12 results match your criteria Journal of Bisexuality [Journal]

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We're Here and We're Queer: Sexual Orientation and Sexual Fluidity Differences Between Bisexual and Queer Women.

J Bisex 2017 24;17(1):125-139. Epub 2016 Aug 24.

Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology, Boston College, Boston, MA.

Theorists and researchers have noted an overlap between bisexually-identified and queer-identified individuals. Whereas early definitions of bisexuality may have been predominantly binary (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299716.2016.1217448DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5730064PMC
August 2016
11 Reads

Pregnant plurisexual women's sexual and relationship histories across the lifespan: A qualitative study.

J Bisex 2017 11;17(3):257-276. Epub 2017 Aug 11.

Department of Psychology and Education, Mount Holyoke College, 205 Reese Psychology and Education Building, South Hadley, Massachusetts, United States 01075, (413) 538-2052,

Plurisexual women (that is, those with the potential for attraction to more than one gender) experience unique issues associated with forming and maintaining intimate relationships. In particular, plurisexual women, unlike monosexual women, navigate choices and decisions related to the gender of their partners throughout their lifetime, and may experience a variety of social pressures and constraints that influence these decisions. However, previous research on women's sexual and relationship trajectories has largely focused on adolescence and young adulthood, and therefore we know little about the experiences of plurisexual women at other life stages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299716.2017.1344177DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6433383PMC

Sexual Assault in Bisexual and Heterosexual Women Survivors.

J Bisex 2016;16(2):163-180. Epub 2016 Mar 16.

Department of Criminology, Law and Justice, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Social support is related to sexual minority status and negative psychological impact among sexual assault survivors. We compared bisexual and heterosexual survivors on how different types of social support are connected to symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. A community sample of bisexual and heterosexual (N = 905) women sexual assault survivors completed three annual surveys. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299716.2015.1136254DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4955638PMC
March 2016
22 Reads

Do bisexual girls report higher rates of substance use than heterosexual girls? A failure to replicate with incarcerated and detained youth.

J Bisex 2015;15(4):498-508. Epub 2015 Nov 17.

University of Rhode Island, Department of Psychology, Brown University, Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Rhode Island Training School.

Prior research suggests that sexual minority females, particularly bisexuals, report greater rates of substance use than heterosexuals. However, to our knowledge, no study has compared alcohol/drug use between bisexual and heterosexual incarcerated or detained female youth. The current study pools data from three prior treatment studies with incarcerated or detained adolescent girls that self-identify as bisexual or heterosexual (=86). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299716.2015.1057889DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4833403PMC
November 2015
10 Reads

Homogeneous Gynephiles and Heterogeneous Androphiles: A Factor Analysis of Differences and Similarities in Attractions to the Sexes as a Function of Sexual Orientation.

J Bisex 2014 Jul;14(3-4):468-501

What is it about men and women that make them sexually attractive to those people who find them attractive? Which parts of the body? Which sexual acts? We address this question empirically through a factor analysis of people's ratings of the attractiveness of women's and men's body parts, and of particular sex acts with men and women. Participants of a wide variety of sexual orientations (including a rich sample of bisexuals) rated body parts (by sex) and sex acts (by sex) on 1-to-5 scales. We factor-analyzed answers to these 50 questions to reveal the factor structure of people's attractions as a function of their sexual orientation (itself derived from a previously reported cluster analysis of the Klein Sexual Orientation Grid), then calculated average responses of the male and female clusters on the factors that had emerged. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299716.2014.938285DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4268786PMC
July 2014
12 Reads

Cluster Analysis of the Klein Sexual Orientation Grid in Clinical and Nonclinical Samples: When Bisexuality Is Not Bisexuality.

J Bisex 2014 ;14(3-4):349-372

HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center, University of California, San Diego.

