3,182 results match your criteria Journal of Drugs in Dermatology[Journal]


Hyperpigmentation Disorders in Hispanic Population in the United States

Authors:
Marta I. Rendon

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):s112-114

The Hispanic population is the third largest growing group in the United States and is projected to increase to 119 million by 2060. Skin of color populations including Hispanics are more susceptible to a variety of pigmentary disorders including melasma and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH). Most previous treatment options for these disorders remain unsatisfactory. Read More

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March 2019
12 Reads

Hyperpigmentation Disorders in Hispanic Population in the United States

Authors:
Marta I. Rendon

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):s112-114

The Hispanic population is the third largest growing group in the United States and is projected to increase to 119 million by 2060. Skin of color populations including Hispanics are more susceptible to a variety of pigmentary disorders including melasma and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH). Most previous treatment options for these disorders remain unsatisfactory. Read More

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March 2019
5 Reads

Dermatological Concerns in the Latino Population

Authors:
Marta I. Rendon

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):s111

The Latino, or Hispanics in the United States, are the drivers behind demographic growth. They are heterogeneous in many dimensions related to health risks and dermatological conditions. Understanding the heterogeneity and clinical manifestation of skin concerns in such population is essential for health care providers. Read More

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Cosmetic Laser Procedures in Latin Skin

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):s127-131

Hispanics/Latinos are one of the fastest growing segments in the skin of color population in the United States. Utilization of lasers especially in people with skin of color requires a thorough understanding of laser physics and laser tissue interactions. In this article, we will outline the different lasers used in our practice based on each chromophore. Read More

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Acne and Rosacea: Special Considerations in the Treatment of Patients With Latin American Ancestry

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):s124-126

Acne is a common disease among patients with Latin American ancestry. Its presentation is very similar to that in all skin types, but nodulocystic acne is more frequent in patients with oily and darker skin than in white Caucasians. Acne sequelae in patients with Latin American ancestry and with darker skin include postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) and atrophic and hypertrophic scars or keloids, with PIH being the most common complication affecting the quality of life of patients. Read More

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Photoaging and Photoprotection in United States Hispanic Population

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3s):s121-123

Photoaging is a complex and chronic process that induces structural and functional changes in sun-exposed skin, including coarse wrinkles, laxity, dyschromia, telangiectasias, and potential precancerous lesions. Pigmented skin presents different structure and physiology that contribute to distinctive photoaging process. The skin of color population is reported to “age better” than their Caucasian counterparts in general, with fewer wrinkles and better skin texture. Read More

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March 2019
1 Read

Skin Cancer in Hispanics in the United States

Authors:
Maritza I. Perez

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):s117-120

The Hispanic population has been the principal driver of U.S. demographic growth in the last two decades. Read More

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Disorders of Hypopigmentation

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):s115-s116

Hypopigmentation and depigmentation of the skin can be due to multiple causes and has a broad differential diagnosis. The most common cause of depigmentation worldwide is vitiligo. This disorder affects 1-2% of the world’s population and is seen in all races. Read More

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March 2019
1 Read

Over-the-Counter Hair Loss Treatments: Help or Hype?

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):312

This review of the current available OTC options is much appreciated in the December 2018 article by Bater and Rieder, however, most of the products mentioned have no current research or data in the past decade except for the supplements. In this field of alopecia, supplement data is expanding rapidly. Read More

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March 2019
3 Reads

Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Leg Successfully Treated With an Oral Retinoid and a Bi-layered Skin Substitute

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):301-302

Erosive pustular dermatosis is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterized by crusted erosions, sterile pustules, skin atrophy, and scarring alopecia. Cases of involvement of lower extremities, with or without scalp lesions, have been scarcely reported in the literature, and have been denominated Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Legs. The disorder usually affects elderly patients associated with chronic venous insufficiency and venous dermatitis. Read More

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March 2019
1 Read

Efficacy of a Once-Daily Fixed Combination Halobetasol (0.01%) and Tazarotene (0.045%) Lotion in the Treatment of Localized Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):297-299

