467 results match your criteria Journal of Clinical Engineering [Journal]


Medical computing over the World Wide Web: use of forms and CGI scripts for constructing medical algorithm Web pages.

J Clin Eng 1997 Nov-Dec;22(6):419-34

Department of Anaesthesia, Toronto Hospital, Ontario, Canada.

The development of the World Wide Web has led to an explosion of educational and clinical resources available via the Internet with minimal effort or special training. However, most of these Web pages contain only static information; few offer dynamic information shaped around clinical or laboratory test findings. In this report we show how this goal can be achieved with the design and construction of Medical Algorithm Web Pages (MAWP). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 1998
2 Reads

Utilization of the Internet to deliver educational materials to healthcare professionals.

J Clin Eng 1997 Nov-Dec;22(6):413-8

Department of Osteopathic Surgical Specialties, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA.

We have developed a computer-based learning module which uses three-dimensional animation sequences to enhance the acquisition of physical concepts and skills necessary for clinical evaluation and treatment of the cervical spine. This teaching tool, designed to serve as an adjunct to teaching strategies that faculty may be currently using, is available to students through the Kobiljak Resource Center at Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine (MSUCOM) and via the Internet (http:/(/)hal.bim. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 1998
3 Reads

Computer-aided learning--a solution for the training needs of users & maintainers of medical equipment.

J Clin Eng 1997 Nov-Dec;22(6):406-12

Department of Medical Electronics and Physics, St. Bartholomew's & The Royal London School of Medicine & Dentistry, Queen Mary & Westfield College, London, UK.

It can be argued that the strategic role of training and assessment in the use and maintenance of medical equipment for the delivery of safe and efficient healthcare is underestimated. While there has been frequent comment on this issue, the resources provided for this activity are most often insufficient. New methods are required to deliver regular, cost-effective training within the working environment, at the time and place of need. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 1998
19 Reads

A study on the current situation in the biomedical technology and clinical engineering sector in Bulgaria--advances, trends and needs.

J Clin Eng 1997 Nov-Dec;22(6):391-9

Institute of Biomedical Technology, Patras, Greece.

A survey of the clinical engineering sector in Bulgaria was carried out, within the context of the 1996 Phare Partnership Program, with the aim to provide a reflection of the current situation concerning the management of biomedical technology and investigate the relevant needs in hospitals. The survey was initiated by the Institute of Biomedical Technology (INBIT) in Patras, Greece, with the active support of national organizations, educational institutions and other parties that share involvement in the overall management of medical devices in Bulgaria. This paper summarizes the results of the survey, giving an insight into the situation in the field and providing the basis for a more thorough study on the Biomedical Technology and Clinical Engineering sectors in Bulgaria. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 1998
3 Reads

Technology assessment--a survey of the clinical engineer's role within the hospital.

J Clin Eng 1997 Nov-Dec;22(6):373-82

St. Joseph Regional Health Center, Bryan, TX, USA.

Advancements in technology are vital to improve clinical outcomes within the medical community and, in particular, to healthcare systems. The need for a systematic approach to analyzing, assessing and selecting the best new technology for individual hospitals continues to increase in response to this technological growth. To determine the use of technology assessment, the effectiveness of different methods, and the role of clinical engineers and bioengineers in this process, a survey was conducted of clinical engineering departments throughout the United States. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 1998
4 Reads

Development of a new Clinical Engineering Management Tool & Information System (CLE-MANTIS).

J Clin Eng 1997 Sep-Oct;22(5):342-9

Institute of Biomedical Technology Patras, Greece.

The evolution of the field of biomedical technology has led to the diffusion of an impressive number of medical devices into healthcare institutions. In this environment, Clinical Engineering Departments (CEDs) are expanding their role in healthcare technology management, by changing their structure and introducing quality systems in order to improve their services and monitor the outcomes. In the framework of the national project BIOTECHNET II, a software tool for the management of biomedical technology, named CLE-MANTIS, has been developed, with the aim to assist CEDs in their tasks. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1998
6 Reads

A new model to estimate the appropriate staff for a clinical engineering department.

