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jul 13;14(1):46. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Research, Innovation & Engagements Portfolio, Mangosuthu University of Technology, P O Box 12363, Durban, 4026, South Africa.

Background: Limpopo province, South Africa, has a rich plant diversity and is referred to as one of the hotspots areas within the country. The aim of the current work was to identify and document medicinal plant species used by the indigenous Pedi people of Blouberg area, Limpopo Province, South Africa.

Methods: A total of 40 informants which includes both traditional healers and medicinal plant sellers were randomly selected and asked about the plant species used in treatment of variety of infections using a structured questionnaire. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0245-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6044033PMC
July 2018
12 Reads

Sustainability issues of commercial non-timber forest product extraction in West Suriname.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jun 28;14(1):44. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Vondellaan 55, 2332 AA, Leiden, Netherlands.

Background: Non-timber forest products (NTFPs) have been traded for millennia by indigenous communities. Current increased demands driven by globalisation, however, put more pressure on local harvesters and their surrounding ecosystems. The safeguarding of indigenous access rights to harvesting grounds is needed, either through communal land titles or collaborative management agreements, both to secure prior indigenous rights and to minimise further negative ecological impacts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0244-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6027770PMC

A study on food-medicine continuum among the non-institutionally trained siddha practitioners of Tiruvallur district, Tamil Nadu, India.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jun 28;14(1):45. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Addiriyah Chair for Environmental Studies, College of Science, King Saud University, 2455, Riyadh, 11451, Saudi Arabia.

Background: Medicinal properties of the food species are one of the poorly documented and important areas of ethnopharmacology. The present survey quantitatively documented the medicinal foods prescribed by the non-institutionally trained siddha practitioners of Tiruvallur district of Tamil Nadu.

Methods: Field work was carried out between December 2014 and April 2017 using a questionnaire. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0240-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6025710PMC
June 2018
4 Reads

Astonishing diversity-the medicinal plant markets of Bogotá, Colombia.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jun 20;14(1):43. Epub 2018 Jun 20.

William L. Brown Center, Missouri Botanical Garden, P.O. Box 299, St. Louis, MO, 63166-0299, USA.

Background: Despite the importance of local markets as a source of medicinal plants in Colombia, comparatively little comparative research reports on the pharmacopoeiae sold. This stands in contrast to wealth of available information for other components of plant use in Colombia and other countries. The present provides a detailed inventory of the medicinal plant markets in the Bogotá metropolitan area, hypothesizing that the species composition, and medicinal applications, would differ across markets of the city. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0241-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6011411PMC
June 2018
1 Read
2.000 Impact Factor

An ethnobotanical survey of edible fungi in Chuxiong City, Yunnan, China.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jun 15;14(1):42. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Minzu University of China, Beijing, 100081, China.

Background: Chuxiong, known as "the City of Fungi," is rich in fungal resources and traditional knowledge related to fungal biodiversity. The local environment is an excellent habitat for a wide variety of edible fungi. In addition, the region is home to many ethnic minorities and especially the Yi ethnic group who has a long history for traditionally using fungi as food or medicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0239-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6003210PMC
June 2018
1 Read
2.000 Impact Factor

Understanding the motivations for keeping wild birds in the semi-arid region of Brazil.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jun 11;14(1):41. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Biológicas (Zoologia), Departamento de Sistemática e Ecologia, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Cidade Universitária, João Pessoa, PB, 58059-970, Brazil.

Background: Birds are kept as pets around the world, and bird-keeping is an ancient and widespread practice, constituting one of the main reasons for the decline of some species. In the semi-arid region of Brazil, this practice is very common and continues despite being designated as illegal in recent decades. This study aimed to identify the species and families of songbirds used as pets in the semi-arid region of Brazil, characterize the maintenance of the exploited species in captivity, and evaluate the sociocultural context associated with this practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0243-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5996533PMC

Cross-cultural comparison of plant use knowledge in Baitadi and Darchula districts, Nepal Himalaya.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jun 11;14(1):40. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Department of Forest, District Forest Office, Baitadi, Farwest Nepal, Nepal.