Recently, clinical data on 8 weeks’ once-daily treatment of localized moderate-to-severe psoriasis with a novel fixed combination halobetasol propionate 0.01%/tazarotene 0.045% (HP/TAZ) lotion were published. Read More

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Clinical Evidence of Dermal and Epidermal Restructuring from a Biologically Active Growth Factor Serum for Skin Rejuvenation

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):290-295

Background: Topical skin care products use various technologies to promote skin repair. Growth factors of human, animal, and plant-derived origins have clinically demonstrated the ability to repair skin by promoting collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production to reconstruct and reinforce skin’s extracellular matrix (ECM). Human skin cells respond to instructions from highly specialized proteins or hormones referred to as growth factors. Read More

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0.5% 5-Fluorouracil/10% Salicylic Acid for the Treatment of Distal Actinic Keratoses Under Daily Practice Conditions

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):285-288

Background: Actinic keratosis (AKs) are sun-induced skin lesions that are at risk to progress to invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Treatments have shown to be effective on face or balding scalp area but limited data support their efficacy on distal extremities. Objective: To describe the efficacy of 0. Read More

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Assessing the Synergistic Effect of a Fixed Combination Halobetasol Propionate 0.01% and Tazarotene 0.045% Lotion in Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):279-284.

Background: Fixed combinations are commonplace in dermatology, providing significant efficacy and tolerability benefits. In some cases, two active ingredients complement each other providing a cumulative or additive effect. In rarer cases, a synergistic effect may be seen where the sum of the two active ingredients combined action is greater than the sum of the efficacy of the constituent parts. Read More

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March 2019
5 Reads

Combination of Fractional Resurfacing and Dermabrasion Techniques to Improve Aesthetic Outcomes of Facial Grafts

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):274-275

The use of full-thickness skin grafts (FTSG) in facial reconstruction during dermatologic surgery is well-established. Surgical sites that commonly receive a skin graft include the scalp, nose and ear Read More

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March 2019
4 Reads

The Use of Deoxycholic Acid for the Clinical Reduction of Excess Submental Fat in Indian Patients

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):266-272

Copy: The injectable adipocytolytic drug deoxycholic acid (DCA) is the first pharmacological intervention approved for the reduction of submental fat (SMF) and offers an alternative to invasive measures to improve the submental profile and the cervico-mental angle. DCA injection (ATX-101, Kybella [United States], Belkyra [Canada]; Kythera Biopharmaceuticals, Inc., Westlake Village, CA, acquired by Allergan, Inc. Read More

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Dual Immunostaining With SOX10 and AE1/AE3 to Confirm Perineural Invasion on Mohs Sections

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):262-264

Perineural invasion (PNI) is associated with high risk keratinocyte carcinomas. Identification of PNI during Mohs surgery is important for staging and post-adjuvant treatment decisions but can be challenging. To confirm or exclude PNI suspected on hematoxylin and eosin sections, we performed immunohistochemical double staining on Mohs frozen sections. Read More

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The Role of Topical Retinoids in Prevention and Treatment of Atrophic Acne Scarring: Understanding the Importance of Early Effective Treatment

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):255-260

Atrophic acne scarring is a frequent occurrence among acne patients. These facial marks are often very emotionally distressing for the patient and can result in adverse impact to quality of life. While most clinicians consider scarring as a sequela of moderate to severe acne, recent studies have found that scars are also associated with mild acne. Read More

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Pseudofolliculitis Barbae: A Review of Current Treatment Options

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):246-250

The purpose of this review is to discuss the disease process and wide variety of treatment options for psuedofolliculitis barbae (PFB), or razor bumps. PFB is caused by hair follicles penetrating the skin and causing an inflammatory response. PFB can occur to anyone who shaves, and is more likely in those with curly hair. Read More

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Treating Acne With Topical Antibiotics: Current Obstacles and the Introduction of Topical Minocycline as a New Treatment Option

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):240-244

Oral antibiotics are well established treatments for acne vulgaris but are associated with undesirable side effects. Topical antibiotics offer an improved safety profile but have led to an alarming rise in worldwide P. acnes resistance. Read More

