1,404 results match your criteria Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance [Journal]


Sorted Golden-step phase encoding: an improved Golden-step imaging technique for cardiac and respiratory self-gated cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Apr 18;21(1):23. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 720 Rutland Ave, Suite 726 Ross Building, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA.

Background: Numerous self-gated cardiac imaging techniques have been reported in the literature. Most can track either cardiac or respiratory motion, and many incur some overhead to imaging data acquisition. We previously described a Cartesian cine imaging technique, pseudo-projection motion tracking with golden-step phase encoding, capable of tracking both cardiac and respiratory motion at no cost to imaging data acquisition. Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0533-8DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

The aorta after coarctation repair - effects of calibre and curvature on arterial haemodynamics.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Apr 11;21(1):22. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Centre for Translational Cardiovascular Imaging, Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, WC1N 3JH, UK.

Background: Aortic shape has been proposed as an important determinant of adverse haemodynamics following coarctation repair. However, previous studies have not demonstrated a consistent relationship between shape and vascular load. In this study, 3D aortic shape was evaluated using principal component analysis (PCA), allowing investigation of the relationship between 3D shape and haemodynamics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0534-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458643PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

Kidney transplantation is associated with reduced myocardial fibrosis. A cardiovascular magnetic resonance study with native T1 mapping.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Mar 27;21(1):21. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Department of Internal Medicine, UNESP, Univ Estadual Paulista, Rubião Jr, s/n, Botucatu/SP, 18.618-970, Brazil.

Background: The measurement of native T1 through cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a noninvasive method of assessing myocardial fibrosis without gadolinium contrast. No studies so far have evaluated native T1 after renal transplantation. The primary aim of the current study is to assess changes in the myocardium native T1 6 months after renal transplantation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0531-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6437926PMC

Validation of aortic valve 4D flow analysis and myocardial deformation by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients after the arterial switch operation.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Mar 18;21(1):20. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Pediatric Cardiology, University Medical Center Utrecht / Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: Aortic regurgitation (AR) and subclinical left ventricular (LV) dysfunction expressed by myocardial deformation imaging are common in patients with transposition of the great arteries after the arterial switch operation (ASO). Echocardiographic evaluation is often hampered by reduced acoustic window settings. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging provides a robust alternative as it allows for comprehensive assessment of degree of AR and LV function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0527-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6421716PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Measuring inorganic phosphate and intracellular pH in the healthy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy hearts by in vivo 7T P-cardiovascular magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Mar 14;21(1):19. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research (OCMR), Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, BHF Centre of Research Excellence, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Background: Cardiovascular phosphorus MR spectroscopy (P-CMRS) is a powerful tool for probing energetics in the human heart, through quantification of phosphocreatine (PCr) to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio. In principle, P-CMRS can also measure cardiac intracellular pH (pH) and the free energy of ATP hydrolysis (ΔG). However, these require determination of the inorganic phosphate (Pi) signal frequency and amplitude that are currently not robustly accessible because blood signals often obscure the Pi resonance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0529-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6419336PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Automated quality control in image segmentation: application to the UK Biobank cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Mar 14;21(1):18. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Biomedical Image Analysis Group, Department of Computing, Imperial College London, Queen's Gate, London, SW7 2AZ, UK.

Background: The trend towards large-scale studies including population imaging poses new challenges in terms of quality control (QC). This is a particular issue when automatic processing tools such as image segmentation methods are employed to derive quantitative measures or biomarkers for further analyses. Manual inspection and visual QC of each segmentation result is not feasible at large scale. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0523-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6416857PMC
March 2019
1 Read
4.556 Impact Factor

High resolution, 3-dimensional Ferumoxytol-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance venography in central venous occlusion.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Mar 11;21(1):17. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Diagnostic Cardiovascular Imaging Laboratory, University of California, Los Angeles, Peter V. Ueberroth Building Suite 3371, 10945 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, 90095-7206, CA, USA.

