327 results match your criteria Journal of Cardiovascular Management[Journal]


The challenges of implementing a cardiovascular information system.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(4):35-9

Cardiovascular Services, AnMed Health Medical Center, Anderson, SC, USA.

The past decade has seen the expansion of the cardiac catheterization laboratory's hemodynamic monitoring system from an instrument for capturing essential physiologic information to the hub of an integrated cardiovascular information system. This evolution has increased the complexity of equipment replacement and necessitates a structured, coordinated effort across multiple hospital departments. This article describes the experience of AnMed Health Medical Center (Anderson, SC) in acquiring and implementing its cardiovascular information system and how proactive planning helped minimize the investment risk. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2006
7 Reads

Women's Heart Advantage Program: the impact 3 years later.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(4):27-34

Marketing & Communications, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.

Yale-New Haven Hospital, in partnership with Voluntary Hospital Association (VHA Inc), launched the Women's Heart Advantage program in March 2001. Major program components implemented include (1) a comprehensive initial and ongoing internal communication program; (2) a health promotion initiative including a 24-hour, 7-days-a-week women's heart line staffed by nurses and an Internet health question-and-answer forum; (3) significant ongoing communication with nurses and physicians; (4) a community outreach effort to educate poor and minority women; and (5) an aggressive effort to secure financial partners to underwrite the cost of the program. Before launching the program, a telephone survey of 300 randomly selected New Haven County women ages 40 to 70 years was initiated in January 2001 and repeated in January 2002, 2003, and 2004. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2006
3 Reads

Capitalizing on current technology to improve the electrocardiogram data management process.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(4):21-6

Cardiovascular Services, 165 Portsmouth Street, Concord, NH 03301, USA.

Concord Hospital was able to use an existing electrocardiogram (ECG) data management system to greatly improve efficiency regarding the managing, interpreting, viewing, and reporting of ECGs. By taking advantage of the full capabilities of the current ECG data management system, Tracemaster, we were able to design a workflow process to allow any physician to view and interpret electronically any current or previous ECGs from any computer. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2006
2 Reads

Do volumes matter? Clinical, operational, and financial implications.

Authors:
Karen Hartman

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(4):16-20

Corazon Consulting, 5000 McKnight Road, Suite 300, Pittsburgh, PA 15237, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2006
2 Reads

What, then, to do about vascular services?

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(4):13-5

Ronning Healthcare Strategies, Portland, Oregon, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2006
4 Reads

The vital link.

Authors:
Penny S Schmiege

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(4):11-2

Cardiopulmonary Services, Boswell Hospital, Sun City, Arizona, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2006
5 Reads

Peripheral angiography.

Authors:
Jackie Miller

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(4):9-10

Coding Strategies Inc.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2006
4 Reads

Cardiologist recruitment becomes strategy, part III: bringing the birds to roost.

Authors:
Philip L Ronning

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(4):5-7

Ronning Healthcare Strategies, Portland, Oregon, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2006
4 Reads

Shelf-price agreements: the next frontier in competitive bidding for coronary intervention supplies.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(3):27-30

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0311, USA.

In an attempt to further reduce operating costs, in 2004 our institution embarked on a novel approach in which we defined the price to be paid for interventional cardiology supplies and challenged vendors to meet that price. The results suggest that this strategy can further reduce supply costs while maintaining collaborative relationships with vendors. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 2005
9 Reads

Advance-practice nursing in heart-failure management: an integrative review.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(3):19-23

Department of Care Coordination, H068, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850, USA.

The number of patients with heart failure (HF) is predicted to escalate into the next decade, whereas the number of cardiac specialists who are skilled in evidence-based recommendations in HF practice will struggle to provide available, quality care. The advance-practice nurse, whose focus is HF management, may be an important key to improving access to this growing aggregate. This integrative review indicates the positive cost-to-benefit ratio for the advance-practice nurse's collaboration in HF management. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 2005
4 Reads

Adoption of Angiomax at Christus Santa Rosa Medical Center decreases costs and increases satisfaction.

Authors:
Elvira Starin

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(3):14-8

Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory, Catheterization Laboratory Holding, Intermediate Care Unit, Christus Santa Rosa Medical Center, 2827 Babcock Road, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA.