J Clin Eng 1997 Sep-Oct;22(5):335-41

Università degli Studi di Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

This study points out that the Clinical Engineering Department (CED) can provide expertise for the improvement of healthcare services if the size of the CED is appropriately determined; that is when the number of engineers, technicians and administrative staff is suitable for the activities that they are intended to carry out and for the amount of equipment they must manage. The paper presents a simple and flexible model where the staff is estimated according to the activities that need to be carried out by the CED and according to the amount of biomedical equipment being managed. Several examples of application and comparisons with the results provided by other models are reported and discussed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1998
3 Reads

Effective communication and supervision in the biomedical engineering department.

J Clin Eng 1997 Sep-Oct;22(5):328-34

Biomedical Engineering Department, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

It is important for biomedical engineering supervisors to master the art of effective communication. Supervisors who have effective communication skills can successfully initiate creative programs and generate a harmonious working atmosphere. Using effective communication, they can promote good working conditions, such as high morale, worker initiative and loyalty to the department, which are almost impossible to measure but imperative for a successful department. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1998
4 Reads

Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. Part 2: Neurophysiological background.

J Clin Eng 1997 Sep-Oct;22(5):321-7

Department of Neurosurgery, University of Texas-Houston Medical School, USA.

Continuous intraoperative monitoring of neurophysiological signals provides a reliable way to determine the functional integrity of the nervous system during the course of neurological, orthopedic, or vascular surgery. To understand the use of electrophysiological recording in the operating room, the basic mechanisms that give rise to the recorded signals are briefly reviewed. Additionally, the equipment necessary for proper signal recording and presentation of the results is described. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1998
3 Reads

Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. Part 1: General overview.

J Clin Eng 1997 Sep-Oct;22(5):316-20

University of Texas-Houston Medical School, USA.

Intraoperative electrophysiological recordings are gradually becoming part of standard medical practice, mainly because they offer an objective and effective way to assess the functional integrity of the nervous system of a patient during the course of an orthopedic, neurological, or vascular surgery. Continuous monitoring of spontaneous and triggered bioelectrical activity not only can avert damage of neurological structures that are at risk during certain surgical maneuvers, but also allows identification of specific neuronal structures and landmarks that cannot be easily recognized on anatomical grounds only. This series on neurophysiological monitoring will introduce various techniques of monitoring available today, the rationale for their intraoperative use, and the main principles on which they are based. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1998
4 Reads

Directory of CE and biomedical organizations.

Authors:

J Clin Eng 1997 Jul-Aug;22(4):260-1

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 1997
2 Reads

Establishment of a clinical engineering department in a Venezuelan national reference hospital.

J Clin Eng 1997 Jul-Aug;22(4):239-48

Department of Technology of Biological Processes, Simón Bolívar University, Caracas, Venezuela.

Since 1976, Clinical Engineering (CE) has been studied at the Simón Bolívar University (USB) as part of the Bioengineering Studies program developed at that University. However, it was not until 1996 that Clinical Engineering activities were established in a Venezuelan hospital. This paper describes how the USB, using its own human resources, has achieved the establishment of a Clinical Engineering Department in a national reference hospital for the first time. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 1997
2 Reads

1997 survey of salaries & responsibilities for hospital biomedical clinical engineering & technology personnel.

Authors:
G F Nighswonger

J Clin Eng 1997 Jul-Aug;22(4):214-32

The Journal of Clinical Engineering conducted its twelfth annual survey of the salaries paid to biomedical/clinical engineering and technology personnel in U.S. hospitals. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 1997
2 Reads

Using performance measurement to clean house.

Authors:
O R Keil

J Clin Eng 1997 May-Jun;22(3):132-3

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 1997
4 Reads

An evaluation of three oscillometric non-invasive blood pressure simulators.