Background: Although cardiovascular magnetic resonance venography (CMRV) is generally regarded as the technique of choice for imaging the central veins, conventional CMRV is not ideal. Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCA) are less suited to steady state venous imaging than to first pass arterial imaging and they may be contraindicated in patients with renal impairment where evaluation of venous anatomy is frequently required. We aim to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 3-dimensional (3D) ferumoxytol-enhanced CMRV (FE-CMRV) for suspected central venous occlusion in patients with renal failure and to assess its clinical impact on patient management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0528-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6410526PMC
March 2019
3 Reads

A cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) safe metal braided catheter design for interventional CMR at 1.5 T: freedom from radiofrequency induced heating and preserved mechanical performance.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Mar 7;21(1):16. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Cardiovascular Branch, Division of Intramural Research, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 2c713, Bethesda, MD, 20892-1538, USA.

Background: Catheter designs incorporating metallic braiding have high torque control and kink resistance compared with unbraided alternatives. However, metallic segments longer than a quarter wavelength (~ 12 cm for 1.5 T scanner) are prone to radiofrequency (RF) induced heating during cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) catheterization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0526-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404324PMC

Microvasculature and intraplaque hemorrhage in atherosclerotic carotid lesions: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Mar 4;21(1):15. Epub 2019 Mar 4.

Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre, P.O. Box 5800, 6202, AZ, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Background: The presence of intraplaque haemorrhage (IPH) has been related to plaque rupture, is associated with plaque progression, and predicts cerebrovascular events. However, the mechanisms leading to IPH are not fully understood. The dominant view is that IPH is caused by leakage of erythrocytes from immature microvessels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0524-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6398220PMC
March 2019
3 Reads

Comparison of myocardial fibrosis quantification methods by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for risk stratification of patients with suspected myocarditis.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Feb 28;21(1):14. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Noninvasive Cardiovascular Imaging, Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.

Background: Although the presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is a significant discriminator of events in patients with suspected myocarditis, no data are available on the optimal LGE quantification method.

Methods: Six hundred seventy consecutive patients (48 ± 16 years, 59% male) with suspected myocarditis were enrolled between 2002 and 2015. We performed LGE quantitation using seven different signal intensity thresholding methods based either on 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 standard deviations (SD) above remote myocardium or full width at half maximum (FWHM). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0520-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6393997PMC
February 2019
4 Reads

Visualization of coronary arteries in paediatric patients using whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography: comparison of image-navigation and the standard approach for respiratory motion compensation.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Feb 25;21(1):13. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Division of Biomedical Engineering and Imaging Sciences, King's College London, London, UK.

Aims: To investigate the use of respiratory motion compensation using image-based navigation (iNAV) with constant respiratory efficiency using single end-expiratory thresholding (CRUISE) for coronary magnetic resonance angiography (CMRA), and compare it to the conventional diaphragmatic navigator (dNAV) in paediatric patients with congenital or suspected heart disease.

Methods: iNAV allowed direct tracking of the respiratory heart motion and was generated using balanced steady state free precession startup echoes. Respiratory gating was achieved using CRUISE with a fixed 50% efficiency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0525-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6388473PMC
February 2019

Quantification in cardiovascular magnetic resonance: agreement of software from three different vendors on assessment of left ventricular function, 2D flow and parametric mapping.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Feb 21;21(1):12. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Working Group on Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, a joint cooperation between the Charité Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine and HELIOS Hospital Berlin-Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, Medical University Berlin, Charité Campus Buch, Lindenberger Weg 80, 13125, Berlin, Germany.

Background: Quantitative results of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) image analysis influence clinical decision making. Image analysis is performed based on dedicated software. The manufacturers provide different analysis tools whose algorithms are often unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0522-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6383230PMC
February 2019

In vitro optimization and comparison of CT angiography versus radial cardiovascular magnetic resonance for the quantification of cross-sectional areas and coronary endothelial function.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Feb 7;21(1):11. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV and UNIL), Rue du Bugnon 46, Lausanne, 1011, VD, Switzerland.

