15,273 results match your criteria Journal of Cell Science [Journal]


Centriole assembly at a glance.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 20;132(4). Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.

The centriole organelle consists of microtubules (MTs) that exhibit a striking 9-fold radial symmetry. Centrioles play fundamental roles across eukaryotes, notably in cell signaling, motility and division. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster, we cover the cellular life cycle of this organelle - from assembly to disappearance - focusing on human centrioles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.228833DOI Listing
February 2019

Actin cytoskeleton self-organization in single epithelial cells and fibroblasts under isotropic confinement.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 20. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Mechanobiology Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore

Actin cytoskeleton self-organization in two cell types, fibroblasts and epitheliocytes, was studied in cells confined to isotropic adhesive islands. In fibroblasts plated onto islands of optimal size, an initially circular actin pattern evolves into a radial pattern of actin bundles that undergo asymmetric chiral swirling before finally producing parallel linear stress fibres. Epitheliocytes however, did not exhibit succession through all the actin patterns described above. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.220780DOI Listing
February 2019

LC3-associated phagocytosis at a glance.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 20;132(5). Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Department of Immunology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA

Classically, canonical autophagy has been considered a survival mechanism initiated in response to nutrient insufficiency. We now understand that autophagy functions in multiple scenarios where it is necessary to maintain homeostasis. Recent evidence has established that a variety of non-canonical functions for autophagy proteins are mechanistically and functionally distinct from autophagy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.222984DOI Listing
February 2019

Tau modulated Schwann cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation following peripheral nerve injury.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Key laboratory of neuroregeneration of Jiangsu and Ministry of Education, Co-innovation Center of Neuroregeneration, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu, China

Microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is essential for the assembly and stability of microtubule and the functional maintenance of the nervous system. Tau is abundant in neurons and detectable in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. However, whether tau existed in Schwann cells, the unique glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, remains unclear. Read More

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.222059
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.222059DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Arp2/3-branched actin regulates microtubule acetylation level and affects mitochondrial distribution.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Institute of Systems Biomedicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191, China

Actin and microtubule cytoskeletons regulate cell morphology, participate in organelle trafficking and function in response to diverse environmental cues. Precise spatial-temporal coordination between these two cytoskeletons is essential for cells to live and move. Here we report a novel cross-talk between actin and microtubules, in which the branched actin maintains microtubule organization, dynamics and stability by affecting tubulin acetylation level. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.226506DOI Listing
February 2019

The unfolded protein response in metazoan development.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 15;132(5). Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Cell Biology, New York University School of Medicine, 540 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016, USA

Eukaryotic cells respond to an overload of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by activating signaling pathways that are referred to as the unfolded protein response (UPR). Much UPR research has been conducted in cultured cells that exhibit no baseline UPR activity until they are challenged by ER stress initiated by chemicals or mutant proteins. At the same time, many genes that mediate UPR signaling are essential for the development of organisms ranging from and fish to mice and humans, indicating that there is physiological ER stress that requires UPR in normally developing animal tissues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.217216DOI Listing
February 2019

Meeting report - Building the Cell 2018.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 15;132(5). Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Centre for Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine, King's College London, London SE1 9RT, UK

Cell biologists from all around the world gathered in Paris on the 26 to 28 September 2018 to participate in the 3rd international meeting 'Building the Cell'. It was organized by Hélène Barelli, Arnaud Echard, Thierry Galli, Florence Niedergang, Manuel Théry and Marie Hélène Verlhac on behalf of the French Society for Cell Biology (SBCF) at the Institut Pasteur. Around 230 participants joined the meeting for stimulating talks, discussions, poster sessions, and a gala dinner on the Seine that included a music performance by the rock group 'Membrane Band'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.229765DOI Listing
February 2019

Cancer cells in the tumor core exhibit spatially coordinated migration patterns.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Institut Curie, PSL Research University, CNRS, UMR 144, F-75005 Paris, France.