J Clin Eng 1997 Mar-Apr;22(2):93-100

Department of Medical Physics and Medical Engineering, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Scotland.

A number of simulators have been developed for testing and evaluating oscillometric non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) monitors. These simulators may be used to assist with the routine and corrective maintenance of NIBP monitors; for training clinical staff in the use and limitations of oscillometric NIBP monitors; to complement clinical trials in the process of evaluating new NIBP monitors; and to assist with the development of new NIBP monitors. We assessed three NIBP simulators (Bio-Tek BP-Pump, Dynatech CuffLink, and Metron QA-1280A) in the light of these applications, considering such features as the ability to calibrate NIBP monitors; the range of simulated waveforms; weak and strong pulses and artifact; graphical displays of the cuff pressure and the oscillometric waveform; and the recording of performance measures of each NIBP determination such as determination time, inflation rate and peak cuff inflation pressure. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1997
8 Reads

Compliance with the ethylene oxide standard during exhaust system upgrade at a hospital sterilizer.

J Clin Eng 1997 Mar-Apr;22(2):119-25

SSM/Spotts, Stevens and McCoy, Inc., Reading, PA, USA.

This case study documents the problem-solving approach used to implement all pertinent sections of the Ethylene Oxide Standard (29 CFR 1910.1047) during an exhaust ventilation system upgrade at an ethylene oxide hospital sterilizer unit. The approach for implementation of the standard utilized the following methodology: A. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1997
1 Read

Economic and ethical considerations in managed care.

J Clin Eng 1997 Mar-Apr;22(2):113-8

Bioengineering Program, Texas A&M University, College Station, USA.

The growth of managed care has had a significant impact on the way hospitals provide medical services, the relationships between hospitals and physicians, and the relationships between providers and patients. This impact arises primarily from the economic constraints that managed care places on the provider. As hospital employees or contractors, and as consumers of health care services, clinical engineering personnel need to understand the effects of managed care on the hospital and the physician. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1997
3 Reads

Australian operating room registered nurse education: a national study comparing two types of healthcare technology.

J Clin Eng 1997 Mar-Apr;22(2):101-12

Centre for Research into Nursing and Health Care, University of South Australia, Underdale.

A random sample of operating room registered nurses (N = 258) working in hospitals throughout Australia was surveyed to compare how and what they initially learned about two types of healthcare technology--the count procedure and the electrosurgical unit (ESU)--and the consequences of their use. The most frequently identified method of initially learning to use both technologies was receiving instruction from a staff member on their unit. A comparison of what registered nurses initially learned about the technologies revealed that nurses were significantly more likely to learn more about the count procedure. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1997
1 Read

Defining the scope of an equipment management program.

Authors:
O R Keil

J Clin Eng 1997 Jan-Feb;22(1):6, 8

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 1997
2 Reads

Power quality issues and the effects on medical equipment.

Authors:
R Bert

J Clin Eng 1997 Jan-Feb;22(1):35-40

Providence St. Peter Hospital, Olympia, WA 98506, USA.

Power quality issues are becoming more important as more medical equipment utilizes microprocessor controls and switched DC power supplies. Externally and internally induced power surges and harmonics can have a dramatic effect on equipment performance. The effectiveness of a good "Equipment Management Program" can be greatly affected by poor power quality in today's hospitals. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 1997
5 Reads

Directory of CE & biomedical organizations.

Authors:

J Clin Eng 1997 Jan-Feb;22(1):28-9

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 1997
4 Reads

Protecting the immunocompromised patient: the role of the hospital clinical engineer.

Authors:
T J O'Dea

J Clin Eng 1996 Nov-Dec;21(6):466-82

University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinical, Minneapolis 55455, USA.