Background: Our objectives were first to determine the optimal coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) protocol for the quantification and detection of simulated coronary artery cross-sectional area (CSA) differences in vitro, and secondly to quantitatively compare the performance of the optimized CTA protocol with a previously validated radial coronary cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) technique.

Methods: 256-multidetector CTA and radial coronary CMR were used to obtain images of a custom in vitro resolution phantom simulating a range of physiological responses of coronary arteries to stress. CSAs were automatically quantified and compared with known nominal values to determine the accuracy, precision, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and circularity of CSA measurements, as well as the limit of detection (LOD) of CSA differences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0521-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6366062PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Myocardial triglycerides in cardiac amyloidosis assessed by proton cardiovascular magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Jan 31;21(1):10. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Gloriastrasse 35, 8092, Zurich, Switzerland.

Background: Cardiac involvement of amyloidosis leads to left-ventricular (LV) wall thickening with progressive heart failure requiring rehospitalization. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a valuable tool to non-invasively assess myocardial thickening as well as structural changes. Proton CMR spectroscopy (H-CMRS) additionally allows assessing metabolites including triglycerides (TG) and total creatine (CR). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-019-0519-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354424PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Safety and prognostic value of regadenoson stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in heart transplant recipients.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Jan 24;21(1). Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical Center, 420 Delaware Street SE, MMC 508, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.

Background: There is a critical need for non-invasive methods to detect coronary allograft vasculopathy and to risk stratify heart transplant recipients. Vasodilator stress testing using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is a promising technique for this purpose. We aimed to evaluate the safety and the prognostic value of regadenoson stress CMR in heart transplant recipients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0515-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6345066PMC
January 2019
2 Reads
4.556 Impact Factor

Fetal hemodynamics and cardiac streaming assessed by 4D flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance in fetal sheep.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Jan 21;21(1). Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Translational Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.

Background: To date it has not been possible to obtain a comprehensive 3D assessment of fetal hemodynamics because of the technical challenges inherent in imaging small cardiac structures, movement of the fetus during data acquisition, and the difficulty of fusing data from multiple cardiac cycles when a cardiac gating signal is absent. Here we propose the combination of volumetric velocity-sensitive cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging ("4D flow" CMR) and a specialized animal preparation (catheters to monitor fetal heart rate, anesthesia to immobilize mother and fetus) to examine fetal sheep cardiac hemodynamics in utero.

Methods: Ten pregnant Merino sheep underwent surgery to implant arterial catheters in the target fetuses. Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0512-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6340188PMC
January 2019
10 Reads

Late effects of pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation on left ventricular function, aortic stiffness and myocardial tissue characteristics.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Jan 17;21(1). Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, P.O. Box 9600, postal zone C2-S, 2300 RC, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Background: Pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. As HSCT survival has significantly improved, with a growing number of HSCT indications, tailored screening strategies for HSCT-related late effects are warranted. Little is known regarding the value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for early identification of high-risk patients after HSCT, before symptomatic cardiovascular disease manifests. Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0513-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6335808PMC
January 2019
4 Reads

Automated analysis of cardiovascular magnetic resonance myocardial native T mapping images using fully convolutional neural networks.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Jan 14;21(1). Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.

Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) myocardial native T mapping allows assessment of interstitial diffuse fibrosis. In this technique, the global and regional T are measured manually by drawing region of interest in motion-corrected T maps. The manual analysis contributes to an already lengthy CMR analysis workflow and impacts measurements reproducibility. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0516-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6330747PMC
January 2019

Accelerated free-breathing 3D T1ρ cardiovascular magnetic resonance using multicoil compressed sensing.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Jan 10;21(1). Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.