Background: This study seeks to better understand the human-nature interface and to measure the variability of plant use knowledge among cultures, through inter- and intracultural analyses. We compared plant collection, use, and management of two culturally distinct groups (Baitadi and Darchula) of the Nepal Himalaya. They inhabit different physiographic regions, yet share the same ecological landscape, environmental resources, and livelihood challenges. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0242-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5996461PMC
June 2018
2.000 Impact Factor

The ethnobotanical domain of the Swat Valley, Pakistan.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Jun 8;14(1):39. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of Botany, University of Malakand, Chakdara Dir Lower KP, Pakistan.

Background: This study contributes to the current ethnomedicinal knowledge of the Swat Valley, Pakistan. District Swat possesses remarkable biodiversity owing to its varied topographical and climatic conditions, prompting a distinct human-plant association. Our hypothesis is that the presence of such a great biodiversity has shaped into a formal ethnobotanical culture in the area transmitted through generations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0237-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5994039PMC
June 2018
3 Reads

Ch'ol nomenclature for soil classification in the ejido Oxolotán, Tacotalpa, Tabasco, México.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 May 30;14(1):38. Epub 2018 May 30.

Centro de Investigaciones en Geografía Ambiental, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Antigua Carretera a Pátzcuaro núm. 8701, col. Ex-hacienda de San José de la Huerta, C. P. 58190, Morelia, Michoacán, Mexico.

Background: The traditional ecological knowledge of land of the Ch'ol originary people from southeast Mexico forms part of their cultural identity; it is local and holistic and implies an integrated physical and spiritual worldview that contributes to improve their living conditions. We analyzed the nomenclature for soil classification used in the Mexican state of Tabasco by the Ch'ol farmers with the objective of contributing to the knowledge of the Maya soil classification.

Methods: A map of the study area was generated from the digital database of parcels in the ejido Oxolotán in the municipality of Tacotalpa, to which a geopedological map was overlaid in order to obtain modeled topographic profiles (Zavala-Cruz et al. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0236-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5975485PMC
May 2018
5 Reads

Ethnozoological study of traditional medicinal appreciation of animals and their products among the indigenous people of Metema Woreda, North-Western Ethiopia.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 May 23;14(1):37. Epub 2018 May 23.

Department of Biology, College of Science, Bahir Dar University, P.O. Box 79, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia.

Background: Using animals for different purposes goes back to the dawn of mankind. Animals served as a source of food, medicine, and clothing for humans and provided other services. This study was designed to undertake a cross-sectional ethnozoological field survey among the residents of Metema Woreda from November 2015 to May 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0234-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5967044PMC

Traditional knowledge and cultural importance of Borassus aethiopum Mart. in Benin: interacting effects of socio-demographic attributes and multi-scale abundance.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 May 15;14(1):36. Epub 2018 May 15.

Laboratoire de Biomathématiques et d'Estimation Forestières, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d'Abomey-Calavi, 04 BP 1525, Cotonou, Bénin.

Background: Eliciting factors affecting distribution of traditional knowledge (TK) and cultural importance of plant resources is central in ethnobiology. Socio-demographic attributes and ecological apparency hypothesis (EAH) have been widely documented as drivers of TK distribution, but their synergistic effect is poorly documented. Here, we focused on Borassus aethiopum, a socio-economic important agroforestry palm in Africa, analyzing relationships between the number of use-reports and cultural importance on one hand, and informant socio-demographic attributes (age category and gender) on the other hand, considering the EAH at multi-scale contexts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0233-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5952639PMC
May 2018
2 Reads

Ethnobotanical survey of plants used as repellents against housefly, Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae) in Budondo Subcounty, Jinja District, Uganda.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 May 10;14(1):35. Epub 2018 May 10.

Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Gulu University, P.O. Box 166, Gulu, Uganda.

Background: The housefly, Musca domestica L., is a major public health and domestic pest that spoils food and causes irritation and is a vector of many infectious disease pathogens of medical and veterinary importance. Currently, its control relies largely on chemical pesticides. Read More

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https://ethnobiomed.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1300
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0235-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5946462PMC
May 2018
3 Reads

Ethnobotany of the Sierra Nevada del Cocuy-Güicán: climate change and conservation strategies in the Colombian Andes.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 May 5;14(1):34. Epub 2018 May 5.