While the discipline of clinical engineering has long been limited to the area of medical equipment management, few areas in hospital engineering practice so closely meet the literal definition of "clinical" engineering as the care of the immunocompromised patient. Although ventilation has been the domain of the plant maintenance department, the increasing numbers of clinical engineers being given responsibility for plant functions, as well as the critical nature of the topic, make the care of the bone marrow transplant (BMT) patient an appropriate area of clinical engineering practice. Further, as clinical engineering branches out of the equipment management area, the clinical engineer can be truly termed the "hospital engineer". Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1997
1 Read

A network-based prototype for interactive telemedicine & automated management of distributed, clinical databases.

J Clin Eng 1996 Sep-Oct;21(5):383-91

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ, USA.

A network-based prototype has been developed to automate the process of generating and maintaining distributed databases of medical images and clinical reports, and for conducting interactive consultation among disparate clinical and research sites irrespective of the architecture of interacting computers. Pathologists routinely interpret gross and microscopic specimens to tender diagnoses and to engage in a broad spectrum of research. This assessment process leads to clinical decisions often limited by time constraints and by the availability of local expertise. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 1996
2 Reads

Validating the integrity of one-way check valves for the delivery of contrast solution to multiple patients.

J Clin Eng 1996 Sep-Oct;21(5):375-82

Toronto Hospital, Ontario, Canada.

The infusion of contrast solution into multiple patients from a single infusion bag is desired in clinics concerned with the high cost of the solution. Using one-way check valves in the infusion line is a protection method to reduce the risk of blood-borne cross-contamination. The suitability of this method is assessed through testing of the operating characteristics of the valves and infusion system and the high back pressure testing of the valves. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 1996
3 Reads

Can chaos theory be used to increase preventive maintenance effectiveness?

Authors:
W P Rice

J Clin Eng 1996 Jul-Aug;21(4):332-8

Saint Joseph's Hospital, Marshfield, WI, USA.

Clinical engineering programs typically establish the content and frequency of a device's inspection and preventive maintenance procedures at the time of implementation. In some programs, these are not altered throughout the device's useful life. In others, history data and traditional statistical methods are used to adapt procedures to change in risk measures. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1996
2 Reads

Biomedical engineering education in Canada, 1996.

J Clin Eng 1996 Jul-Aug;21(4):317-31

Division of Biomedical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.

This paper updates the information contained in a previously published paper, ¿Bioengineering Education in Canada, 1988,¿ which appeared in the Journal of Clinical Engineering (Volume 13, No. 5). It describes the current biomedical engineering and biomedical engineering technology programs available in Canada, but does not attempt to evaluate them. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1996
2 Reads

Technical note: Rationale, development, use and evaluation of an equipment management and image storage system.

Authors:
J Klepper G Geiger

J Clin Eng 1996 Jul-Aug;21(4):313-6

Jacobi Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA.

Lack of space and organization have become significant problems in the contemporary business world. Modern industries must eliminate mountains of paper and better organize themselves. With the incorporation of a fully automated equipment management system and image storage system, the Jacobi Medical Center has succeeded in correcting these problems. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1996
2 Reads

Developing an in-house software system for medical equipment inventory management.

Authors:
J C Taube D Cowden

J Clin Eng 1996 Jul-Aug;21(4):309-12

Wake Medical Center, Raleigh, NC, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1996
2 Reads

1996 survey of salaries & responsibilities for hospital biomedical/clinical engineering & technology personnel.

Authors:
G F Nighswonger

J Clin Eng 1996 Jul-Aug;21(4):291-308

The Journal of Clinical Engineering conducted its eleventh annual survey of the salaries paid to biomedical/clinical engineering and technology personnel in U.S. hospitals. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1996
4 Reads

Accreditation & clinical engineering.

Authors:
O R Keil

J Clin Eng 1996 Jul-Aug;21(4):258, 260

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1996
2 Reads

Development of a clinical internship program.

Authors:
C S Lessard N Cram

J Clin Eng 1996 May-Jun;21(3):245-9

Texas A&M University, College Station, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 1996
3 Reads

Examination of several instruments for the electrical detection of holes in latex gloves during use.

J Clin Eng 1996 May-Jun;21(3):212-25

Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545, USA.