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March 2019
1 Read

Low Dose Naltrexone in Dermatology

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):235-238

Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) has been successfully studied as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory therapy in a wide range of conditions including Crohn’s disease, fibromyalgia, major depressive disorder, cancer, chronic regional pain syndrome, Charcot-Marie-Tooth, and multiple sclerosis.1-5 Recently, off label LDN has been shown to improve dermatologic conditions such as systemic sclerosis, Hailey-Hailey Disease, lichen planopilaris, and guttate psoriasis.6-9 In this article, we examine the existing evidence for use of LDN in skin disease and discuss its potential application in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD). Read More

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March 2019
3 Reads

Onset of Action of Antipsoriatic Drugs for Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis: An Update

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Mar;18(3):229-233

Objectives: The time that drugs for moderate-to-severe psoriasis take to see a clinically meaningful improvement (TOA) is one of the most important attributes of treatment success. This study synthesizes TOA data from previously reviewed drugs and adds clinical data for tidrakizumab and certolizumab pegol for comparison. Methods: We reviewed published and presented efficacy data regarding TOA, which was defined as the time at which 25% of the sample population reached Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) 75 or the time at which the sample population reached a mean PASI 50. Read More

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March 2019
4 Reads

Topical Treatment for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(s2):s112-s116

Atopic dermatitis affects up to 20% of children and continues to increase in prevalence. Effective disease control is aimed at decreasing symptoms and reducing the frequency of flares, which may be complicated by secondary bacterial infections. Although recent advances have produced a number of non-systemic treatment options, topical corticosteroids remain a fundamental component of treatment algorithms. Read More

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February 2019
4 Reads

Management of Atopic Dermatitis

Authors:
Leon H. Kircik

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2s):s111

Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is estimated to affect 15-20% of children and remains a major health consideration for pediatricians and dermatologists.1 Over the past three decades, studies have shown an increase in the prevalence of AD in industrialized nations, with lower numbers seen in developing countries.2 Read More

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February 2019
1 Read

The Clinical Relevance and Therapeutic Benefit of Established Active Ingredients Incorporated into Advanced Foam Vehicles: Vehicle Characteristics Can Influence and Improve Patient Outcomes

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2s):s100-s107

Topical delivery of therapeutic agents for skin diseases is a major advantage in dermatology. However, the efficacy and tolerability of topically applied therapies is dependent on several characteristics, including percutaneous penetration and permeation of active ingredient and lack of side effects, especially local tolerability reactions. Importantly, the ultimate performance of a topical product includes collectively the effects of the active ingredient and the impact that specific additives have on vehicle characteristics, such as penetration, permeation, epidermal barrier properties, relative irritancy, allergenicity potential, and patient acceptance/preference of the vehicle formulation used. Read More

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February 2019
1 Read

Vehicles Always Matter

Authors:
Leon H. Kircik

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2s):s99

It has been said that the best treatment for a given patient is the one that the patient will actually use. The comment, often spoken with humor, actually underscores several important aspects of dermatology care today. Foremost is the fact that patient adherence (as influenced by their satisfaction with treatment) is a critical driver of clinical success. Read More

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February 2019
11 Reads

Vesiculobullous Darier Disease Symptomatically Responsive to Cetirizine

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2):213-214

Darier disease is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis of abnormal keratinization characterized by hyperkeratotic papules and plaques with a predilection for seborrheic areas. We report a case of a rare vesiculobullous variant of treatment-resistant Darier disease in a 55-year-old woman that failed topical tacrolimus and topical and oral glucocorticoids. Cetirizine was initiated at 10 mg daily and increased to 40 mg daily over four weeks, with resultant marked improvement of the patient’s burning sensation. Read More

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February 2019
8 Reads
1.320 Impact Factor

A Case of Complete Resolution of Severe Plantar Dyshidrotic Eczema With Dupilumab

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2):211-212

A 44-year-old woman with a history of asthma, hypercholesterolemia, and impaired glucose tolerance presented with severely painful and intensely pruritic plantar dermatitis for more than two years that impaired her ability to walk. Read More