We used a cluster analysis to empirically address whether sexual orientation is a continuum or can usefully be divided into categories such as heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual using scores on the Klein Sexual Orientation Grid (KSOG) in three samples: groups of men and women recruited through bisexual groups and the Internet (Main Study men; Main Study women), and men recruited for a clinical study of HIV and the nervous system (HIV Study men). A five-cluster classification was chosen for the Main Study men (n = 212), a four-cluster classification for the Main Study women (n = 120), and a five-cluster classification for the HIV Study men (n = 620). We calculated means and standard deviations of these 14 clusters on the 21 variables composing the KSOG. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299716.2014.938398DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4267693PMC
January 2014
13 Reads

Exploring the Intersectionality of Bisexual, Religious/Spiritual, and Political Identities from a Feminist Perspective.

J Bisex 2013 Jul;13(3):285-309

Assistant Professor of Psychology in the Psychology Department at Westminster College, Fulton, MO.

While there is a small but growing body of work that examines the religious and spiritual lives of bisexuals, there is a strong need for additional research that further explores the intersectionality of these distinct identities. Motivated by the feminist notions that the personal is political and that individuals are the experts of their own experiences (Unger, 2001), the specific aim of this study is to better understand the intersection of multiple identities experienced by bisexual individuals. Relying upon data collected by Herek, Glunt, and colleagues during their Northern California Health Study, in this exploratory study we examine the intersection of bisexual, religious/spiritual, and political identities by conducting an archival secondary analysis of 120 self-identified bisexual individuals. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15299716.2013.813
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299716.2013.813001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4251592PMC
July 2013
10 Reads

Subjective Sexual Experiences of Behaviorally Bisexual Men in the Midwestern United States: Sexual Attraction, Sexual Behaviors, & Condom Use.

J Bisex 2012 18;12(2):246-282. Epub 2012 May 18.

Indiana University, Center for Sexual Health Promotion, Bloomington, IN, USA.

Studies concerning behaviorally bisexual men continue to focus on understanding sexual risk in according to a narrow range of sexual behaviors. Few studies have explored the subjective meanings and experiences related to bisexual men's sexual behaviors with both male and female partners. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 75 men who engaged in bisexual behavior within the past six months. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3382978PMC
May 2012
29 Reads

Individual and Social Factors Related to Mental Health Concerns among Bisexual Men in the Midwestern United States.

J Bisex 2012 18;12(2):223-245. Epub 2012 May 18.

Indiana University, Center for Sexual Health Promotion, Bloomington, IN, USA.

Research has not yet explored the potential impact of social stress, biphobia, and other factors on the mental health of bisexual men. In-depth interviews were conducted with a diverse sample of 75 men who engaged in bisexual behavior within the past six months. Interviewers explored potential mental health stressors and supports. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3383005PMC
May 2012
18 Reads

Introduction to the Special Issue: Bisexual Health: Unpacking the Paradox.

J Bisex 2012 Jan 18;12(2):161-167. Epub 2012 May 18.

Indiana University, Bloomington, Bloomington, Indiana, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299716.2012.674849DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3380368PMC
January 2012
9 Reads

Sexual Behaviors and Experiences among Behaviorally Bisexual Latino Men in the Midwestern United States: Implications for Sexual Health Interventions.

J Bisex 2012 18;12(2):283-310. Epub 2012 May 18.

Indiana University, Center for Sexual Health Promotion, Bloomington, IN, USA.

The Midwestern United States (U.S.) has a high number of recent Latino migrants, but little information is available regarding their sexual behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299716.2012.674865DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3368508PMC
May 2012
27 Reads

Assessing Bisexual Stigma and Mental Health Status: A Brief Report.

Authors:
Wendy Bostwick

J Bisex 2012 ;12(2):214-222

Assistant Professor in the Public Health and Health Education Program at Northern Illinois University and a participating scientist with the Center for Population Research in LGBT Health, at The Fenway Institute in Boston, MA.

Bisexual women often report higher rates of depression and mental health problems than their heterosexual and lesbian counterparts. These disparities likely occur, in part, as a result of the unique stigma that bisexual women face and experience. Such stigma can in turn operate as a stressor, thereby contributing to poor mental health status. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15299716.2012.674860DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3966467PMC
January 2012
20 Reads
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