In early stages of metastasis, cancer cells exit the primary tumor and enter the vasculature. Although most studies have focused on the tumor invasive front, cancer cells from the tumor core can also potentially metastasize. To address cell motility in the tumor core, we imaged tumor explants from spontaneously-forming tumors in real time using long-term two-photon microscopy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.220277DOI Listing
February 2019

Poly-ubiquitylation of α-tubulin at K304 is required for flagellar disassembly in .

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Key Laboratory of Algal Biology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430072, China

Cilia/flagella are structurally conserved and dynamic organelles; their assembly and disassembly are coordinated with the cell cycle and cell differentiation. Several post-translational modifications, including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitylation, participate in ciliary disassembly. However, the detailed mechanism and the role of ubiquitylation in ciliary disassembly are unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.229047DOI Listing
February 2019

VEGFR2 survival and mitotic signaling depends on joint-activation of associated C3ar1/C5ar1 and IL-6R-gp130.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH 44106, USA

Purified vascular endothelial cell (EC) growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) auto-phosphorylates upon VEGF-A occupation arguing that VEGR2 confers its mitotic and viability signaling in and of itself. Herein, we show that in ECs, VEGFR2 function requires concurrent C3a/C5a receptor (C3ar1/C5ar1) and IL-6 receptor (IL-6R)-gp130 co-signaling. C3ar1/C5ar1 or IL-6R blockade totally abolished VEGFR2 auto-phosphorylation, downstream Src, ERK, AKT, mTOR, and STAT3 activation, and EC cell cycle entry. Read More

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.219352
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.219352DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

An alternative membrane topology permits lipid droplet localization of peroxisomal fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory Internal Medicine IV, University of Heidelberg, Germany

Fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1 (Far1) is an ubiquitously expressed peroxisomal membrane protein generating fatty alcohols required for the biosynthesis of ether lipids.Lipid droplet localization of exogenously expressed and endogenous human Far1 was observed by fluorescence microscopy under conditions of increased triglyceride synthesis in tissue culture cells. This unexpected finding was supported further by correlative light electron microscopy and subcellular fractionation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.223016DOI Listing
February 2019

VAPB depletion alters neuritogenesis and phosphoinositide balance in motoneuron-like cells: relevance to VAPB-linked ALS.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Neuroscience Institute and BIOMETRA department, Università degli Studi di Mlano, Milano, Italy

VAPB and VAPA are ubiquitously expressed ER membrane proteins that play key roles in lipid exchange at membrane contact sites. A mutant, aggregation-prone, form of VAPB (P56S) is linked to a dominantly inherited form of ALS, however, it has been unclear whether its pathogenicity is due to toxic gain of function, to negative dominance, or simply to insufficient levels of the wild-type protein produced from a single allele (haploinsufficiency). To investigate whether reduced levels of functional VAPB, independently from the presence of the mutant form, affect the physiology of mammalian motoneuron-like cells, we generated NSC34 clones, from which VAPB was partially or nearly completely depleted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.220061DOI Listing
February 2019

Nuclear RNA foci from expansion mutation form paraspeckle-like bodies.

J Cell Sci 2019 02 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Biotechnology, Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia

The GGGGCC (GC) repeat expansion mutation in gene is the most common genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Transcription of the repeat and formation of nuclear RNA foci, which sequester specific RNA-binding proteins is one of the possible pathological mechanisms. Here, we show that (GC) repeat RNA predominantly associates with essential paraspeckle proteins SFPQ, NONO, RBM14, FUS and hnRNPH and co-localizes with known paraspeckle-associated RNA As formation of paraspeckles in motor neurons has been associated with early phases of ALS, we investigated the extent of similarity between paraspeckles and (GC) RNA foci. Read More

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.224303
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.224303DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Phosphorylation of the Bruchpilot N-terminus unlocks axonal transport of active zone building blocks.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Freie Universität Berlin, Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laboratory of Structural Biochemistry, Takustraβe 6, D-14195 Berlin, Germany