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February 2019
2 Reads

Pustular DRESS Syndrome Secondary to Hydroxychloroquine With EBV Reactivation

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2):207-209

Background: Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS syndrome) or drug-induced hypersensitivity (DIHS) is a rare and feared complication of frequently used medications such as anticonvulsants, sulfonamides, and allopurinol. To date, no reports of hydroxychloroquine-induced pustular DRESS syndrome have been associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation nor imitated other cutaneous adverse drug reactions as in our patient. Observation: A 56-year-old female presented with a diffuse cutaneous eruption involving the face, trunk, extremities, and palms approximately two weeks after the initiation of hydroxychloroquine therapy for a suspected Sjögren's-like process with inflammatory cervical lymphadenopathy. Read More

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February 2019
18 Reads

Applications of Topical Oak Bark Extract in Dermatology: Clinical Examples and Discussion

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2):203-206

The versatility of wound healing and anti-inflammatory agents can be assets to dermatologists when other therapies lack appropriate mechanisms of action, or when the risk to benefit ratio may be in question. Bensal HP ointment is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent with in vitro activity against important pathogens such as MRSA and gram-negative bacteria, some fungal strains, and yeasts.1 Based on the physiochemical composition of Bensal HP ointment, and its impact after application to skin, there are many potentially benefits derived from the formulation stability. Read More

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February 2019
1 Read

Cortexolone 17α-Propionate (Clascoterone) is an Androgen Receptor Antagonist in Dermal Papilla Cells In Vitro

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2):197-201

Cortexolone 17α-propionate (clascoterone) is a novel androgen antagonist that is currently being analyzed in a large phase 2 clinical trial for the topical treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA). While the pathogenesis of AGA is still debated, the consensus is that AGA is an androgen-dependent hair disorder with strong genetic links, and that the testosterone metabolite, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), plays a causal role in its development. DHT binds to the androgen receptor (AR) in scalp dermal papilla cells (DPC) to induce AR-mediated transcription of genes that contribute to AGA in genetically predisposed individuals. Read More

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February 2019
10 Reads

Tavaborole 5% Topical Solution for the Treatment of Toenail Onychomycosis in Pediatric Patients: Results from a Phase 4 Open-Label Study

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2):190-195

Background: This study was designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and efficacy of tavaborole in pediatric patients. Study Design: In this open-label, single-arm study, pediatric patients (aged 6 to <17 years) with distal subungual onychomycosis affecting ≥20% of the target great toenail applied tavaborole once daily to all affected toenails (2 drops/great toenail, 1 drop/other toenail) for 48 weeks. In addition, a maximal-use subgroup (aged 12 to <17 years) applied tavaborole to all 10 toenails and ≤2 mm of surrounding skin for the first 28 days. Read More

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February 2019
1 Read

Novel Tretinoin 0.05% Lotion for the Once-daily Treatment of Moderate-to-Severe Acne Vulgaris in an Adult and Adolescent Female Population

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2):178-188

Background: Acne vulgaris (acne) is a common dermatological condition typically associated with adolescents, affecting about 85% of young people. However, it is also prevalent and persistent into adulthood, particularly in females. The efficacy of tretinoin in acne is well documented with large pivotal studies. Read More

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February 2019
7 Reads

Apremilast for the Treatment of Mild-to-Moderate Hidradenitis Suppurativa in a Prospective, Open-Label, Phase 2 Study

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2):170-176

Background: Treatment options are limited for patients with hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, may offer an attractive therapeutic option for patients with mild-to-moderate HS. Methods: This open-label, phase 2 clinical trial enrolled adults (≥18 years of age) with mild-to-moderate HS. Read More

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February 2019
2 Reads

A Review of the Dermatologic Symptoms of Idiopathic Mast Cell Activation Syndrome

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2):162-168

Since the first reported cases in 2007, idiopathic mast cell activation syndrome has been increasingly recognized. Understanding of the cutaneous manifestations of this condition is imperative for dermatologists given the substantial clinical heterogeneity in its presentation and high estimated prevalence. A review of PubMed® and SCOPUS® databases was performed in order to investigate the most common dermatologic manifestations of idiopathic mast cell activation syndrome. Read More