Background: Endogenous contrast T1ρ cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) can detect scar or infiltrative fibrosis in patients with ischemic or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy. Existing 2D T1ρ techniques have limited spatial coverage or require multiple breath-holds. The purpose of this project was to develop an accelerated, free-breathing 3D T1ρ mapping sequence with whole left ventricle coverage using a multicoil, compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction technique for rapid reconstruction of undersampled k-space data. Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0507-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327532PMC
January 2019
6 Reads

Association of left atrial volume index and all-cause mortality in patients referred for routine cardiovascular magnetic resonance: a multicenter study.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Jan 7;21(1). Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Cardiology, Houston Methodist Hospital, 6550 Fannin St., Suite 677, Smith Tower, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.

Background: Routine cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) allows for the measurement of left atrial (LA) volumes. Normal reference values for LA volumes have been published based on a group of European individuals without known cardiovascular disease (CVD) but not on one of similar United States (US) based volunteers. Furthermore, the association between grades of LA dilatation by CMR and outcomes has not been established. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0517-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322235PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Machine learning derived segmentation of phase velocity encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance for fully automated aortic flow quantification.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Jan 7;21(1). Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medicine, 525 E 68th St, New York, NY, 10065, USA.

Background: Phase contrast (PC) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is widely employed for flow quantification, but analysis typically requires time consuming manual segmentation which can require human correction. Advances in machine learning have markedly improved automated processing, but have yet to be applied to PC-CMR. This study tested a novel machine learning model for fully automated analysis of PC-CMR aortic flow. Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0509-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322266PMC
January 2019
14 Reads
4.556 Impact Factor

Prognostic and functional implications of left atrial late gadolinium enhancement cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Jan 3;21(1). Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

Background: Left atrial (LA) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is indicative of fibrosis, and has been correlated with reduced LA function, increased LA volume, and poor procedural outcomes in cohorts with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the role of LGE as a prognostic biomarker for arrhythmia in cardiac disease has not been examined.

Methods: In this study, we assessed LA LGE using a 3D LGE CMR sequence to examine its relationships with new onset atrial arrhythmia, and LA and left ventricular (LV) mechanical function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0514-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6317232PMC
January 2019
4 Reads

Pelvic cardiovascular magnetic resonance venography: venous changes with patient position and hydration status.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2019 Jan 3;21(1). Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical Center, 416 East 55th Street, New York, NY, 10022, USA.

Background: To determine the effect of hydration as well as prone versus supine positioning on the pelvic veins during cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) venography.

Methods: Under institutional review board approval, 8 healthy subjects were imaged with balanced steady state free precession, non-contrast CMR venography to measure common and external iliac vein volumes and common femoral vein cross-sectional area in the supine, prone and decubitus positions after dehydration and again following re-hydration. CMR venography from 23 patients imaged both supine and prone were retrospectively reviewed and measurements of common femoral and iliac veins areas were compared using Wilcoxon test. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0503-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6317255PMC
January 2019
1 Read
4.556 Impact Factor

Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 2017.

Authors:
Warren J Manning

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 12 28;20(1):89. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.

There were 106 articles published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (JCMR) in 2017, including 92 original research papers, 3 reviews, 9 technical notes, and 1 Position paper, 1 erratum and 1 correction. The volume was similar to 2016 despite an increase in manuscript submissions to 405 and thus reflects a slight decrease in the acceptance rate to 26.7%. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0518-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6309095PMC
December 2018
1 Read

The interplay between metabolic alterations, diastolic strain rate and exercise capacity in mild heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 12 24;20(1):88. Epub 2018 Dec 24.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research (OCMR), University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Oxford, OX3 9DU, UK.

Background: Heart failure (HF) is characterized by altered myocardial substrate metabolism which can lead to myocardial triglyceride accumulation (steatosis) and lipotoxicity. However its role in mild HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is uncertain. We measured myocardial triglyceride content (MTG) in HFpEF and assessed its relationships with diastolic function and exercise capacity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0511-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6304764PMC
December 2018
4 Reads

Aminophylline shortage and current recommendations for reversal of vasodilator stress: an ASNC information statement endorsed by SCMR.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 12 20;20(1):87. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Department of Medicine, and Department of Radiology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, 622 West 168th Street PH 10-203, New York, NY, 10032, USA.