Angiomax allows for easier post-percutaneous coronary intervention care and enhanced throughput and has become the gold standard of care in our institution. This article describes how Angiomax was brought into our hospital; the rationale and science to support its use; and the resulting patient and staff satisfaction, improved throughput, and cost savings. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 2005
2 Reads

Turnaround times.

Authors:
Penny Schmiege

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(3):12-3

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 2005
2 Reads

Carotid stenting.

Authors:
Jackie Miller

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(3):9-11

Coding Strategies Inc, USA.

Coding personnel should be aware of the new CPT guidelines for reporting carotid and vertebral stent placement. Payors' billing requirements for these procedures vary, and it is important to determine before billing whether the payor will accept the applicable CPT category I or III code or whether an unlisted code must be reported. Coding guidancefor these procedures will likely continue to evolve in thenear future. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 2005
2 Reads

Cardiologist recruitment becomes strategy, part II: taking the bird's-eye view.

Authors:
Philip L Ronning

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 ;16(3):5-8

Ronning Healthcare Strategies, Portland, Oregon, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 2005
3 Reads

Positioning your catheterization laboratory to survive the push for noninvasive diagnostics.

Authors:
Marsha L Knapik

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 Mar-Apr;16(2):12-4

Health Care Visions Ltd, 3283 Babcock Boulevard, Pittsburgh, PA 15237, USA.

The use of noninvasive imaging modalities such as computerized tomography and magnetic resonance for coronary disease diagnosis will dramatically decrease the volume of diagnostic patients in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Consideration must be given to what can be done to keep the cardiac catheterization laboratory a productive and cost-effective department once diagnostics are removed from the catheterization laboratory setting. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2005
2 Reads

Carotid artery stenting: anatomy of a Medicare coverage decision.

Authors:
Tom Meskan

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 Mar-Apr;16(2):7-11

Boston Scientific Corporation, One SciMed Place, Maple Grove, MN 55311, USA.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has made an important reimbursement decision regarding carotid artery stenting for patients at high risk for carotid endarterectomy surgery. This article will identify the carotid coverage questions and process as a case study of the issues that the Centers and stakeholders can face regarding complex new technologies, as well as the questions for carotid artery stenting and other new technologies that the process raises for your hospital. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2005
2 Reads

The reason for the cardiovascular test.

Authors:
Cindy C Parman

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 Mar-Apr;16(2):5-6

Coding Strategies Inc., USA.

When diagnosis codes are reported and sequenced on an insurance claim, official guidelines are available to provide instructions for the correct assignment of ICD-9-CM codes. These instructions are intended to ensure that the correct reason for the diagnostic service is reported and that procedures are reimbursed when they are medically necessary. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2005
5 Reads

Cardiologist recruitment becomes strategic, Part I: Feathering the nest.

Authors:
Philip L Ronning

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 Mar-Apr;16(2):3-4

Ronning Healthcare Strategies, Portland, Oregan, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2005
3 Reads

Rapid-cycle improvement in quality of care for patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction or heart failure: moving from a culture of missed opportunity to a system of accountability.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 Jan-Feb;16(1):14-9

The University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

We describe a 1-year multidisciplinary initiative to improve the quality of care for patients with acute myocardial infarction and heart failure. In January 2002, this rapid-cycle improvement project began with a partnership of inpatient cardiology nursing and physician leadership. This inpatient leadership team analyzed clinical and operational processes, and revised and developed tools such as standard order sets, discharge instructions, clinical pocket guides, and daily monitoring logs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2005
4 Reads

Implementing evidence-based practice for acute myocardial infarction utilizing automated information technology.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 Jan-Feb;16(1):8-13

Saint Vincent Health Center, Erie, PA 16544, USA.

Saint Vincent Health Center has adopted 2 strong tools--evidence-based practice and automated information technology--to significantly improve mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Automated information technology drives real-time evidence-based clinical processes and has reduced mortality from 10% to 3% over a 1-year period. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2005
2 Reads

Echocardiography "add-on" codes.

Authors:
Cindy C Parman

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 Jan-Feb;16(1):6-7

Coding Strategirs Inc., USA.