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February 2019
4 Reads

The Efficacy of Topical Minoxidil for Non-Scarring Alopecia: A Systematic Review

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2):155-160

Introduction: Topical minoxidil is the first-line therapy for treating both male and female androgenetic alopecia. Currently there are no comprehensive reviews on the clinical efficacy of minoxidil on hair loss. Method: A literature search was conducted to identify clinically relevant studies regarding the efficacy of topical minoxidil for human subjects for hair loss. Read More

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February 2019
3 Reads

Is It Time to Rethink What Thickness Really Means as a Prognostic Indicator in Melanoma? Ten Questions We Should Be Asking Ourselves

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2):148-151

Tumor thickness has been a key tool for prognosis of melanoma. However, with the advent of gene expression profile (GEP) assays for melanoma and the discovery of multiple melanoma subtypes, it is time to reassess how we view tumor thickness as a prognostic indicator.Herein we present ten questions for consideration by the shrewd practitioner when considering prognostic factors of melanoma. Read More

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February 2019
3 Reads

Natural Skin Care Products as Adjunctive to Prescription Therapy in Moderate to Severe Rosacea

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 02;18(2):141-146

Background: Rosacea is characterized by irritation associated with erythema, telangiectasias and papules/pustules. Whole formula nature-based sensitive skin products are formulated to maintain skin barrier and appropriate hydration that can lead to soothing benefits. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of a regimen consisting of a cleanser containing natural oils, beeswax, and witch hazel and day and night creams containing natural oils, glycerin, and botanical anti-inflammatories (NR); and a synthetic dermatologist-recommended regimen of cetyl alcohol, sodium lauryl sulphate-containing cleanser, and glycerin, polyisobutene-containing lotion (CR) in subjects with rosacea. Read More

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February 2019
4 Reads

Histopathology of Basal Cell Carcinoma After Treatment With Vismogedib

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 Feb;18(2):136-138

Background: Vismodegib used in the treatment of metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or locally advanced, recurrent BCC not amenable to surgery or radiation leads to various clinical changes. Objective: Aim was to elucidate the histopathology that corresponds to tumor involution observed with vismodegib therapy. Methods: Retrospective case series of patients treated with vismodegib between May 2012 and April 2017 with intra- or post-treatment biopsy. Read More

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February 2019
2 Reads

Superficial Radiation Therapy: A Viable Nonsurgical Option for Treating Basal and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lower Extremities

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 02;18(2):130-134

Background: Superficial radiation therapy (SRT) is a nonsurgical method of treating basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) lesions on the lower extremities of older individuals that might otherwise suffer complications or prolonged healing following surgical intervention. Objective: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SRT for treating BCC and SCC lesions on the lower extremities of elderly patients in an outpatient clinic setting. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed using data from consecutive patients with BCC and SCC on their lower extremities and were treated with SRT. Read More

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February 2019
1 Read

Systemic Therapies for Moderate-to-Severe Atopic Dermatitis: Expert Perspectives in Practice

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 02;18(2):122-129

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects around 13% of children and 7% of adults in the US. It can have a significant impact on the quality of life (QoL) of affected individuals due to pruritus and the visibility of lesions on the skin. AD is increasingly recognized as a systemic disease, since dysregulation of the adaptive and innate immune systems plays a key role in the underlying disease pathogenesis, which has important implications for how the condition is treated. Read More

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February 2019
1 Read

Principles of Moisturizer Product Design

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 01;18(1s):s89-95

Moisturizers provide significant benefit in dermatology – as adjuvant therapy for many clinical conditions, as a key player in anti-aging regimens, and as a core component in maintaining healthy skin barrier function. Although they have been a mainstay for decades, lotions and creams are no longer formulated with a one-size-fits-all approach, where thickness was the primary cue for efficacy. In fact, moisturizer design today has become an art as well as a science. Read More

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January 2019
11 Reads

Recent Advances in Mild and Moisturizing Cleansers

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 01;18(1s):s80-88

Mild and moisturizing cleanser technologies, and the science underpinning them, have progressed significantly over the past decade. This includes introduction of amino-acid based milder surfactants into the cleansing arena, a deeper understanding of the roles of stratum corneum lipids and proteins in their interaction with cleanser surfactants, the role of pH in skin cleansing, and the development of improved methodologies for predicting skin irritation and drying potential of cleansers. In this paper, the recent advances in these areas as well as newer technologies are reviewed, and the future directions are outlined. Read More