The initial purpose of this research was to investigate the use of electrical conductivity for detecting holes in latex gloves, while they are being worn, using both recently developed devices and laboratory equipment. The individual devices were not evaluated or critically compared. The use of this technique as a quality assurance procedure, and to determine the degradation of latex gloves due to storage and exposure to disinfectants, was also investigated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 1996
3 Reads

Testing for EMC (electromagnetic compatibility) in the clinical environment.

J Clin Eng 1996 May-Jun;21(3):207-11

Biomedical Engineering Department, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, USA.

Testing for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) in the clinical environment introduces a host of complex conditions not normally encountered under laboratory conditions. In the clinical environment, various radio-frequency (RF) sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) may be present throughout the entire spectrum of interest. Isolating and analyzing the impact from the sources of interference to medical devices involves a multidisciplinary approach based on training in, and knowledge of, the following: operation of medical devices and their susceptibility to EMI; RF propagation modalities and interaction theory; spectrum analysis systems and techniques (preferably with signature analysis capabilities) and calibrated antennas; the investigation methodology of suspected EMC problems, and testing protocols and standards. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 1996
2 Reads

Electrosurgery smoke: hazards and protection.

J Clin Eng 1996 Mar-Apr;21(2):149-55

Toronto Hospital, Ontario, Canada.

Early discussion regarding smoke produced by both surgical lasers and electrosurgical machines concluded that the smoke produced by these instruments was little more than a malodorous nuisance. Animal and human studies to date, however, have suggested that this smoke is, indeed, dangerous. This smoke has been shown to be mutagenic and can contain bacteria and viruses, the HIV virus being the most notable. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1996
6 Reads

SMDA '90 (Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990): user facility requirements of the final medical device reporting regulation.

Authors:
M Shepherd

J Clin Eng 1996 Mar-Apr;21(2):114-48

DEVTEQ, Walnut Creek, CA, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1996
2 Reads

Quality in management of biomedical equipment.

J Clin Eng 1996 Mar-Apr;21(2):108-13

General Hospital of Bolzano, Italy.

The project described in this paper concerns the assurance of quality in biomedical equipment management. The project commenced in 1988 with the establishment of the Clinical Engineering Department at the General Hospital of Bolzano, which was entrusted with the task of managing all biomedical equipment installed within its health institutions. To ensure the systematic and organic management of biomedical technology, new technical and administrative procedures were introduced. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1996
14 Reads

Why bad things happen to good clinical engineers.

Authors:
D P Harrington

J Clin Eng 1996 Mar-Apr;21(2):105-7

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 1996
2 Reads

Contract management using cause-effect clues in service worksheets.

Authors:
J H Chen

J Clin Eng 1996 Jan-Feb;21(1):51-4

National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine, Taipei.

Sophisticated equipment often needs intensive technical resources to maintain its system availability. Service contracts can be an easy channel to outside technical resources. Usually, a service contract purchaser only sees its cost instead of its maintenance quality. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 1996
2 Reads

Use of an in-house-built ribavirin aerosol evacuation system to control incidental employee exposure to ribavirin aerosol.

J Clin Eng 1996 Jan-Feb;21(1):46-50

University of Alberta Hospitals, Edmonton, Canada.

Ongoing controversy regarding the hazards of exposure of healthcare workers to ribavirin aerosol led to the design and evaluation of a ribavirin aerosol evacuation system that scavenges the excess ribavirin. An oxyhood was placed within a croupette oxygen and cool mist tent. The tent was placed under negative pressure, using the hospital wall suction. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 1996
1 Read

Problems, perils, precautions and rewards in overseas clinical engineering training.

Authors:
G I Johnston

J Clin Eng 1996 Jan-Feb;21(1):41-5

Oregon Health Sciences University, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 1996
2 Reads

Clinical engineering in South Africa.