Pharmacologic reversal of serious or intolerable side effects (SISE) from vasodilator stress is an important safety and comfort measure for patients experiencing such effects. While typically performed using intravenous aminophylline, recurrent shortages of this agent have led to a greater need to limit its use and consider alternative agents. This information statement provides background and recommendations addressing indications for vasodilator reversal, timing of a reversal agent, incidence of observed SISE with vasodilator stress, clinical and logistical considerations for aminophylline-based reversal, and alternative non-aminophylline based reversal protocols. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0510-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6300896PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Dynamic changes in injured myocardium, very early after acute myocardial infarction, quantified using T1 mapping cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 12 20;20(1):82. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Acute Vascular Imaging Centre, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Background: It has recently been suggested that myocardial oedema follows a bimodal pattern early post ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Yet, water content, quantified using tissue desiccation, did not return to normal values unlike oedema quantified by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. We studied the temporal changes in the extent and intensity of injured myocardium using T1-mapping technique within the first week after STEMI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0506-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6300907PMC
December 2018
6 Reads

Regional assessment of carotid artery pulse wave velocity using compressed sensing accelerated high temporal resolution 2D CINE phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 12 20;20(1):86. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) allows for non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness by means of measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV). PWV can be calculated from the time shift between two time-resolved flow curves acquired at two locations within an arterial segment. These flow curves can be derived from two-dimensional CINE phase contrast CMR (2D CINE PC CMR). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0499-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6300923PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Maldistribution of pulmonary blood flow in patients after the Fontan operation is associated with worse exercise capacity.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 12 17;20(1):85. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of Cardiology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Maldistribution of pulmonary artery blood flow (MPBF) is a potential complication in patients who have undergone single ventricle palliation culminating in the Fontan procedure. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is the best modality that can evaluate MPBF in this population. The purpose of this study is to identify the prevalence and associations of MPBF and to determine the impact of MPBF on exercise capacity after the Fontan operation. Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0505-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6296022PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance left ventricular strain in end-stage renal disease patients after kidney transplantation.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 12 17;20(1):83. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Background: Cardiovascular disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and kidney transplant (KT) patients. Compared with left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (LVEF), LV strain has emerged as an important marker of LV function as it is less load dependent. We sought to evaluate changes in LV strain using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in ESRD patients who received KT, to determine whether KT may improve LV function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0504-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6296102PMC
December 2018
3 Reads

Impaired aortic distensibility and elevated central blood pressure in Turner Syndrome: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 12 13;20(1):80. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine and Medical Research Laboratories, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark.

Background: Women with Turner Syndrome have an increased risk for aortic dissection. Arterial stiffening is a risk factor for aortic dilatation and dissection. Here we investigate if arterial stiffening can be observed in Turner Syndrome patients and is an initial step in the development of aortic dilatation and subsequent dissection. Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0497-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6292015PMC
December 2018
22 Reads
4.556 Impact Factor

Simultaneous multi slice (SMS) balanced steady state free precession first-pass myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance with iterative reconstruction at 1.5 T.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 12 10;20(1):84. Epub 2018 Dec 10.

School of Biomedical Engineering and Imaging Sciences, King's College London, 3rd Floor Lambeth Wing, St Thomas' Hospital, Westminster Bridge Road, London, SW1 7EH, UK.

Background: Simultaneous-Multi-Slice (SMS) perfusion imaging has the potential to acquire multiple slices, increasing myocardial coverage without sacrificing in-plane spatial resolution. To maximise signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), SMS can be combined with a balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) readout. Furthermore, application of gradient-controlled local Larmor adjustment (GC-LOLA) can ensure robustness against off-resonance artifacts and SNR loss can be mitigated by applying iterative reconstruction with spatial and temporal regularisation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0502-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6287353PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Cardiac work is related to creatine kinase energy supply in human heart failure: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 12 10;20(1):81. Epub 2018 Dec 10.