Protein scaffolds at presynaptic active zone membranes control information transfer at synapses. For scaffold biogenesis and maintenance, scaffold components must be safely transported along axons. A spectrum of kinases was suggested to control transport of scaffold components, but direct kinase/substrate relationships and operational principles steering phosphorylation-dependent active zone protein transport are presently unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.225151DOI Listing
February 2019

Synthetic lethality of cytolytic HSV-1 in cancer cells with ATRX and PML deficiency.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Cancer Research Unit, Children's Medical Research Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW 2145 Australia

Cancers that utilize the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) mechanism for telomere maintenance are often difficult to treat and have a poor prognosis. They are also commonly deficient for expression of ATRX protein, a repressor of ALT activity, and a component of PML nuclear bodies (PML NBs) which are required for intrinsic immunity to various viruses. Here we asked whether ATRX-deficiency creates a vulnerability in ALT cancer cells that could be exploited for therapeutic purposes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.222349DOI Listing
February 2019
5.432 Impact Factor

Excitable dynamics of Ras triggers spontaneous symmetry breaking of PIP3 signaling in motile cells.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043, Japan

Spontaneous cell movement is underpinned by an asymmetric distribution of signaling molecules including small G proteins and phosphoinositides on the cell membrane. A fundamental question lies in the molecular network for the spontaneous symmetry breaking. Here we report that spatiotemporal dynamics of GTP bound Ras (Ras-GTP) breaks the symmetry due to excitability even in the absence of extracellular spatial cues and downstream signaling activities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.224121DOI Listing
February 2019

Atrophy, oxidative switching and ultrastructural defects in skeletal muscle of Ataxia Telangiectasia mouse model.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Anatomical, Histological, Forensic and Orthopaedic Sciences, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy

Ataxia Telangiectasia is a rare, multi system disease caused by ATM kinase deficiency. knockout mice recapitulate premature aging, immunodeficiency, cancer predisposition, growth retardation and motor defects but not cerebellar neurodegeneration and ataxia. We explored if Atm loss is responsible of skeletal muscle defects by investigating myofiber morphology, oxidative/glycolytic activity, myocyte ultrastructural architecture and neuromuscular junctions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.223008DOI Listing
February 2019

Deficiency of Fhl2 leads to delayed neuronal cell migration and premature astrocyte differentiation.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Molecular Pediatrics, University Hospital Erlangen, 91054 Erlangen, Germany

Fhl2 (Four and a half LIM domain protein 2) is an adaptor protein capable of mediating protein-protein interactions. Here, we report for the first time phenotypic changes in the brain of Fhl2-deficient mice. We showed that: (i) Fhl2 is expressed in neural stem cells, precursors, and mature cells of the neuronal lineage; (ii) Fhl2 deficiency leads to delayed neuroblast migration , to (iii) premature astroglial differentiation of neural stem cells (NSC) , and to (iv) a gliosis-like accumulation of GFAP+ astrocytes that substantially increases with age. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.228940DOI Listing
February 2019

Podoplanin regulates the migration of mesenchymal stromal cells and their interaction with platelets.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) up-regulate podoplanin at sites of infection, chronic inflammation, and cancer. We investigated the functional consequences of podoplanin expression on the migratory potential of MSC and their interactions with circulating platelets. Expression of podoplanin significantly enhanced the migration of MSC compared to MSC lacking podoplanin. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.222067DOI Listing
February 2019

Reconstitution of cell migration at a glance.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11;132(4). Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Institut Curie, PSL Research University, CNRS, UMR 144, F-75005 Paris, France

Single cells migrate in a myriad of physiological contexts, such as tissue patrolling by immune cells, and during neurogenesis and tissue remodeling, as well as in metastasis, the spread of cancer cells. To understand the basic principles of single-cell migration, a reductionist approach can be taken. This aims to control and deconstruct the complexity of different cellular microenvironments into simpler elementary constrains that can be recombined together. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.225565DOI Listing
February 2019

Cell scientists to watch - Franziska Lautenschläger.