Doppler pulsed wave or continuous wave and color-flow velocity services are reported with add-on codes in addition to the basic echocardiography study. To be reimbursed, payor medical necessity guidelines must be met, and documentation in the echography report must clearly support all services performed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2005
2 Reads

Back to the future: using history as a lesson, not a location.

Authors:
Philip L Ronning

J Cardiovasc Manag 2005 Jan-Feb;16(1):4-5

Ronning Healtcare Strategies, Poland, OR, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2005
3 Reads

Bringing measurement and management science to the cath laboratory: the National Cardiovascular Data Registry (ACC-NCDR) and the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory Continuous Quality Improvement Toolkit (ACC-CathKIT).

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Nov-Dec;15(6):20-6

Cardiology Division, Scott and White Clinic, Temple, TX, USA.

Diagnostic cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary interventions are widely performed for the evaluation and treatment of patients with cardiac disease. Because of high utilization, cost, and complication rates, invasive cardiac procedures are closely monitored and frequently measured using national benchmark databases and public reports. Before decision makers can accept these data and reports as accurate, it is necessary that the measurement process be performed correctly. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2005
3 Reads

Successfully developing a cardiovascular research program in a community hospital.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Nov-Dec;15(6):13-9

Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian, Newport Beach, CA 92663, USA.

Hoag Memorial Hospital, located in Newport Beach, Calif, is a not-for-profit community medical center. Within 2 years, our cardiovascular (CV) research program had enrolled more than 150 patients in 13 industry-sponsored clinical trials. This article highlights the best practices that have allowed us to create a foundation for success. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2005
2 Reads

Cardiac telemetry coding.

Authors:
Cindy C Parman

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Nov-Dec;15(6):11-2

Coding Strategies Inc.

In summary, documentation of the procedure performed and individual insurance payor guidelines will determine the procedure code billed for telemetry services. Because codes accepted for these services and reimbursement guidelines may vary, it may be necessary to obtain specific guidance before claim submission. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2005
3 Reads

Why physicians can make a real difference.

Authors:
Philip L Ronning

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Nov-Dec;15(6):9-10

Ronning Healthcare Strategies, Portland, OR, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2005
2 Reads

Campaign sounds call to action to reduce delay and increase survival for heart attacks.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Sep-Oct;15(5):16-8

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2004
1 Read

Shelf price agreements: a novel approach to competitive bidding for arrhythmia therapy devices.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Sep-Oct;15(5):12-5

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center, Ann Arbor 48109-0477, USA.

Over the past decade, the financial pressures from variations in reimbursement and payer mix, combined with rapidly evolving technology, has forced healthcare institutions in the United States to seek out further options for cost savings. In the arena of interventional cardiology, the ability to successfully negotiate the lowest possible cost for a relatively small number of high-cost devices can result in significant savings. Historically, competitive bidding with market-share guarantee to a preferred vendor or two initially resulted in moderate cost savings. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2004
3 Reads

And still more new codes.

Authors:
Cindy C Parman

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Sep-Oct;15(5):10-1

Coding Strategies, Inc, USA.

Before reporting the new Category III CPT codes, contact payors to determine both acceptance of these temporary codes and reimbursement allowances. Documentation must clearly support all services performed, and the requirements for an online medical evaluation should be followed, with the encounter recorded in the individual patient medical record. Hospitals should also review the quarterly changes to OPPS codes and descriptors and ensure that Charge Description Masters are updated as new codes become effective. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2004
2 Reads

Feasibility to the sixth power.

Authors:
Philip L Ronning

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Sep-Oct;15(5):8-9

Ronning Healthcare Strategies, Portland, Oregon, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
November 2004
2 Reads

Working with your local Medicare contractor to shape patient care.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Jul-Aug;15(4):23-7

Reimbursement & Outcomes Planning, Cardiovascular, Boston Scientific Corporation, Boston, MA, USA.

When hospitals pursue appropriate Medicare coverage by interacting effectively with their local Medicare contractor, they have an opportunity to provide their patients with greater access to care and help their hospital meet important revenue objectives. This is especially true when ensuring Medicare coverage of appropriate cardiovascular services. Local contractors are private entities that administer national Medicare policies regionally and interpret the "gray areas" of coverage. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2004
2 Reads

Peripheral vascular care: should you have a "vascular center"?