Division of MR Research, Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University, Park Building, 600 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

Background: It has been hypothesized that the supply of chemical energy may be insufficient to fuel normal mechanical pump function in heart failure (HF). The creatine kinase (CK) reaction serves as the heart's primary energy reserve, and the supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP flux) it provides is reduced in human HF. However, the relationship between the CK energy supply and the mechanical energy expended has never been quantified in the human heart. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0491-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6287363PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Real-time assessment of right and left ventricular volumes and function in children using high spatiotemporal resolution spiral bSSFP with compressed sensing.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 12 6;20(1):79. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

UCL Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, 30 Guildford Street, London, WC1N 1EH, UK.

Background: Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) assessment of ventricular volumes and function enables data acquisition during free-breathing. The requirement for high spatiotemporal resolution in children necessitates the use of highly accelerated imaging techniques.

Methods: A novel real-time balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) spiral sequence reconstructed using Compressed Sensing (CS) was prospectively validated against the breath-hold clinical standard for assessment of ventricular volumes in 60 children with congenital heart disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0500-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6282387PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Diagnostic and prognostic significance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance native myocardial T1 mapping in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 12 3;20(1):78. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

POLARIS, Academic Radiology, Department of Infection, Immunity and Cardiovascular Disease, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Background: Native T1 may be a sensitive, contrast-free, non-invasive cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) marker of myocardial tissue changes in patients with pulmonary artery hypertension. However, the diagnostic and prognostic value of native T1 mapping in this patient group has not been fully explored. The aim of this work was to determine whether elevation of native T1 in myocardial tissue in pulmonary hypertension: (a) varies according to pulmonary hypertension subtype; (b) has prognostic value and (c) is associated with ventricular function and interaction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0501-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6276188PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Multidimensional fetal flow imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance: a feasibility study.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 11 29;20(1):77. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Purpose: To image multidimensional flow in fetuses using golden-angle radial phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (PC-CMR) with motion correction and retrospective gating.

Methods: A novel PC-CMR method was developed using an ungated golden-angle radial acquisition with continuously incremented velocity encoding. Healthy subjects (n = 5, 27 ± 3 years, males) and pregnant females (n = 5, 34 ± 2 weeks gestation) were imaged at 3 T using the proposed sequence. Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0498-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6264058PMC
November 2018
31 Reads

Feasibility of 3D black-blood variable refocusing angle fast spin echo cardiovascular magnetic resonance for visualization of the whole heart and great vessels in congenital heart disease.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 11 26;20(1):76. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Departments of Pediatrics and Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern/Children's Health, Dallas, TX, USA.

Background: Volumetric black-blood cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been hampered by long scan times and flow sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of black-blood, electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered and respiratory-navigated 3D fast spin echo (3D FSE) for the visualization of the whole heart and great vessels.

Methods: The implemented 3D FSE technique used slice-selective excitation and non-selective refocusing pulses with variable flip angles to achieve constant echo signal for tissue with T1 (880 ms) and T2 (40 ms) similar to the vessel wall. Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0508-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6260764PMC
November 2018
12 Reads

Asymptomatic myocardial ischemia forecasts adverse events in cardiovascular magnetic resonance dobutamine stress testing of high-risk middle-aged and elderly individuals.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 11 22;20(1):75. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine Section, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, 27157-1045, USA.

Background: Current guidelines for assessing the risk of experiencing a hospitalized cardiovascular (CV) event discourage stress testing of asymptomatic individuals; however, these recommendations are based on evidence gathered primarily from those aged < 60 years, and do not address the possibility of unrecognized "silent myocardial ischemia" in middle aged and older adults.