Authors:

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11;132(4). Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Franziska Lautenschläger studied physics at the University of Leipzig, Germany and Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse, France, before graduating with a physics diploma from Leipzig. For her PhD on mechanical changes during stem cell differentiation, she joined the laboratory of Jochen Guck at the University of Cambridge, UK. In 2011, Franziska moved to Paris, France, for her postdoctoral work on the migration of immune cells under confinement at the Institut Curie with supervisor Matthieu Piel. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.230151DOI Listing
February 2019

Interview with the Guest Editor - Manuel Théry.

Authors:

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11;132(4). Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Manuel Théry graduated from the Ecole Supérieure de Physique et Chimie de la ville de Paris (ESPCI-ParisTech) and the University Paris Diderot, France, with a master in physics and biology interfaces and subsequently obtained his PhD working with Michel Bornens on the control of cell polarity through adhesion at the Institut Curie, Paris. He joined the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) in Grenoble, France, where he set up the 'CytoMorphoLab' together with Laurent Blanchoin. Since 2014, Manuel has directed the Paris unit of this laboratory at the Hôpital Saint Louis, where he investigates the (self-)assembly of the cytoskeleton and how this orchestrates cell geometry and mechanical information in the cell. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.230144DOI Listing
February 2019

How does T cell receptor clustering impact on signal transduction?

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11;132(4). Epub 2019 Feb 11.

EMBL Australia Node in Single Molecule Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia

The essential function of the T cell receptor (TCR) is to translate the engagement of peptides on the major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) into appropriate intracellular signals through the associated cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3) complex. The spatial organization of the TCR-CD3 complex in the membrane is thought to be a key regulatory element of signal transduction, raising the question of how receptor clustering impacts on TCR triggering. How signal transduction at the TCR-CD3 complex encodes the quality and quantity of pMHC molecules is not fully understood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.226423DOI Listing
February 2019

Condensins and cohesins - one of these things is not like the other!

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 7;132(3). Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Biological Sciences, 111 Research Drive, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA

Condensins and cohesins are highly conserved complexes that tether together DNA loci within a single DNA molecule to produce DNA loops. Condensin and cohesin structures, however, are different, and the DNA loops produced by each underlie distinct cell processes. Condensin rods compact chromosomes during mitosis, with condensin I and II complexes producing spatially defined and nested looping in metazoan cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.220491DOI Listing
February 2019

The zinc-finger protein CLAMP promotes chromatin insulator function in .

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Nuclear Organization and Gene Expression Section, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland

Chromatin insulators are DNA-protein complexes that establish independent higher order DNA domains to influence transcription. Insulators are functionally defined by two different properties: they can block communication between an enhancer and a promoter and also act as a barrier between heterochromatin and euchromatin. In , the insulator complex contains three core components; Su(Hw), CP190 and Mod(mdg4)67. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.226092DOI Listing
February 2019

Ena orchestrates remodelling within the actin cytoskeleton to drive robust macrophage chemotaxis.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 18;132(5). Epub 2019 Feb 18.

School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TD, UK

The actin cytoskeleton is the engine that powers the inflammatory chemotaxis of immune cells to sites of tissue damage or infection. Here, we combine genetics with live imaging to investigate how cytoskeletal rearrangements drive macrophage recruitment to wounds in We find that the actin-regulatory protein Ena is a master regulator of lamellipodial dynamics in migrating macrophages, where it remodels the cytoskeleton to form linear filaments that can then be bundled together by the cross-linker Fascin (also known as Singed in flies). In contrast, the formin Dia generates rare, probing filopods for specialised functions that are not required for migration. Read More

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.224618
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.224618DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

More from less - bottom-up reconstitution of cell biology.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 4;132(4). Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, 82152 Martinsried, Germany