Authors:
Barbara Sallo

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Jul-Aug;15(4):18-22

Health Care Visions Ltd, Pittsburgh, PA 15237, USA.

Cardiovascular care is big business for hospitals. Although a lot of attention and resources are directed to care and treatment of the coronary arteries, peripheral vascular disease (PVD) care has gained momentum. Even though the dollars spent on PVD care are significantly less than for cardiac, the patients are the same, and PVD care is an essential component of full-service cardiovascular care. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2004
4 Reads

Improved clinical outcomes with compliance in routine use of standard medical therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Jul-Aug;15(4):14-7

Cardiovascular Research Institute, West Penn Hospital, Temple University Campus, Pittsburgh, PA 15224, USA.

Acute coronary syndrome is a major public health problem. It is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. Despite multiple guidelines, the standard medical therapies are not optimally utilized for prevention of adverse events in this population. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2004
3 Reads

Cardiac nuclear medicine.

Authors:
Cindy C Parman

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Jul-Aug;15(4):12-3

Coding Strategies Inc., USA.

Documentation of the specific nuclear medicine procedure performed should include whether the test represents the following: Perfusion or blood pool study. Planar or SPECT images. First pass or gated equilibrium (multiple-gated acquisition). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2004
2 Reads

The product line executive of the future, Part II: Charting your course.

Authors:
Philip L Ronning

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Jul-Aug;15(4):8-11

Ronning Healthcare Strategies, Portland, OR, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 2004
3 Reads

Evidence-based practice strategies for cardiovascular care.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 May-Jun;15(3):10-9

Department of Nursing, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Academic Support Building, Box 855 Mail Code A250, 600 Centerview Road, Hershey, PA 17033-0855, USA.

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach utilizing the best available information to support clinical decisions. The cardiovascular literature sufficiently supports the adoption of EBP to reduce practice variations and improve patient outcomes. However, the ability to appraise evidence and determine the best ways to implement evidence into practice remains a challenge for most clinicians and administrators. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2004
4 Reads

The product line manager of the future, Part I: The winds of change.

Authors:
Philip L Ronning

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 May-Jun;15(3):7-9

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2004
3 Reads

A six sigma approach to maximizing productivity in the cardiac cath lab.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Mar-Apr;15(2):19-24

Cardiac Cath Lab/Special Procedures, Acadiana Heart Institute, Our Lady of Lourdes Regional Medical Center, Lafayette, LA, USA.

Cardiac catheterization laboratories represent one of the most significant capital investments for hospitals. Historically, hospitals could achieve an economic return fairly rapidly on this capital investment because of the relatively high contribution margin on many of the procedures performed in the department. However, recent changes in DRG assignments, declines in Medicare reimbursement, and the advent of new technologies, such as drug-coated stents, pose a threat to achieving planned economic return. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2004
4 Reads

Building a cardiology practice.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Mar-Apr;15(2):16-8

Pikes Peak Cardiology, Colorado Springs, CO, USA.

This study was designed to quantify the clinical and marketing effectiveness of the Pocket EKG Clinical Based Marketing Program by measuring its impact on new patient visits, patient satisfaction, payor negotiations, and patient management at Pikes Peak Cardiology (PPC), Colorado Springs, Colorado. New patient visits were found to increase by 22% for 6.5 consecutive years. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2004
6 Reads

Translational barriers and their effect upon cardiovascular revenues and reimbursement.

Authors:
Scott R Call

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Mar-Apr;15(2):13-5

Intermountain Health Care, 8th Avenue & C Street, Cardiovascular Department, Salt Lake City, UT 84143, USA.

During the past 2 decades in health care environments, particularly hospitals, attempts to centralize operational processes have inadvertently bred barriers to interdepartmental communication, resulting in the creation of informational silos and, ultimately, decreases in revenues reported and reimbursement obtained. Overall, operational centralization has reaped process improvement. However, these efficiencies have come at the cost of measurable accuracies that directly affect the bottom line. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2004
2 Reads

Disruptive technology: new medical advances are troublesome for even the most successful health systems and innovator health companies.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Mar-Apr;15(2):9-12

Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL, USA.