Wageningen University, Biosystematics Group, Droevendaalsesteeg 1, 6708 PB, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Background: The Sierra Nevada del Cocuy-Güicán in the Colombian Andes is protected as a National Natural Park since 1977 because of its fragile páramo ecosystems, extraordinary biodiversity, high plant endemism, and function as water reservoir. The vegetation on this mountain is threatened by expanding agriculture, deforestation, tourism, and climate change. We present an ethnobotanical inventory among local farmer communities and discuss the effects of vegetation change on the availability of useful plants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0227-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5935911PMC

Local ecological knowledge concerning the invasion of Amerindian lands in the northern Brazilian Amazon by Acacia mangium (Willd.).

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 May 3;14(1):33. Epub 2018 May 3.

Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia-INPA, Avenida André Araújo, 2936, Petrópolis, Manaus, AM, 69067-375, Brazil.

Introduction: Invasive plants can impact biodiversity as well as the lives of native human populations. Natural ecosystems represent sources of natural resources essential for the subsistence and socio-cultural continuity of these social groups. Approximately 30,000 ha of Acacia mangium were planted for commercial purposes in savanna areas surrounding indigenous lands in Roraima State, Brazil, at the end of the 1990s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0231-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5934789PMC

Sociodemographic differences in the cultural significance of edible and toxic mushrooms among Tsotsil towns in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico.

Authors:
Felipe Ruan-Soto

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 May 3;14(1):32. Epub 2018 May 3.

Centro de Investigaciones Multidisciplinarias sobre Chiapas y la Frontera Sur, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, San Cristóbal de Las Casas, México.

Background: Mushrooms are important forest resources, mostly as food, despite the serious health threat posed by toxic species. In the Highlands of Chiapas, numerous wild mushroom intoxications have been registered. While Chiapas has been vastly studied from an ethnomycological perspective, no certainty exists as to how nomenclature systems differentiate edible and toxic species, which species are most culturally significant, and whether sociodemographic factors relate to how well-known they are in the Highlands of Chiapas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0232-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5934899PMC

Ethnobotanical investigation on medicinal plants in Algoz area (South Kordofan), Sudan.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Apr 27;14(1):31. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

College of Applied and Industrial Sciences, University of Bahri, P.O. Box 1606, Khartoum, Sudan.

Background: The inhabitants of western Sudan use traditional medicine for the treatment of various ailments due to lack of medical doctors and unaffordable prices of pharmaceutical products. The present study is the first documentation of the traditional plant knowledge on medicinal uses of plants by healers in Algoz (South Kordofan), Sudan.

Method: Ethnobotanical data were collected over a period from March to November 2015 using semi-structured interviews with 30 healers (24 male and 6 female) living in the investigated area. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0230-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5921783PMC
April 2018
12 Reads

Survey of farmers' knowledge of cassava mosaic disease and their preferences for cassava cultivars in three agro-ecological zones in Benin.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Apr 25;14(1):29. Epub 2018 Apr 25.

Central Laboratory of Plant Biotechnology and Plant Breeding, Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technique, University of Abomey - Calavi, Abomey-Calavi, Benin.

Background: Cassava is an important crop in Africa that is widely cultivated for its starchy tuberous root, which constitutes a major source of dietary carbohydrates. Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) is the most devastating disease affecting cassava in Africa and causes enormous losses in yield. In Benin, specifically, cultivars resistant to CMD are not commonly planted, and even when CMD is observed in fields, farmers do not implement control measures, presumably because they lack proper knowledge and training. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0228-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5918766PMC
April 2018
10 Reads

Quantitative study of medicinal plants used by the communities residing in Koh-e-Safaid Range, northern Pakistani-Afghan borders.

J Ethnobiol Ethnomed 2018 Apr 25;14(1):30. Epub 2018 Apr 25.

Institute of Biological Sciences, Sarhad University of Science and Information Technology, Peshawar, Pakistan.

Background: The residents of remote areas mostly depend on folk knowledge of medicinal plants to cure different ailments. The present study was carried out to document and analyze traditional use regarding the medicinal plants among communities residing in Koh-e-Safaid Range northern Pakistani-Afghan border.

Methods: A purposive sampling method was used for the selection of informants, and information regarding the ethnomedicinal use of plants was collected through semi-structured interviews. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13002-018-0229-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5922303PMC
April 2018
2 Reads
2.000 Impact Factor