The ultimate goal of bottom-up synthetic biology is recreating life in its simplest form. However, in its quest to find the minimal functional units of life, this field contributes more than its main aim by also offering a range of tools for asking, and experimentally approaching, biological questions. This Review focusses on how bottom-up reconstitution has furthered our understanding of cell biology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.227488DOI Listing
February 2019

A SEPT1-based scaffold is required for Golgi integrity and function.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 1;132(3). Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) Berlin, Molecular Pharmacology and Cell Biology, 13125 Berlin, Germany

Compartmentalization of membrane transport and signaling processes is of pivotal importance to eukaryotic cell function. While plasma membrane compartmentalization and dynamics are well known to depend on the scaffolding function of septin GTPases, the roles of septins at intracellular membranes have remained largely elusive. Here, we show that the structural and functional integrity of the Golgi depends on its association with a septin 1 (SEPT1)-based scaffold, which promotes local microtubule nucleation and positioning of the Golgi. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.225557DOI Listing
February 2019

Influence of the extracellular matrix on cell-intrinsic circadian clocks.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 1;132(3). Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Wellcome Centre for Cell-Matrix Research and Manchester Breast Centre, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK

Cell-autonomous circadian clocks coordinate tissue homeostasis with a 24-hourly rhythm. The molecular circadian clock machinery controls tissue- and cell type-specific sets of rhythmic genes. Disruptions of clock mechanisms are linked to an increased risk of acquiring diseases, especially those associated with aging, metabolic dysfunction and cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.207498DOI Listing
February 2019

PIKfyve complex regulates early melanosome homeostasis required for physiological amyloid formation.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Structure and Membrane Compartments, Institut Curie, Paris Sciences & Lettres Research University, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR144, Paris, France

The metabolism of PI(3,5)P2 is regulated by the PIKfyve, VAC14 and FIG4 complex, whose mutations are associated with hypopigmentation in mice. These pigmentation defects indicate a key but yet unexplored physiological relevance of this complex in the biogenesis of melanosomes. Here we show that PIKfyve activity regulates formation of amyloid matrix composed of PMEL protein within early endosomes, called stage I melanosomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.229500DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Necroptotic MLKL attenuates autophagy following its translocation to intracellular membranes.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Cell Signalling and Cell Death Division, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, 1G Royal Parade, Melbourne, Victoria 3052, Australia

Necroptosis is an inflammatory form of programmed cell death mediated by the pseudokinase mixed-lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL). Upon phosphorylation by receptor-interacting protein kinase-3 (RIPK3), MLKL oligomerizes, and translocates to and disrupts the plasma membrane, thereby causing necroptotic cell lysis. Herein, we show that activation of necroptosis in mouse dermal fibroblasts (MDFs) and HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells results in accumulation of the autophagic marker, lipidated LC3B, in an MLKL-dependent manner. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.220996DOI Listing
February 2019

Tissue-type plasminogen activator regulates p35-mediated Cdk5 activation in the postsynaptic terminal.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Division of Neuropharmacology and Neurologic Diseases, Yerkes National Primate Research Center; Atlanta, GA, USA

Neuronal depolarization induces the synaptic release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). Cyclin dependent kinase-5 (Cdk5) is a member of the family of cyclin-dependent kinases that regulates cell migration and synaptic function in postmitotic neurons. Cdk5 is activated by its binding to p35, a membrane-anchored protein that is rapidly degraded by the proteasome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.224196DOI Listing
February 2019

IFT25 is required for the construction of the trypanosome flagellum.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 22;132(5). Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Sorbonne université, École doctorale complexité du vivant, ED 515, 7 Quai Saint-Bernard, case 32, 75252 Paris cedex 05, France

Intraflagellar transport (IFT), the movement of protein complexes responsible for the assembly of cilia and flagella, is remarkably conserved from protists to humans. However, two IFT components (IFT25 and IFT27) are missing from multiple unrelated eukaryotic species. In mouse, IFT25 (also known as HSPB11) and IFT27 are not required for assembly of several cilia with the noticeable exception of the flagellum of spermatozoa. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.228296DOI Listing
February 2019