Authors:
G P Locke

J Clin Eng 1996 Jan-Feb;21(1):37-40

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 1996
2 Reads

Computerized maintenance management systems: how to match your department's needs with commercially available products.

Authors:
T Cohen

J Clin Eng 1995 Nov-Dec;20(6):457-68

University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.

Computerized maintenance management systems (CMMS) are used by clinical engineering departments to collect, store, analyze and report data on the repair and maintenance performed on medical devices and other equipment. Evaluation of commercial CMMS require a careful requirements analysis and then a comprehensive evaluation of the products available in the marketplace that can come the closest to meeting those requirements. This paper provides a comprehensive list of evaluation questions to use to determine the best software system for a clinical engineering department's needs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1996
2 Reads

The role of appropriate medical technology procurement and user maintenance instructions in developing countries.

Authors:
P D Lee

J Clin Eng 1995 Sep-Oct;20(5):407-13

King's Mill Centre for Healthcare Services (NHS Trust), Sutton-in-Ashfield, UK.

Reports bear witness that a significant proportion of all healthcare equipment in developing countries is not in use. There are many and varied reasons this, including inappropriateness or a lack of basic maintenance. This report addresses these issues, including guidelines for procurement staff and end-users and a bibliography. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1996
2 Reads

Airborne transmission of respiratory diseases.

Authors:
S A Baker

J Clin Eng 1995 Sep-Oct;20(5):401-6

Park Place Medical Center, Port Arthur, TX, USA.

In surveys during the past decade, CEs and BMETs have reported an increasing frequency of respiratory illnesses they believed to be acquired as a result of their occupation. These illnesses varied from mild to severe in terms of long-term prognosis. With the increasing numbers of cases of drug-resistant organisms, respiratory infections are a growing concern for healthcare workers, employers, and government officials. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1996
3 Reads

Advancing biomedical engineering in developing nations: Project HOPE and the potential impact of nongovernmental organizations.

J Clin Eng 1995 Sep-Oct;20(5):394-400

Project HOPE, Millwood, VA, USA.

Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have played a major role in the diffusion of biomedical engineering training to developing nations. This paper reviews the roles and unique attributes of NGOs in biomedical engineering training programs. The activities of one leading NGO in this field, Project HOPE, are discussed with examples drawn from around the world. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1996
3 Reads

Focus on: ORBIS International Flying Eye Hospital, Department of Technical Services.

J Clin Eng 1995 Sep-Oct;20(5):388-93

ORBIS International, New York City 10036, USA.

The ORBIS International Flying Eye Hospital is dedicated to restoring sight to the blind through medical education programs in developing countries. The modification of a DC-10 aircraft to house a teaching hospital for ophthalmic surgery involved a variety of engineering challenges to satisfy standards for both hospital and aircraft safety. The Technical Services Department maintains all medical equipment on the aircraft, encountering situations not found in traditional clinical engineering departments. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1996
4 Reads

Factors affecting film-screen mammographic image quality.

Authors:
J H Mathis

J Clin Eng 1995 Sep-Oct;20(5):376-87

Diagnostic Imaging Technical Education Center Inc., Beachwood, OH 44122, USA.

This paper discusses the technical aspects of mammographic image quality and the factors that affect it. Emphasis is placed on the role of the service professional and the challenges he or she faces as a result of implementation of the Mammography Quality Standards Act of 1992 (MQSA). The passage of the MQSA represented the first attempt to legislate diagnostic image quality. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1996
2 Reads

Radiology & imaging technology: every challenge an opportunity.

Authors:
G F Nighswonger

J Clin Eng 1995 Sep-Oct;20(5):373-5

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1996
3 Reads

A systems engineering approach to technology assessment.

Authors:
A T Crepea

J Clin Eng 1995 Jul-Aug;20(4):297-303

Kaiser Foundation Hospitals, Berkeley, CA 94710, USA.

This paper presents a technology assessment process based on systems engineering methodologies used in the aerospace and defense industries. Systems engineering, defined in the U.S. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1995
2 Reads