Methods: We performed dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) stress testing in 327 consecutively recruited participants aged > 55 years without CV-related symptoms nor known coronary artery disease, but otherwise at increased risk for a future CV event due to pre-existing hypertension or diabetes mellitus for at least 5 years. After adjusting for the demographics and CV risk factors, log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards models determined the additional predictive value of the stress test results for forecasting hospitalized CV events/survival. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0492-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6249873PMC
November 2018
17 Reads

Importance of operator training and rest perfusion on the diagnostic accuracy of stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 11 19;20(1):74. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

School of Biomedical Engineering & Imaging Sciences, King's College London, King's Health Partners, 4th Floor Lambeth Wing, St Thomas' Hospital, London, SE1 7EH, UK.

Background: Clinical evaluation of stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is currently based on visual assessment and has shown high diagnostic accuracy in previous clinical trials, when performed by expert readers or core laboratories. However, these results may not be generalizable to clinical practice, particularly when less experienced readers are concerned. Other factors, such as the level of training, the extent of ischemia, and image quality could affect the diagnostic accuracy. Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0493-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245890PMC
November 2018
20 Reads

Quantitative myocardial first-pass cardiovascular magnetic resonance perfusion imaging using hyperpolarized [1-C] pyruvate.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 11 12;20(1):73. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Gloriastrasse, 35 8092, Zurich, Switzerland.

Background: The feasibility of absolute myocardial blood flow quantification and suitability of hyperpolarized [1-C] pyruvate as contrast agent for first-pass cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) perfusion measurements are investigated with simulations and demonstrated in vivo in a swine model.

Methods: A versatile simulation framework for hyperpolarized CMR subject to physical, physiological and technical constraints was developed and applied to investigate experimental conditions for accurate perfusion CMR with hyperpolarized [1-C] pyruvate. Absolute and semi-quantitative perfusion indices were analyzed with respect to experimental parameter variations and different signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) levels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0495-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6231262PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Incidence and predictors of left ventricular thrombus by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention: a meta-analysis.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 11 8;20(1):72. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

The Hatter Cardiovascular Institute, Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, London, UK.

Introduction: The incidence of left ventricular (LV) thrombus formation in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients in the current era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is not well established. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the actual incidence and predictors of LV thrombus by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in STEMI treated by primary PCI.

Methods: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE databases up to February 2018. Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0494-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6222991PMC
November 2018
16 Reads

Validation of a rapid semi-automated method to assess left atrial longitudinal phasic strains on cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 11 5;20(1):71. Epub 2018 Nov 5.

National Heart Research Institute Singapore, National Heart Centre Singapore, 5 Hospital Drive, Singapore, 169609, Singapore.

Background: Abnormal left atrial (LA) function is a marker of cardiac dysfunction and adverse cardiovascular outcome, but is difficult to assess, and hence not, routinely quantified. We aimed to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of a fast method to measure long-axis LA strain and strain rate (SR) with standard cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) compared to conventional feature tracking (FT) derived longitudinal strain.

Methods: We studied 50 normal controls, 30 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and 100 heart failure (HF) patients, including 40 with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), 30 mid-range ejection fraction (HFmrEF) and 30 preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0496-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6219067PMC
November 2018
15 Reads

Semi-automatic detection of myocardial trabeculation using cardiovascular magnetic resonance: correlation with histology and reproducibility in a mouse model of non-compaction.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 10 25;20(1):70. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, CRMBM, Marseille, France.

Background: The definition of left ventricular (LV) non-compaction is controversial, and discriminating between normal and excessive LV trabeculation remains challenging. Our goal was to quantify LV trabeculation on cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images in a genetic mouse model of non-compaction using a dedicated semi-automatic software package and to compare our results to the histology used as a gold standard.

Methods: Adult mice with ventricular non-compaction were generated by conditional trabecular deletion of Nkx2-5. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0489-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6201553PMC
October 2018
2 Reads

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance evidence of myocardial fibrosis and its clinical significance in adolescent and adult patients with Ebstein's anomaly.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 09 27;20(1):69. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Department of Cardiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610041, Sichuan Province, China.