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January 2019

The Importance of Understanding Consumer Preferences for Dermatologist Recommended Skin Cleansing and Care Products

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 01;18(1s):s75-79

Dermatologist recommendations of skin care products are critical to the management of compromised and healthy skin and appreciated by patients. Professionals must carefully weigh not only the safety and efficacy but also the aesthetics of products if they are to achieve the desired outcome of satisfied patients. This article elucidates the relevance of product sensory characteristics and consumer preferences, with specific focus on what appeals to men vs. Read More

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January 2019

The Spectrum of Sensitive Skin: Considerations for Skin Care in Vulnerable Populations

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 01;18(1s):s68-74

Sensitive skin is a multifactorial condition, where the underlying pathology is not fully understood, and the clinical signs may not always be present or obvious. Despite this challenge, there has been recent progress to understand the different subtypes of sensitive skin, as well as new methods to measure the sensorial response that may not be obvious from visual examination. Similarly, there has been progress in understanding in the management of symptoms through skin care regimens designed for sensitive skin. Read More

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January 2019

Skin Barrier Insights: From Bricks and Mortar to Molecules and Microbes

Authors:
Carol A. Bosko

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 01;18(1s):s63-67

Recent advances in genomics, spectroscopy, and immunology have increased our understanding of the skin barrier. A new model of barrier lipid organization has emerged owing to the application of advanced modeling and microscopy techniques. The contribution of filaggrin gene mutations to atopic dermatitis has increased our appreciation of the role barrier perturbations play in inflammatory dermatoses. Read More

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January 2019
13 Reads

Concurrent Scabies Incognito and Crusted Scabies With Scalp Lesions Masquerading as Erythrodermic Dermatitis: Scabies Surrepticius in an Immunosuppressed Nonagenarian With Hyperkeratotic Plaques on her Head

Authors:
Philip R. Cohen

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 01;18(1):105

I read with interest the excellent report by Tolkachjhov et al1 that describes the delay in diagnosis of a scabies infestation in a 90-year-old woman. Her condition mimicked dermatitis not only on clinical presentation but also on evaluation of skin biopsies. Read More

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January 2019
3 Reads

Bullous Pemphigoid Associated With a New Combination Checkpoint Inhibitor Immunotherapy

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 01;18(1):103-104

Novel immunotherapies including antibodies to programmed death ligand 1 (PD-1) and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) have become common therapies for neoplasms including metastatic melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Dermatologic toxicity is the most common adverse event associated with these immunotherapies. We report a case of bullous pemphogoid (BP) in a patient receiving combination durvalumab and tremelimumab, two newer immunotherapy checkpoint inhibitors under investigation in phase III trials. Read More

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January 2019
14 Reads

Managing the Aesthetic Patient

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 01;18(1):92-102

wide variety of therapeutic options, some challenges have arisen: designing an adequate treatment plan, electing the most suitable procedures for the patient, taking into consideration the rheological characteristics of the products, considering the amount needed to achieve a natural look, but also defining the safest way to deliver the treatment. Aging of the facial structural tissue layers occurs at a different pace and the requirements for the aesthetic approach of a 30-year-old patient are different from a 60-year-old patient. A group of twelve experts in minimally invasive injectable procedures sought to identify common changes observed in different age groups in order to help in establishing a plan of treatment for patients of different ages. Read More

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January 2019
3 Reads

Open-Label, Post-Marketing Study to Evaluate the Performance and Safety of Calcium Hydroxylapatite With Integral Lidocaine to Correct Facial Volume Loss

Authors:
Gabriele F. Muti

J Drugs Dermatol 2019 01;18(1):86-91

Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA, Radiesse®) with integral 0.3% lidocaine (CaHA(+)) has recently been approved for use in aesthetic medicine. This study assessed the performance of CaHA(+) in subjects undergoing treatment for facial volume loss and evaluated subject and physician satisfaction. Read More

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January 2019
17 Reads