An independent expert panel conducted a multi-year research/education/advocacy initiative on the impact of the new drug-eluting stent technology. They conclude that this technology represents a "tipping point" in a series of transformative drugs and medical devices, often used in combination, and recommend that healthcare decision makers develop careful, data-based strategies to avoid the disruptiveness of these medical advances. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
July 2004
4 Reads

Riding the storms--approaching cardiac intervention: combining an information-based managerial perspective with a knowledge-based expert view.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Jan-Feb;15(1):17-20

Department of Cardiology, Thoraxcenter, University Medical Center, Groningen, The Netherlands.

To contribute to an improvement of efficiency within the health care system, it is important for each medical professional involved in a specific value chain of cure to have some basic understanding of the related and updated treatment methods. In a relatively short time, the field of interventional cardiology has evolved into an independent clinical discipline with a wide variety of therapeutic modalities. At present, it is possible to safely treat lesions in the main stem of the left coronary artery with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2004
2 Reads

A retrospective study of left ventricular assist device-related infections.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Jan-Feb;15(1):9-16

Department of Nursing, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA 17033, USA.

Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) represent considerable technological advancements, which are increasing survival and maintaining the highest quality of life for patients with chronic heart failure. A retrospective analysis of outcomes was conducted on 90 patients during LVAD support with either a Thoratec (n = 41) or HeartMate (n = 49) device, with a median of 56 days (range 3-350 days). Device-related infections occurred in 18 of the 90 subjects (20%). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2004
5 Reads

Change and the learning organization.

Authors:
Philip L Ronning

J Cardiovasc Manag 2004 Jan-Feb;15(1):7-8

Tiber Group, LLC, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2004
5 Reads

Maximizing the quality and cost-effectiveness of cardiac care with laboratory technology and process improvements.

Authors:
Djiby Diop

J Cardiovasc Manag 2003 Nov-Dec;14(6):19-23

University of Massachusetts Medical Center, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2004
2 Reads

Using performance improvement strategies to reduce and prevent medication errors. 1.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2003 Nov-Dec;14(6):15-8

Chickasaw Nation Health System, Ada, Oklahoma, USA.

The headlines feature tragic stories describing errors in medical practice. Medical literature reveals that errors in medical practice are common. In 1999, the Institute of Medicine released its report. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2004
2 Reads

A formal, standardized and evidence-based approach to Chest Pain Center development and process improvement: the Society of Chest Pain Centers and Providers accreditation process.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2003 Nov-Dec;14(6):11-4

The notion of a Chest Pain Center has continued to develop over the past twenty years. The designation of "Chest Pain Center" now applies to the entire facility, much the same as that of "Trauma Center." The Chest Pain Center model incorporates both operational and clinical considerations required to develop proper Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) care in the context of a complex health-care system. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2004
4 Reads

Evaluating the intangibles: assessing a candidate's potential.

Authors:
Philip Ronning

J Cardiovasc Manag 2003 Nov-Dec;14(6):7-10

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2004
3 Reads

Cardiac PACS: strategies for planning, integration & vendor selection.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2003 Sep-Oct;14(5):22-6

Cardiologists are clamoring for better imaging techniques, the ability to view images from their office or home, and for the resulting improvement in efficiency which translates into increased profitability. The future is here; are you ready? Cardiac systems have developed into full-blown information management and digital imaging systems. Hospitals are moving aggressively to update their cardiac information systems and identifying the significant role the CIS (cardiac information system) plays in the selection process. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2004
4 Reads

Designs that make a difference: the Cardiac Universal Bed model.

J Cardiovasc Manag 2003 Sep-Oct;14(5):16-20

Information contained in this article includes some of the findings from a joint research project conducted by Corazon Consulting and Ohio State University Medical Center on national trends in Cardiac Universal Bed (CUB) utilization. This article outlines current findings and "best practice" standards related to the benefits of developing care delivery models to differentiate an organization with a competitive advantage in the highly dynamic marketplace of cardiovascular care. (OSUMC, a Corazon client, is incorporating the CUB into their Ross Heart Hospital slated to open this spring. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2004
4 Reads