Background: Myocardial fibrosis is a common pathophysiological process that is related to ventricular remodeling in congenital heart disease. However, the presence, characteristics, and clinical significance of myocardial fibrosis in Ebstein's anomaly have not been fully investigated. This study aimed to evaluate myocardial fibrosis using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and T1 mapping techniques, and to explore the significance of myocardial fibrosis in adolescent and adult patients with Ebstein's anomaly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0488-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6158838PMC
September 2018
10 Reads

Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in the prospective, population-based, Hamburg City Health cohort study: objectives and design.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 09 24;20(1):68. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

University Heart Center Hamburg, Department of General and Interventional Cardiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany.

Background: The purpose of this work is to describe the objectives and design of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in the single center, prospective, population-based Hamburg City Health study (HCHS). The HCHS aims at improving risk stratification for coronary artery disease (CAD), atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure (HF).

Methods: The HCHS will finally include 45,000 inhabitants of the city of Hamburg (Germany) between 45 and 74 years who undergo an extensive cardiovascular evaluation and collection of biomaterials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0490-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6151919PMC
September 2018
6 Reads

Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) expert consensus for CMR imaging endpoints in clinical research: part I - analytical validation and clinical qualification.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 09 20;20(1):67. Epub 2018 Sep 20.

Institute of Experimental and Translational Cardiovascular Imaging, Goethe University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany.

Cardiovascular disease remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Changing natural history of the disease due to improved care of acute conditions and ageing population necessitates new strategies to tackle conditions which have more chronic and indolent course. These include an increased deployment of safe screening methods, life-long surveillance, and monitoring of both disease activity and tailored-treatment, by way of increasingly personalized medical care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0484-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6147157PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Effect of isolated left bundle-branch block on biventricular volumes and ejection fraction: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance assessment.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 09 20;20(1):66. Epub 2018 Sep 20.

Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.

Background: Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is associated with abnormal left ventricular (LV) contraction, and is frequently associated with co-morbid cardiovascular disease, but the effect of an isolated (i.e. in the absence of cardiovascular dissease) LBBB on biventricular volumes and ejection fraction (EF) is not well characterized. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0457-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6146610PMC
September 2018
4 Reads

Three-dimensional free breathing whole heart cardiovascular magnetic resonance T mapping at 3 T.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 09 17;20(1):64. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.

Background: This study demonstrates a three-dimensional (3D) free-breathing native myocardial T mapping sequence at 3 T.

Methods: The proposed sequence acquires three differently T-weighted volumes. The first two volumes receive a saturation pre-pulse with different recovery time. Read More

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https://jcmr-online.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1296
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0487-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6139904PMC
September 2018
12 Reads

Automated cardiovascular magnetic resonance image analysis with fully convolutional networks.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 09 14;20(1):65. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

Biomedical Image Analysis Group, Department of Computing, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Background: Cardiovascular resonance (CMR) imaging is a standard imaging modality for assessing cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), the leading cause of death globally. CMR enables accurate quantification of the cardiac chamber volume, ejection fraction and myocardial mass, providing information for diagnosis and monitoring of CVDs. However, for years, clinicians have been relying on manual approaches for CMR image analysis, which is time consuming and prone to subjective errors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0471-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6138894PMC
September 2018
4 Reads
4.560 Impact Factor

Comparison of left ventricular strains and torsion derived from feature tracking and DENSE CMR.

J Cardiovasc Magn Reson 2018 09 13;20(1):63. Epub 2018 Sep 13.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.

Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) feature tracking is increasingly used to quantify cardiac mechanics from cine CMR imaging, although validation against reference standard techniques has been limited. Furthermore, studies have suggested that commonly-derived metrics, such as peak global strain (reported in 63% of feature tracking studies), can be quantified using contours from just two frames - end-diastole (ED) and end-systole (ES) - without requiring tracking software. We hypothesized that mechanics derived from feature tracking would not agree with those derived from a reference standard (displacement-encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) imaging), and that peak strain from feature tracking would agree with that derived using simple processing of only ED and ES contours. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12968-018-0485-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6136226PMC
September 2018
2 Reads