A Cdc42 GEF, Gef1, through endocytosis organizes F-BAR Cdc15 along the actomyosin ring and promotes concentric furrowing.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Biochemistry & Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA

During cytokinesis, fission yeast coordinates actomyosin ring constriction with septum ingression, resulting in concentric furrow formation by a poorly defined mechanism. We report that cells lacking the Cdc42 activator Gef1, combined with an activated allele of the formin, Cdc12, display non-concentric furrowing. Non-concentrically furrowing cells display uneven distribution of the scaffold Cdc15 along the ring. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.223776DOI Listing
February 2019

Minimal systems shed light on cell polarity.

J Cell Sci 2019 Jan 30;132(4). Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Bionanoscience Department, Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Delft 2600 GA, The Netherlands

Cell polarity - the morphological and functional differentiation of cellular compartments in a directional manner - is required for processes such as orientation of cell division, directed cellular growth and motility. How the interplay of components within the complexity of a cell leads to cell polarity is still heavily debated. In this Review, we focus on one specific aspect of cell polarity: the non-uniform accumulation of proteins on the cell membrane. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.217554DOI Listing
January 2019

Rab10 regulates tubular endosome formation through KIF13A and KIF13B motors.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 19;132(5). Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Integrative Life Sciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578, Japan

Recycling endosomes are stations that sort endocytic cargoes to their appropriate destinations. Tubular endosomes have been characterized as a recycling endosomal compartment for clathrin-independent cargoes. However, the molecular mechanism by which tubular endosome formation is regulated is poorly understood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.226977DOI Listing
February 2019

Repetitive switching between DNA binding modes enables target finding by the glucocorticoid receptor.

J Cell Sci 2019 Jan 25. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Institute of Biology, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands

Transcription factor mobility is a determining factor in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we have studied the intranuclear dynamics of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single-molecule microscopy. First we have described the dynamic states in which the GR occurs. Read More

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.217455
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.217455DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Src-mediated phosphorylation of βPix-b regulates dendritic spine morphogenesis.

J Cell Sci 2019 Jan 25. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

School of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea

PAK-interacting guanine nucleotide exchange factor (βPix) has been implicated in many actin-based cellular processes including spine morphogenesis in neurons. However, the molecular mechanisms by which βPix controls spine morphology remain elusive. Previously, we have reported the expression of several alternative spliced βPix isoforms in the brain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.224980DOI Listing
January 2019

Structure and function analysis of the aminophospholipid translocase TAT-1.

J Cell Sci 2019 Jan 25. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA

The aminophospholipid translocase TAT-1 maintains phosphatidylserine (PS) asymmetry in the plasma membrane and regulates endocytic transport. Despite these important functions, the structure-function relationship of this protein is poorly understood. Taking advantage of the mutations identified by the million mutation project, we investigated the effects of 16 single amino-acid substitutions on the two functions of the TAT-1 protein. Read More

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.227660
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.227660DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

An essential role for dNTP homeostasis following CDK-induced replication stress.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 15. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

CRUK-MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, ORCRB, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7DQ, UK

Replication stress is a common feature of cancer cells, and thus a potentially important therapeutic target. Here we show that CDK-induced replication stress is synthetic lethal with mutations disrupting dNTP homeostasis in fission yeast. Wee1 inactivation leads to increased dNTP demand and replication stress through CDK-induced firing of dormant replication origins. Read More

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.226969
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.226969DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Reconstituting the reticular ER network - mechanistic implications and open questions.

J Cell Sci 2019 Jan 22;132(4). Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major membrane-bound organelle in all eukaryotic cells. This organelle comprises morphologically distinct domains, including the nuclear envelope and peripheral sheets and tubules. The tubules are connected by three-way junctions into a network. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.227611DOI Listing
January 2019

New Editor on Journal of Cell Science.

Authors:
Michael Way

J Cell Sci 2019 Jan 22;132(2). Epub 2019 Jan 22.

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.229740
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.229740DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Differential YAP expression in glioma cells induces cell competition and promotes tumorigenesis.

J Cell Sci 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Penn State Health Hershey Medical Center, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033, USA

Intratumor heterogeneity associates with cancer progression and may account for a substantial portion of therapeutic resistance. Although extensive studies have focused on the origin of the heterogeneity, biological interactions between heterogeneous malignant cells within a tumor are largely unexplored. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor. Read More

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.225714
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.225714DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads
5.432 Impact Factor

A conserved retromer-independent function for RAB-6.2 in epidermis integrity.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 15;132(5). Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Biology, Davidson College, Davidson, NC 28035, USA

Rab proteins are conserved small GTPases that coordinate intracellular trafficking essential to cellular function and homeostasis. RAB-6.2 is a highly conserved ortholog of human RAB6 proteins. Read More

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.223586
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.223586DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

BBS4 is required for intraflagellar transport coordination and basal body number in mammalian olfactory cilia.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 15;132(5). Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA

Bardet-Beidl syndrome (BBS) manifests from genetic mutations encoding for one or more BBS proteins. BBS4 loss impacts olfactory ciliation and odor detection, yet the cellular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we report that mice exhibit shorter and fewer olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) cilia despite retaining odorant receptor localization. Read More

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.222331
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.222331DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Identification and characterization of genes encoding the nuclear envelope LINC complex in the monocot species .

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 11;132(3). Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Biological Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4295, USA

The linker of nucleoskeleton to cytoskeleton (LINC) complex is an essential multi-protein structure spanning the nuclear envelope. It connects the cytoplasm to the nucleoplasm, functions to maintain nuclear shape and architecture and regulates chromosome dynamics during cell division. Knowledge of LINC complex composition and function in the plant kingdom is primarily limited to , but critically missing from the evolutionarily distant monocots, which include grasses, the most important agronomic crops worldwide. Read More

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.221390
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.221390DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

The integral function of the endocytic recycling compartment is regulated by RFFL-mediated ubiquitylation of Rab11 effectors.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 7;132(3). Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Biomedical Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Hyogo 669-1337, Japan

Endocytic trafficking is regulated by ubiquitylation (also known as ubiquitination) of cargoes and endocytic machineries. The role of ubiquitylation in lysosomal delivery has been well documented, but its role in the recycling pathway is largely unknown. Here, we report that the ubiquitin (Ub) ligase RFFL regulates ubiquitylation of endocytic recycling regulators. Read More

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http://jcs.biologists.org/lookup/doi/10.1242/jcs.228007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.228007DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Synaptotagmin 5 regulates Ca-dependent Weibel-Palade body exocytosis in human endothelial cells.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 15;132(5). Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute, St George's, University of London, London SW18 ORE, UK

Elevations of intracellular free Ca concentration ([Ca]) are a potent trigger for Weibel-Palade body (WPB) exocytosis and secretion of von Willebrand factor (VWF) from endothelial cells; however, the identity of WPB-associated Ca-sensors involved in transducing acute increases in [Ca] into granule exocytosis remains unknown. Here, we show that synaptotagmin 5 (SYT5) is expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and is recruited to WPBs to regulate Ca-driven WPB exocytosis. Western blot analysis of HUVECs identified SYT5 protein, and exogenously expressed SYT5-mEGFP localised almost exclusively to WPBs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.221952DOI Listing
February 2019

Force-history dependence and cyclic mechanical reinforcement of actin filaments at the single molecular level.

J Cell Sci 2019 Feb 4;132(4). Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA

The actin cytoskeleton is subjected to dynamic mechanical forces over time and the history of force loading may serve as mechanical preconditioning. While the actin cytoskeleton is known to be mechanosensitive, the mechanisms underlying force regulation of actin dynamics still need to be elucidated. Here, we investigated actin depolymerization under a range of dynamic tensile forces using atomic force microscopy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jcs.216911DOI Listing
February 2019